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Versions: (draft-ernst-nemo-terminology) 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 RFC 4885

NEMO Working Group                                              T. Ernst
Internet-Draft                                    Keio University / WIDE
Expires: April 27, 2006                                        H-Y. Lach
                                                           Motorola Labs
                                                        October 24, 2005


                  Network Mobility Support Terminology
                     draft-ietf-nemo-terminology-04

Status of this Memo

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 27, 2006.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2005).

Abstract

   This document defines a terminology for discussing network mobility
   issues and solution requirements.








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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4

   2.  Architectural Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     2.1.  Mobile Network (NEMO)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     2.2.  Mobile Router (MR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     2.3.  Egress Interface (E-face)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     2.4.  Ingress Interface (I-face) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     2.5.  Mobile Network Prefix (MNP)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     2.6.  NEMO-link  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     2.7.  Mobile Network Node (MNN)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     2.8.  Correspondent Node (CN)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     2.9.  Correspondent Router (CR)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     2.10. Correspondent Entity (CE)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8

   3.  Functional Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
     3.1.  Local Fixed Node (LFN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
     3.2.  Visiting Mobile Node (VMN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
     3.3.  Local Mobile Node (LMN)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     3.4.  NEMO-enabled node (NEMO-node)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     3.5.  MIPv6-enabled (MIPv6-node) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

   4.  Nested Mobility Terms  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
     4.1.  Nested Mobile Network (nested-NEMO)  . . . . . . . . . . . 11
     4.2.  root-NEMO  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
     4.3.  parent-NEMO  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
     4.4.  sub-NEMO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
     4.5.  root-MR  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
     4.6.  parent-MR  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
     4.7.  sub-MR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

   5.  Multihoming Terms  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
     5.1.  Multihomed host or MNN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
     5.2.  Multihomed Mobile Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
     5.3.  Multihomed Mobile Network (multihomed-NEMO)  . . . . . . . 14
     5.4.  Nested Multihomed Mobile Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
     5.5.  Illustration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

   6.  Home Network Model Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     6.1.  Home Link  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     6.2.  Home Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     6.3.  Home Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     6.4.  Mobile Home Network  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     6.5.  Distributed Home Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     6.6.  Mobile Aggregated Prefix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     6.7.  Aggregated Home Network  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     6.8.  Extended Home Network  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18



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     6.9.  Virtual Home Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

   7.  Mobility Support Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
     7.1.  Host Mobility Support  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
     7.2.  Network Mobility Support (NEMO Support)  . . . . . . . . . 19
     7.3.  NEMO Basic Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
     7.4.  NEMO Extended Support  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
     7.5.  MRHA Tunnel  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

   8.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

   9.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

   10. Acknowledgments  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

   11. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
     11.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
     11.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

   Appendix A.  Change Log From Earlier Versions  . . . . . . . . . . 24
     A.1.  Changes since draft-nemo-terminology-03.txt  . . . . . . . 24
     A.2.  Changes since draft-nemo-terminology-02.txt  . . . . . . . 24
     A.3.  Changes since draft-nemo-terminology-01.txt  . . . . . . . 24
     A.4.  Changes since draft-nemo-terminology-00.txt  . . . . . . . 25

   Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
   Intellectual Property and Copyright Statements . . . . . . . . . . 27
























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1.  Introduction

   Network mobility support is concerned with managing the mobility of
   an entire network.  This arises when a router connecting a network to
   the Internet dynamically changes its point of attachment to the fixed
   infrastructure, thereby causing the reachability of the entire
   network to be changed in relation to the fixed Internet topology.
   Such a network is referred to as a mobile network.  Without
   appropriate mechanisms to support network mobility, sessions
   established between nodes in the mobile network and the global
   Internet cannot be maintained after the mobile router changes its
   point of attachment.  As a result, existing sessions would break and
   connectivity to the global Internet would be lost.

   This document defines the specific terminology needed to describe the
   problem space, the design goals [1], and the solutions for network
   mobility support.  This terminology aims to be consistent with the
   usual IPv6 terminology [2] and the generic mobility-related terms
   already defined in the Mobility Related Terminology [3] and in the
   Mobile IPv6 specification [4].  Some terms introduced in this
   document may only be useful for defining the problem scope and
   functional requirements of network mobility support.

   Note that the abbreviation NEMO stands for either "a NEtwork that is
   MObile" or "NEtwork MObility".  The former (see Section 2.1) is used
   as a noun, e.g. "a NEMO" meaning "a mobile network".  The latter (see
   Section 7) refers to the concept of "network mobility" as in "NEMO
   Basic Support" and is also the working group's name.

   Section 2 introduces terms to define the architecture while terms
   needed to emphasize the distinct functionalities of those
   architectural components are described in Section 3.  Section 4,
   Section 5 and Section 6 describe terms pertaining to nested mobility,
   multihoming and different configurations of mobile networks at home,
   respectively.  The different types of mobility are defined in
   Section 7.  The last section lists miscellaneous terms which do not
   fit in any other section.














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2.  Architectural Components

   A mobile network is composed of one or more mobile IP-subnets (NEMO-
   link) and is viewed as a single unit.  This network unit is connected
   to the Internet by means of one or more mobile routers (MRs).  Nodes
   behind the MR (referred to as MNNs) primarily comprise fixed nodes
   (nodes unable to change their point of attachment while maintaining
   ongoing sessions), and possibly mobile nodes (nodes able to change
   their point of attachment while maintaining ongoing sessions).  In
   most cases, the internal structure of the mobile network will be
   stable (no dynamic change of the topology), but this is not always
   true.

   Figure 1 illustrates the architectural components involved in network
   mobility and defined in the following paragraphs: Mobile Router (MR),
   NEMO-link, Mobile Network Node (MNN), "ingress interface", "egress
   interface", and Correspondent Node (CN).  The other terms "access
   router" (AR), "Fixed Node (FN)", "Mobile Node (MN)", "home agent"
   (HA), "home link" and "foreign link" are not terms specific to
   network mobility and thus are defined in [3].

                     _
               CN ->|_|-| Internet
                        |  _____
                        |-|     |       |<- home link
                       _  |     |-|  _  |  _
                    |-|_|-|_____| |-|_|-|-|_|<- HA (Home Agent)
                    |  \                |  _
     foreign link ->|  ^                |-|_|<- MR (Mobile Router)
                       .. AR (access    ___|___
                             router)     _|  |_
                                        |_|  |_|
                                         ^    ^
                                      MNN1    MNN2


   Figure 1: Mobile Network on the Home Link

   Figure 2 shows a single mobile subnetwork.  Figure 3 illustrates a
   larger mobile network comprising several subnetworks, attached to a
   foreign link.










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                             _
                       CN ->|_|-|
                                |  _____
                   _  |         |-|     |       |<- home link
                  |_|-|  _  |  _  |     |-|  _  |  _
         2 MNNs -> _  |-|_|-|-|_|-|_____| |-|_|-|-|_|<- HA
                  |_|-|  .  |  \             \  |
                      |  .  |<- foreign      ^AR
   single NEMO-link ->   .       link
                         .
                         ^ MR


   Figure 2: Single Mobile Subnetwork on a Foreign Link

   At the network layer, MRs get access to the global Internet from the
   Access Router(s) (AR) on a visited link.  An MR maintains the
   Internet connectivity for the entire mobile network.  A given MR has
   one or more egress interface and one or more ingress interface.  When
   forwarding a packet to the Internet, the packet is transmitted
   upstream through one of the MR's egress interfaces to the AR; when
   forwarding a packet from the AR down to the mobile network, the
   packet is transmitted downstream through one of the MR's ingress
   interfaces.

2.1.  Mobile Network (NEMO)

   As defined in [3]:

   An entire network, moving as a unit, which dynamically changes its
   point of attachment to the Internet and thus its reachability in the
   topology.  The mobile network is composed of one or more IP-subnets
   and is connected to the global Internet via one or more Mobile
   Routers (MR).  The internal configuration of the mobile network is
   assumed to be relatively stable with respect to the MR.

   Re-arrangement of the mobile network and changing the attachment
   point of the egress interface to the foreign link are orthogonal
   processes and do no affect each other.

2.2.  Mobile Router (MR)

   As defined in [3]:

   A router capable of changing its point of attachment to the Internet,
   moving from one link to another link.  The MR is capable of
   forwarding packets between two or more interfaces, and possibly
   running a dynamic routing protocol modifying the state by which it



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   does packet forwarding.

   An MR acts as a gateway between an entire mobile network and the rest
   of the Internet, and has one or more egress interface and one or more
   ingress interface.  Packets forwarded upstream to the rest of the
   Internet are transmitted through one of the MR's egress interfaces;
   packets forwarded downstream to the mobile network are transmitted
   through one of the MR's ingress interfaces.

2.3.  Egress Interface (E-face)

   As defined in [3]:

   The network interface of an MR attached to the home link if the MR is
   at home, or attached to a foreign link if the MR is in a foreign
   network.

2.4.  Ingress Interface (I-face)

   As defined in [3]:

   The interface of an MR attached to a link inside the mobile network.

2.5.  Mobile Network Prefix (MNP)

   As defined in [3]:

   A bit string that consists of some number of initial bits of an IP
   address which identifies the entire mobile network within the
   Internet topology.  All nodes in a mobile network necessarily have an
   address containing this prefix.

2.6.  NEMO-link

   A link (subnet) which comprises, or is located within, the mobile
   network.

2.7.  Mobile Network Node (MNN)

   As defined in [3]:

   Any node (host or router) located within a mobile network, either
   permanently or temporarily.  A Mobile Network Node may either be a
   fixed node (LFN) or a mobile node (VMN or LMN).

2.8.  Correspondent Node (CN)

   Any node that is communicating with one or more MNNs.  A CN could be



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   either located within a fixed network or within another mobile
   network, and could be either fixed or mobile.

2.9.  Correspondent Router (CR)

   This refers to the entity which is capable of terminating a Route
   Optimization [7] session on behalf of a Correspondent Node.

2.10.  Correspondent Entity (CE)

   This refers to the entity which a Mobile Router or Mobile Network
   Node attempts to establish a Route Optimization session with.
   Depending on the Route Optimization approach [7], the Correspondent
   Entity maybe a Correspondent Node or Correspondent Router.





































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3.  Functional Terms

                              _
                         CN->|_|-|
        NEMO-link 1->|           |  _____
                  _  |           |-|     |       |<- home link
           MNN1->|_|-|'i'_'e'|  _  |     |-|  _  |  _
                     |--|_|--|-|_|-|_____| |-|_|-|-|_|<- HA
                      'i'|   |  \                |
                     ____|__ |
        NEMO-link 2-^ _| .   |<- foreign
                     |_| .       link
               MNN2 -^   .
                         ^
                         MR

   'i': MR's ingress interface
   'e': MR's egress interface

   Figure 3: Larger Mobile Network with 2 subnets

   Within the term Mobile Network Node (MNN), we can distinguish between
   Local Fixed Nodes (LFN), Visiting Mobile Nodes (VMN) and Local Mobile
   Nodes (LMN).  The distinction is a property of how different types of
   nodes can move in the topology and is necessary to discuss issues
   related to mobility management and access control; however it does
   not imply that network mobility or host mobility should be handled
   differently.  Nodes are classified according to their function and
   capabilities with the rationale that nodes with different properties
   may have different requirements.

3.1.  Local Fixed Node (LFN)

   A fixed node (FN), either a host or a router, that belongs to the
   mobile network and is unable to change its point of attachment while
   maintaining ongoing sessions.  Its address is located within an MNP.

3.2.  Visiting Mobile Node (VMN)

   Either a mobile node (MN) or a mobile router (MR), assigned to a home
   link that doesn't belong to the mobile network and which is able to
   change its point of attachment while maintaining ongoing sessions.  A
   VMN that is temporarily attached to a NEMO-link (used as a foreign
   link) obtains an address on that link (i.e. the address is taken from
   an MNP).  Figure 4 illustrates a VMN changing its point of attachment
   from its HA to within a mobile network.





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3.3.  Local Mobile Node (LMN)

   Either a mobile node (MN) or a mobile router (MR), assigned to a home
   link belonging to the mobile network and which is able to change its
   point of attachment while maintaining ongoing sessions.  Its address
   is taken from an MNP.  Figure 4 illustrates a LMN changing its point
   of attachment within the mobile network.

3.4.  NEMO-enabled node (NEMO-node)

   A node that has been extended with network mobility support
   capabilities as described in NEMO specifications.

   In NEMO Basic Support [5], only the MR and the HA are NEMO-enabled.

   For NEMO Extended Support, details of the capabilities are not known
   yet at the time of this writing, but NEMO-enabled nodes may be
   expected to implement some sort of Route Optimization.



   NEMO-link 1 |  _      +++++++<<<+++++++++++
               |-|_|-|   +                   +
      ++<<<LMN-|  \  |   +                 |-MR
      +              |   +          _____  |  _ HA_MR
      +        |  _  |   +         |     |-|-|_|
      + LMN _  |-|_|-|   _   |  _  |     |    _
      ++++>|_|-|  \  |--|_|--|-|_|-|_____|-|-|_|
               |     |   ^   |  \          |    HA_VMN
        VMN _  |         MR                |
           |_|-|                           |-VMN
           ^    NEMO-link 2                   +
           +                                  +
           ++++++++<<<+++++++++++++++++++++++++


   +++>+++ = changing point of attachment

   Figure 4: LFN vs LMM vs VMN

3.5.  MIPv6-enabled (MIPv6-node)

   A node which has been extended with host mobility support
   capabilities as defined in the Mobile IPv6 specification [4].







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4.  Nested Mobility Terms

   Nested mobility occurs when there is more than one level of mobility,
   i.e. when a mobile network acts as an access network and allows
   visiting nodes to attach to it.  There are two cases of nested
   mobility:

   o  The attaching node is a single VMN (see Figure 4).  For instance,
      when a passenger carrying a mobile phone gets Internet access from
      the public access network deployed on a bus.

   o  The attaching node is a MR with nodes behind it, i.e. a mobile
      network (see Figure 5).  For instance, when a passenger carrying a
      PAN gets Internet access from the public access network deployed
      on a bus.

   For the second case, we introduce the following terms:

4.1.  Nested Mobile Network (nested-NEMO)

   A mobile network is said to be nested when a mobile network (sub-
   NEMO) is attached to a larger mobile network (parent-NEMO).  The
   aggregated hierarchy of mobile networks becomes a single nested
   mobile network (see Figure 5).

4.2.  root-NEMO

   The mobile network at the top of the hierarchy connecting the
   aggregated nested mobile networks to the Internet (see Figure 5).

4.3.  parent-NEMO

   The upstream mobile network providing Internet access to another
   mobile network further down the hierarchy (see Figure 5).

4.4.  sub-NEMO

   The downstream mobile network attached to another mobile network up
   in the hierarchy.  It becomes subservient of the parent-NEMO.  The
   sub-NEMO is getting Internet access through the parent-NEMO and does
   not provide Internet access to the parent-NEMO (see Figure 5).

4.5.  root-MR

   The MR(s) of the root-NEMO used to connect the nested mobile network
   to the fixed Internet (see Figure 5).  Note: was referred to as
   "TMLR" (Top-Level Mobile Router) in former versions of this document
   .



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4.6.  parent-MR

   The MR(s) of the parent-NEMO.

4.7.  sub-MR

   The MR(s) of the sub-NEMO which is connected to a parent-NEMO


                                               _____
                             _  |        _    |     |
                       _  |-|_|-|  _  |-|_|-|-|     |-|        _
                 _  |-|_|-|  \  |-|_|-|  \  | |_____| |  _  |-|_|
           _  |-|_|-|     |           |     |         |-|_|-|
          |_|-|  \  |                                    \  |
              |

          MNN   AR  sub-MR  AR  root-MR AR              AR   HA

          <--------------><----------><----><---------><-------->
              sub-NEMO     root-NEMO    fl   Internet   Home Network



   Figure 5: Nested Mobility: a sub-NEMO attached to a larger mobile
   network

























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5.  Multihoming Terms

   Multihoming, as currently defined by the IETF, covers site-
   multihoming [8] and host multihoming.  We enlarge this terminology to
   include "multihomed mobile router" and "multihomed mobile network".
   The specific configurations and issues pertaining to multihomed
   mobile networks are covered in [9].

5.1.  Multihomed host or MNN

   A host (e.g. an MNN) is multihomed when it has several IPv6 addresses
   to choose between, i.e. in the following cases when it is either:

      Multi-prefixed: multiple prefixes are advertised on the link(s)
      the host is attached to, or

      Multi-interfaced: the host has multiple interfaces to choose
      between, on the same link or not.

5.2.  Multihomed Mobile Router

   From the definition of a multihomed host, it follows that a mobile
   router is multihomed when it has several IPv6 addresses to choose
   between, i.e. in the following cases when the MR is either:

      Multi-prefixed: multiple prefixes are advertised on the link(s) an
      MR's egress interface is attached to, or.

      Multi-interfaced: the MR has multiple egress interfaces to choose
      between, on the same link or not (see Figure 6).



                                   _____
                   _           _  |     |
                  |_|-|  _  |-|_|-|     |-|        _
                   _  |-|_|=|  \  |_____| |  _  |-|_|
                  |_|-|     |             |-|_|-|
                                             \  |
                  MNNs   MR   AR  Internet   AR    HA



   Figure 6: Multihoming: MR with multiple E-faces







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5.3.  Multihomed Mobile Network (multihomed-NEMO)

   A mobile network is multihomed when either a MR is multihomed or
   there are multiple MRs to choose between, or multiple prefixes are
   advertised in the mobile network.



                        MR1
                         _  |
                   _  |-|_|-|  _____
                  |_|-|     |-|     |
             MNNs  _  |       |     |-|        _
                  |_|-|  _  |-|_____| |  _  |-|_|
                      |-|_|-|         |-|_|-|
                            |               |
                        MR2


   Figure 7: Multihoming: Single NEMO-link with Multiple MRs

5.4.  Nested Multihomed Mobile Network

   A nested mobile network is multihomed when either a root-MR is
   multihomed or there are multiple root-MRs to choose between or
   multiple prefixes are advertised in the nested mobile network.

5.5.  Illustration

   Figure 6 and Figure 7 show two examples of multihomed mobile
   networks.  Figure 8 shows two independent mobile networks.  NEMO-1 is
   single-homed to the Internet through MR1.  NEMO-2 is multihomed to
   the Internet through MR2a and MR2b.  Both mobile networks offer
   access to visiting nodes and networks through an AR.

   Let's consider the two following nested scenarios in Figure 8:

   Scenario 1: What happens when MR2a's egress interface is attached to
   AR1 ?



      *  NEMO-2 becomes subservient of NEMO-1

      *  NEMO-1 becomes the parent-NEMO for NEMO-2 and the root-NEMO for
         the aggregated nested mobile network





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      *  NEMO-2 becomes the sub-NEMO

      *  MR1 is the root-MR for the aggregated nested mobile network

      *  MR2a is a sub-MR in the aggregated nested mobile network

      *  NEMO-2 is still multihomed to the Internet through AR1 and ARz

      *  The aggregated nested mobile network is not multihomed, since
         NEMO-2 cannot be used as a transit network for NEMO-1

   Scenario 2: What happens when MR1's egress interface is attached to
   AR2 ?



      *  NEMO-1 becomes subservient of NEMO-2

      *  NEMO-1 becomes the sub-NEMO

      *  NEMO-2 becomes the parent_NEMO for NEMO-1 and also the root-
         NEMO for the aggregated nested mobile network

      *  MR2a and MR2b are both root-MRs for the aggregated nested
         mobile network

      *  MR1 is a sub-MR in the aggregated nested mobile network

      *  NEMO-1 is not multihomed

      *  The aggregated nested mobile network is multihomed





                   _  |  _  |
                  |_|-|-|_|-|  _   _____
    NEMO-1    MNNs _  | MR1 |-|_|-|     |
                  |_|-|       ARx |     |-|        _
               AR1 \  |     |  _  |     | |  _  |-|_|
                         _  |-|_|-|     | |-|_|-|
                   _  |-|_|-| ARy |     |       |
                  |_|-| MR2a   _  |     |
    NEMO-2    MNNs _  |     |-|_|-|     |
                  |_|-|  _  | ARz |_____|
                   \  |-|_|-|
               AR2      MR2b



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   Figure 8: Nested Multihomed NEMO


















































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6.  Home Network Model Terms

   The terms in this section are useful to describe the possible
   configurations of mobile networks at the home.  Such configurations
   are detailed in [6]

6.1.  Home Link

   The link attached to the interface at the Home Agent on which the
   Home Prefix is configured.  The interface can be a virtual interface,
   in which case the Home Link is a Virtual Home Link.

6.2.  Home Network

   The Network formed by the application of the Home Prefix to the Home
   Link.  With NEMO, the concept of Home Network is extended as
   explained below.

6.3.  Home Address

   With Mobile IPv6, a Home Address is derived from the Home Network
   prefix.  This is generalized in NEMO, with some limitations: A Home
   Address can be derived either from the Home Network or from one of
   the Mobile Router's MNPs.

6.4.  Mobile Home Network

   A Mobile Network that hosts a Home Agent and mobile nodes.  The
   Mobile Network serves as the Home Network for the mobile nodes in the
   Mobile Network.  The MR that owns the MNP acts as the Home Agent for
   the Mobile Home Network.

6.5.  Distributed Home Network

   A Distributed Home Network is a collection of geographically
   distributed Home Networks each served by a Home Agent.  The same home
   prefix is advertised in all the Home Networks.  The distributed Home
   Networks maybe connected using a mesh of IPsec protected tunnels.

6.6.  Mobile Aggregated Prefix

   An aggregation of Mobile Network Prefixes that is in turn advertised
   as the Home Link Prefix.

6.7.  Aggregated Home Network

   The Home Network associated with a Mobile Aggregated Prefix.  This
   Aggregation is advertised as a subnet on the Home Link, and thus used



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   as Home Network for NEMO purposes.

6.8.  Extended Home Network

   The network associated with the aggregation of one or more Home
   Network(s) and Mobile Network(s).  As opposed to the Mobile IPv6 Home
   Network that is a subnet, the extended Home Network is an aggregation
   and is further subnetted.

6.9.  Virtual Home Network

   An aggregation of Mobile Network Prefixes that is in turn advertised
   as the Home Link Prefix.  The Extended Home Network and the
   Aggregated Home Network can be configured as Virtual Home Network.





































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7.  Mobility Support Terms

7.1.  Host Mobility Support

   Host Mobility Support is a mechanism which maintains session
   continuity between mobile nodes and their correspondents upon the
   mobile host's change of point of attachment.  It can be achieved
   using Mobile IPv6 or other mobility support mechanisms.

7.2.  Network Mobility Support (NEMO Support)

   Network Mobility Support is a mechanism which maintains session
   continuity between mobile network nodes and their correspondents upon
   a mobile router's change of point of attachment.  Solutions for this
   problem are classified into NEMO Basic Support, and NEMO Extended
   Support.

7.3.  NEMO Basic Support

   NEMO Basic Support is a solution to preserve session continuity by
   means of bi-directional tunneling between MRs and their HAs much like
   what is done with Mobile IPv6 [4] for mobile nodes when Routing
   Optimization is not used.  Only the HA and the MR are NEMO-enabled.
   The solution for doing this is solely specified in [5].

7.4.  NEMO Extended Support

   NEMO Extended support is to provide the necessary optimization,
   including routing optimization between arbitrary MNNs and CNs.

7.5.  MRHA Tunnel

   The bi-directional tunnel between a Mobile Router and its Home Agent.


















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8.  Security Considerations

   As this document only provides terminology and describes neither a
   protocol nor an implementation or a procedure, there are no security
   considerations associated with it.














































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9.  IANA Considerations

   This document requires no IANA actions.
















































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10.  Acknowledgments

   The material presented in this document takes most of the text from
   internet-drafts submitted to the former MobileIP WG and the MONET
   BOF.  The authors would therefore like to thank both Motorola Labs
   Paris and INRIA (PLANETE team, Grenoble, France) where this
   terminology originated, for the opportunity to bring it to the IETF,
   and particularly Claude Castelluccia for his advice, suggestion, and
   direction, Alexandru Petrescu and Christophe Janneteau.  We also
   acknowledge input from Hesham Soliman, Mattias Petterson, Marcelo
   Bagnulo, TJ Kniveton and numerous other people from the NEMO Working
   Group.  The Home Network Model section is contributed by Pascal
   Thubert, Ryuji Wakikawa and Vijay Devaparalli.






































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11.  References

11.1.  Normative References

   [1]  Ernst, T., "Network Mobility Support Goals and Requirements",
        draft-ietf-nemo-requirements-05 (work in progress),
        October 2005.

   [2]  Deering, S. and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6)",
        IETF RFC 2460, December 1998.

   [3]  Manner, J. and M. Kojo, "Mobility Related Terminology",
        RFC 3753, June 2004.

   [4]  Johnson, D., Perkins, C., and J. Arkko, "Mobility Support in
        IPv6", RFC 3775, June 2004.

   [5]  Devarapalli, V., Wakikawa, R., Petrescu, A., and P. Thubert,
        "Network Mobility (NEMO) Basic Support Protocol", RFC 3963,
        January 2005.

   [6]  Thubert, P., Wakikawa, R., and V. Devarapalli, "NEMO Home
        Network Models", draft-ietf-nemo-home-network-models-05 (work in
        progress), June 2005.

11.2.  Informative References

   [7]  Ng, C., "Network Mobility Route Optimization Problem Statement",
        draft-ietf-nemo-ro-problem-statement-01 (work in progress),
        October 2005.

   [8]  Abley, J., Black, B., and V. Gill, "Goals for IPv6 Site-
        Multihoming Architectures", RFC 3582, August 2003.

   [9]  Ng, C., Ernst, T., Paik, E., and M. Bagnulo, "Analysis of
        Multihoming in Network Mobility Support",
        draft-ietf-nemo-multihoming-issues-04 (work in progress),
        October 2005.













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Appendix A.  Change Log From Earlier Versions

   The discussions behind the changes in the lattest versions of this
   documents are reflected in the "issue" web page:
   http://www.sfc.wide.ad.jp/~ernst/nemo/

A.1.  Changes since draft-nemo-terminology-03.txt

   Updated the Home Network Model section with new definitions provided
   by Vijay

   Added definitions of CR and CE as suggested by the RO PB Statement
   and Analysis authors [7]

A.2.  Changes since draft-nemo-terminology-02.txt

   - Issue A18: Redesigned Figure 3

   - Issue A22: The follolwing comment added in the definition of
   "Mobile Network": "Re-arrangement of the mobile network and changing
   the attachment point of the egress interface to the foreign link are
   orthogonal processes and do no affect each other." (as suggested by
   TJ)

   - Issue A23: Clarified in definition of "NEMO-link" that the link may
   comprise the mobile network: "A link (subnet) which comprises, or is
   located within, the mobile network." (as suggested by TJ)

   - Issue A24: Removed definition of CR (as suggested by TJ)

   - Issue A25: Removed the miscellaneous terms "Idle MNN" and "Idle
   mobile network" (as suggested by TJ)

   - Issue A26: English brush up.

A.3.  Changes since draft-nemo-terminology-01.txt

   - Shorten abstract.

   - Reshaped some figures.

   - LFN, VMN, LMN: said that the node is able/unable to move while
   maintaining/not maintaining ongoing sessions.  Text already
   appareared in the document, but not in the definition itself.

   - NEMO-enabled: said that MR and HA are the only NEMO-enabled nodes
   in NEMO Basic Support




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   - Removed "NEMO-enabled MR" as this definition is self-contained into
   "NEMO-enabled Node"

   - Rephrased the definition of "multihomed host", "multihomed router",
   "multihomed mobile network" and removed the terms multi-addressed and
   multi-sited, multi-rooted-NEMO, etc.  Such terms were not so useful,
   and somewhat too long.

   - Added the case "multiple MNPs are advertised" to the definition of
   mobile network

   - Copy-pasted terms defined from RFC 3753 so that the document is
   self-contained

   - Updated References

   - Added new term "Correspondent Router"

   - Permanently removed NEMO-Prefix.  Only MNP will be used

   - Added terms "Mobile Home Network" and "Distributed Home Network" in
   the Home Network Model section.  These 2 terms were provided by
   Pascal Thubert on July 30th 2004

A.4.  Changes since draft-nemo-terminology-00.txt

   - NEMO will be used either as the concept for NEtwork MObility and a
   noun meaning "NEtwork that is MObile"

   - Deprecated TMLR and MONET.

   - Added NEMO-prefix, NEMO-link, NEMO-enabled MR.

   - Precision that IP address of LFN, LMN, or VMN is taken from a MNP

   - Added abbreviation E-face (Egress interface) and I-face (Ingress
   interface)

   - Some re-ordering of terms, and a few typos.

   - Added some text from the usage draft-thubert-usages (now home
   network model draft-ietf-nemo-home-network-models)









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Authors' Addresses

   Thierry Ernst
   Keio University / WIDE
   Jun Murai Lab., Keio University.
   K-square Town Campus, 1488-8 Ogura, Saiwa-Ku
   Kawasaki, Kanagawa  212-0054
   Japan

   Phone: +81-44-580-1600
   Fax:   +81-44-580-1437
   Email: ernst@sfc.wide.ad.jp
   URI:   http://www.sfc.wide.ad.jp/~ernst/


   Hong-Yon Lach
   Motorola Labs Paris
   Espace Technologique - Saint Aubin
   Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex,   91 193
   France

   Phone: +33-169-35-25-36
   Fax:
   Email: hong-yon.lach@motorola.com
   URI:


























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