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Versions: (draft-fedyk-l1vpn-basic-mode) 00 01 02 03 04 05 RFC 5251

   Internet Working Group                           D. Fedyk(ed.)
   Internet Draft                                          Nortel
   Date Created: May 23, 2008                      Y Rekhter(ed.)
   Expiration Date: November 23, 2008            Juniper Networks
   Intended Status: Standards Track              D. Papadimitriou
                                                   Alcatel-Lucent
                                                        R. Rabbat
                                                           Google
                                                        L. Berger
                                                             LabN


                         Layer 1 VPN Basic Mode
                    draft-ietf-l1vpn-basic-mode-05.txt


Status of this Memo

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Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The IETF Trust (2008).

Abstract

   This document describes the Basic Mode of Layer 1 VPNs (L1VPN BM).
   L1VPN Basic mode is a port-based VPN. In L1VPN Basic Mode (BM), the
   basic unit of service is a Label Switched Path (LSP) between a pair
   of customer ports within a given VPN port-topology. This document
   defines the operational model using either provisioning or a VPN
   auto-discovery mechanism, and the signaling extensions for the L1VPN
   BM.


Fedyk, Rekhter                                             [Page 1]

Internet Draft  draft-ietf-l1vpn-basic-mode-05.txt       May 2008

Conventions used in this document

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].

   This document expects that the reader is familiar with the
   terminology defined and used in [RFC3945], [RFC3471], [RFC3473],
   [RFC3477], [RFC4201], [RFC4202], [RFC4204], [RFC4208] and referenced
   therein.











































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Table of Contents

   1. Introduction...............................................4
   2. Layer 1 VPN Service........................................5
   3. Addressing, Ports, Links and Control Channels..............7
   3.1 Service Provider Realm....................................7
   3.2 Layer 1 Ports and Index...................................8
   3.3 Port and Index Mapping....................................8
   4. Port Based L1VPN Basic Mode...............................10
   4.1 L1VPN Port Information Tables............................11
   4.1.1. Local Auto-Discovery Information......................12
   4.1.2. PE Remote Auto-Discovery Information..................12
   4.2 CE to CE LSP Establishment...............................14
   4.3 Signaling................................................14
   4.3.1 Signaling Procedures...................................15
   4.3.1.1 Shuffling Sessions...................................16
   4.3.1.2 Stitched or Nested Sessions..........................17
   4.3.1.3 Other Signaling......................................17
   4.4 Recovery Procedures......................................18
   5. Security Considerations...................................19
   6. IANA Considerations.......................................20
   7. Intellectual Property Considerations......................20
   8. References................................................21
   8.1 Normative References.....................................21
   8.2 Informative References...................................21
   9. Acknowledgments...........................................23
   10. Authors' Addresses.......................................23
   11. Disclaimer of Validity...................................23
   12. Copyright Statement......................................24























Fedyk & Rekhter.                                          [Page 3]

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1. Introduction


   This document describes the basic mode of Layer 1 VPNs (L1VPN BM)
   that is outlined in [RFC4847].  The applicability of Layer 1 VPNS is
   covered in [L1VPN-APPLIC]. In this document, we consider a layer 1
   service provider network that consists of devices that support GMPLS
   (e.g., Lambda Switch Capable devices, Optical Cross Connects,
   SONET/SDH Cross Connects, etc.). We partition these devices into P
   (provider) and PE (provider edge) devices. In the context of this
   document we will refer to the former devices as just "P", and to the
   latter devices as just "PE". The Ps are connected only to the
   devices within the provider's network. The PEs are connected to the
   other devices within the network (either Ps or PEs), as well as to
   the devices outside of the service provider network. We'll refer to
   such other devices as Customer Edge (CE) devices. An example of a CE
   would be a GMPLS-enabled device that is either a router, an SDH
   cross-connect, or an Ethernet switch.

   [RFC4208] defines signaling from the CE to the PE. In the [RFC4208],
   the term Core Node (CN) corresponds to P and PE Nodes, edge Core
   Node corresponds to PE, and Edge Node (EN) corresponds to CE.

   Figure 1 illustrates the components in an L1VPN network.

                         +---+    +---+
                         | P |....| P |
                         +---+    +---+
                        /              \
                  +-----+               +-----+    +--+
          +--+    |  PE |               |     |----|  |
          |CE|----|     |               |     |    |CE|
          +--+\   +-----+               |     |----|  |
               \     |                  | PE  |    +--+
                \ +-----+               |     |
                 \| PE  |               |     |    +--+
                  |     |               |     |----|CE|
                  +-----+               +-----+    +--+
                         \              /
                         +---+    +---+
                         | P |....| P |
                         +---+    +---+

   Figure 1: Generalized Layer 1 VPN Reference Model

   This document specifies how the L1VPN Basic Mode (BM) service can be
   realized using off-line provisioning or VPN auto-discovery,
   Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling
   [RFC3471], [RFC3473], Routing [RFC4202], and LMP [RFC4204]
   mechanisms.



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   L1VPN auto-discovery has similar requirements [RFC4847] to L3VPN
   auto-discovery. As with L3VPNs, there are protocol choices to be
   made with auto-discovery. Section 4.1.1 deals with the information
   that needs to be discovered.

   GMPLS routing and signaling are used without extensions within the
   service provider network to establish and maintain Lambda Switch
   Capable (LSC) or SONET/SDH (TDM) connections between service
   provider nodes. This follows the model in [RFC4208].

   In L1VPN Basic Mode (BM), the use of LMP facilitates the population
   of the service provider port information tables. Indeed, LMP MAY be
   used as an option to automate local CE-PE link discovery. LMP also
   MAY augment routing in extended mode as well as failure handling
   capabilities.

   Consideration of inter-AS and inter-provider L1VPNs requires further
   analysis beyond the scope of this document.

2. Layer 1 VPN Service

   Layer 1 VPN (L1VPN) services on the interfaces of customer and
   service provider ports MAY be any of the Layer 1 interfaces
   supported by GMPLS. Since the mechanisms specified in this document
   use GMPLS as the signaling mechanism, and since GMPLS applies to
   both SONET/SDH (TDM) and Lambda Switch Capable (LSC) interfaces, it
   follows that L1VPN services include (but are not restricted) to
   Lambda Switch Capable or TDM-based equipment. Note that this
   document describes Basic Mode L1VPNs and as such requires that:
   (1) GMPLS RSVP-TE is used for signaling both within the service
   provider (between PEs), as well as between the customer and the
   service provider (between CE and PE);
   (2) GMPLS Routing on the CE-PE link is outside the scope of the
   basic mode of operation of L1VPN see [RFC4847].

   A CE is connected to a PE via one or more links. In the context of
   this document a link is a GMPLS Traffic Engineering (TE) link
   construct, as defined in [RFC4202]. In the context of this document,
   a TE link is a logical construct that is a member of a VPN hence
   introducing the notion of membership to a set of CEs forming the
   VPN. Interfaces at the end of each link are limited to type LSC or
   TDM that are supported by GMPLS. More specifically a <CE, PE> link
   MUST be of the type <X, LSC> or <Y, TDM> where X = PSC, L2SC or TDM
   and Y = PSC or L2SC. In case the LSP is not terminated by the CE, X
   MAY also = LSC and Y = TDM. One of the applications of a L1VPN
   connection is to provide a "virtual private lambda" or similar. In
   this case, the CE is truly the end point in GMPLS terms and its
   switching capability on the TE link is not relevant (although its
   GPID MUST be signaled and identical at both CEs i.e. head-end and
   tail-end CE). )



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   Likewise, PEs could be any Layer 1 devices that are supported by
   GMPLS (e.g., optical cross connects, SDH cross-connects), while CEs
   MAY be devices at layers 1, 2 and 3 such as an SDH cross-connect, an
   Ethernet switch, and a router respectively).

   Each TE link MAY consist of one or more channels or sub-channels
   (e.g., wavelength or wavelength and timeslot respectively). For the
   purpose of this discussion all the channels within a given link MUST
   have similar shared characteristics (e.g., switching capability,
   encoding, type, etc.), and MAY be selected independently from the
   CE's point of view. Channels on different links of a CE need not
   have the same characteristics.

   There MAY be more than one TE link between a given CE-PE pair. A CE
   MAY be connected to more than one PE (with at least one port per
   PE). And, conversely, a PE MAY have more than one CE from different
   VPNs connected to it.

   If a CE is connected to a PE via multiple TE links and all the links
   belong to the same VPN, these links (referred to as component links)
   MAY be treated as a single TE link using the link bundling
   constructs [RFC4201].

   In order to satisfy the requirements of the L1VPN Basic Mode it is
   REQUIRED that for a given CE-PE pair at least one of the links
   between them has at least one data bearing channel, and at least one
   control bearing channel, or there is IP reachability between the CE
   and the PE that could be used to exchange control information.

   A point-to-point link has two end-points - one on the CE and one on
   the PE. This document refers to the former as "CE port", and to the
   latter as "PE port". From the above it follows that a CE is
   connected to a PE via one or more ports, where each port MAY consist
   of one or more channels or sub-channels (e.g., wavelength or
   wavelength and timeslot respectively), and all the channels within a
   given port have shared similar characteristics and can be
   interchanged from the CE's point of view. Similar to the definition
   of a TE link, in the context of this document, ports are logical
   constructs that are used to represent a grouping of physical
   resources that are used to connect a CE to a PE on a per L1VPN
   basis.

   At any point in time, a given port on a PE is associated with at
   most one L1VPN, or to be more precise with at most one Port
   Information Table maintained by the PE (although different ports on
   a given PE could be associated with different L1VPNs, or to be more
   precise with different Port Information Tables). The association of
   a port with a VPN MAY be defined by provisioning the relationship on
   the service provider devices. In other words the context of a VPN
   membership in Basic mode is enforced through service provider
   control.


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   It is REQUIRED that the interface between the CE and PE used for the
   purpose of signaling be capable of initiating/processing GMPLS
   protocol messages [RFC3473] and follow the procedures described in
   [RFC4208].

   An important goal of L1VPN service is the ability to support what is
   known as "single-ended provisioning", where the addition of a new
   port to a given L1VPN  involves configuration changes only on the PE
   that has this port.  The extension of this model to the CE is
   outside the scope of the L1VPN BM.

   Another important goal in the L1VPN service is the ability to
   establish/terminate an LSP between a pair of (existing) ports within
   an L1VPN from the CE devices without involving configuration changes
   in any of the service provider's devices. In other words, the VPN
   topology is under the CE device control (provided that the
   underlying PE-PE connectivity be provided and allowed by the
   network).

   The mechanisms outlined in this document aim to achieve these above
   goals. Specifically, as part of the L1VPN service offering, these
   mechanisms (1) enable the service provider to restrict the set of
   ports to which a given port could be connected, (2) enable a CE to
   establish the actual LSP to a subset of ports. Finally, the
   mechanisms allow arbitrary L1VPN topologies to be supported ranging
   from hub-and-spoke to full mesh point-to-point connections. Only
   point-to-point links are supported.

   The exchange of CE routing or topology information to the service
   provider is out of scope for L1VPN BM mode.

3. Addressing, Ports, Links and Control Channels

   GMPLS-established conventions for addressing and link numbering are
   discussed in [RFC3945].  This section builds on those definitions
   for the L1VPN case where we now have customer and service provider
   addresses in a Layer 1 context.

3.1 Service Provider Realm

   It is REQUIRED that a service provider, or a group of service
   providers that collectively offer L1VPN service, have a single
   addressing realm that spans all PE devices involved in providing the
   L1VPN service. This is necessary to enable GMPLS mechanisms for path
   establishment and maintenance. We will refer to this realm as the
   service provider addressing realm. It is further REQUIRED that each
   L1VPN customer have its own addressing realm with complete freedom
   to use private or public addresses. We will refer to such realms as
   the customer addressing realms. Customer addressing realms MAY
   overlap addresses (i.e. non unique address) with each other, and MAY
   also overlap addresses with the service provider realm.

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3.2 Layer 1 Ports and Index

   Within a given L1VPN, each port on a CE that connects the CE to a PE
   has an identifier that is unique within that L1VPN (but need not be
   unique across several L1VPNs). One way to construct such an
   identifier is to assign each port an address that is unique within a
   given L1VPN, and use this address as a port identifier. Another way
   to construct such an identifier is to assign each port on a CE an
   index that is unique within that CE, assign each CE an address that
   is unique within a given L1VPN, and then use a tuple <port index, CE
   address> as a port identifier. Note that both the port and the CE
   address MAY be an address in several formats.  This includes, but is
   not limited to IPv4, and IPv6. This identifier is part of the
   Customer addressing Realm and is used by the CE device to identify
   the CE port and the CE remote port for signaling.  CEs do not know
   or understand the service provider Realm addresses.

   Within a service provider network, each port on a PE that connects
   that PE to a CE has an identifier that is unique within that
   network. One way to construct such an identifier is to assign each
   port on a PE an index that is unique within that PE, assign each PE
   an IP address that is unique within the service provider addressing
   realm, and then use a tuple <port index, PE IPv4 address> or <port
   index, PE IPv6 address> as a port identifier within the service
   provider network. Another way to construct such an identifier is to
   assign an IPv4 or IPv6 address that is unique within the service
   provider addressing realm to each such port. Either way, this IPv4
   or IPv6 address is internal to the service provider network and is
   used for GMPLS signaling within the service provider network.

   As a result, each link connecting the CE to the PE is associated
   with a CE port that has a unique identifier within a given L1VPN,
   and with a PE port that has a unique identifier within the service
   provider network. We'll refer to the former as the customer Port
   Identifier (CPI), and to the latter as the Provider Port Identifier
   (PPI).

3.3 Port and Index Mapping

   This document requires that each PE port that has a PPI also has an
   identifier that is unique within the L1VPN customer addressing realm
   of the L1VPN associated with that port.  One way to construct such
   an identifier is to assign each port an address that is unique
   within a given L1VPN customer addressing realm, and use this address
   as a port identifier. Another way to construct such an identifier is
   to assign each port an index that is unique within a given PE,
   assign each PE an IP address that is unique within a given L1VPN
   customer addressing realm (but need not be unique within the service
   provider network), and then use a tuple <port index, PE IP address>
   that acts as a port identifier.  We'll refer to such port identifier
   as the VPN-PPI. See Figure 2.

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   For L1VPNs it is a requirement that service provider operations are
   independent of the VPN customer's addressing realm and the service
   provider addressing realm is hidden from the customer. To achieve
   this we have created two identifiers at the PE, one customer facing
   and the other service provider facing. The PE IP address used for
   the VPN-PPI is independent of the PE IP address used for the PPI (as
   the two are taken from different address realms, the former from the
   customer's addressing realm and the latter from a VPN service
   Provider's addressing realm). If for a given port on a PE, the PPI
   and the VPN-PPI port identifiers are unnumbered, then they both
   could use exactly the same port index. This is a mere convenience
   since the PPI and VPN_PPI can be in any combination of valid
   formats.


                   (Customer realm)
               +----+                             +----+
               |    |<Port Index>    <Port Index> |    |
               |    |CPI              VPN-PPI     |    |
            ---| CE |-----------------------------| PE |---
               |    |                <Port Index> |    |
               |    |                 PPI         |    |
               +----+                             +----+
                                     (Provider realm)


             Figure 2: Customer/Provider Port/Index Mapping

   Note, as stated earlier, that IP addresses used for the CPIs, PPIs
   and VPN-PPIs could be either IPv4, or IPv6 format addresses.

   For a given link connecting a CE to a PE:

   - If the CPI is an IPv4 address, then the VPN-PPI MUST be an IPv4
   address as well since VPN-PPI are created from the customer address
   space.  If the CPI is a <port index, CPI IPv4 address>, then the
   VPN-PPI MUST be a <port index, PE IPv4 address> for the same reason.

   - If the CPI is an IPv6 address, then the VPN-PPI MUST be an IPv6
   address as well since VPN-PPI are created from the customer address
   space.  If the CPI is a <port index, CPI IPv6 address>, then the
   VPN-PPI MUST be a <port index, PE IPv6 address> for the same reason.

   Note: for a given port on PE, whether the VPN-PPI of that port is an
   IP address or a <port index, PE IP address> is independent of the
   format of the PPI of that port.

   This document assumes that assignment of the PPIs is controlled
   solely by the service provider (without any coordination with the
   L1VPN customers), while assignment of addresses used by the CPIs and
   VPN-PPIs is controlled solely by the administrators of L1VPN. This

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   provides maximum flexibility. The L1VPN administrator is the entity
   that controls the L1VPN service specifics for the L1VPN customers.
   This function may be owned by the service provider but may also be
   performed by a third party who has agreements with the service
   provider. And, of course, each L1VPN customer could assign such
   addresses on its own, without any coordination with other L1VPNs.

   This document also requires IP connectivity between the CE and the
   PE as specified earlier, which is used for the control channel
   between CE and PE. This connectivity could be either a single IP
   hop, which could be realized by either a dedicated link or by an L2
   VPN, or an IP private network, such as L3VPN. The only requirement
   on this connectivity is an unambiguous way to correlate a particular
   CE-PE control channel with a particular L1VPN. When such a channel
   is realized by a dedicated link, such a link should be associated
   with a particular L1VPN. When such channel is realized by an L2VPN,
   a distinct L2VPN should be associated with an L1VPN. When such
   channel is realized by an L3VPN, a distinct L3VPN should be
   associated with an L1VPN.

   We'll refer to the CE's address of this channel as the CE Control
   Channel Address (CE-CC-Addr), and to the PE's address of this
   channel as the PE Control Channel Address (PE-CC-Addr). Both CE-CC-
   Addr and PE-CC-Addr are REQUIRED to be unique within the L1VPN they
   belong to, but are not REQUIRED to be unique across multiple L1VPNs.
   Control channel addresses are not shared amongst multiple VPNs.
   Assignment of CE-CC-Addr and PE-CC-Addr is controlled by the
   administrators of the L1VPN.

   Multiple ports on a CE could share the same control channel only as
   long as all these ports belong to the same L1VPN. Likewise, multiple
   ports on a PE could share the same control channel only as long as
   all these ports belong to the same L1VPN.

4. Port Based L1VPN Basic Mode

   An L1VPN is a port-based VPN service where a pair of CEs could be
   connected through the service provider network via a GMPLS-based LSP
   within a given VPN port topology. It is precisely this LSP that
   forms the basic unit of the L1VPN service that the service provider
   network offers. If a port by which a CE is connected to a PE
   consists of multiple channels (e.g., multiple wavelengths), the CE
   could establish LSPs to multiple other CEs in the same VPN over this
   single port.

   In the L1VPN, the service provider does not initiate the creation of
   an LSP between a pair of CE ports. The LSP establishment is
   initiated by the CE. However, the SP, by using the
   mechanisms/toolkit outlined in this document, restricts the set of
   other CE ports, which may be the remote endpoints of LSPs that have
   the given port as the local endpoint. Subject to these restrictions,
   the CE-to-CE connectivity is under the control of the CEs

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   themselves. In other words, the SP allows a L1VPN to have a certain
   set of topologies (expressed as a port-to-port connectivity matrix.
   CE-initiated signaling is used to choose a particular topology from
   that set.

   For each L1VPN that has at least one port on a given PE, the PE
   maintains a Port Information Table (PIT) associated with that L1VPN.
   This tables contains a list of <CPI, PPI> tuples for all the ports
   within its L1VPN. In addition, for local PE ports of a given L1VPN
   the tuples also include the VPN-PPIs of these ports.


                  PE                        PE
               +---------+             +--------------+
   +--------+  | +------+|             | +----------+ | +--------+
   |  VPN-A |  | |VPN-A ||             | |  VPN-A   | | |  VPN-A |
   |   CE1  |--| |PIT   ||    Route    | |  PIT     | |-|   CE2  |
   +--------+  | |      ||<----------->| |          | | +--------+
               | +------+|Dissemination| +----------+ |
               |         |             |              |
   +--------+  | +------+|             | +----------+ | +--------+
   | VPN-B  |  | |VPN-B ||  --------   | |   VPN-B  | | |  VPN-B |
   |  CE1   |--| |PIT   ||-(  GMPLS  )-| |   PIT    | |-|   CE2  |
   +--------+  | |      || (Backbone ) | |          | | +--------+
               | +------+|  ---------  | +----------+ |
               |         |             |              |
   +--------+  | +-----+ |             | +----------+ | +--------+
   | VPN-C  |  | |VPN-C| |             | |   VPN-C  | | |  VPN-C |
   |  CE1   |--| |PIT  | |             | |   PIT    | |-|   CE2  |
   +--------+  | |     | |             | |          | | +--------+
               | +-----+ |             | +----------+ |
               +---------+             +--------------+

                   Figure 3 Basic Mode L1VPN Service

4.1 L1VPN Port Information Tables


   Figure 3 illustrates three VPNs, VPN-A, VPN-B, and VPN-C with their
   associated PITs. A PIT consists of local information as well as
   remote information. It follows that PIT on a given PE is populated
   from two information sources:

     1. The information related to the CEs' ports attached to the ports
        local to that PE.
     2. The information about the CEs connected to the remote PEs

   A PIT MAY be populated via provisioning or by auto-discovery
   procedures. When provisioning is used the entire table MAY be
   populated by provisioning commands either at a console or by a
   management system which may have some automation capability.
   As the network grows some form of automation is desirable.

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   For local information between a CE and a PE, a PE MAY leverage LMP
   to populate the <CPI, VPN-PPI> link information. This local
   information also needs to be propagated to other PEs that share the
   same VPN. The mechanisms for this are out of scope for this document
   but the information needed to be exchanged is described in section
   4.1.1.

   The PIT is by nature VPN-specific. A PE is REQUIRED to maintain a
   PIT for each L1VPN for which it has member CEs locally attached. A
   PE is does not need to maintain PITs for other L1VPNs. However, the
   full set of PITs with all L1VPN entries for multiple VPNs MAY also
   be available to all PEs.

   The remote information in the context of a VPN identifier (i.e., the
   remote CEs of this VPN) MAY also be sent to the local CE belonging
   to the same VPN. Exchange of this information is outside the scope
   of this document.

4.1.1. Local Auto-Discovery Information

   The information that needs to be discovered on a PE local port is
   the local CPI and the VPN-PPI.

   This information MAY be configured or if LMP is used between the CE
   and PE, LMP MAY be used to exchange this information.

   Once a CPI has been discovered, the corresponding VPN-PPI maps in a
   local context to a VPN Identifier and a corresponding PPI.
   One way to enforce a provider controlled VPN context is to pre-
   provision VPN-PPI's with a VPN identifier. Other policy mechanisms
   to achieve this are outside the scope of this document.  In this
   manner, a relationship of a CPI to a VPN and PPI port can be
   established when the port is provisioned as belonging to the VPN.


4.1.2. PE Remote Auto-Discovery Information

   This section provides the information that is carried by any auto-
   discovery mechanism, and is used to dynamically populate a PIT. The
   information provides a single <CPI, PPI> mapping.  Each auto-
   discovery mechanism will define the method(s) by which multiple
   <CPI, PPI> mappings are communicated, as well as invalidated.

   This information should be consistent regardless of the mechanism
   used to distribute the information [L1VPN-BGP-AD], [L1VPN-OSPF-AD].







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   The format of encoding a single <PPI, CPI> tuple is:

        +---------------------------------------+
        |     PPI Length (1 octet)              |
        +---------------------------------------+
        |     PPI (variable)                    |
        +---------------------------------------+
        |     CPI AFI (2 octets)                |
        +---------------------------------------+
        |     CPI (length)                      |
        +---------------------------------------+
        |     CPI (variable)                    |
        +---------------------------------------+

        Figure 4: Auto-Discovery Information

   The use and meaning of these fields are as follows:


   PPI Length:

      A one octet field whose value indicates the length of the PPI
      field.

   PPI field:

      A variable length field that contains the value of the PPI
      (either an address or <port index, address> tuple. Note, PPI is
      always encoded consistently within a provider domain so the
      format of the PPI field is implicit within a given provider
      network.


   CPI AFI field:

      A two octets field whose value indicates address family of the
      CPI. This value is assigned in [L1VPN-BGP-AD].

   CPI Length:

      A one octet field whose value indicates the length of the CPI
      field.

   CPI (variable):

      A variable length field that contains the CPI value (either an
      address or <port index, address> tuple.


   <PPI, CPI> tuples MUST also be associated with one or more globally
   unique identifiers associated with a particular VPN.  A globally
   unique identifier can encode a VPN-ID, a route target, or any other

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   globally unique identifier. The globally unique identifiers are
   under control of network providers. Uniqueness within a service
   provider administrative domain is sufficient for basic mode
   operation. In the case of multiple provider networks which is beyond
   the scope of this document, the globally unique identifier need only
   be unique and consistent between the those providers.  In this
   document we specify a generic encoding format for the globally
   unique identifier common to all the auto-discovery mechanisms.
   However, each auto-discovery mechanism will define the specific
   method(s) by which the encoding is distributed and the association
   with a <PPI, CPI> tuple is made.  The encoding of the globally
   unique identifier associated with the VPN is:

            +------------------------------------------------+
            |  L1vpn Globally unique identifier  (8 octets)  |
            +------------------------------------------------+

       Figure 5: Auto-Discovery Globally unique identifier Format


4.2 CE to CE LSP Establishment

   In order to establish an LSP, a CE needs to identify all other CEs
   in the CE's L1VPN it wants to connect to. A CE may already have
   obtained this information through provisioning or through some other
   schemes (such schemes are outside the scope of this document).

   Ports associated with a given CE-PE link, in addition to their CPI
   and PPI MAY also have other information associated with them that
   describes characteristics and constraints of the channels within
   these ports, such as encoding supported by the channels, bandwidth
   of a channel, total unreserved bandwidth within the port, etc. This
   information could be further augmented with the information about
   certain capabilities of the service provider network (e.g., support
   regeneration section overhead (RSOH) Data Communications Channel
   (DCC) transparency, arbitrary concatenation, etc.). This information
   is used to ensure that ports at each end of an LSP have compatible
   characteristics, and that there are sufficient unallocated resources
   to establish an LSP between these ports.

   It may happen that for a given pair of ports within an L1VPN, each
   of the CEs connected to these ports would concurrently try to
   establish an LSP to the other CE. If having a pair of LSPs between a
   pair of ports is viewed as undesirable, the way to resolve this is
   to require the CE with the lower value of the CPI to terminate the
   LSP originated by the CE. This option could be controlled by
   configuration on the CE devices.

4.3 Signaling

   In L1VPN BM a CE needs to be configured with the CPIs of other
   ports. Once a CE is configured with the CPIs of the other ports

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   within the same L1VPN, which we'll refer to as "target ports", the
   CE uses a (subset of) GMPLS signaling, to request the provider
   network to establish an LSP to a target port.

   For inter-CE connectivity, the request originated by the CE contains
   the CPI of the port on the CE that CE wants to use for the LSP, and
   the CPI of the target port. When the PE attached to the CE that
   originated the request receives the request, the PE identifies the
   appropriate PIT, and then uses the information in that PIT to find
   out the PPI associated with the CPI of the target port carried in
   the request. The PPI should be sufficient for the PE to establish an
   LSP. Ultimately the request reaches the CE associated with the
   target CPI (note that the request still carries the CPI of the CE
   that originated the request). If the CE associated with the target
   CPI accepts the request, the LSP is established.

   Note that a CE need not establish an LSP to every target port that
   CE knows about - it is a local CE matter to select a subset of
   target ports to which the CE will try to establish LSPs.

   The procedures for establishing an individual connection between two
   corresponding CEs is the same as the procedure specified for GMPLS
   overlay [RFC4208].

4.3.1 Signaling Procedures

   When an ingress CE sends an RSVP Path message to an ingress PE, the
   source IP address in the IP packet that carries the message is set
   to the appropriate CE-CC-Addr, and the destination IP address in the
   packet is set to the appropriate PE-CC-Addr. When the ingress PE
   sends back to the ingress CE the corresponding Resv message, the
   source IP address in the IP packet that carries the message is set
   to the PE-CC-Addr, and the destination IP address is set to the CE-
   CC-Addr.

   Likewise, when an egress PE sends an RSVP Path message to an egress
   CE, the source IP address in the IP packet that carries the message
   is set to the appropriate PE-CC-Addr, and the destination IP address
   in the packet is set to the appropriate CE-CC-Addr. When the egress
   CE sends back to the egress PE the corresponding Resv message, the
   source IP address in the IP packet that carries the message is set
   to the CE-CC-Addr, and the destination IP address is set to the PE-
   CC-Addr.

   In addition to being used for IP addresses in the IP packet that
   carries RSVP messages between CE and PE, CE-CC-Addr and PE-CC-Addr
   are also used in the Next/Previous Hop Address field of the IF_ID
   RSVP_Hop Object that is carried between CEs and PEs.

   In the case where a link between CE and PE is a numbered non-bundled
   link, the CPI and VPN-PPI of that link are used for the Type 1 or 2
   TLVs of the IF_ID RSVP Hop Object that is carried between the CE and

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   PE. In the case where a link between CE and PE is an unnumbered non-
   bundled link, the CPI and VPN-PPI of that link are used for the IP
   Address field of the Type 3 TLV. In the case where a link between CE
   and PE is a bundled link, the CPI and VPN-PPI of that link are used
   for the IP Address field of the Type 3 TLVs.

   Additional processing related to unnumbered links is described in
   the "Processing the IF_ID RSVP_Hop Object"/"Processing the IF_ID
   TLV", and "Unnumbered Forwarding Adjacencies" sections of RFC 3477
   [RFC3477].

   When an ingress CE originates a Path message to establish an LSP
   from a particular port on that CE to a particular target port, the
   CE uses the CPI of its port in the Sender Template object. If the
   CPI of the target port is an IP address, then the CE uses it in the
   Session object. And if the CPI of the target port is a <port index,
   IP address> tuple, then the CE uses the IP address part of the tuple
   in the Session object, and the whole tuple as the Unnumbered
   Interface ID subobject in the ERO.

   There are two options for RSVP-TE sessions. One option is to have a
   single RSVP-TE session end to end where the addresses of the
   customer and the provider are swapped at the PE, termed shuffling.
   The other option is when stitching or hierarchy is used to create
   two LSP sessions, one between the provider PE(s) and another end to
   end session between the CEs.

4.3.1.1 Shuffling Sessions

   Shuffling sessions are used when the desire is to have a single LSP
   originating at the CE and terminating at the far end CE. The
   customer addresses are shuffled to provider addresses at the ingress
   PE, and back to customer addresses at the egress PE by using the
   mapping provided by the PIT.

   When the Path message arrives at the ingress PE, the PE selects the
   PIT associated with the L1VPN, and then uses this PIT to map CPIs
   carried in the Session and the Sender Template objects to the
   appropriate PPIs. Once the mapping is done, the ingress PE replaces
   CPIs with these PPIs. As a result, the Session and the Sender
   Template objects that are carried in the GMPLS signaling within the
   service provider network carry PPIs, and not CPIs.

   At the egress PE, the reverse mapping operation is performed. The PE
   extracts the ingress/egress PPI values carried in the Sender
   Template and Session objects (respectively). The egress PE
   identifies the appropriate PIT to find the appropriate CPI
   associated with the PPI of the egress CE. Once the mapping is
   retrieved, the egress PE replaces the ingress/egress PPI values with
   the corresponding CPI values. As a result, the Session and the
   Sender Template objects included in the GMPLS RSVP-TE Path message
   sent from the egress PE to the egress CE carry CPIs, and not PPIs.

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   Here also, for the GMPLS RSVP-TE Path messages sent from the egress
   PE to CE, the source IP address (of the IP packet carrying this
   message) is set to the appropriate PE-CC-Addr, and the destination
   IP address (of the IP packet carrying this message) is set to the
   appropriate CE-CC-Addr.

   At this point the CE's view is a single LSP point to point between
   the two CEs with a virtual link between the PE nodes.  CE-PE(-)PE-
   CE.  The L1VPN PE nodes have a view of the PE-PE LSP segment in all
   its detail.  The PEs MAY filter the RSVP-TE signaling removing
   information about the provider topology and replacing it with a view
   of a virtual link.

   This translation of addresses and session ids is termed shuffling
   and driven by the L1VPN Port information tables (see section 4).
   This MUST be performed for all RSVP-TE Messages at the PE edges.  In
   this case there is one CE to CE session.

4.3.1.2 Stitched or Nested Sessions

   Stitching or Nesting options are dependent on the LSP switching
   types. If the CE to CE and PE to PE LSPs are identical in switching
   type and capacity the LSP MAY be stitched together and the
   procedures in [RFC5150] apply. If the CE to CE LSPs and the PE to PE
   LSPs are of not the same switching type or of different but
   compatible capacity the LSPs MAY be Nested and the procedures for
   [RFC4206] apply.  The Stitched and Nested LSP signaling are
   analogous procedures and can be discussed together.

   When the Path Message arrives at the ingress PE, the PE selects the
   PIT associated with the L1VPN, and then uses this PIT to map CPIs
   carried in the Session and the Sender Template objects to the
   appropriate PPIs. Once the mapping is done, a new PE to PE session
   is established with the parameters compatible with the CE session.
   Upon successful establishment of the PE to PE session, the CE
   signaling request is sent to the egress PE.

   At the ingress PE, when stitching and nesting are used a PE to PE
   session is established. This could be achieved by several means:
     - Associating an already established PE-PE FA-LSP or LSP to the
      destination that meets the requested parameters.
     - Establishing a compliant PE-PE LSP segment.

   At this point the CE's view is a single LSP point to point between
   the two CEs with a virtual node between the PE nodes.  CE-PE(-)PE-
   CE.  The L1VPN PE nodes have a view of the PE-PE LSP segment in all
   its detail.  The PEs do not have to filter the RSVP-TE signaling
   removing information about the provider topology because the PE-PE
   signaling is not visible to the CE nodes.

4.3.1.3 Other Signaling


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   An ingress PE may receive and potentially reject a Path message that
   contains an Explicit Route Object and so cause the switched
   connection setup to fail. However, the ingress PE may accept EROs,
   which include a sequence of {<ingress PE (strict), egress CE CPI
   (loose)>}.

   - Path message without ERO: when an ingress PE receives a Path
   message from an ingress CE that contains no ERO, it MUST calculate a
   route to the destination for the PE-to-PE LSP and include that route
   in an ERO, before forwarding the Path message. One exception would
   be if the egress core node were also adjacent to this core node.

   - Path message with ERO: when an ingress PE receives a Path message
   from an ingress CE that contains an ERO (of the form detailed
   above), the former computes a path to reach the egress PE. It then
   inserts this path as part of the ERO before forwarding the Path
   message.

   In the case of Shuffling the overlay rules for Notification and RRO
   Processing are identical to the UNI or Overlay Model[RFC4208] which
   state that Edge PE MAY remove/edit Provider Notification and RRO
   objects when passing the messages to the CEs.


4.4 Recovery Procedures

   Signaling:

   A CE requests a network protected (from PE-to-PE) LSP by using
   [RFC4873] technique. Dynamic identification of merge nodes is
   supported via the LSP Segment Recovery Flags carried in the
   Protection object (see Section 6.2 of [RFC4873]).

   Notification:

   A Notify Request object MAY be inserted in Path or Resv messages to
   indicate the address of a CE that should be notified of an LSP
   failure.  Notifications MAY be requested in both the upstream and
   downstream directions:

   o) Upstream notification is indicated via the inclusion of a Notify
   Request object in the corresponding Path message.

   o) Downstream notification is indicated via the inclusion of a
   Notify Request object in the corresponding Resv message.

   A PE receiving a message containing a Notify Request object SHOULD
   store the Notify Node Address in the corresponding RSVP state block.
   The PE SHOULD also include a Notify Request object in the outgoing
   Path or Resv message.  The outgoing Notify Node Address MAY be
   updated based on local policy.  This means that a PE upon reception
   of this object from the CE MAY update its value.

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   If the ingress CE includes a Notify Request object into the Path
   message, the ingress PE MAY replace the received 'Notify Node
   Address' by its own selected 'Notify Node Address', and in
   particular the local TE Router_ID.  The Notify Request object MAY be
   carried in Path or Resv messages (Section 7 of [RFC3473]). The
   format of the Notify Request object is defined in [RFC3473].
   In GMPLS, Notify Node Addresses may be IPv4 or IPv6 [RFC3473].

   Inclusion of a Notify Request object is used to request the
   generation of notifications upon failure occurrence but does not
   guarantee that a Notify message will be generated.



5. Security Considerations

   Security for L1VPNs is covered in [RFC4847] and [L1VPN-APPLIC]. In
   this document we discuss the security aspects with respect to the
   control plane.

   The association of a particular port with a particular L1VPN (or to
   be more precise with a particular PIT) is a configuration operation,
   generally done manually by the service provider as part of the
   service provisioning process. Thus, it cannot be altered via
   signaling between CE and PE. This means that the signaling cannot be
   used to deliver L1VPN traffic to the wrong customer. The operator
   should apply appropriate security mechanisms to the management and
   configuration process, and should consider data plane verification
   techniques to protect against accidental misconfiguration. The
   customer may also apply end-to-end (i.e., CE to CE) data plane
   connectivity tests over the L1VPN connection to detect
   misconnection. Data plane connectivity testing can be performed
   using the Link Management Protocol (LMP) [RFC4204].

   Note that it is also possible to populate the local part of a PIT
   using autodiscovery through LMP. LMP may be secured as described in
   [RFC4204]. Signaling between CE and PE is assumed to be over a
   private link (for example, in-band or in-fiber) or a private
   network. Use of a private link makes the CE-PE connection secure at
   the same level as the data link described in the previous
   paragraphs. The use of a private network assumes that entities
   outside the network cannot spoof or modify control plane
   communications between CE and PE. Furthermore, all entities in the
   private network are assumed to be trusted. Thus, no security
   mechanisms are required by the protocol exchanges described in this
   document.

   However, an operator that is concerned about the security of their
   private control plane network may use the authentication and
   integrity functions available in RSVP-TE [RFC3473] or utilize IPsec
   [RFC4301], [RFC4302], [RFC4835], [RFC4306], and [RFC2411] for the

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   point-to-point signaling between PE and CE. See [MPLS-SEC] for a
   full discussion of the security options available for the GMPLS
   control plane.

   Note further that a private network (e.g., Layer 2 VPN, or Layer 3
   VPN) might be used to provide control plane connectivity between a
   PE and more than one CE. In this scenario, it is RECOMMENDED that
   each L1 VPN customer would have its own such private network. Then
   the security mechanisms provided by the private network SHOULD be
   used to ensure security of the control plane communication between a
   customer and a service provider.

6. IANA Considerations

   This document makes no requests for IANA action.

7. Intellectual Property Considerations

   The IETF takes no position regarding the validity or scope of any
   Intellectual Property Rights or other rights that might be claimed
   to pertain to the implementation or use of the technology described
   in this document or the extent to which any license under such
   rights might or might not be available; nor does it represent that
   it has made any independent effort to identify any such rights.
   Information on the procedures with respect to rights in RFC
   documents can be found in BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Copies of IPR disclosures made to the IETF Secretariat and any
   assurances of licenses to be made available, or the result of an
   attempt made to obtain a general license or permission for the use
   of such proprietary rights by implementers or users of this
   specification can be obtained from the IETF on-line IPR repository
   at http://www.ietf.org/ipr.

   The IETF invites any interested party to bring to its attention any
   copyrights, patents or patent applications, or other proprietary
   rights that may cover technology that may be required to implement
   this standard. Please address the information to the IETF at ietf-
   ipr@ietf.org.














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8. References

8.1 Normative References

   [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
             Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [RFC3471] Berger, L. (editor), "Generalized MPLS -Signaling
             Functional Description", January 2003, RFC3471.

   [RFC3473] Berger, L. (editor), "Generalized MPLS Signaling - RSVP-TE
             Extensions", RFC3473, January 2003.

   [RFC3477] Kompella, K. and Y. Rekhter, "Signalling Unnumbered
             Links in Resource ReSerVation Protocol - Traffic
             Engineering (RSVP-TE)", RFC 3477, January 2003.

   [RFC4202] Kompella, K., Rekhter, Y., "Routing Extensions in Support
             of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)",
             RFC 4202, October 2005.

   [RFC4204] J. Lang (editor), "Link Management Protocol (LMP)," RFC
             4204, October 2005.

   [RFC4206] Kompella, K. and Y. Rekhter, "Label Switched Paths (LSP)
             Hierarchy with Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching
             (GMPLS)Traffic Engineering (TE)", RFC 4206, October 2005.

   [RFC4208] Swallow, G., et al., "Generalized Multiprotocol Label
             Switching (GMPLS) User-Network Interface (UNI): Resource
             ReserVation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) Support
             for the Overlay Model", RFC 4208, October 2005.

   [RFC4873] Berger, L., Bryskin, I., Papadimitriou, D. Farrel, A.,
             "GMPLS Based Segment Recovery", RFC 4873, May 2007.

   [RFC5150] A. Ayyangar, K. Kompella, J.P. Vasseur, A. Farrel, "Label
             Switched Path Stitching with Generalized MPLS Traffic
             Engineering", RFC 5150, February 2008.



8.2 Informative References

   [RFC3945] E. Mannie (editor), "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label
             Switching (GMPLS) Architecture" RFC3945, October 2004.

   [RFC4201] Kompella, K., Rekhter, Y., Berger, L., "Link Bundling in
             MPLS Traffic Engineering (TE)", RFC 4201, October 2005.



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   [RFC4847] Takeda, T., Editor "Framework and Requirements for Layer 1
             Virtual Private Networks", RFC 4847, April 2007.

   [RFC2411] R. Thayer, N. Doraswamy, R. Glenn, "IP Security Document
             Roadmap," November 1998.

   [RFC4301] S. Kent, K. Seo, "Security Architecture for the Internet
             Protocol," December 2005.

   [RFC4302] S. Kent, "IP Authentication Header," December 2005.

   [RFC4306] C. Kaufman, "Internet Key Exchange (IKEv2) Protocol",
             December 2005.

   [RFC4835] V. Manral, "Cryptographic Algorithm Implementation
             Requirements for Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) and
             Authentication Header (AH)", April 2007.

   [L1VPN-BGP-AD] Ould-Brahim, H., Fedyk, D., Rekhter, Y., "BGP-based
             Auto-Discovery for L1VPNs", work in progress.

   [L1VPN-OSPF-AD] Bryskin, I., Berger, Lou "OSPF Based L1VPN Auto-
             Discovery", work in progress.

   [L1VPN-APPLIC] Takeda, T (editor), "Applicability Statement for
             Layer 1 Virtual Private Networks (L1VPNs) Basic Mode",
             draft-ietf-l1vpn-applicability-basic-mode, work in
             progress.

   [MPLS-SEC] Fang, L., " Security Framework for MPLS and GMPLS
             Networks", draft-ietf-mpls-mpls-and-gmpls-security-
             framework, work in progress.





















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9. Acknowledgments

   The authors would like to thank Adrian Farrel, Hamid Ould-Brahim,
   and Tomonori Takeda for their valuable comments.

   Sandy Murphy, Charlie Kaufman, Pasi Eronen, Russ Housley, Tim
   Polk, and Ron Bonica provided input during the IESG review process.


10. Authors' Addresses


   Don Fedyk
   Nortel Networks
   600 Technology Park
   Billerica, Massachusetts
   01821 U.S.A
   Phone: +1 (978) 288 3041
   Email: dwfedyk@nortel.com

   Yakov Rekhter
   Juniper Networks
   1194 N. Mathilda Avenue
   Sunnyvale, CA 94089
   Email: yakov@juniper.net

   Dimitri Papadimitriou
   Alcatel-Lucent
   Fr. Wellesplein 1,
   B-2018 Antwerpen, Belgium
   Phone: +32 3 240-8491
   Email: Dimitri.Papadimitriou@alcatel-lucent.be

   Richard Rabbat
   Google, Inc
   1600 Amphitheatre Pkwy
   Mountain View, CA 95054
   Email: rabbat@alum.mit.edu

   Lou Berger
   LabN Consulting, LLC
   Phone:  +1 301-468-9228
   EMail:  lberger@labn.net


11. Disclaimer of Validity

   "This document and the information contained herein are provided on
   an "AS IS" basis and THE CONTRIBUTOR, THE ORGANIZATION HE/SHE
   REPRESENTS OR IS SPONSORED BY (IF ANY), THE INTERNET SOCIETY, THE

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   IETF TRUST AND THE INTERNET ENGINEERING TASK FORCE DISCLAIM ALL
   WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY
   WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY
   RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
   PARTICULAR PURPOSE.



12. Copyright Statement

   Copyright (C) The IETF Trust (2008).

   This document is subject to the rights, licenses and restrictions
   contained in BCP 78, and except as set forth therein, the authors
   retain all their rights.





































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