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Versions: 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 RFC 4877

MIP6 Working Group                                        V. Devarapalli
Internet-Draft                                                     Nokia
Expires: March 17, 2006                               September 13, 2005


         Mobile IPv6 Operation with IKEv2 and the revised IPsec
                   draft-ietf-mip6-ikev2-ipsec-03.txt

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on March 17, 2006.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2005).

Abstract

   This document describes Mobile IPv6 operation with the revised IPsec
   architecture and IKEv2.










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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.  Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   3.  Packet Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   4.  Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     4.1.  General Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     4.2.  Policy Requirements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     4.3.  IPsec Protocol Processing Requirements . . . . . . . . . .  6
     4.4.  Dynamic Keying Requirements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
   5.  Manual Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     5.1.  Binding Update and Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . .  9
     5.2.  Return Routabililty Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
     5.3.  Mobile Prefix Discovery Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     5.4.  Payload Packets  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   6.  Dynamic Configuration  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
     6.1.  Security Policy Database Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
       6.1.1.  Binding Updates and Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . 12
       6.1.2.  Return Routability Messages  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
       6.1.3.  Mobile Prefix Discovery Messages . . . . . . . . . . . 13
       6.1.4.  Payload Packets  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
     6.2.  Security Association negotiation using IKEv2 . . . . . . . 15
     6.3.  Movements and Dynamic Keying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
   7.  The use of EAP authentication  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
   8.  Dynamic Home Address Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
   9.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
   10. IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
   11. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
   12. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
     12.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
     12.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
   Author's Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
   Intellectual Property and Copyright Statements . . . . . . . . . . 24


















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1.  Introduction

   RFC 3776 describes how IPsec [12] is used with Mobile IPv6 [2] to
   protect the signaling messages.  It also illustrates examples of
   Security Policy Database and Security Association Database entries
   that can be used to protect Mobile IPv6 signaling messages.

   The IPsec architecture has been revised [5].  Among the many changes,
   the list of selectors has been expanded to included the Mobility
   Header message type.  This has an impact on how security policies and
   security associations are configured for protecting mobility header
   messages.  It becomes easier to differentiate between the various
   Mobility Header messages based on the type value instead of checking
   if a particular mobility header message is being sent on a tunnel
   interface between the mobile node and the home agent, as it was in
   RFC 3776.  The revised IPsec architecture specification also includes
   ICMP message type and code as selectors.  This makes it possible to
   protect Mobile Prefix Discovery messages without applying the same
   security associations to all ICMPv6 messages.

   This document discusses new requirements for the home agent and the
   mobile node to use the revised IPsec architecture and IKEv2.
   Section 4 lists the requirements.  Section 5 and Section 6 describe
   the required Security Policy Database (SPD) and Security Association
   Database (SAD) entries.

   The Internet Key Exchange (IKE) has also been substantially revised
   and simplified [4].  Section 6.2 of this document describes how IKEv2
   can be used to setup security associations for Mobile IPv6.

   The use of EAP within IKEv2 is allowed to authenticate the mobile
   node to the home agent.  This is described in Section 7.  A method
   for dynamically configuring a home address from the home agent using
   the Configuration Payload in IKEv2 is described in Section 8.


2.  Terminology

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [1].


3.  Packet Formats

   The mobile node and the home agent must support the packet formats as
   defined in Section 3 of RFC 3776.  This document does not update the
   packet formats described in RFC 3776.



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4.  Requirements

   This section describes mandatory rules and requirements for all
   Mobile IPv6 mobile nodes and home agents so that IPsec, with IKEv2 as
   the key negotiation protocol, can be used to protect traffic between
   the mobile node and the home agent.  Many of the requirements are
   repeated from RFC 3776 to make this document self-contained and
   complete.

4.1.  General Requirements

   o  RFC 3775 states that manual configuration of IPsec security
      associations MUST be supported and automated key management MAY be
      supported.  This document does not make any recommendations
      regarding the support of manual IPsec configuration and dynamic
      IPsec configuration.  This document just describes the use of
      manually created IPsec security associations and the use of IKEv2
      as the automated IPsec key management protocol for protecting
      Mobile IPv6 signaling messages.

   o  ESP encapsulation for Binding Updates and Binding Acknowledgements
      MUST be supported and used.

   o  ESP encapsulation in tunnel mode for the Home Test Init and Home
      Test messages tunneled between the mobile node and the home agent
      MUST be supported and SHOULD be used.

   o  ESP encapsulation of the ICMPv6 messages related to mobile prefix
      discovery MUST be supported and SHOULD be used.

   o  ESP encapsulation of the payload packets tunneled between the
      mobile node and the home agent MAY be supported and used.

   o  If multicast group membership control protocols or stateful
      address autoconfiguration protocols are supported, payload data
      protection MUST be supported for those protocols.

   o  The home agent and the mobile node MAY support authentication
      using EAP in IKEv2 as described in Section 7.

   o  The home agent and the mobile node MAY support remote
      configuration of home address as described in Section 8.  When the
      home agent receives a configuration payload with a CFG_REQUEST for
      INTERNAL_IP6_ADDR, it must reply with a valid home address for the
      mobile node.  The home agent could pick a home address from a
      local database or from a DHCPv6 server on the home link.





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4.2.  Policy Requirements

   The following requirements are related to the configuration of
   security policy database on the home agent and the mobile node.

   o  RFC 3776 required configuration of the security policies per
      interface in order to be able to differentiate between mobility
      header messages sent to the home agent and tunneled through the
      home agent to the correspondent node.  Since the Mobility Header
      message type is a selector, it is now easy to differentiate
      between HoTi and HoT messages from other mobility header messages.
      Therefore per-interface configuration of security policies is not
      required.

   o  The home agent MUST be able to prevent a mobile node from using
      its security association to send a Binding Update on behalf of
      another mobile node.  With manual IPsec configuration, the home
      agent MUST be able to verify that a security association was
      created for a particular home address.  With dynamic keying, it
      should be possible for the home agent to verify that the identity
      presented in the IKE_AUTH exchange is allowed to create security
      associations for a particular home address.

   o  The home agent MAY use the Peer Authorization Database (PAD) [5]
      to store per-mobile node state.  The PAD entry for a mobile node
      can contain a shared key, public key or a trust anchor to verify
      the mobile node's certificate for authenticating the mobile node.

   o  As required in the base specification [7], when a packet destined
      to the receiving node is matched against IPsec security policy or
      selectors of a security association, an address appearing in a
      Home Address destination option is considered as the source
      address of the packet.

      Note that the home address option appears before IPsec headers.
      Section 11.3.2 of the base specification describes one possible
      implementation approach for this: The IPsec policy operations can
      be performed at the time when the packet has not yet been modified
      per Mobile IPv6 rules, or has been brought back to its normal form
      after Mobile IPv6 processing.  That is, the processing of the Home
      Address option is seen as a fixed transformation of the packets
      that does not affect IPsec processing.

   o  Similarly, a home address within a Type 2 Routing header destined
      to the receiving node is considered as the destination address of
      the packet, when a packet is matched against IPsec security policy
      or selectors of a security association.




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      Similar implementation considerations apply to the Routing header
      processing as was described above for the Home Address destination
      option.

   o  When the mobile node returns home and de-registers with the Home
      Agent, the tunnel between the home agent and the mobile node's
      care-of address is torn down.  The security policy entries, which
      were used for protecting tunneled traffic between the mobile node
      and the home agent MUST be made inactive (for instance, by
      removing them and installing them back later through an API).  The
      corresponding security associations could be kept as they are or
      deleted depending on how they were created.  If the security
      associations were created dynamically using IKE, they are
      automatically deleted when they expire.  If the security
      associations were created through manual configuration, they MUST
      be retained and used later when the mobile node moves away from
      home again.  The security associations protecting Binding Updates
      and Acknowledgements, and prefix discovery SHOULD NOT be deleted
      as they do not depend on care-of addresses and can be used again.

   o  The mobile node MUST use the Home Address destination option in
      Binding Updates and Mobile Prefix Solicitations, sent to the home
      agent from a care-of address, so that the home address is visible
      when the IPsec policy checks are made.

   o  The home agent MUST use the Type 2 Routing header in Binding
      Acknowledgements and Mobile Prefix Advertisements sent to the
      mobile node, again due to the need to have the home address
      visible when the policy checks are made.

4.3.  IPsec Protocol Processing Requirements

   The following lists requirements for IPsec processing at the Home
   Agent and the mobile node.

   o  The home agent and mobile node SHOULD support Mobility Header
      message type as an IPsec selector.

   o  The home agent and mobile node SHOULD support ICMPv6 message type
      as an IPsec selector.

   o  The home agent MUST be able to distinguish between HoTi messages
      sent to itself, when it is acting as a Correspondent Node, from
      those sent to Correspondent Nodes when it is acting as a home
      agent, based on the destination address of the packet.






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   o  When securing Binding Updates, Binding Acknowledgements, and
      prefix discovery, both the mobile nodes and the home agents MUST
      support and SHOULD use the Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)
      [6] header in transport mode and MUST use a non-null payload
      authentication algorithm to provide data origin authentication,
      connectionless integrity and optional anti-replay protection.

   o  Tunnel mode IPsec ESP MUST be supported and SHOULD be used for the
      protection of packets belonging to the return routability
      procedure.  A non-null encryption transform and a non-null
      authentication algorithm MUST be applied.

   o  When ESP is used to protect Binding Updates, there is no
      protection for the care-of address that appears in the IPv6 header
      outside the area protected by ESP.  It is important for the home
      agent to verify that the care-of address has not been tampered
      with.  As a result, the attacker would have redirected the mobile
      node's traffic to another address.  In order to prevent this,
      Mobile IPv6 implementations MUST use the Alternate Care-of Address
      mobility option in Binding Updates sent by mobile nodes while away
      from home.  The exception to this is when the mobile node returns
      home and sends a Binding Update to the home agent in order to de-
      register.

      When IPsec is used to protect return routability signaling or
      payload packets, the mobile node MUST set the source address it
      uses for the outgoing tunnel packets to the current primary care-
      of address.

   o  When IPsec is used to protect return routability signaling or
      payload packets, IPsec security associations are needed to provide
      this protection.  When the care-of address for the mobile node
      changes as a result of an accepted Binding Update, special
      treatment is needed for the next packets sent using these security
      associations.  The home agent MUST set the new care-of address as
      the destination address of these packets, as if the outer header
      destination address in the security association had changed.
      Similarly, the home agent starts to expect the new source address
      in the tunnel packets received from the mobile node.

      Such address changes can be implemented, for instance, through an
      API from the Mobile IPv6 implementation to the IPsec
      implementation.  One such API is described in [14].  It should be
      noted that the use of such an API and the address changes MUST
      only be done based on the Binding Updates received by the home
      agent and protected by the use of IPsec.  Address modifications
      based on other sources, such as Binding Updates to the
      correspondent nodes protected by return routability, or open



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      access to an API from any application may result in security
      vulnerabilities.

4.4.  Dynamic Keying Requirements

   The following requirements are related to the use of a dynamic key
   management protocol by the mobile node and the home agent.
   Section 6.2 describes the use of IKEv2 as the dynamic key management
   protocol.

   o  The mobile node MUST use its Care-of Address as source address in
      protocol exchanges, when using dynamic keying.

   o  The mobile node and the home agent MUST create security
      associations based on the home address, so that the security
      associations survive change in Care-of Address.  When using IKEv2
      as the key exchange protocol, the home address should be carried
      as the initiator IP address in the TSi payload during the
      CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange [4].

   o  If the mobile node has used IKEv2 to establish security
      associations with its home agent, it should follow the procedures
      discussed in Section 11.7.1 and 11.7.3 of the base specification
      [2] to determine whether the IKE endpoints can be moved or if IKE
      SA has to be re-established.

   o  If the home agent has used IKEv2 to establish security
      associations with the mobile node, it should follow the procedures
      discussed in Section 10.3.1 and 10.3.2 of the base specification
      [2] to determine whether the IKE endpoints can be moved or if IKE
      SA has to be re-established.


5.  Manual Configuration

   This section describes the SPD and SAD entries that can be used to
   protect Mobile IPv6 signaling messages.  The SPD and SAD entries are
   only example configurations.  A particular mobile node implementation
   and a home agent implementation could configure different SPD and SAD
   entries as long as they provide the required security of the Mobile
   IPv6 signaling messages.

   For the examples described in this document, a mobile node with home
   address, "home_address_1", a home agent with address, "home_agent_1"
   and a user of the mobile node with identity "user_1" are assumed.  If
   the home address of the mobile node changes, the SPD and SAD entries
   need to re-created or updated for the new home address.




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5.1.  Binding Update and Acknowledgements

   The following are the SPD and SAD entries on the mobile node and the
   home agent to protect Binding Updates and Acknowledgements.

        mobile node SPD-S:
          - IF source = home_address_1 & destination = home_agent_1 &
               proto = MH & mh_type = BU
            Then use SA SA1

          - IF source = home_agent_1 & destination = home_address_1 &
               proto = MH & mh_type = BAck
            Then use SA SA2

        mobile node SAD:
          - SA1(OUT, spi_a, home_agent_1, ESP, TRANSPORT):
            source = home_address_1 & destination = home_agent_1 &
            proto = MH & mh_type = BU
          - SA2(IN, spi_b, home_address_1, ESP, TRANSPORT):
            source = home_agent_1 & destination = home_address_1 &
            proto = MH & mh_type = BAck

        home agent SPD-S:
          - IF source = home_agent_1 & destination = home_address_1 &
               proto = MH & mh_type = BAck
            Then use SA SA2

          - IF source = home_address_1 & destination = home_agent_1 &
               proto = MH & mh_type = BU
            Then use SA SA1

        home agent SAD:
          - SA2(OUT, spi_b, home_address_1, ESP, TRANSPORT):
            source = home_agent_1 & destination = home_address_1 &
            proto = MH & mh_type = BAck
          - SA1(IN, spi_a, home_agent_1, ESP, TRANSPORT):
            source = home_address_1 & destination = home_agent_1 &
            proto = MH & mh_type = BU

5.2.  Return Routabililty Messages

   The following are the SPD and SAD entries on the mobile node and the
   home agent to protect Return Routability messages.








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        mobile node SPD-S:
          - IF source = home_address_1 & destination = any &
            proto = MH & mh_type = HoTi
            Then use SA SA3

          - IF destination = home_address_1 & source = any &
            proto = MH & mh_type = HoT
            Then use SA SA4

        mobile node SAD:
          - SA3(OUT, spi_c, home_agent_1, ESP, TUNNEL):
            source = home_address_1 & destination = any & proto = MH &
            mh_type = HoTi
          - SA4(IN, spi_d, care_of_address_1, ESP, TUNNEL):
            source = any & destination = home_address_1 & proto = MH &
            mh_type = HoT

        home agent SPD-S:
          - IF destination = home_address_1 & source = any &
            proto = MH & mh_type = HoT
            Then use SA SA4

          - IF source = home_address_1 & destination = any &
            proto = MH & mh_type = HoTi
            Then use SA SA3

        home agent SAD:
          - SA4(OUT, spi_d, care_of_address_1, ESP, TUNNEL):
            source = any & destination = home_address_1 & proto = MH &
            mh_type = HoT
          - SA3(IN, spi_c, home_agent_1, ESP, TUNNEL):
            source = home_address_1 & destination = any & proto = MH &
            mh_type = HoTi

5.3.  Mobile Prefix Discovery Messages

   The following are the SPD and SAD entries used to protect Mobile
   Prefix Discovery messages.













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        mobile node SPD-S:
          - IF source = home_address_1 & destination = home_agent_1 &
               proto = ICMPv6 & icmp6_type = MPS
            Then use SA SA5.

          - IF source = home_agent_1 & destination = home_address_1 &
               proto = ICMPv6 & icmp6_type = MPA
            Then use SA SA6

        mobile node SAD:
          - SA5(OUT, spi_e, home_agent_1, ESP, TRANSPORT):
            source = home_address_1 & destination = home_agent_1 &
            proto = ICMPv6 & icmp6_type = MPS
          - SA6(IN, spi_f, home_address_1, ESP, TRANSPORT):
            source = home_agent_1 & destination = home_address_1 &
            proto = ICMPv6 & icmp6_type = MPA

        home agent SPD-S:
          - IF source = home_agent_1 & destination = home_address_1 &
               proto = ICMPv6 & icmp6_type = MPA
            Then use SA SA6

          - IF source = home_address_1 & destination = home_agent_1 &
               proto = ICMPv6 & icmp6_type = MPS
            Then use SA SA5

        home agent SAD:
          - SA6(OUT, spi_f, home_address_1, ESP, TRANSPORT):
            source = home_agent_1 & destination = home_address_1 &
            proto = ICMPv6 & icmp6_type = MPA
          - SA5(IN, spi_e, home_agent_1, ESP, TRANSPORT):
            source = home_address_1 & destination = home_agent_1 &
            proto = ICMPv6 & icmp6_type = MPS

5.4.  Payload Packets

   Payload traffic tunneled through the home agent can be protected by
   IPsec, if required.  The mobile node and the home agent use ESP in
   tunnel mode to protect the tunneled traffic.  The SPD and SAD entries
   shown in Section 5.2.4 of [3] are applicable here.


6.  Dynamic Configuration

   This section describes the use of IKEv2 to setup the required
   security associations.





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6.1.  Security Policy Database Entries

   The following sections describe the security policy entries on the
   mobile node and the home agent.  The SPD entries are only example
   configurations.  A particular mobile node implementation and a Home
   Agent implementation could configure different SPD entries as long as
   they provide the required security of the Mobile IPv6 signaling
   messages.  In the examples shown below, the identity of the user of
   the mobile node is assumed to be user_1, the home address of the
   mobile node is assumed to be home_address_1 and the IPv6 address of
   the Home Agent is assumed to be home_agent_1.

6.1.1.  Binding Updates and Acknowledgements

   The following are the SPD entries on the mobile node and the home
   agent for protecting Binding Updates and Acknowledgements.

       mobile node SPD-S:
         - IF source = home_address_1 & destination = home_agent_1 &
              proto = MH & local_mh_type = BU & remote_mh_type = BAck
           Then use SA ESP transport mode
                       IDi = user_1, IDr = home_agent_1,
                       TSi = home_address_1, MH, BU
                       TSr = home_agent_1, MH, BAck

       home agent SPD-S:
         - IF source = home_agent_1 & destination = home_address_1 &
              proto = MH & local_mh_type = BAck & remote_mh_type = BU
           Then use SA ESP transport mode
                       IDi = home_agent_1, IDr = user_1
                       TSi = home_agent_1, MH, BAck
                       TSr = home_address_1, MH, BU

   In the examples shown above, the home address of the mobile node
   might not be available all the time.  For instance, the mobile node
   might have not configured a home address yet.  When the mobile node
   acquires a new home address, it must either add the address to the
   corresponding SPD entries or create the SPD entries for the home
   address.

   The home agent should have named SPD entries per mobile node, based
   on the identity of the mobile node.  The identity of the mobile node
   is stored in the "Name" selector in the SPD [5].  The Home Address
   presented by the mobile node during the IKE negotiation is stored as
   the Remote IP address in the resultant IPsec security associations.
   The home agent MAY also have generic SPD entries to prevent mobility
   header traffic that requires IPsec protection from bypassing the
   IPsec filters.



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   The Mobility Header message type is negotiated by placing it in the
   most significant eight bits of the 16 bit local "port" selector
   during IKEv2 exchange.  For more details, refer to [5].  The TSi and
   TSr payloads in the above examples will contain many other selectors
   apart from home_address_1.  For the sake of brevity, they are not
   shown here.

6.1.2.  Return Routability Messages

   The following are the SPD entries on the mobile node and the home
   agent for protecting the Return Routability messages.

       mobile node SPD-S:
         - IF source = home_address_1 & destination = any &
              proto = MH & local_mh_type = HoTi &
              remote_mh_type = HoT
           Then use SA ESP tunnel mode
                       IDi = user_1, IDr = home_agent_1,
                       TSi = home_address_1, MH, HoTi
                       TSr = home_agent_1, MH, HoT
                       outer src addr = coa,
                       outer dst addr = home_agent_1,
                       inner src addr = home_address_1

       home agent SPD-S:
         - IF source = any & destination = home_address_1 &
              proto = MH & local_mh_type = HoT &
              remote_mh_type = HoTi
           Then use SA ESP tunnel mode
                       IDi = home_agent_1, IDr = user_1
                       TSi = home_agent_1, MH, HoT
                       TSr = home_address_1, MH, HoTi
                       outer src addr = home_agent_1,
                       outer dst addr = coa,
                       inner dst addr = home_address_1

   When the mobile node's Care-of Address changes the SPD entries on
   both the mobile node and the home agent must be updated.  The home
   agent knows about the change in Care-of Address of the mobile node
   when it receives a Binding Update from the mobile node.

6.1.3.  Mobile Prefix Discovery Messages

   The following are the SPD entries on the mobile node and the home
   agent for protecting Mobile Prefix Discovery messages.






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       mobile node SPD-S:
         - IF source = home_address_1 & destination = home_agent_1 &
              proto = ICMPv6 & local_mh_type = MPS &
              remote_mh_type = MPA
           Then use SA ESP transport mode
                       IDi = user_1, IDr = home_agent_1,
                       TSi = home_address_1, ICMPv6, MPS
                       TSr = home_agent_1, ICMPv6, MPA

        home agent SPD-S:
         - IF source = home_agent_1 & destination = home_address_1 &
              proto = ICMPv6 & local_mh_type = MPA &
              remote_mh_type = MPS
           Then use SA ESP transport mode
                       IDi = home_agent_1, IDr = user_1
                       TSi = home_agent_1, ICMPv6, MPA
                       TSr = home_address_1, ICMPv6, MPS

   In the examples shown above, the home address of the mobile node
   might not be available all the time.  When the mobile node acquires a
   new home address, it must add the address to the corresponding SPD
   entries.

   The TSi and TSr payloads in the above examples will contain many
   other selectors apart from home_address_1.  For brevity, they are not
   show here.

6.1.4.  Payload Packets

   The following are the SPD entries on the mobile node and the home
   agent if payload traffic exchanged between the mobile node and its
   Correspondent Node needs to be protected.  The SPD entries are
   similar to the entries for protecting Return Routability messages and
   have lower priority than the above SPD entries.

















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       mobile node SPD-S:
         - IF interface = IPv6 tunnel to home_agent_1 & proto = X
           Then use SA ESP tunnel mode
                           IDi = user_1,
                           outer src addr = coa
                           outer dst addr = home_agent_1,
                           inner src addr = home_address_1

         - IF destination = home_address_1 & proto = X &
              source = CN
           Then use SA ESP tunnel mode
                           IDi = user_1,
                           outer src addr = home_agent_1,
                           outer dst addr = coa,

       home agent SPD-S:
         - IF interface = IPv6 tunnel to home_address_1 & proto = X
           Then use SA ESP tunnel mode
                           IDr = user_1,
                           outer src addr = home_agent_1,
                           outer dst addr = coa,
                           inner dst addr = home_address_1

         - IF interface = IPv6 tunnel to home_address_1 & proto = X
           Then use SA ESP tunnel mode
                           IDr = user_1,
                           outer src addr = coa,
                           outer dst addr = home_agent_1,
                           inner src addr = home_address_1

6.2.  Security Association negotiation using IKEv2

   Mobile IPv6 signaling messages are typically initiated by the mobile
   node.  The mobile node sends a Binding Update to the home agent
   whenever it moves and acquires a new Care-of Address.

   The mobile node initiates an IKEv2 protocol exchange if the required
   security associations are not present.  The default mechanism used
   for mutual authentication is a shared secret between the mobile node
   and the home agent.  The home agent uses the identity of the mobile
   node to identify the corresponding shared secret.  If public key
   based mechanism is available, it should be the preferred mechanism
   for mutual authentication.  The home agent and the mobile node should
   use their private keys to generate the AUTH payload, when a public
   key based mechanism is used.  The mobile node and the home agent
   should use CERTREQ and CERT payloads if the identities need to be
   verified.  If the mobile node is configured with the home agent
   information including the public key that corresponds to the home



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   agent, then the mobile node MAY exclude the CERTREQ payload in
   message 3.  Similarly, the home agent MAY exclude the CERTREQ payload
   in message 2, if it is configured with the mobile node information.

   If a shared secret is being used, the mobile node uses the shared
   secret to generate the AUTH payload in the IKE_AUTH exchange.  If the
   mobile node is using a public key based mechanism, then it uses its
   private key to generate the AUTH payload in the IKE_AUTH exchange.

        Mobile Node                      Home Agent
        -----------                      ----------
        HDR, SAi1, KEi, Ni      -->

                               <--      HDR, SAr1, KEr, Nr, [CERTREQ]

        HDR, SK {IDi, [CERT,] [CERTREQ,] [IDr,]
                 AUTH, SAi2, TSi, TSr}
                                -->

                               <--      HDR, SK {IDr, [CERT,] AUTH,
                                                  SAr2, TSi, TSr}

   The mobile node should always includes its identity in the IDi
   payload in the IKE_AUTH exchange.  The mobile node could use the
   following different types of identities to identity itself to the
   home agent.

   o  Home Address - The mobile node could use its statically configured
      home address as its identity.  In this case the ID Type field is
      set to ID_IPV6_ADDR.
   o  FQDN - The mobile node can use a Fully Qualified Domain Name as
      the identifier and set the ID Type field to ID_FQDN.
   o  RFC 822 identifier - If the mobile node uses a RFC 822 identifier
      [10], it sets the ID Type field to ID_RFC822_ADDR.

   In the IKE_AUTH exchange, the mobile node includes the home address
   and the appropriate selectors in the TSi (Traffic Selector-initiator)
   payload to negotiate IPsec security associations for protecting the
   Binding Update and Binding Acknowledgement messages.  The mobile node
   MAY use a range of selectors that includes the mobility message types
   for Binding Update and Binding Acknowledgement to use the same pair
   of IPsec security association for both messages.

   After the IKE_AUTH exchange completes, the mobile node initiates
   CREATE_CHILD_SA exchanges to negotiate additional security
   associations for protecting Return Routability signaling, Mobile
   Prefix Discovery messages and optionally payload traffic.  The
   CREATE_CHILD_SA exchanges are protected by the security association



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   created during the IKE_AUTH exchange.  If a correspondent node that
   is also a mobile node, initiates the return routability exchange,
   then the home agent initiates the CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange to
   negotiate security associations for protecting Return Routabilty
   messages.

   It is important that the security associations are created based on
   the home address of the mobile node, so that the security
   associations survive Care-of Address change.  The mobile node MUST
   use its home address as the initiator IP address in the TSi payload
   in the CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange in order to create the security
   associations for the home address.

        Mobile Node                      Home Agent
        -----------                      ----------
        HDR, SK {[N], SA, Ni, [KEi],
                 [TSi, TSr]}    -->

                                <--      HDR, SK {SA, Nr, [KEr],
                                                  [TSi, TSr]}

   When PKI based authentication is used between the mobile node and the
   Home Agent, the identity presented by the mobile node in the IDi
   payload must correspond to the identity in the certificate fetched by
   the Home Agent.  The home agent uses the identity presented in the
   IDi payload to lookup the policy and the certificate that corresponds
   to the mobile node.  If the mobile node presents its home address in
   the IDi payload, then the home agent MUST verify that the home
   address matches the address in the iPAddress field in the
   SubjectAltName extension [9].

   If the mobile node had used its home address in the IDi field,
   implementations are required to match the source address in the outer
   most IP header with the IP address in the IDi field [9].  This
   verification step, however, should be configurable [9].  With Mobile
   IPv6, this verification step will always fail because the source
   address in the outer most IP header is the care-of address and the IP
   address in the IDi field is the home address.  Therefore, this
   verification step should be skipped.

6.3.  Movements and Dynamic Keying

   If the mobile node moves and its care-of address changes, the IKEv2
   SA might not be valid, unless the mobility extensions defined in [13]
   are implemented by both the mobile node and the home agent.  RFC 3775
   defines a mechanism based on the successful exchange of Binding
   Update and Binding Acknowledgement messages.  The IKE SA endpoints
   are updated on the home agent when it receives the Binding Update



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   from the mobile node's new care-of address and on the mobile node
   when it receives the Binding acknowledgement sent by the home agent.
   This capability to change IKE endpoints is indicated through setting
   the Key Management Capability (K) flag [2] in the Binding Update and
   Binding Acknowledgement messages.  If the mobile node or the home
   agent does not support this capability, then an IKEv2 exchange MUST
   be initiated to re-establish the IKE SA.


7.  The use of EAP authentication

   In addition to using public key signatures and shared secrets, EAP
   [11] can be used with IKEv2 for authenticating the mobile node to the
   home agent.

   The mobile node indicates that it wants to use EAP by including the
   IDi payload but leaving out the AUTH payload in the first message
   during the IKE_AUTH exchange.  The home agent then includes an EAP
   payload if it is willing to use an extensible authentication method.
   Security associations are not created until the subsequent IKE_AUTH
   exchange after successful EAP authentication.  The use of EAP adds at
   least two round trips to the IKE negotiation.

        Mobile Node                     Home Agent
        ------------                    ----------
        HDR, SAi1, KEi, Ni      -->

                                <--     HDR, SAr1, KEr, Nr, [CERTREQ]

        HDR, SK {IDi, [CERTREQ,] [IDr,]
                 SAi2, TSi, TSr}-->

                                <--     HDR, SK {IDr, [CERT,] AUTH,
                                                 EAP }

        HDR, SK {EAP}           -->

                                <--     HDR, SK {EAP (success)}

        HDR, SK {AUTH}          -->

                                <--     HDR, SK {AUTH, SAr2, TSi,
                                                 TSr}

   Some EAP methods generate a shared key on the mobile node and the
   Home Agent once the EAP authentication succeeds.  In this case, the
   shared key is used to generate the AUTH payloads in the subsequent
   messages.  The shared key, if used to generate the AUTH payloads,



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   MUST NOT be used for any other purpose.  For more details, refer to
   [4].

   The use of EAP between the mobile node and the home agent might
   require the home agent to contact an authorization server like the
   AAA Home server, on the home link, to authenticate the mobile node.
   Please refer to [7] for more details.

   The IKEv2 specification [4] requires that public key based mechanism
   be used to authenticate the home agent to the mobile node, when EAP
   is used.  This should be used by default by the mobile node and the
   home agent.  If the EAP method that is used, supports mutual
   authentication and key generation, then the mobile node MAY use EAP
   itself to authenticate the home agent.  The mobile node can request
   this by including the EAP_ONLY_AUTHENTICATION notification payload
   [8] in message 3.  If the home agent supports the
   EAP_ONLY_AUTHENTICATION notification payload and agrees to use EAP,
   it omits the public key based AUTH and CERT payloads in message 4.
   If the home agent does not support this mechanism, it rejects it by
   including an AUTH payload in message 4.  More details can be found in
   [8].


8.  Dynamic Home Address Configuration

   The mobile node can dynamically configure a home address by including
   a Configuration Payload in the IKE_AUTH exchange, with a request for
   an address from the home link.  The mobile node should include an
   INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS attribute in the CFG_REQUEST Payload.  The
   mobile node MAY also include the INTERNAL_IP6_SUBNET attribute if it
   wants to obtain information about the IPv6 prefixes on the home link.
   If the mobile node wants to configure a DNS server from the home link
   it can request for the DNS server information by including an
   INTERNAL_IP6_DNS attribute in the CFG_REQUEST payload.

   When the home agent receives a configuration payload with a
   CFG_REQUEST for INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS, it replies with a valid home
   address for the mobile node.  The INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS attribute in
   the CFG_REPLY contains the prefix length of the home prefix in
   addition to a 128 bit home address.  The home agent could use a local
   database or contact a DHCPv6 server on the home link to allocate a
   home address.  The Home Agent should also include an
   INTERNAL_ADDRESS_EXPIRY attribute to indicate to the mobile node, the
   duration for which the dynamically allocated home address is valid.







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        Mobile Node                        Home Agent
        -----------                        ----------
        HDR, SK {IDi, [CERT,] [CERTREQ,]
                 [IDr,] AUTH, CP(CFG_REQUEST),
                 SAi2, TSi, TSr}
                                 -->

                                 <--   HDR, SK {IDr, [CERT,] AUTH,
                                                CP(CFG_REPLY), SAr2,
                                                TSi, TSr}

   The mobile node could suggest a home address that it wants to use in
   the CFG_REQUEST.  For example, this could be a home address that it
   was allocated before or could be an address the mobile node auto-
   configured from the IPv6 prefix on the home link.  The Home Agent
   could let the mobile node use the same home address by setting the
   INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS attribute in the CFG_REPLY payload to the same
   home address.  If the home agent wants the mobile node to use a
   different home address, it sends a new home address in the
   INTERNAL_IP_ADDRESS attribute in the CFG_REPLY payload.  The Mobile
   Node MUST stop using its old home address and start using the newly
   allocated home address.

   In case the home agent is unable to allocate a home address for the
   mobile node during the IKE_AUTH exchange, it MUST send a Notify
   Payload with an INTERNAL_ADDRESS_FAILURE message.


9.  Security Considerations

   This document describes how IPsec can be used to secure Mobile IPv6
   signaling messages.  Please refer to RFC 3775 for security
   considerations related to the use of IPsec with Mobile IPv6.

   A misbehaving mobile node could create IPsec security associations
   for a home address that belongs to another mobile node.  Therefore,
   the home agent should check if a particular mobile node is authorized
   to use a home address before creating IPsec security associations for
   the home address.  If the home address is assigned as described in
   Section 8, the home agent MUST associate the home address with the
   identity used in IKE negotiation.  The home agent MAY store the
   assigned home address in the SPD entries created for the mobile node.

   The use of EAP for authenticating the mobile node to the home agent
   is described in Section 7.  This document recommends that if the EAP
   method used, supports mutual authentication, then EAP itself be used
   for authenticating the home agent to the mobile node also.  This runs
   contrary to the recommendation in [4].  The home agent can ignore the



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   recommendation in this document and implement EAP authentication as
   described in the IKEv2 specification.  Security considerations
   related to the use of EAP with IKEv2 are described in [4] and [8].


10.  IANA Considerations

   This document requires no action from IANA.


11.  Acknowledgements

   The author would like to thank Mika Joutsenvirta, Pasi Eronen,
   Francis Dupont, Jari Arkko, Gerardo Giaretta and Shinta Sugimoto for
   reviewing the draft.

   Many of the requirements listed in Section 4 are copied from RFC
   3776.  Therefore, the authors of RFC 3776 are acknowledged.


12.  References

12.1.  Normative References

   [1]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement
        Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [2]  Johnson, D., Perkins, C., and J. Arkko, "Mobility Support in
        IPv6", RFC 3775, June 2004.

   [3]  Arkko, J., Devarapalli, V., and F. Dupont, "Using IPsec to
        Protect Mobile IPv6 Signaling Between Mobile Nodes and Home
        Agents", RFC 3776, June 2004.

   [4]  Kaufman, C., "Internet Key Exchange (IKEv2) Protocol",
        draft-ietf-ipsec-ikev2-17 (work in progress), October 2004.

   [5]  Kent, S. and K. Seo, "Security Architecture for the Internet
        Protocol", draft-ietf-ipsec-rfc2401bis-06 (work in progress),
        April 2005.

   [6]  Kent, S., "IP Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)",
        draft-ietf-ipsec-esp-v3-10 (work in progress), March 2005.

12.2.  Informative References

   [7]   Giaretta, G., "Goals for AAA-HA interface",
         draft-giaretta-mip6-aaa-ha-goals-00 (work in progress),



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         September 2004.

   [8]   Eronen, P., "Extension for EAP Authentication in IKEv2",
         draft-eronen-ipsec-ikev2-eap-auth-03 (work in progress),
         April 2005.

   [9]   Korver, B., "The Internet IP Security PKI Profile of IKEv1/
         ISAKMP, IKEv2, and PKIX",
         draft-ietf-pki4ipsec-ikecert-profile-05 (work in progress),
         August 2005.

   [10]  Crocker, D., "Standard for the format of ARPA Internet text
         messages", STD 11, RFC 822, August 1982.

   [11]  Aboba, B., Blunk, L., Vollbrecht, J., Carlson, J., and H.
         Levkowetz, "Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP)",
         RFC 3748, June 2004.

   [12]  Kent, S. and R. Atkinson, "Security Architecture for the
         Internet Protocol", RFC 2401, November 1998.

   [13]  Eronen, P., "IKEv2 Mobility and Multihoming Protocol (MOBIKE)",
         draft-ietf-mobike-protocol-01 (work in progress), July 2005.

   [14]  Sugimoto, S., "PF_KEY Extension as an Interface between Mobile
         IPv6 and IPsec/IKE", draft-sugimoto-mip6-pfkey-migrate-01 (work
         in progress), September 2005.
























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Author's Address

   Vijay Devarapalli
   Nokia Research Center
   313 Fairchild Drive
   Mountain View, CA  94043
   USA

   Email: vijay.devarapalli@nokia.com










































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