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behave                                                          F. Baker
Internet-Draft                                             Cisco Systems
Intended status: Informational                                     X. Li
Expires: April 27, 2010                                           C. Bao
                                       CERNET Center/Tsinghua University
                                                                  K. Yin
                                                           Cisco Systems
                                                        October 24, 2009


                  Framework for IPv4/IPv6 Translation
                  draft-ietf-behave-v6v4-framework-03

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
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   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.

   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 27, 2010.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2009 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents in effect on the date of
   publication of this document (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info).
   Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights
   and restrictions with respect to this document.





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Abstract

   This note describes a framework for IPv4/IPv6 translation.  This is
   in the context of replacing NAT-PT, which was deprecated by RFC 4966,
   and to enable networks to have IPv4 and IPv6 coexist in a somewhat
   rational manner while transitioning to an IPv6 network.


Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
     1.1.  Why Translation? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     1.2.  Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     1.3.  Translation Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     1.4.  Transition Plan  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
   2.  Scenarios for IPv4/IPv6 Translation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     2.1.  Scenario 1: an IPv6 network to the IPv4 Internet . . . . . 11
     2.2.  Scenario 2: the IPv4 Internet to an IPv6 network . . . . . 13
     2.3.  Scenario 3: the IPv6 Internet to an IPv4 network . . . . . 13
     2.4.  Scenario 4: an IPv4 network to the IPv6 Internet . . . . . 14
     2.5.  Scenario 5: an IPv6 network to an IPv4 network . . . . . . 15
     2.6.  Scenario 6: an IPv4 network to an IPv6 network . . . . . . 15
     2.7.  Scenario 7: the IPv6 Internet to the IPv4 Internet . . . . 16
     2.8.  Scenario 8: the IPv4 Internet to the IPv6 Internet . . . . 17
   3.  Framework  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     3.1.  Translation Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
       3.1.1.  Address Translation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
       3.1.2.  IP and ICMP Translation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
       3.1.3.  Maintaining Translation State  . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
       3.1.4.  DNS64 and DNS46  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
       3.1.5.  ALGs for Other Applications Layer Protocols  . . . . . 20
     3.2.  Operation Mode for Specific Scenarios  . . . . . . . . . . 20
       3.2.1.  Stateless Translation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
       3.2.2.  Stateful Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
     3.3.  Layout of the Related Documents  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
   4.  Translation in Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
   5.  Unsolved Problems  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
   6.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
   7.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
   8.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
   9.  References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
     9.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
     9.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
   Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29







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1.  Introduction

   This note describes a framework for IPv4/IPv6 translation.  This is
   in the context of replacing NAT-PT [RFC2766], which was deprecated by
   [RFC4966], and to enable networks to have IPv4 and IPv6 coexist in a
   somewhat rational manner while transitioning to an IPv6-only network.

   NAT-PT was deprecated to inform the community that NAT-PT had
   operational issues and was not considered a viable medium- or long-
   term strategy for either coexistence or transition.  It wasn't
   intended to say that IPv4<->IPv6 translation was bad, but the way
   that NAT-PT did it was bad, and in particular using NAT-PT as a
   general-purpose solution was bad.  As with the deprecation of the RIP
   routing protocol [RFC1923] at the time the Internet was converting to
   CIDR, the point was to encourage network operators to actually move
   away from technology with known issues.

   [RFC4213] describes the IETF's view of the most sensible transition
   model.  The IETF recommends, in short, that network operators
   (transit providers, service providers, enterprise networks, small and
   medium businesses, SOHO and residential customers, and any other kind
   of network that may currently be using IPv4) obtain an IPv6 prefix,
   turn on IPv6 routing within their networks and between themselves and
   any peer, upstream, or downstream neighbors, enable it on their
   computers, and use it in normal processing.  This should be done
   while leaving IPv4 stable, until a point is reached that any
   communication that can be carried out could use either protocol
   equally well.  At that point, the economic justification for running
   both becomes debatable, and network operators can justifiably turn
   IPv4 off.  This process is comparable to that of [RFC4192], which
   describes how to renumber a network using the same address family
   without a flag day.  While running stably with the older system,
   deploy the new.  Use the coexistence period to work out such kinks as
   arise.  When the new is also running stably, shift production to it.
   When network and economic conditions warrant, remove the old, which
   is now no longer necessary.

   The question arises: what if that is infeasible due to the time
   available to deploy or other considerations?  What if the process of
   moving a network and its components or customers is starting too late
   for contract cycles to affect IPv6 turn-up on important parts at a
   point where it becomes uneconomical to deploy global IPv4 addresses
   in new services?  How does one continue to deploy new services
   without balkanizing the network?

   This document describes translation as one of the tools networks
   might use to facilitate coexistence and ultimate transition.




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1.1.  Why Translation?

   Besides dual-stack deployment, there are two fundamental approaches
   one could take to interworking between IPv4 and IPv6: tunneling and
   translation.  One could - and in the 6NET we did - build an overlay
   network using the new protocol inside tunnels.  Various proposals
   take that model, including 6to4 [RFC3056], Teredo [RFC4380], ISATAP
   [RFC5214], and DS-Lite [I-D.durand-softwire-dual-stack-lite].  The
   advantage of doing so is that the new is enabled to work without
   disturbing the old protocol, providing connectivity between users of
   the new protocol.  There are two disadvantages to tunneling:

   o  Operators of old protocol networks are unable to offer services to
      users of the new architecture, and those users are unable to use
      the services of the underlying infrastructure - it is just
      bandwidth, and

   o  It doesn't enable new protocol users to communicate with old
      protocol users without dual-stack hosts.

   As noted, in this work, we look at Internet Protocol translation as a
   transition strategy.  [RFC4864] forcefully makes the point that many
   of the reasons people use Network Address Translators are met as well
   by routing or protocol mechanisms that preserve the end-to-end
   addressability of the Internet.  What it did not consider is the case
   in which there is an ongoing requirement to communicate with IPv4
   systems, but configuring IPv4 routing is not in the network
   operator's view the most desirable strategy, or is infeasible due to
   a shortage of global address space.  Translation enables the client
   of a network, whether a transit network, an access network, or an
   edge network, to access the services of the network and communicate
   with other network users regardless of their protocol usage - within
   limits.  Like NAT-PT, IPv4/IPv6 translation under this rubric is not
   a long-term support strategy, but it is a medium-term coexistence
   strategy that can be used to facilitate a long-term program of
   transition.

1.2.  Terminology

   The following terminology is used in this document and other
   documents related to it.

   An IPv4 network:  A specific network that has an IPv4-only
      deployment.  This could be an enterprise's IPv4-only network or an
      ISP's IPv4-only network.  The IPv4 Internet is the set of all
      interconnected IPv4 networks.





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   An IPv6 network:  A specific network that has an IPv6-only
      deployment.  This could be an enterprise's IPv6-only network or an
      ISP's IPv6-only network.  The IPv6 Internet is the set of all
      interconnected IPv6 networks.

   Dual-Stack implementation:  A Dual-Stack implementation, in this
      context, comprises an IPv4/IPv6 enabled end system stack,
      applications plus routing in the network.  It implies that two
      application instances are capable of communicating using either
      IPv4 or IPv6 - they have stacks, they have addresses, and they
      have any necessary network support including routing.

   IPv4-converted addresses:  They are the IPv6 addresses used to
      represent IPv4 hosts.  They have an explicit mapping relationship
      to IPv4 addresses.  This relationship is self described by mapping
      IPv4 address in the IPv6 address.  Both stateless and stateful
      translators are using IPv4-converted IPv6 addresses to represent
      IPv4 hosts.

   IPv4-only:  An IPv4-only implementation, in this context, comprises
      an IPv4-enabled end system stack, applications plus routing in the
      network.  It implies that two application instances are capable of
      communicating using IPv4, but not IPv6 - they have an IPv4 stack,
      addresses, and network support including IPv4 routing and
      potentially IPv4/IPv4 translation, but some element is missing
      that prevents communication with IPv6 hosts.

   IPv4-translatable addresses:  They are the IPv6 addresses to be
      assigned to IPv6 hosts for the stateless translator.  They have an
      explicit mapping relationship to IPv4 addresses.  This
      relationship is self described by mapping IPv4 address in the IPv6
      address.  The stateless translator is using the corresponding IPv4
      addresses to represent the IPv6 hosts.  The stateful translator
      does not use this kind of addresses, since the IPv6 hosts are
      represnted by the IPv4 address pool in the translator via dynamic
      states.

   IPv6-only:  An IPv6-only implementation, in this context, comprises
      an IPv6 enabled end system stack, applications directly or
      indirectly using that IPv6 stack, plus routing in the network.  It
      implies that two application instances are capable of
      communicating using IPv6, but not IPv4 - they have an IPv6 stack,
      addresses, and network support including routing in IPv6, but some
      element is missing that prevents communication with IPv4 hosts.







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   Network-Specific Prefix (NSP):  IPv6 prefixes are assigned to a
      network operator by its regional internet registrar (RIR).  From
      an IPv6 prefix assigned to the operator, the operator chooses a
      longer prefix for use by the operator's translator(s).  Hence a
      given IPv4 address would have different IPv6 representations in
      different networks that use different prefixes.  A network-
      specific prefix is also known as a Local Internet Registry (LIR)
      prefix.

   State:  "State" refers to dynamic information that is stored in a
      network element.  For example, if two systems are connected by a
      TCP connection, each stores information about the connection,
      which is called "connection state".  In this context, the term
      refers to dynamic correlations between IP addresses on either side
      of a translator, or {IP address, transport protocol, transport
      port number} tuples on either side of the translator.  Of stateful
      algorithms, there are at least two major flavors depending on the
      kind of state they maintain:

      Hidden state:  the existence of this state is unknown outside the
         network element that contains it.

      Known state:  the existence of this state is known by other
         network elements.

   Stateful Translation:  A translation algorithm may be said to
      "require state in a network element" or be "stateful" if the
      transmission or reception of a packet creates or modifies a data
      structure in the relevant network element.

   Stateful Translator:  A translator that uses stateful translation for
      either the source or destination address.  A stateful translator
      also uses a stateless translation algorithm for the other type of
      address.

   Stateless Translation:  A translation algorithm that is not
      "stateful" is "stateless".  It derives its needed information
      algorithmically from the messages it is translating.

   Stateless Translator:  A translator that uses only stateless
      translation for both destination address and source address.

   Well-Known Prefix (WKP):  A prefix assigned by IANA.  In this case,
      there would be a single representation of a public IPv4 address in
      the IPv6 address space.






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1.3.  Translation Objectives

   In any translation model, there is a question of objectives.
   Ideally, one would like to make any system and any application
   running on it able to "talk with" - exchange datagrams supporting
   applications with - any other system running the same application
   regardless of whether they have an IPv4 stack and connectivity or
   IPv6 stack and connectivity.  That was the model for NAT-PT, and the
   things it necessitated led to scaling and operational difficulties
   [RFC4966] .

   So the question comes back to what different kinds of connectivity
   can be easily supported and what kinds are harder, and what
   technologies are needed to at least pick the low-hanging fruit.  We
   observe that applications today fall into three main categories:

   Client/Server Application:  Per whatis.com, "'Client/server'
      describes the relationship between two computer programs in which
      one program, the client, makes a service request from another
      program, the server, which fulfills the request."  In networking,
      the behavior of the applications is that connections are initiated
      from client software and systems to server software and systems.
      Examples include mail handling between an end user and his mail
      system (POP3, IMAP, and MUA->MTA SMTP), FTP, the web, and DNS name
      resolution.

   Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Application:  A P2P application is an application
      that uses the same endpoint to initiate outgoing sessions to
      peering hosts as well as accept incoming sessions from peering
      hosts.  These in turn fall broadly into two categories:

      Peer-to-peer infrastructure applications:  Examples of
         "infrastructure applications" include SMTP between MTAs,
         Network News, and SIP.  Any MTA might open an SMTP session with
         any other at any time; any SIP Proxy might similarly connect
         with any other SIP Proxy.  An important characteristic of these
         applications is that they use ephemeral sessions - they open
         sessions when they are needed and close them when they are
         done.

      Peer-to-peer file exchange applications:  Examples of these
         include Limewire, BitTorrent, and UTorrent.  These are
         applications that open some sessions between systems and leave
         them open for long periods of time, and where ephemeral
         sessions are important, are able to learn about the reliability
         of peers from history or by reputation.  They use the long-term
         sessions to map content availability.  Short-term sessions are
         used to exchange content.  They tend to prefer to ask for



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         content from servers that they find reliable and available.

   If the question is the ability to open connections between systems,
   then one must ask who opens connections.

   o  We need a technology that will enable systems that act as clients
      to be able to open sessions with other systems that act as
      servers, whether in the IPv6->IPv4 direction or the IPv4->IPv6
      direction.  Ideally, this is stateless; especially in a carrier
      infrastructure, the preponderance of accesses will be to servers,
      and this optimizes access to them.  However, a stateful algorithm
      is acceptable if the complexity is minimized and a stateless
      algorithm cannot be constructed.

   o  We also need a technology that will allow peers to connect with
      each other, whether in the IPv6->IPv4 direction or the IPv4->IPv6
      direction.  Again, it would be ideal if this was stateless, but a
      stateful algorithm is acceptable if the complexity is minimized
      and a stateless algorithm cannot be constructed.

   o  In many situations, hosts are purely clients.  In those
      situations, we do not need an algorithm to enable connections to
      those hosts

   The complexity arguments bring us in the direction of hidden state:
   if state must be shared between the application and the translator or
   between translation components, complexity and deployment issues are
   greatly magnified.  The objective of the translators is to reduce, as
   much as possible, the software changes in the hosts necessary to
   support translation.

   NAT-PT is an example of a facility with known state - at least two
   software components (the data plane translator and the DNS
   Application Layer Gateway, which may be implemented in the same or
   different systems) share and must coordinate translation state.  A
   typical IPv4/IPv4 NAT implements an algorithm with hidden state.
   Obviously, stateless translation requires less computational overhead
   than stateful translation, and less memory to maintain the state,
   because the translation tables and their associated methods and
   processes exist in a stateful algorithm and don't exist in a
   stateless one.

1.4.  Transition Plan

   While the design of IPv4 made it impossible for IPv6 to be compatible
   on the wire, the designers intended that it would coexist with IPv4
   during a period of transition.  The primary mode of coexistence was
   dual-stack operation - routers would be dual-stacked so that the



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   network could carry both address families, and IPv6-capable hosts
   could be dual-stack to maintain access to IPv4-only partners.  The
   goal was that the preponderance of hosts and routers in the Internet
   would be IPv6-capable long before IPv4 address space allocation was
   completed.  At this time, it appears the exhaustion of IPv4 address
   space will occur before significant IPv6 adoption.

   Curran's "A Transition Plan for IPv6" [RFC5211] proposes a three-
   phase progression:

   Preparation Phase (current):  characterized by pilot use of IPv6,
      primarily through transition mechanisms defined in [RFC4213], and
      planning activities.

   Transition Phase (2010 through 2011):  characterized by general
      availability of IPv6 in provider networks which SHOULD be native
      IPv6; organizations SHOULD provide IPv6 connectivity for their
      Internet-facing servers, but SHOULD still provide IPv4-based
      services via a separate service name.

   Post-Transition Phase (2012 and beyond):  characterized by a
      preponderance of IPv6-based services and diminishing support for
      IPv4-based services.

   Various timelines have been discussed, but most will agree with the
   pattern of the above three transition phases, also known as an "S"
   curve transition pattern.

   In each of these phases, the coexistence problem and solution space
   has a different focus:

   Preparation Phase:  Coexistence tools are needed to facilitate early
      adopters by removing impediments to IPv6 deployment, and to assure
      that nothing is lost by adopting IPv6, in particular that the IPv6
      adopter has unfettered access to the global IPv4 Internet
      regardless of whether they have a global IPv4 address (or any IPv4
      address or stack at all).  While it might appear reasonable for
      the cost and operational burden to be borne by the early adopter,
      the shared goal of promoting IPv6 adoption would argue against
      that model.  Additionally, current IPv4 users should not be forced
      to retire or upgrade their equipment and the burden remains on
      service providers to carry and route native IPv4.  This is known
      as the early stage of the "S" curve.

   Transition Phase:  This is the last stage of "S" curve.  During the
      middle stage of "S" curve, while IPv6 adoption can be expected to
      accelerate, there will still be a significant portion of the
      Internet operating in IPv4-only or preferring IPv4.  During this



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      phase the norm shifts from IPv4 to IPv6, and coexistence tools
      evolve to ensure interoperability between domains that may be
      restricted to IPv4 or IPv6.

   Post-Transition Phase:  In this phase, IPv6 is ubiquitous and the
      burden of maintaining interoperability shifts to those who choose
      to maintain IPv4-only systems.  While these systems should be
      allowed to live out their economic life cycles, the IPv4-only
      legacy users at the edges should bear the cost of coexistence
      tools, and at some point service provider networks should not be
      expected to carry and route native IPv4 traffic.

   The choice between the terms "transition" versus "coexistence" has
   engendered long philosophical debate.  "Transition" carries the sense
   that we are going somewhere, while "coexistence" seems more like we
   are sitting somewhere.  Historically with IETF, "transition" has been
   the term of choice [RFC4213][RFC5211], and the tools for
   interoperability have been called "transition mechanisms".  There is
   some perception or conventional wisdom that adoption of IPv6 is being
   impeded by the deficiency of tools to facilitate interoperability of
   nodes or networks that are constrained (in some way, fully or
   partially) from full operation in one of the address families.  In
   addition, it is apparent that transition will involve a period of
   coexistence; the only real question is how long that will last.

   Thus, coexistence is an integral part of the transition plan, not in
   conflict with it, but there will be a balancing act.  It starts out
   being a way for early adopters to easily exploit the bigger IPv4
   Internet, and ends up being a way for late/never adopters to hang on
   with IPv4 (at their own expense, with minimal impact or visibility to
   the Internet).  One way to look at solutions is that cost incentives
   (both monetary cost and the operational overhead for the end user)
   should encourage IPv6 and discourage IPv4.  That way natural market
   forces will keep the transition moving - especially as the legacy
   IPv4-only stuff ages out of use.  There will come a time to set a
   date after which no one is obligated to carry native IPv4 but it
   would be premature to attempt to do so yet.  The end goal should not
   be to eliminate IPv4 by fiat, but rather render it redundant through
   ubiquitous IPv6 deployment.  IPv4 may never go away completely, but
   rational plans should move the costs of maintaining IPv4 to those who
   insist on using it after wide adoption of IPv6.


2.  Scenarios for IPv4/IPv6 Translation

   It is important to note that the choice of translation solution and
   the assumptions about the network where they are used impact the
   consequences.  A translator for the general case has a number of



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   issues that a translator for a more specific situation may not have
   at all.

   The intention of this document is to focus on network-based
   translation solutions under all kinds of situations.  All IPv4/IPv6
   translation cases can be easily described in terms of "interoperation
   between a set of systems (applications) that only communicate using
   IPv4 and a set of systems that only communicate using IPv6", but the
   differences at a detailed level make them interesting.

   Based on the transition plan described in Section 1.4, there are four
   types of IPv4/IPv6 translation scenarios:

   a.  Interoperation between an IPv6 network and the IPv4 Internet

   b.  Interoperation between an IPv4 network and the IPv6 Internet

   c.  Interoperation between an IPv6 network and an IPv4 network

   d.  Interoperation between the IPv6 Internet and the IPv4 Internet

   Each one in the above can be divided into two scenarios, depending on
   whether the IPv6 side or the IPv4 side initiates communication, so
   there are a total of eight scenarios.

   Scenario 1: an IPv6 network to the IPv4 Internet

   Scenario 2: the IPv4 Internet to an IPv6 network

   Scenario 3: the IPv6 Internet to an IPv4 network

   Scenario 4: an IPv4 network to the IPv6 Internet

   Scenario 5: an IPv6 network to an IPv4 network

   Scenario 6: an IPv4 network to an IPv6 network

   Scenario 7: the IPv6 Internet to the IPv4 Internet

   Scenario 8: the IPv4 Internet to the IPv6 Internet

   We will discuss each scenario in detail in the next section.

2.1.  Scenario 1: an IPv6 network to the IPv4 Internet

   Due to the lack of the publicly routable IPv4 addresses or under
   other technical or economical constraints, the network is IPv6-only,
   but the hosts in the network require communicating with the global



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   IPv4 Internet.

   This is the typical scenario for what we sometimes call "green_field"
   deployments.  One example is an enterprise network that wishes to
   operate only IPv6 for operational simplicity, but still wishes to
   reach the content in the IPv4 Internet.  The green_field enterprise
   scenario is different from ISP's network in the sense that there is
   only one place that the enterprise can easily modify: the border
   between its network and the IPv4 Internet.  Obviously, the IPv4
   Internet operates the way it already does.  But in addition, the
   hosts in the enterprise network are commercially available devices,
   personal computers with existing operating systems.  This restriction
   drives us to a "one box" type of solution, where IPv6 can be
   translated into IPv4 to reach the public Internet.

   Other cases that have been mentioned include wireless ISP networks
   and sensor networks.  This bears a striking resemblance to this
   scenario as well, if one considers the ISP network to simply be a
   very special kind of enterprise network.


               --------
             //        \\       -----------
            /            \     //          \\
           /             +----+              \
          |              |XLAT|               |
          |  The IPv4    +----+  An IPv6      |
          |  Internet    +----+  Network      |  XLAT: v4/v6
          |              |DNS |               |        Translator
           \             +----+              /   DNS:  DNS64
            \            /     \\          //
             \\        //       -----------
                --------
                          <====

                           Figure 1: Scenario 1

   Currently, there are two proposed solutions for this scenario: NAT64
   [I-D.bagnulo-behave-nat64] as the stateful translation and IVI
   [I-D.xli-behave-ivi] as the stateless translation schemes,
   respectively.  The NAT64 can support any IPv6 addresses in an IPv6
   network communicating with the IPv4 Internet, while IVI can support a
   subset of the IPv6 addresses in an IPv6 network communicating with
   the IPv4 Internet.







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2.2.  Scenario 2: the IPv4 Internet to an IPv6 network

   This scenario is predicted to become increasingly important as the
   network administrators are under pressure to put IPv6-only servers in
   its network, while the majority of the Internet users are still in
   the IPv4 Internet.  For example, for an IPv6 operator, it may be a
   difficult proposition to leave all IPv4-only devices without
   reachability.  Thus, with a translation solution for this scenario,
   the benefits would be clear.  Not only could servers move directly to
   IPv6 without trudging through a difficult transition period, but they
   could do so without risk of losing connectivity with the IPv4-only
   Internet.


               --------
             //        \\        ----------
            /            \     //          \\
           /             +----+              \
          |              |XLAT|               |
          |  The IPv4    +----+  An IPv6      |
          |  Internet    +----+  Network      |  XLAT: v4/v6
          |              |DNS |               |        Translator
           \             +----+              /   DNS:  DNS46
            \            /     \\          //
             \\        //        ----------
               --------
                          ====>

                           Figure 2: Scenario 2

   In general, this scenario presents a hard case for translation.
   Stateful translation such as NAT-PT [RFC2766] can be used in this
   scenario, but it requires tightly coupled DNS ALG in the translator
   and this technique was deprecated by the IETF [RFC4966].

   The stateless translation solution IVI [I-D.xli-behave-ivi] in
   Scenario 1 can also work in Scenario 2, since it can support IPv4-
   initiated communications with a subset of the IPv6 addresses in an
   IPv6 network.

2.3.  Scenario 3: the IPv6 Internet to an IPv4 network

   There is a requirement for a legacy IPv4 network to provide services
   to IPv6 hosts.







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                                -----------
              ----------       //         \\
            //          \\    /             \
           /             +----+              \
          |              |XLAT|               |
          |  An IPv4     +----+  The IPv6     |
          |  Network     +----+  Internet     |  XLAT: v4/v6
          |              |DNS |               |        Translator
           \             +----+               /  DNS:  DNS64
            \\         //      \             /
              ---------         \\         //
                                 -----------
                         <====

                           Figure 3: Scenario 3

   The stateless translation will not work for this scenario, because an
   IPv4 network needs to communicate with all of the IPv6 Internet, not
   just a small subset, and stateless can only support a small subset.
   However, IPv6-initiated communication can be achieved through
   stateful translation.  For example, NAT64 [I-D.bagnulo-behave-nat64]
   can support this scenario.

2.4.  Scenario 4: an IPv4 network to the IPv6 Internet

   Due to technical or economical constraints, the network is IPv4-only,
   and IPv4-only hosts (applications) may require communicating with the
   global IPv6 Internet.


                                -----------
              ----------       //         \\
            //          \\    /             \
           /             +----+              \
          |              |XLAT|               |
          |  An IPv4     +----+  The IPv6     |  XLAT: v4/v6
          |  Network     +----+  Internet     |        Translator
          |              |DNS |               |  DNS:  DNS46
           \             +----+               /
            \\         //      \             /
              ---------         \\         //
                                 ----------
                         =====>

                           Figure 4: Scenario 4

   In general, this scenario presents a hard case for translation.
   Stateful translation such as NAT-PT [RFC2766] can be used in this



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   scenario, but it requires a tightly coupled DNS ALG in the translator
   and this technique was deprecated by the IETF [RFC4966].

   From the transition phase discussion in Section 1.4, this scenario
   will probably only occur when we are well past the early stage of the
   "S" curve and the v4/v6 transition has already moved to the right
   direction.  Therefore, in-network translation is not viable for this
   scenario and other techniques should be considered.

2.5.  Scenario 5: an IPv6 network to an IPv4 network

   This is one of the scenarios where both an IPv4 network and an IPv6
   network are within the same organization.

   The IPv4 addresses used are either public IPv4 addresses or [RFC1918]
   addresses.  The IPv6 addresses used are either public IPv6 addresses
   or ULAs (Unique Local Addresses) [RFC4193].


              ---------          ---------
            //         \\      //          \\
           /             +----+              \
          |              |XLAT|               |
          |  An IPv4     +----+  An IPv6      |
          |  Network     +----+  Network      |  XLAT: v4/v6
          |              |DNS |               |        Translator
           \             +----+              /   DNS:  DNS64
            \\         //      \\          //
               --------          ---------
                         <====


                           Figure 5: Scenario 5

   The translation requirement from this scenario has no significant
   difference from scenario 1, so both the stateful and stateless
   translation schemes discussed in Section 2.1 apply here.

2.6.  Scenario 6: an IPv4 network to an IPv6 network

   This is another scenario when both an IPv4 network and an IPv6
   network are within the same organization.

   The IPv4 addresses used are either public IPv4 addresses or [RFC1918]
   addresses.  The IPv6 addresses used are either public IPv6 addresses
   or ULAs (Unique Local Addresses) [RFC4193].





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               --------          ---------
            //         \\      //          \\
           /             +----+              \
          |              |XLAT|               |
          |  An IPv4     +----+  An IPv6      |
          |  Network     +----+  Network      |  XLAT: v4/v6
          |              |DNS |               |        Translator
           \             +----+              /   DNS:  DNS46
             \\        //      \\          //
               --------          ---------
                           ====>


                           Figure 6: Scenario 6

   The translation requirement from this scenario has no significant
   difference from scenario 2, so the translation scheme discussed in
   Section 2.2 applies here.

2.7.  Scenario 7: the IPv6 Internet to the IPv4 Internet

   This seems the ideal case for in-network translation technology,
   where any IPv6-only host or application on the global Internet can
   initiate communication with any IPv4-only host or application on the
   global Internet.


               --------          ---------
             //       \\        //        \\
            /           \      /            \
           /             +----+              \
          |              |XLAT|               |
          |  The IPv4    +----+  The IPv6     |
          |  Internet    +----+  Internet     |  XLAT: v4/v6
          |              |DNS |               |        Translator
           \             +----+              /   DNS:  DNS64
             \          /      \            /
              \\      //        \\        //
               --------          ---------
                         <====


                           Figure 7: Scenario 7

   Due to the huge difference in size between the address spaces of the
   IPv4 Internet and the IPv6 Internet, there is no viable translation
   technique to handle unlimited IPv6 address translation.




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   If we ever run into this scenario, fortunately, the IPv4-IPv6
   transition has already past the early stage of the "S" curve,
   therefore, there is no obvious business reason to demand a
   translation solution as the only transition strategy.

2.8.  Scenario 8: the IPv4 Internet to the IPv6 Internet

   This seems the ideal case for in-network translation technology,
   where any IPv4-only host or application on the global Internet can
   open connection to any IPv6-only host or application on the global
   Internet.


               --------          ---------
             //       \\        //        \\
            /           \      /            \
           /             +----+              \
          |              |XLAT|               |
          |  The IPv4    +----+  The IPv6     |
          |  Internet    +----+  Internet     |  XLAT: v4/v6
          |              |DNS |               |        Translator
           \             +----+              /   DNS:  DNS46
             \          /      \            /
              \\      //        \\        //
               --------          ---------
                           ====>


                           Figure 8: Scenario 8

   Due to the huge difference in size between the address spaces of the
   IPv4 Internet and the IPv6 Internet, there is no viable translation
   technique to handle unlimited IPv6 address translation.

   If we ever run into this scenario, fortunately, the IPv4-IPv6
   transition has already past the early stage of the "S" curve,
   therefore, there is no obvious business reason to demand a
   translation solution as the only transition strategy.


3.  Framework

   Having laid out the preferred transition model and the options for
   implementing it (Section 1.1), defined terms (Section 1.2),
   considered the requirements (Section 1.3), considered the transition
   model (Section 1.4), and considered the kinds of scenarios the
   facility would support (Section 2), we now turn to a framework for
   IPv4/IPv6 translation.  The framework contains the following



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   components:

   o  Address translation

   o  IP and ICMP translation

   o  Maintaining translation state

   o  DNS64 and DNS46

   o  ALGs for other application-layer protocols (e.g., FTP)

3.1.  Translation Components

3.1.1.  Address Translation

   When IPv6/IPv4 translation is performed, we should specify how an
   individual IPv6 address is translated to a corresponding IPv4
   address, and vice versa, in cases where an algorithmic mapping is
   used.  This includes the choice of IPv6 prefix and the choice of
   method by which the remainder of the IPv6 address is derived from an
   IPv4 address [I-D.ietf-behave-address-format].

   Note that translating IPv4 address to IPv6 address and translating
   IPv6 address to IPv4 address are different for stateless translation
   and stateful translation.  [I-D.ietf-behave-address-format].

   o  For stateless translation, the algorithmic mapping algorithm is
      used both to translate IPv4 addresses to IPv6 addresses and to
      translate IPv6 addresses to IPv4 addresses.  In this case, blocks
      of service provider's IPv4 addresses are mapped into IPv6 and used
      by physical IPv6 hosts.  The original IPv4 form of these blocks of
      service provider's IPv4 addresses are used to represent the
      physical IPv6 hosts in IPv4.  Note that the stateless translation
      supports both IPv6 initiated as well as IPv4 initiated
      communications.

   o  For stateful translation, the algorithmic mapping algorithm is
      used to translate IPv4 addresses to IPv6 addresses, while a
      session initiated state table is used to translate IPv6 addresses
      to IPv4 addresses.  In this case, blocks of service provider's
      IPv4 addresses are maintained in the translator as the IPv4
      address pools and dynamically bind to the specific IPv6 addresses.
      The original IPv4 form of these blocks of service provider's IPv4
      addresses are used to represent the physical IPv6 host in IPv4.
      However, due to the dynamic binding, stateful translation in
      general only supports IPv6-initiated communication.




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3.1.2.  IP and ICMP Translation

   The IPv4/IPv6 translator is based on the update to the Stateless IP/
   ICMP Translation Algorithm (SIIT) described in [RFC2765].  The
   algorithm translates between IPv4 and IPv6 packet headers (including
   ICMP headers) [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate].

   The IP and ICMP translation document [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate]
   addresses both stateless and stateful modes.  In the stateless mode,
   translation information is carried in the address itself, permitting
   both IPv4->IPv6 and IPv6->IPv4 session establishment with neither
   state nor configuration in the IP/ICMP translator.  In the stateful
   mode, translation state is maintained between IPv4 address/transport
   port tuples and IPv6 address/transport port tuples, enabling IPv6
   systems to open sessions with IPv4 systems.  The choice of
   operational mode is made by the operator deploying the network and is
   critical to the operation of the applications using it.

3.1.3.  Maintaining Translation State

   For the stateful translator, besides IP and ICMP translation, special
   action must be taken to maintain the translation states.  NAT64
   [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate-stateful] describes a mechanism for
   maintaining state.

3.1.4.  DNS64 and DNS46

   [I-D.ietf-behave-dns64] and possible future documents describes the
   mechanisms by which a DNS translator is intended to operate.  It is
   designed to operate on the basis of known but fixed state: the
   resource records, and therefore the names and addresses, are known to
   network elements outside of the data plane translator, but the
   process of serving them to applications does not interact with the
   data plane translator in any way.

   There are at least two possible implementations of a DNS64 and DNS46:

   Static records:  One could literally populate DNS with corresponding
      A and AAAA records.  This is most appropriate for stub services
      such as access to a legacy printer pool.

   Dynamic Translation of static records:  In more general operation,
      the expected behavior is for the application to request both A and
      AAAA records, and for an A record to be (retrieved and) translated
      by the DNS64 if and only if no reachable AAAA record exists, or
      for an AAAA record to be (retrieved and) translated by the DNS46
      if and only if no reachable A record exists.




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3.1.5.  ALGs for Other Applications Layer Protocols

   In addition, some applications require special support.  An example
   is FTP.  FTP's active mode doesn't work well across NATs without
   extra support such as SOCKS [RFC1928] [RFC3089].  Across NATs, it
   generally uses passive mode.  However, the designers of FTP
   inexplicably wrote different and incompatible passive mode
   implementations for IPv4 and IPv6 networks.  Hence, either they need
   to fix FTP, or a translator must be written for the application.
   Other applications may be similarly broken.

   As a general rule, a simple operational recommendation will work
   around many application issues, which is that there should be a
   server in each domain or an instance of the server should have an
   interface in each domain.  For example, an SMTP MTA may be confused
   by finding an IPv6 address in its HELO when it is connected to using
   IPv4 (or vice versa), but would work perfectly well if it had an
   interface in both the IPv4 and IPv6 domains and was used as an
   application-layer bridge between them.

3.2.  Operation Mode for Specific Scenarios

   Currently, the proposed solutions for IPv6/IPv4 translation are
   classified into stateless translation and stateful translation.

3.2.1.  Stateless Translation

   For stateless translation, the translation information is carried in
   the address itself, permitting both IPv4->IPv6 and IPv6->IPv4
   sessions establishment.  The stateless translation supports end-to-
   end address transparency and has better scalability compared with the
   stateful translation.  [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate]
   [I-D.xli-behave-ivi].

   Although the stateless translation mechanisms typically put
   constraints on what IPv6 addresses can be assigned to IPv6 hosts that
   want to communicate with IPv4 destinations using an algorithmic
   mapping.  For Scenario 1 ("an IPv6 network to the IPv4 Internet"), it
   is not a serious drawback, since the address assignment policy can be
   applied to satisfy this requirement for the IPv6 hosts which need the
   communication ability to the IPv4 Internet.  In addition, the
   stateless translator supports Scenario 2 ("the IPv4 Internet to an
   IPv6 network"), which means that not only could servers move directly
   to IPv6 without trudging through a difficult transition period, but
   they could do so without risk of losing connectivity with the IPv4-
   only Internet.

   Stateless translation can be used for Scenarios 1, 2, 5 and 6, i.e.



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   it supports "an IPv6 network to the IPv4 Internet", "the IPv4
   Internet to an IPv6 network", "an IPv6 network to an IPv4 network"
   and "an IPv4 network to an IPv6 network".


              --------
           //        \\       -----------
          /            \     //          \\
         /             +----+              \
        |              |XLAT|               |
        |  The IPv4    +----+  An IPv6      |
        |  Internet    +----+  Network      |  XLAT: Stateless v4/v6
        |              |DNS |  (address     |        Translator
         \             +----+   subset)    /   DNS:  DNS64/DNS46
          \            /     \\          //
           \\        //        ----------
             --------
                       <====>



           Figure 9: Stateless translation for Scenarios 1 and 2



               --------          ---------
            //         \\      //          \\
           /             +----+              \
          |              |XLAT|               |
          |  An IPv4     +----+  An IPv6      |
          |  Network     +----+  Network      |  XLAT: v4/v6
          |              |DNS |               |        Translator
           \             +----+              /   DNS:  DNS64/DNS46
             \\        //      \\          //
               --------          ---------
                         <====>



           Figure 10: Stateless translator for Scenarios 5 and 6

   The implementation of the stateless translator needs to refer to
   [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate], [I-D.ietf-behave-address-format], and
   [I-D.ietf-behave-dns64].







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3.2.2.  Stateful Translation

   For stateful translation, the translation state is maintained between
   IPv4 address/port pairs and IPv6 address/port pairs, enabling IPv6
   systems to open sessions with IPv4 systems
   [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate] [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate-stateful].

   Stateful translator can be used for Scenarios 1, 3 and 5, i.e. it
   supports "an IPv6 network to the IPv4 Internet", "the IPv6 Internet
   to an IPv4 network" and "an IPv6 network to an IPv4 network".

   For Scenario 1, any IPv6 addresses in an IPv6 network can use
   stateful translation, however it typically only supports initiation
   from the IPv6 side (NAT64 doesn't support IPv4-initiation), and does
   not result in stable addresses that can be used in DNS, other
   protocols and applications that do not deal well with highly dynamic
   addresses.


             --------
           //        \\       -----------
          /            \     //          \\
         /             +----+              \
        |              |XLAT|               |
        |  The IPv4    +----+  An IPv6      |
        |  Internet    +----+  Network      |  XLAT: Stateful v4/v6
        |              |DNS |               |        Translator
         \             +----+              /   DNS:  DNS64
          \            /     \\          //
           \\        //       -----------
             --------
                        <====


               Figure 11: Stateful translator for Scenario 1

   For scenario 3, the servers using IPv4 private addresses [RFC1918]
   and being reached from the IPv6 Internet basically includes the cases
   that for whatever reason the servers cannot be upgraded to IPv6 and
   they don't have public IPv4 addresses and it would be useful to allow
   IPv6 nodes in the IPv6 Internet to reach those servers.










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                                -----------
              ----------       //         \\
             //          \\    /             \
           /             +----+              \
          |              |XLAT|               |
          |  An IPv4     +----+  The IPv6     |
          |  Network     +----+  Internet     |  XLAT: v4/v6
          |              |DNS |               |        Translator
           \             +----+               /  DNS:  DNS64
            \\         //      \             /
              ---------         \\         //
                                -----------
                          <====


               Figure 12: Stateful translator for Scenario 3

   Similarly, the stateful translator can also be used for Scenario 5.


               --------          ---------
            //         \\      //          \\
           /             +----+              \
          |              |XLAT|               |
          |  An IPv4     +----+  An IPv6      |
          |  Network     +----+  Network      |  XLAT: v4/v6
          |              |DNS |               |        Translator
           \             +----+              /   DNS:  DNS64
             \\        //      \\          //
               --------          ---------
                          <====


               Figure 13: Stateful translator for Scenario 5

   The implementation of the stateful translator needs to refer to
   [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate], [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate-stateful],
   [I-D.ietf-behave-address-format], and [I-D.ietf-behave-dns64].

3.3.  Layout of the Related Documents

   Based on the above analysis, the IPv4/IPv6 translation series
   consists of the following documents.

   o  Framework for IPv4/IPv6 Translation (this document).

   o  Address translation (The choice of IPv6 prefix and the choice of
      method by which the remainder of the IPv6 address is derived from



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      an IPv4 address, part of the SIIT update)
      [I-D.ietf-behave-address-format],

   o  IP and ICMP Translation (Header translation and ICMP handling,
      part of the SIIT update.)  [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate].

   o  Xlate-stateful (Stateful translation including session database
      and mapping table handing) [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate-stateful].

   o  DNS64/DNS46 (DNS64: A to AAAA mapping and DNSSec discussion)
      [I-D.ietf-behave-dns64].

   o  FTP ALG.

   o  Others (Multicast, etc).

   The relationship among these documents is shown in the following
   figure.


               -----------------------------------------
              |   Framework for IPv4/IPv6 Translation  |
               -----------------------------------------
                 ||                                 ||
    -------------------------------------------------------------------
   |             ||     stateless and stateful      ||                 |
   |   --------------------                   ---------------------    |
   |  |Address Translation |   <========     | IP/ICMP Translation |   |
   |   --------------------                   ---------------------    |
   |          /\                                        /\             |
   |          ||                      ------------------||------------ |
   |          ||                     |  stateful        \/             |
   |   -----------------             |        ---------------------    |
   |  |   DNS64/DNS46   |            |       |  Table Maintenance  |   |
   |   -----------------             |        ---------------------    |
    -------------------------------------------------------------------
              /\                                        /\
              ||                                        ||
       -----------------                       --------------------
      |     FTP ALG     |                     |      Others        |
       -----------------                       --------------------




                        Figure 14: Document Layout

   In the document layout, the IP/ICMP Translation and DNS64/DNS46 refer



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   to Address Translation.  The Table Maintenance and IP/ICMP
   Translation refer to each other.

   The FTP ALG and other documents refer to the Address Format, IP/ICMP
   Translation and Table Maintenance documents.


4.  Translation in Operation

   Operationally, there are two ways that translation could be used - as
   a permanent solution making transition "the other guy's problem", and
   as a temporary solution for a new part of one's network while
   bringing up IPv6 services in the remaining parts of one's network.
   We obviously recommend the latter.  For the IPv4 parts of the
   network, [RFC4213]'s recommendation holds: bringing IPv6 up in those
   domains, moving production to it, and then taking down the now-
   unnecessary IPv4 service when economics warrant remains the least
   risk approach to transition.


                           ----------------------
                    //////                        \\\\\\
                ///         IPv4 or Dual Stack           \\\
              ||    +----+      Routing          +-----+    ||
             |      |IPv4|                       |IPv4+|      |
             |      |Host|                       |IPv6 |      |
              ||    +----+                       |Host |    ||
                \\\                              +-----+ ///
                    \\\\\+----+ +---+ +----+ +----+/////
                         |XLAT|-|DNS|-|SMTP|-|XLAT|
                         |    |-|64 |-|MTA |-|    |
                    /////+----+ +---+ +----+ +----+\\\\\
                ///                                      \\\
              ||    +-----+                     +----+      ||
             |      |IPv4+|                     |IPv6|        |
             |      |IPv6 |                     |Host|        |
              ||    |Host |                     +----+      ||
                \\\ +-----+  IPv6-only Routing           ///
                    \\\\\\                        //////
                           ----------------------


                 Figure 15: Translation Operational Model

   During the coexistence phase, as shown in Figure 15, one expects a
   combination of hosts - IPv6-only gaming devices and handsets, older
   computer operating systems that are IPv4-only, and modern mainline
   operating systems that support both.  One also expects a combination



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   of networks - dual-stack devices operating in single-stack networks
   are effectively single-stack, whether that stack is IPv4 or IPv6, as
   the other isn't providing communications services.


5.  Unsolved Problems

   This framework could support multicast; some discussions are in
   [I-D.venaas-behave-mcast46] and [I-D.xli-behave-ivi].

   This framework could support stateless translation with IPv4 address
   and transport port number multiplexing, some discussions are in
   [I-D.xli-behave-ivi].


6.  IANA Considerations

   This memo requires no parameter assignment by the IANA.

   Note to RFC Editor: This section will have served its purpose if it
   correctly tells IANA that no new assignments or registries are
   required, or if those assignments or registries are created during
   the RFC publication process.  From the author's perspective, it may
   therefore be removed upon publication as an RFC at the RFC Editor's
   discretion.


7.  Security Considerations

   At this point, the editor knows of no other security issues raised by
   the address format that are not already applicable to the addressing
   architecture in general.


8.  Acknowledgements

   This is under development by a large group of people.  Those who have
   posted to the list during the discussion include Andrew Sullivan,
   Andrew Yourtchenko, Bo Zhou, Brian Carpenter, Congxiao Bao, Dan Wing,
   Dave Thaler, Ed Jankiewicz, Fred Baker, Gang Chen, Hui Deng, Hiroshi
   Miyata, Iljitsch van Beijnum, John Schnizlein, Kevin Yin, Magnus
   Westerlund, Marcelo Bagnulo Braun, Margaret Wasserman, Masahito Endo,
   Phil Roberts, Philip Matthews, Remi Denis-Courmont, Remi Despres and
   Xing Li.

   Ed Jankiewicz described the transition plan.





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9.  References

9.1.  Normative References

   [I-D.ietf-behave-address-format]
              Huitema, C., Bao, C., Bagnulo, M., Boucadair, M., and X.
              Li, "IPv6 Addressing of IPv4/IPv6 Translators",
              draft-ietf-behave-address-format-00 (work in progress),
              August 2009.

   [I-D.ietf-behave-dns64]
              Bagnulo, M., Sullivan, A., Matthews, P., and I. Beijnum,
              "DNS64: DNS extensions for Network Address Translation
              from IPv6 Clients to  IPv4 Servers",
              draft-ietf-behave-dns64-01 (work in progress),
              October 2009.

   [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate]
              Li, X., Bao, C., and F. Baker, "IP/ICMP Translation
              Algorithm", draft-ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate-02 (work in
              progress), October 2009.

   [I-D.ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate-stateful]
              Bagnulo, M., Matthews, P., and I. Beijnum, "NAT64: Network
              Address and Protocol Translation from IPv6 Clients to IPv4
              Servers", draft-ietf-behave-v6v4-xlate-stateful-02 (work
              in progress), October 2009.

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [RFC2460]  Deering, S. and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol, Version 6
              (IPv6) Specification", RFC 2460, December 1998.

   [RFC4291]  Hinden, R. and S. Deering, "IP Version 6 Addressing
              Architecture", RFC 4291, February 2006.

9.2.  Informative References

   [I-D.bagnulo-behave-nat64]
              Bagnulo, M., Matthews, P., and I. Beijnum, "NAT64: Network
              Address and Protocol Translation from IPv6 Clients to IPv4
              Servers", draft-bagnulo-behave-nat64-03 (work in
              progress), March 2009.

   [I-D.durand-softwire-dual-stack-lite]
              Durand, A., Droms, R., Haberman, B., and J. Woodyatt,
              "Dual-stack lite broadband deployments post IPv4



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              exhaustion", draft-durand-softwire-dual-stack-lite-01
              (work in progress), November 2008.

   [I-D.venaas-behave-mcast46]
              Venaas, S., Asaeda, H., SUZUKI, S., and T. Fujisaki, "An
              IPv4 - IPv6 multicast translator",
              draft-venaas-behave-mcast46-01 (work in progress),
              July 2009.

   [I-D.xli-behave-ivi]
              Li, X., Bao, C., Chen, M., Zhang, H., and J. Wu, "The
              CERNET IVI Translation Design and Deployment for the IPv4/
              IPv6  Coexistence and Transition", draft-xli-behave-ivi-02
              (work in progress), June 2009.

   [RFC1918]  Rekhter, Y., Moskowitz, R., Karrenberg, D., Groot, G., and
              E. Lear, "Address Allocation for Private Internets",
              BCP 5, RFC 1918, February 1996.

   [RFC1923]  Halpern, J. and S. Bradner, "RIPv1 Applicability Statement
              for Historic Status", RFC 1923, March 1996.

   [RFC1928]  Leech, M., Ganis, M., Lee, Y., Kuris, R., Koblas, D., and
              L. Jones, "SOCKS Protocol Version 5", RFC 1928,
              March 1996.

   [RFC2428]  Allman, M., Ostermann, S., and C. Metz, "FTP Extensions
              for IPv6 and NATs", RFC 2428, September 1998.

   [RFC2765]  Nordmark, E., "Stateless IP/ICMP Translation Algorithm
              (SIIT)", RFC 2765, February 2000.

   [RFC2766]  Tsirtsis, G. and P. Srisuresh, "Network Address
              Translation - Protocol Translation (NAT-PT)", RFC 2766,
              February 2000.

   [RFC3056]  Carpenter, B. and K. Moore, "Connection of IPv6 Domains
              via IPv4 Clouds", RFC 3056, February 2001.

   [RFC3089]  Kitamura, H., "A SOCKS-based IPv6/IPv4 Gateway Mechanism",
              RFC 3089, April 2001.

   [RFC3142]  Hagino, J. and K. Yamamoto, "An IPv6-to-IPv4 Transport
              Relay Translator", RFC 3142, June 2001.

   [RFC3484]  Draves, R., "Default Address Selection for Internet
              Protocol version 6 (IPv6)", RFC 3484, February 2003.




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   [RFC3493]  Gilligan, R., Thomson, S., Bound, J., McCann, J., and W.
              Stevens, "Basic Socket Interface Extensions for IPv6",
              RFC 3493, February 2003.

   [RFC3879]  Huitema, C. and B. Carpenter, "Deprecating Site Local
              Addresses", RFC 3879, September 2004.

   [RFC4192]  Baker, F., Lear, E., and R. Droms, "Procedures for
              Renumbering an IPv6 Network without a Flag Day", RFC 4192,
              September 2005.

   [RFC4193]  Hinden, R. and B. Haberman, "Unique Local IPv6 Unicast
              Addresses", RFC 4193, October 2005.

   [RFC4213]  Nordmark, E. and R. Gilligan, "Basic Transition Mechanisms
              for IPv6 Hosts and Routers", RFC 4213, October 2005.

   [RFC4380]  Huitema, C., "Teredo: Tunneling IPv6 over UDP through
              Network Address Translations (NATs)", RFC 4380,
              February 2006.

   [RFC4862]  Thomson, S., Narten, T., and T. Jinmei, "IPv6 Stateless
              Address Autoconfiguration", RFC 4862, September 2007.

   [RFC4864]  Van de Velde, G., Hain, T., Droms, R., Carpenter, B., and
              E. Klein, "Local Network Protection for IPv6", RFC 4864,
              May 2007.

   [RFC4941]  Narten, T., Draves, R., and S. Krishnan, "Privacy
              Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in
              IPv6", RFC 4941, September 2007.

   [RFC4966]  Aoun, C. and E. Davies, "Reasons to Move the Network
              Address Translator - Protocol Translator (NAT-PT) to
              Historic Status", RFC 4966, July 2007.

   [RFC5211]  Curran, J., "An Internet Transition Plan", RFC 5211,
              July 2008.

   [RFC5214]  Templin, F., Gleeson, T., and D. Thaler, "Intra-Site
              Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP)", RFC 5214,
              March 2008.









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Authors' Addresses

   Fred Baker
   Cisco Systems
   Santa Barbara, California  93117
   USA

   Phone: +1-408-526-4257
   Fax:   +1-413-473-2403
   Email: fred@cisco.com


   Xing Li
   CERNET Center/Tsinghua University
   Room 225, Main Building, Tsinghua University
   Beijing,   100084
   China

   Phone: +86 10-62785983
   Email: xing@cernet.edu.cn


   Congxiao Bao
   CERNET Center/Tsinghua University
   Room 225, Main Building, Tsinghua University
   Beijing,   100084
   China

   Phone: +86 10-62785983
   Email: congxiao@cernet.edu.cn


   Kevin Yin
   Cisco Systems
   No. 2 Jianguomenwai Ave, Chaoyang District
   Beijing,   100022
   China

   Phone: +86-10-8515-5094
   Email: kyin@cisco.com











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