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Versions: 00 01 02 03 04 05 RFC 5297

Internet Engineering Task Force                          D. Harkins, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                            Aruba Networks
Intended status: Standards Track                           June 11, 2008
Expires: December 13, 2008


                 SIV Authenticated Encryption using AES
                       draft-dharkins-siv-aes-04

Status of this Memo

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 13, 2008.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The IETF Trust (2008).

Abstract

   This memo describes SIV, a block cipher mode of operation.  SIV takes
   a key, a plaintext, and multiple variable-length octet strings which
   will be authenticated but not encrypted.  It produces a ciphertext
   having the same length as the plaintext and a synthetic
   initialization vector.  Depending on how it is used, SIV achieves
   either the goal of deterministic authenticated-encryption or the goal
   of nonce-based, misuse-resistant authenticated-encryption.




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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
     1.1.  Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
     1.2.  Definitions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     1.3.  Motivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
       1.3.1.  Key Wrapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
       1.3.2.  Resistance to Nonce Misuse/Reuse . . . . . . . . . . .  4
       1.3.3.  Key Derivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
       1.3.4.  Robustness versus Performance  . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
       1.3.5.  Conservation of Cryptographic Primitives . . . . . . .  6
   2.  Specification of SIV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     2.1.  Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     2.2.  Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     2.3.  Doubling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     2.4.  S2V  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     2.5.  CTR  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     2.6.  SIV Encrypt  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     2.7.  SIV Decrypt  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
   3.  Nonce-based Authenticated Encryption with SIV  . . . . . . . . 14
   4.  Deterministic Authenticated Encryption with SIV  . . . . . . . 15
   5.  Optimizations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
   6.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
     6.1.  AEAD_AES_SIV_CMAC_256  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
     6.2.  AEAD_AES_SIV_CMAC_384  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
     6.3.  AEAD_AES_SIV_CMAC_512  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
   7.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
   8.  Acknowledgments  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
   9.  References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
     9.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
     9.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
   Appendix A.  Test Vectors  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
     A.1.  Deterministic Authenticated Encryption Example . . . . . . 20
     A.2.  Nonce-based Authenticated Encryption Example . . . . . . . 22
   Author's Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
   Intellectual Property and Copyright Statements . . . . . . . . . . 25















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1.  Introduction

1.1.  Background

   Various attacks have been described (e.g.  [BADESP]) when data is
   merely privacy-protected and not additionally authenticated or
   integrity protected.  Therefore combined modes of encryption and
   authentication have been developed ([RFC5116], [CCM], [GCM], [JUTLA],
   [OCB]).  These provide conventional authenticated-encryption when
   used with a nonce ("a number used once") and typically accept
   additional inputs that are authenticated but not encrypted,
   hereinafter referred to as "associated data" or AD.

   A deterministic, nonce-less, form of authenticated-encryption has
   been used to protect the transportation of cryptographic keys (e.g.
   [X9F1], [RFC3217], [RFC3394]).  This is generally referred to as "Key
   Wrapping".

   This memo describes a new block cipher mode, SIV, that provides both
   nonce-based authenticated encryption as well as deterministic, nonce-
   less key wrapping.  It contains a PRF construction called S2V and an
   encryption/decryption construction, called CTR.  SIV was specified by
   Phillip Rogaway and Thomas Shrimpton in [DAE].  The underlying block
   cipher used herein for both S2V and CTR is AES with key lengths of
   128 bits, 192 bits, or 256 bits.  S2V uses AES in CMAC ([CMAC]) mode,
   CTR uses AES in counter ([MODES]) mode.

   Associated data is data input to an authenticated-encryption mode
   that will be authenticated but not encrypted.  [RFC5116] says that
   associated data can include "addresses, ports, sequence numbers,
   protocol version numbers, and other fields that indicate how the
   plaintext or ciphertext should be handled, forwarded, or processed."
   These are multiple, distinct inputs and may not be contiguous.  Other
   authenticated-encryption cipher modes allow only a single associated
   data input.  Such a limitation may require implementation of a
   scatter/gather form of data marshalling to combine the multiple
   components of the associated data into a single input or may require
   a pre-processing step where the associated data inputs are
   concatenated together.  SIV accepts multiple variable-length octet
   strings (hereinafter referred to as a "vector of strings") as
   associated data inputs.  This obviates the need for data marshalling
   or pre-processing of associated data to package it into a single
   input.

   By allowing associated data to consist of a vector of strings SIV
   also obviates the requirement to encode the length of component
   fields of the associated data when those fields have variable length.




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1.2.  Definitions

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].

1.3.  Motivation

1.3.1.  Key Wrapping

   A key distribution protocol must protect keys it is distibuting.
   This has not always been done right.  For example, RADIUS [RFC2865]
   uses MPPE [RFC2548] to encrypt a key prior to transmission from
   server to client.  It provides no integrity checking of the encrypted
   key.  [RADKEY] specifies the use of [RFC3394] to wrap a key in a
   RADIUS request but because of the inability to pass associated data
   an HMAC [RFC2104] is necessary to provide authentication of the
   entire request.

   SIV can be used as a drop-in replacement for any specification that
   uses [RFC3394] or [RFC3217], including the aforementioned use.  It is
   a more general purpose solution as it allows for associated data to
   be specified.

1.3.2.  Resistance to Nonce Misuse/Reuse

   The nonce-based authenticated encryption schemes described above are
   susceptible to reuse and/or misue of the nonce.  Depending on the
   specific scheme there are subtle and critical requirements placed on
   the nonce (see [SP800-38D]).  [GCM] states that it provides
   "excellent security" if its nonce is guaranteed to be distinct but
   provides "no security" otherwise.  Confidentiality guarantees are
   voided if a counter in [CCM] is reused.  In many cases guaranteeing
   no reuse of a nonce/counter/IV is not a problem but in others it will
   be.

   For example, many applications obtain access to cryptographic
   functions via an application program interface to a cryptographic
   library.  These libraries are typically not stateful and any nonce,
   initialization vector, or counter required by the cipher mode is
   passed to the cryptographic library by the application.  Putting the
   construction of a security-critical datum outside the control of the
   encryption engine places an onerous burden on the application writer
   who may not provide the necessary cryptographic hygiene.  Perhaps his
   random number generator is not very good or maybe an application
   fault causes a counter to be reset.  The fragility of the cipher mode
   may result in its inadvertent misuse.  Also, if one's environment is
   (knowingly or unknowingly) a virtual machine it may be possible to



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   roll back a virtual state machine and cause nonce reuse thereby
   gutting the security of the authenticated encryption scheme (see
   [VIRT]).

   If the nonce is random, a requirement that it never repeat will limit
   the amount of data that can be safely protected with a single key to
   one block.  More sensibly a random nonce is required to "almost
   always" be non-repeating but that will drastically limit the amount
   of data that can be safely protected.

   SIV provides a level of resistance to nonce reuse and misuse.  If the
   nonce is never reused then the usual notion of nonce-based security
   of an authenticated encryption mode is achieved.  If, however, the
   nonce is reused, authenticity is retained and confidentiality is only
   compromised to the extent that an attacker can determine that the
   same plaintext (and same associated data) was protected with the same
   nonce and key.  See Security Considerations (Section 7).

1.3.3.  Key Derivation

   A PRF is frequently used as a key derivation function (e.g.  [WLAN])
   by passing it a key and a single string.  Typically this single
   string is the concatenation of a series of smaller strings--for
   example, a label and some context to bind into the derived string.

   These are usually multiple strings but are mapped to a single string
   because of the way PRFs are typically defined--two inputs: a key and
   data.  Such a crude mapping is inefficient because additional data
   must be included--the length of variable-length inputs must be
   encoded separately--and, depending on the PRF, memory allocation and
   copying may be needed.  Also, if only one or two of the inputs
   changed when deriving a new key it may still be necessary to process
   all of the other constants that preceded it every time the PRF is
   invoked.

   When a PRF is used in this manner its input is a vector of strings
   and not a single string and the PRF should handle the data as such.
   The S2V ("string to vector") PRF construction accepts a vector of
   inputs and provides a more natural mapping of input that does not
   require additional lengths encodings and obviates the memory and
   processing overhead to marshall inputs and their encoded lengths into
   a single string.  Constant inputs to the PRF need only be computed
   once.

1.3.4.  Robustness versus Performance

   SIV cannot perform at the same high throughput rates that other
   authenticated encryption schemes can (e.g.  [GCM] or [OCB]) due to



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   the requirement for two passes of the data but for situations where
   performance is not a limiting factor-- e.g. control plane
   applications-- it can provide a robust alternative, especially when
   considering its resistance to nonce re-use.

1.3.5.  Conservation of Cryptographic Primitives

   The cipher mode described herein can do authenticated encryption, key
   wrapping, key derivation, and serve as a generic message
   authentication algorithm.  It is therefore possible to implement all
   these functions with a single tool, instead of one tool for each
   function.  This is extremely attractive for devices that are memory
   and/or processor constrained and that cannot afford to implement
   multiple cryptographic primitives to accomplish these functions.


2.  Specification of SIV

2.1.  Notation

   SIV and S2V use the following notation:

   len(A)
       returns the number of bits in A.

   pad(X)
       indicates padding of string X, len(X) < 128, out to 128 bits by
       the concatenation of a single bit of 1 followed by as many 0 bits
       as are necessary.

   leftmost(A,n)
       the n most significant bits of A.

   rightmost(A,n)
       the n least significatn bits of A.

   A || B
       means concatenation of string A with string B.

   A xor B
       is the exclusive OR operation on two equal length strings, A and
       B.

   A xorend B
       where len(A) >= len(B), means xoring a string B onto the end of
       string A-- i.e. leftmost(A, len(A)-len(B)) || (rightmost(A,
       len(B)) xor B)




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   A bitand B
       is the logical AND operation on two equal equal length strings, A
       and B.

   dbl(S)
       is the multiplication of S and 0...010 in a finite field
       represented using the primitive polynomial x^128 + x^7 + x^2 + x
       + 1.  See Doubling (Section 2.3)

   a^b
       indicates a string that is "b" bits each having the value "a".

   <zero>
       indicates a string that is 128 zero bits.

   <one>
       indicates a string that is 127 zero bits concatenated with a
       single one bit, that is 0^127 || 1^1.

   A/B
       indicates the greatest integer less than or equal to the real-
       valued quotient of A and B.

   E(K,X)
       indicates AES encryption of string X using key K

2.2.  Overview

   SIV-AES uses AES in CMAC mode (S2V) and in counter mode (CTR).  SIV-
   AES takes either a 256, 384, or 512 bit key (which is broken up into
   two equal-sized keys, one for S2V and the other for CTR), a variable
   length plaintext, and multiple variable length strings representing
   associated data.  It's output is a ciphertext which comprises a
   synthetic initialization vector concatenated with the encrypted
   plaintext.

2.3.  Doubling

   The doubling operation on a 128-bit input string is performed using a
   left-shift of the input followed by a conditional xor operation on
   the result with the constant:

                    00000000 00000000 00000000 00000087

   The condition under which the xor operation is performed is when the
   bit being shifted off is one.

   Note that this is the same operation used to generate sub-keys for



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   CMAC-AES

2.4.  S2V

   The S2V operation consists of the doubling and xoring of the outputs
   of a pseudo-random function, CMAC, operating over individual strings
   in the input vector: S1, S2, ...  Sn.  It is bootstrapped by
   performing CMAC on a 128-bit string of zeros.  If the length of the
   final string in the vector is greater than or equal to 128 bits the
   output of the double/xor chain is xored onto the end of the final
   input string.  That result is input to a final CMAC operation to
   produce the output V. If the length of the final string is less than
   128 bits the output of the double/xor chain is doubled once more and
   it is xored with the final string padded using the padding function
   pad(X).  That result is input to a final CMAC operation to produce
   the output V.

   S2V with key k on a vector of n inputs S1, S2, ..., Sn-1, Sn, and
   len(Sn) >= 128:

                      +----+       +----+       +------+      +----+
                      | S1 |       | S2 | . . . | Sn-1 |      | Sn |
                      +----+       +----+       +------+      +----+
         <zero>   K     |            |             |             |
           |      |     |            |             |             V
           V      |     V            V             V    /----> xorend
       +-----+    |  +-----+      +-----+       +-----+ |        |
       | AES-|<----->| AES-|  K-->| AES-|  K--->| AES-| |        |
       | CMAC|       | CMAC|      | CMAC|       | CMAC| |        |
       +-----+       +-----+      +-----+       +-----+ |        V
           |           |             |             |    |     +-----+
           |           |             |             |    | K-->| AES-|
           |           |             |             |    |     | CMAC|
           |           |             |             |    |     +-----+
           \-> dbl -> xor -> dbl -> xor -> dbl -> xor---/        |
                                                                 V
                                                               +---+
                                                               | V |
                                                               +---+

   where 'dbl' is the double operation.

                                 Figure 2








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   S2V with key k on a vector of n inputs S1, S2, ..., Sn-1, Sn, and
   len(Sn) < 128:

                    +----+       +----+       +------+      +---------+
                    | S1 |       | S2 | . . . | Sn-1 |      | pad(Sn) |
                    +----+       +----+       +------+      +---------+
        <zero>  K     |            |             |               |
          |     |     |            |             |               V
          V     |     V            V             V     /------> xor
       +-----+  |  +-----+      +-----+       +-----+  |         |
       | AES-|<--->| AES-|  K-->| AES-|   K-->| AES-|  |         |
       | CMAC|     | CMAC|      | CMAC|       | CMAC|  |         |
       +-----+     +-----+      +-----+       +-----+  |         V
         |           |             |             |     |      +-----+
         |           |             |             |     |  K-->| AES-|
         |           |             |             |     |      | CMAC|
         |           |             |             |     |      +-----+
         \-> dbl -> xor -> dbl -> xor -> dbl -> xor-> dbl        |
                                                                 V
                                                               +---+
                                                               | V |
                                                               +---+

   where 'dbl' is the double operation.

                                 Figure 3

   Algorithmically S2V can be described as:

   S2V(K, S1, ..., Sn) {
     if n = 0 then
       return V = AES-CMAC(K, <one>)
     fi
     D = AES-CMAC(K, <zero>)
     for i = 1 to n-1 do
       D = dbl(D) xor AES-CMAC(K, Si)
     done
     if len(Sn) >= 128 then
       T = Sn xorend D
     else
       T = dbl(D) xor pad(Sn)
     fi
     return V = AES-CMAC(K, T)
   }







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2.5.  CTR

   CTR is a counter mode of AES.  It takes as input a plaintext P of
   arbitrary length, a key K of length 128, 192 or 256 bits, and a
   counter X that is 128 bits in length, and outputs Z which represents
   a concatenation of a synthetic initialization vector V, and the
   ciphertext, C, which is the same length as the plaintext.

   The ciphertext is produced by xoring the plaintext with the first
   len(P) bits of the following string:

                  E(K, X) || E(K, X+1) || E(K, X+2) || ...

   Before beginning counter mode, the 31st and 63rd bits (where the
   rightmost bit is the 0th bit) of the counter are cleared.  This
   enables implementations which support native 32 bit (64 bit) addition
   to increment the counter modulo 2^32 (2^64).  More formally, for 32
   bit addition the counter is incremented as:

                      SALT=leftmost(X,96)

                      n=rightmost(X,32)

                      X+i = SALT || (n + i mod 2^32).

   For 64 bit addition the counter is incremented as:

                      SALT=leftmost(X,64)

                      n=rightmost(X,64)

                      X+i = SALT || (n + i mod 2^64).

   Performing 32 bit or 64 bit addition on the counter will limit the
   amount of plaintext that can be safely protected by SIV-AES to 2^39 -
   128 bits or 2^71 - 128 bits, respectively.

2.6.  SIV Encrypt

   SIV-encrypt takes as input a key K of length 256, 384 or 512 bits,
   plaintext of arbitrary length, and a vector of associated data where
   the number of components in the vector is not greater than 126 (see
   Section 7).  It produces output, Z, which is the concatenation of a
   128-bit synthetic initialization vector and ciphertext whose length
   is equal to the length of the plaintext.

   The key is split into equal halves, K1 = leftmost(K, len(K)/2) and K2
   = rightmost(K, len(K)/2).  K1 is used for S2V and K2 is used for CTR.



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   In the encryption mode the associated data and plaintext represent
   the vector of inputs to S2V, with the plaintext being the last string
   in the vector.  The output of S2V is a synthetic IV which represents
   the initial counter to CTR.

             The encryption construction of SIV is as follows:

              +------+ +------+   +------+              +---+
              | AD 1 | | AD 2 |...| AD n |              | P |
              +------+ +------+   +------+              +---+
                 |         |         |                    |
                 |         |   ...   |  ------------------|
                 \         |        /  /                  |
                  \        |       /  / +------------+    |
                   \       |      /  /  | K = K1||K2 |    |
                    \      |     /  /   +------------+    V
                     \     |    /  /      |     |       +-----+
                      \    |   /  /   K1  |     |  K2   |     |
                       \   |  /  /  ------/     \------>| CTR |
                        \  | /  /  /            ------->|     |
                         | | | |  |             |       +-----+
                         V V V V  V             |          |
                       +------------+       +--------+     V
                       |    S2V     |------>|   V    |   +----+
                       +------------+       +--------+   | C  |
                                                |        +----+
                                                |          |
                                                -----\     |
                                                      \    |
                                                       \   |
                                                        V  V
                                                       +-----+
                                                       |  Z  |
                                                       +-----+


    where the plaintext is P, the associated data is AD1 through ADn, V
      is the synthetic IV, the ciphertext is C, and Z is the output.

                                 Figure 8











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   Algorithmically SIV Encrypt can be described as:

   SIV-ENCRYPT(K, P, AD1, ..., ADn) {
     K1 = leftmost(K, len(K)/2)
     K2 = rightmost(K, len(K)/2)
     V = S2V(K1, AD1, ..., ADn, P)
     Q = V bitand (1^64 || 0^1 || 1^31 || 0^1 || 1^31)
     m = (len(P) + 127)/128

     for i = 0 to m-1 do
       Xi = AES(K2, Q+i)
     done
     X = leftmost(X0 || ... || Xm-1, len(P))
     C = P xor X

     return V || C
   }

   where the key length used by AES in CTR and S2V is len(K)/2 and will
   each be either 128 bits, 192 bits, or 256 bits.

   The 31st and 63rd bit (where the rightmost bit is the 0th) of the
   counter are zeroed out just prior to being used by CTR for
   optimization purposes, see Section 5.

2.7.  SIV Decrypt

   SIV-decrypt takes as input a key K of length 256, 384 or 512 bits, Z
   which represents a synthetic initialization vector V concatentated
   with a ciphertext C, and a vector of associated data where the number
   of components in the vector is not greater than 126 (see Section 7).
   It produces either the original plaintext or the special symbol FAIL.

   The key is split as specified in Section 2.6

   The synthetic initialization vector acts as the initial counter to
   CTR to decrypt the ciphertext.  The associated data and the output of
   CTR represents a vector of strings that is passed to S2V, with the
   CTR output being the last string in the vector.  The output of S2V is
   then compared against the synthetic IV that accompanied the original
   ciphertext.  If they match the output from CTR is returned as the
   decrypted and authenticated plaintext otherwise the special symbol
   FAIL is returned.








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             The decryption construction of SIV is as follows:

                +------+ +------+   +------+           +---+
                | AD 1 | | AD 2 |...| AD n |           | P |
                +------+ +------+   +------+           +---+
                   |        |         |                  ^
                   |        |    ...  /                  |
                   |        |        /  /----------------|
                   |        |       /  /                 |
                   \        |      /  /  +------------+  |
                    \       |     /  /   | K = K1||k2 |  |
                     \      |    /  /    +------------+  |
                      \     |   /  /       |   |      +-----+
                       \    |  /  /     K1 |   |  K2  |     |
                        \   | |  |   /-----/   \----->| CTR |
                         \  | |  |  |         ------->|     |
                          | | |  |  |         |       +-----+
                          V V V  V  V         |         ^
                        +-------------+   +--------+    |
                        |    S2V      |   |   V    |  +---+
                        +-------------+   +--------+  | C |
                              |               | ^     +---+
                              |               | |       ^
                              |               |  \      |
                              |               |   \___  |
                              V               V       \ |
                          +-------+      +---------+ +---+
                          |   T   |----->|  if !=  | | Z |
                          +-------+      +---------+ +---+
                                              |
                                              |
                                              V
                                             FAIL

                                 Figure 10
















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   Algorithmically SIV-Decrypt can be described as:

   SIV-DECRYPT(K, Z, AD1, ..., ADn) {
     V = leftmost(Z, 128)
     C = rightmost(Z, len(Z)-128)
     K1 = leftmost(K, len(K)/2)
     K2 = rightmost(K, len(K)/2)
     Q = V bitand (1^64 || 0^1 || 1^31 || 0^1 || 1^31)

     m = (len(C) + 127)/128
     for i = 0 to m-1 do
       Xi = AES(K2, Q+i)
     done
     X = leftmost(X0 || ... || Xm-1, len(C))
     P = C xor X
     T = S2V(K1, AD1, ..., ADn, P)

     if T = V then
       return P
     else
       return FAIL
     fi
   }

   where the key length used by AES in CTR and S2V is len(K)/2 and will
   each be either 128 bits, 192 bits, or 256 bits.

   The 31st and 63rd bit (where the rightmost bit is the 0th) of the
   counter are zeroed out just prior to being used in CTR mode for
   optimization purposes, see Section 5.


3.  Nonce-based Authenticated Encryption with SIV

   SIV performs nonce-based authenticated encryption when a component of
   the associated data is a nonce.  For purposes of interoperability the
   final component-- i.e. the string immediately preceding the plaintext
   in the vector input to S2V-- is used for the nonce.  Other associated
   data are optional.  It is up to the specific application of SIV to
   specify how the rest of the associated data are input.

   If the nonce is random it SHOULD be at least 128 bits in length and
   be harvested from a pool having at least 128 bits of entropy.  A non-
   random source MAY also be used, for instance a time stamp, or a
   counter.  The definition of a nonce precludes reuse but SIV is
   resistant to nonce reuse.  See Section 1.3.2 for a discussion on the
   security implications of nonce reuse.




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   It MAY be necessary to transport this nonce with the output generated
   by S2V.


4.  Deterministic Authenticated Encryption with SIV

   When the plaintext to encrypt and authenticate contains data that is
   unpredictible to an adversary-- for example, a secret key-- SIV can
   be used in a deterministic mode to perform "key wrapping".  Because
   S2V allows for associated data and imposes no unnatural size
   restrictions on the data it is protecting it is a more useful and
   general purpose solution than [RFC3394].  Protocols which use SIV for
   deterministic authenticated encryption (i.e. for more than just
   wrapping of keys) MAY define associated data inputs to SIV.  It is
   not necessary to add a nonce component to the AD in this case.


5.  Optimizations

   Implementations which cannot or do not wish to support addition
   modulo 2^128 can take advantage of the fact that the 31st and 63rd
   bits (where the rightmost bit is the 0th bit) in the counter are
   cleared before being used by CTR.  This allows implementations which
   natively support 32 bit or 64 bit addition to increment the counter
   naturally.  Of course in this case the amount of plaintext that can
   be safely protected by SIV is reduced by a commensurate amount--
   addition modulo 2^32 limits plaintext to (2^32 - 1) blocks, addition
   modulo 2^64 limits plaintext to (2^64 - 1) blocks.

   It is possible to optimize an implementation of S2V when it is being
   used as a key derivation function (KDF), for example in [WLAN].  This
   is because S2V operates on a vector of distinct strings and typically
   the data passed to a KDF contains constant strings.  Depending on the
   location of variant components of the input different optimizations
   are possible.  The CMAC'd output of intermediate and invariant
   components can be computed once and cached.  This can then be doubled
   and xor'd with the running sum to produce the output.  Or an
   intermediate value that represents the doubled and xor'd output of
   multiple components, up to the variant component, can be computed
   once and cached.


6.  IANA Considerations

   [RFC5116] defines a uniform interface to cipher modes which provide
   nonce-based authenticated encryption with associated data (AEAD).  It
   does this via a registry of AEAD algorithms.




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   The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) will assign three
   entries from the AEAD Registry for AES-SIV-CMAC-256, AES-SIV-CMAC-
   384, AES-SIV-CMAC-512 based upon the following AEAD algorithm
   definitions.  [RFC5116] defines operations in octets, not bits.
   Limits in this section will therefore be specified in octets.  The
   security analysis for each of these algorithms is in [DAE].

   Unfortunately [RFC5116] restricts AD input to a single component and
   limits the benefit SIV offers for dealing in a natural fashion with
   AD consisting of multiple distinct components.  Therefore when it is
   required to access SIV through the interface defined in [RFC5116] it
   is necessary to marshall multiple AD inputs into a single string (see
   Section 1.1) prior to invoking SIV.  Note that this requirement is
   not unique to SIV.  All cipher modes using [RFC5116] MUST similarly
   marshall multiple AD inputs into a single string and any technique
   used for any other AEAD mode (e.g. a scatter/gather technique) can be
   used with SIV.

6.1.  AEAD_AES_SIV_CMAC_256

   The AES-SIV-CMAC-256 AEAD algorithm works as specified in Section 2.6
   and Section 2.7.  The input and output lengths for AES-SIV-CMAC-256
   as defined by [RFC5116] are:

   K_LEN  is 32 octets.

   P_MAX  is unlimited.

   A_MAX  is unlimited.

   N_MIN  is 1 octet.

   N_MAX  is unlimited.

   C_MAX  is unlimited.

   The security implications of nonce re-use and/or mis-use are
   described in Section 1.3.2.

6.2.  AEAD_AES_SIV_CMAC_384

   The AES-SIV-CMAC-384 AEAD algorithm works as specified in Section 2.6
   and Section 2.7.  The input and output lengths for AES-SIV-CMAC-384
   as defined by [RFC5116] are:







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   K_LEN  is 48 octets.

   P_MAX  is unlimited.

   A_MAX  is unlimited.

   N_MIN  is 1 octet.

   N_MAX  is unlimited.

   C_MAX  is unlimited.

   The security implications of nonce re-use and/or mis-use are
   described in Section 1.3.2.

6.3.  AEAD_AES_SIV_CMAC_512

   The AES-SIV-CMAC-512 AEAD algorithm works as specified in Section 2.6
   and Section 2.7.  The input and output lengths for AES-SIV-CMAC-512
   as defined by [RFC5116] are:

   K_LEN  is 64 octets.

   P_MAX  is unlimited.

   A_MAX  is unlimited.

   N_MIN  is 1 octet.

   N_MAX  is unlimited.

   C_MAX  is unlimited.

   The security implications of nonce re-use and/or mis-use are
   described in Section 1.3.2.


7.  Security Considerations

   SIV provides privacy in the sense that the output of SIV-Encrypt is
   indistinguishable from a random string of bits.  It provides
   authenticity in the sense that an attacker is unable to construct a
   string of bits that will return other than FAIL when input to SIV-
   Decrypt.  A proof of the security of SIV with an "all in one" notion
   of security for an authenticated encryption scheme is provided in
   [DAE].

   SIV provides deterministic "key wrapping" when the plaintext contains



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   data that is unpredictable to an adversary (for instance, a
   cryptographic key).  Even when this key is made available to an
   attacker the output of SIV-Encrypt is indistinguishable from random
   bits.  Similarly, even when this key is made available to an
   attacker, she is unable to construct a string of bits that when input
   to SIV-Decrypt will return anything other than FAIL.

   When the nonce used in the nonce-based authenticated encryption mode
   of SIV-AES is treated with the care afforded a nonce or counter in
   other conventional nonce-based authenticated encryption schemes--
   i.e. guarantee that it will never be used with the same key for two
   distinct invocations-- then SIV achieves the level of security
   described above.  If, however, the nonce is reused SIV continues to
   provide the level of authenticity described above but with a slightly
   reduced amount of privacy (see Section 1.3.2).

   If S2V is used as a key derivation function, the secret input MUST be
   generated uniformly at random.  S2V is a pseudo-random function and
   is not suitable for use as a random oracle as defined in [RANDORCL].

   The security bound set by the proof of security of S2V in [DAE]
   depends on the number of vector-based queries made by an adversary
   and the total number of all components in those queries.  The
   security is only proven when the number of components in each query
   is limited to n-1, where n is the blocksize of the underlying pseudo-
   random function.  The underlying pseudo-random function used here is
   based on AES whose blocksize is 128 bits.  Therefore S2V must not be
   passed more than 127 components.  Since SIV includes the plaintext as
   a component to S2V that limits the number of components of associated
   data that can be safely passed to SIV to 126.


8.  Acknowledgments

   Thanks to Phil Rogaway for patiently answering numerous questions on
   SIV and S2V and for useful critiques of earlier versions of this
   paper.  Thanks also to David McGrew for numerous helpful comments and
   suggestions for improving this paper.  Thanks to Jouni Malinen for
   reviewing this paper and producing another independent implementation
   of SIV, thereby confirming the correctness of the test vectors.


9.  References

9.1.  Normative References

   [CMAC]     Dworkin, M., "Recommendation for Block Cipher Modes of
              Operation: The CMAC Mode for Authentication", NIST Special



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              Pulication 800-38B, May 2005.

   [DAE]      Rogaway, P. and T. Shrimpton, "Deterministic Authenticated
              Encryption, A Provable-Security Treatment of the Key-Wrap
              Problem", September 2006.

   [MODES]    Dworkin, M., "Recommendation for Block Cipher Modes of
              Operation: Methods and Techniques", NIST Special
              Pulication 800-38A, 2001 edition.

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [RFC5116]  McGrew, D., "An Interface and Algorithms for Authenticated
              Encryption", RFC 5116, January 2008.

9.2.  Informative References

   [BADESP]   Bellovin, S., "Problem Areas for the IP Security
              Protocols", July 1996.

   [CCM]      Whiting, D., Housley, R., and N. Ferguson, "Counter With
              CBC-MAC (CCM)", June 2002.

   [GCM]      McGrew, D. and J. Viega, "The Galois/Counter Mode of
              Operation (GCM)".

   [JUTLA]    Jutla, C., "Encryption Modes With Almost Free Message
              Integrity", Proceedings of the International Conference on
              the Theory and Application of Cryptographic Techniques:
               Advances in Cryptography.

   [OCB]      Korvetz, T. and P. Rogaway, "The OCB Authenticated
              Encryption Algorithm",
              Internet-Draft: draft-krovetz-ocb-00.txt (a work in
              progress).

   [RADKEY]   Zorn, G., "RADIUS Attributes for the Delivery of Keying
              Material",
              Internet-Draft: draft-zorn-radius-keywrap-13.txt (a work
              in progress).

   [RANDORCL]
              Bellare, M. and P. Rogaway, "Random Oracles are Practicle:
              A Paradigm for Designing Efficient Protocols", Proceeding
              of the First ACM Conference on Computer and COmmunications
              Security ACM, November 1993.




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   [RFC2104]  Krawczyk, H., Bellare, M., and R. Canetti, "HMAC: Keyed-
              Hashing for Message Authentication", RFC 2104,
              February 1997.

   [RFC2548]  Zorn, G., "Microsoft Vendor-specific RADIUS Attributes",
              RFC 2548, March 1999.

   [RFC2865]  Rigney, C., Williams, S., Rubens, A., and W. Simpson,
              "Remote Authentication Dial In User Service", RFC 2865,
              June 2000.

   [RFC3217]  Housley, R., "Triple-DES and RC2 Key Wrapping", RFC 3217,
              December 2001.

   [RFC3394]  Schaad, J. and R. Housley, "Advanced Encryption Standard
              (AES) Key Wrap Algorithm", RFC 3394, February 2005.

   [SP800-38D]
              Dworkin, M., "Recommendations for Block Cipher Modes of
              Operation: Galois Counter Mode (GCM) and GMAC", NIST
              Special Pulication 800-38D, June 2007.

   [VIRT]     Garfinkel, T. and M. Rosenblum, "When Virtual is Harder
              than Real: Security Challenges in Virtual Machine Based
              Computing Environments".

   [WLAN]     "Draft Standard for IEEE802.11: Wireless LAN Medium Access
              Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) Specification",
              2007.

   [X9F1]     Dworkin, M., "Wrapping of Keys and Associated Data",
              Request for review of key wrap algorithms. Cryptology
              ePrint report 2004/340, 2004. Contents are excerpts from a
              draft standard of the Accredited Standards Committee, X9,
              entitled ANS X9.102.


Appendix A.  Test Vectors

   The following test vectors are for the mode defined in Section 6.1.

A.1.  Deterministic Authenticated Encryption Example

   Input:
   -----
   Key:
           fffefdfc fbfaf9f8 f7f6f5f4 f3f2f1f0
           f0f1f2f3 f4f5f6f7 f8f9fafb fcfdfeff



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   AD:
           10111213 14151617 18191a1b 1c1d1e1f
           20212223 24252627

   Plaintext:
           11223344 55667788 99aabbcc ddee

   S2V-CMAC-AES
   ------------
   CMAC(zero):
           0e04dfaf c1efbf04 01405828 59bf073a

   double():
           1c09bf5f 83df7e08 0280b050 b37e0e74

   CMAC(ad):
           f1f922b7 f5193ce6 4ff80cb4 7d93f23b

   xor:
           edf09de8 76c642ee 4d78bce4 ceedfc4f

   double():
           dbe13bd0 ed8c85dc 9af179c9 9ddbf819

   pad:
           11223344 55667788 99aabbcc ddee8000

   xor:
           cac30894 b8eaf254 035bc205 40357819

   CMAC(final):
           85632d07 c6e8f37f 950acd32 0a2ecc93

   CTR-AES
   -------
   CTR:
           85632d07 c6e8f37f 150acd32 0a2ecc93

   E(K,CTR):
           51e218d2 c5a2ab8c 4345c4a6 23b2f08f

   ciphertext:
           40c02b96 90c4dc04 daef7f6a fe5c

   output
   ------
   IV || C:
           85632d07 c6e8f37f 950acd32 0a2ecc93



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           40c02b96 90c4dc04 daef7f6a fe5c

A.2.  Nonce-based Authenticated Encryption Example

   Input:
   -----
   Key:
           7f7e7d7c 7b7a7978 77767574 73727170
           40414243 44454647 48494a4b 4c4d4e4f

   AD1:
           00112233 44556677 8899aabb ccddeeff
           deaddada deaddada ffeeddcc bbaa9988
           77665544 33221100

   AD2:
           10203040 50607080 90a0

   Nonce:
           09f91102 9d74e35b d84156c5 635688c0

   Plaintext:
           74686973 20697320 736f6d65 20706c61
           696e7465 78742074 6f20656e 63727970
           74207573 696e6720 5349562d 414553


   S2V-CMAC-AES
   ------------
   CMAC(zero):
           c8b43b59 74960e7c e6a5dd85 231e591a

   double():
           916876b2 e92c1cf9 cd4bbb0a 463cb2b3

   CMAC(ad1)
           3c9b689a b41102e4 80954714 1dd0d15a

   xor:
           adf31e28 5d3d1e1d 4ddefc1e 5bec63e9

   double():
           5be63c50 ba7a3c3a 9bbdf83c b7d8c755

   CMAC(ad2)
           d98c9b0b e42cb2d7 aa98478e d11eda1b

   xor:



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           826aa75b 5e568eed 3125bfb2 66c61d4e

   double():
           04d54eb6 bcad1dda 624b7f64 cd8c3a1b

   CMAC(nonce)
           128c62a1 ce3747a8 372c1c05 a538b96d

   xor:
           16592c17 729a5a72 55676361 68b48376

   xorend:
           74686973 20697320 736f6d65 20706c61
           696e7465 78742074 6f20656e 63727966
           2d0c6201 f3341575 342a3745 f5c625

   CMAC(final)
           7bdb6e3b 432667eb 06f4d14b ff2fbd0f

   CTR-AES
   -------
   CTR:
           7bdb6e3b 432667eb 06f4d14b 7f2fbd0f

   E(K,CTR):
           bff8665c fdd73363 550f7400 e8f9d376

   CTR+1:
           7bdb6e3b 432667eb 06f4d14b 7f2fbd10

   E(K,CTR+1):
           b2c9088e 713b8617 d8839226 d9f88159

   CTR+2
           7bdb6e3b 432667eb 06f4d14b 7f2fbd11

   E(K,CTR+2):
           9e44d827 234949bc 1b12348e bc195ec7

   ciphertext:
           cb900f2f ddbe4043 26601965 c889bf17
           dba77ceb 094fa663 b7a3f748 ba8af829
           ea64ad54 4a272e9c 485b62a3 fd5c0d

   output
   ------
   IV || C:
           7bdb6e3b 432667eb 06f4d14b ff2fbd0f



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           cb900f2f ddbe4043 26601965 c889bf17
           dba77ceb 094fa663 b7a3f748 ba8af829
           ea64ad54 4a272e9c 485b62a3 fd5c0d



Author's Address

   Dan Harkins (editor)
   Aruba Networks


   Email: dharkins@arubanetworks.com






































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