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Versions: (draft-schoenw-netmod-yang-types) 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 RFC 6021

Network Working Group                              J. Schoenwaelder, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                         Jacobs University
Intended status: Standards Track                        February 3, 2010
Expires: August 7, 2010


                         Common YANG Data Types
                    draft-ietf-netmod-yang-types-06

Abstract

   This document introduces a collection of common data types to be used
   with the YANG data modeling language.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
   other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
   Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt.

   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.

   This Internet-Draft will expire on August 7, 2010.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must



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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the BSD License.

   This document may contain material from IETF Documents or IETF
   Contributions published or made publicly available before November
   10, 2008.  The person(s) controlling the copyright in some of this
   material may not have granted the IETF Trust the right to allow
   modifications of such material outside the IETF Standards Process.
   Without obtaining an adequate license from the person(s) controlling
   the copyright in such materials, this document may not be modified
   outside the IETF Standards Process, and derivative works of it may
   not be created outside the IETF Standards Process, except to format
   it for publication as an RFC or to translate it into languages other
   than English.


Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.  Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   3.  Core YANG Derived Types  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
   4.  Internet Specific Derived Types  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
   5.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
   6.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
   7.  Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
   8.  Acknowledgments  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
   9.  References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
     9.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
     9.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
   Author's Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31




















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1.  Introduction

   YANG [YANG] is a data modeling language used to model configuration
   and state data manipulated by the NETCONF [RFC4741] protocol.  The
   YANG language supports a small set of built-in data types and
   provides mechanisms to derive other types from the built-in types.

   This document introduces a collection of common data types derived
   from the built-in YANG data types.  The definitions are organized in
   several YANG modules.  The "ietf-yang-types" module contains
   generally useful data types.  The "ietf-inet-types" module contains
   definitions that are relevant for the Internet protocol suite.

   The derived types are generally designed to be applicable for
   modeling all areas of management information.

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "NOT RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and
   "OPTIONAL" in this document are to be interpreted as described in BCP
   14, [RFC2119].































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2.  Overview

   This section provides a short overview over the types defined in
   subsequent sections and their equivalent SMIv2 data types.  A YANG
   data type is equivalent to an SMIv2 data type if the data types have
   the same set of values and the semantics of the values are
   equivalent.

   Table 1 lists the types defined in the ietf-yang-types YANG module
   and the corresponding SMIv2 types (if any).

                              ietf-yang-types

        +-----------------------+--------------------------------+
        | YANG type             | Equivalent SMIv2 type (module) |
        +-----------------------+--------------------------------+
        | counter32             | Counter32 (SNMPv2-SMI)         |
        | zero-based-counter32  | ZeroBasedCounter32 (RMON2-MIB) |
        | counter64             | Counter64 (SNMPv2-SMI)         |
        | zero-based-counter64  | ZeroBasedCounter64 (HCNUM-TC)  |
        | gauge32               | Gauge32 (SNMPv2-SMI)           |
        | gauge64               | CounterBasedGauge64 (HCNUM-TC) |
        | object-identifier     | -                              |
        | object-identifier-128 | OBJECT IDENTIFIER              |
        | date-and-time         | -                              |
        | timeticks             | TimeTicks (SNMPv2-SMI)         |
        | timestamp             | TimeStamp (SNMPv2-TC)          |
        | phys-address          | PhysAddress (SNMPv2-TC)        |
        | mac-address           | MacAddress (SNMPv2-TC)         |
        | xpath1.0              | -                              |
        +-----------------------+--------------------------------+

                                  Table 1

   Table 2 lists the types defined in the ietf-inet-types YANG module
   and the corresponding SMIv2 types (if any).















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                              ietf-inet-types

    +-----------------+-----------------------------------------------+
    | YANG type       | Equivalent SMIv2 type (module)                |
    +-----------------+-----------------------------------------------+
    | ip-version      | InetVersion (INET-ADDRESS-MIB)                |
    | dscp            | Dscp (DIFFSERV-DSCP-TC)                       |
    | ipv6-flow-label | IPv6FlowLabel (IPV6-FLOW-LABEL-MIB)           |
    | port-number     | InetPortNumber (INET-ADDRESS-MIB)             |
    | as-number       | InetAutonomousSystemNumber (INET-ADDRESS-MIB) |
    | ip-address      | -                                             |
    | ipv4-address    | -                                             |
    | ipv6-address    | -                                             |
    | ip-prefix       | -                                             |
    | ipv4-prefix     | -                                             |
    | ipv6-prefix     | -                                             |
    | domain-name     | -                                             |
    | host            | -                                             |
    | uri             | Uri (URI-TC-MIB)                              |
    +-----------------+-----------------------------------------------+

                                  Table 2





























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3.  Core YANG Derived Types

   <CODE BEGINS> file "ietf-yang-types@2010-02-03.yang"

 module ietf-yang-types {

   namespace "urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:yang:ietf-yang-types-DRAFT-06";
   prefix "yang";

   organization
    "IETF NETMOD (NETCONF Data Modeling Language) Working Group";

   contact
    "WG Web:   <http://tools.ietf.org/wg/netmod/>
     WG List:  <mailto:netmod@ietf.org>

     WG Chair: David Partain
               <mailto:david.partain@ericsson.com>

     WG Chair: David Kessens
               <mailto:david.kessens@nsn.com>

     Editor:   Juergen Schoenwaelder
               <mailto:j.schoenwaelder@jacobs-university.de>";

   description
    "This module contains a collection of generally useful derived
     YANG data types.

     Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as
     the document authors.  All rights reserved.

     Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or
     without modification, is permitted pursuant to, and subject
     to the license terms contained in, the Simplified BSD License
     set forth in Section 4.c of the IETF Trust's Legal Provisions
     Relating to IETF Documents
     (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info).

     This version of this YANG module is part of RFC XXXX; see
     the RFC itself for full legal notices.";
   // RFC Ed.: replace XXXX with actual RFC number and remove this note

   // RFC Ed.: remove this note
   // Note: extracted from draft-ietf-netmod-yang-types-05.txt

   revision 2010-02-03 {
     description



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      "Initial revision.";
     reference
      "RFC XXXX: Common YANG Data Types";
   }
   // RFC Ed.: replace XXXX with actual RFC number and remove this note

   /*** collection of counter and gauge types ***/

   typedef counter32 {
     type uint32;
     description
      "The counter32 type represents a non-negative integer
       which monotonically increases until it reaches a
       maximum value of 2^32-1 (4294967295 decimal), when it
       wraps around and starts increasing again from zero.

       Counters have no defined `initial' value, and thus, a
       single value of a counter has (in general) no information
       content.  Discontinuities in the monotonically increasing
       value normally occur at re-initialization of the
       management system, and at other times as specified in the
       description of a schema node using this type.  If such
       other times can occur, for example, the creation of an
       a schema node of type counter32 at times other than
       re-initialization, then a corresponding schema node
       should be defined, with an appropriate type, to indicate
       the last discontinuity.

       The counter32 type should not be used for configuration
       schema nodes. A default statement should not be used for
       attributes with a type value of counter32.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the Counter32 type of the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC 2578: Structure of Management Information Version 2 (SMIv2)";
   }

   typedef zero-based-counter32 {
     type yang:counter32;
     default "0";
     description
      "The zero-based-counter32 type represents a counter32
       which has the defined `initial' value zero.

       Schema nodes of this type will be set to zero(0) on creation
       and will thereafter increase monotonically until it reaches
       a maximum value of 2^32-1 (4294967295 decimal), when it



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       wraps around and starts increasing again from zero.

       Provided that an application discovers a new schema node
       of this type within the minimum time to wrap it can use the
       initial value as a delta.  It is important for a management
       station to be aware of this minimum time and the actual time
       between polls, and to discard data if the actual time is too
       long or there is no defined minimum time.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the ZeroBasedCounter32 textual convention of the SMIv2.";
     reference
       "RFC 4502: Remote Network Monitoring Management Information
                  Base Version 2 using SMIv2";
   }

   typedef counter64 {
     type uint64;
     description
      "The counter64 type represents a non-negative integer
       which monotonically increases until it reaches a
       maximum value of 2^64-1 (18446744073709551615 decimal),
       when it wraps around and starts increasing again from zero.

       Counters have no defined `initial' value, and thus, a
       single value of a counter has (in general) no information
       content.  Discontinuities in the monotonically increasing
       value normally occur at re-initialization of the
       management system, and at other times as specified in the
       description of a schema node using this type.  If such
       other times can occur, for example, the creation of
       a schema node of type counter64 at times other than
       re-initialization, then a corresponding schema node
       should be defined, with an appropriate type, to indicate
       the last discontinuity.

       The counter64 type should not be used for configuration
       schema nodes. A default statement should not be used for
       attributes with a type value of counter64.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the Counter64 type of the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC 2578: Structure of Management Information Version 2 (SMIv2)";
   }

   typedef zero-based-counter64 {
     type yang:counter64;



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     default "0";
     description
      "The zero-based-counter64 type represents a counter64 which
       has the defined `initial' value zero.

       Schema nodes of this type will be set to zero(0) on creation
       and will thereafter increase monotonically until it reaches
       a maximum value of 2^64-1 (18446744073709551615 decimal),
       when it wraps around and starts increasing again from zero.

       Provided that an application discovers a new schema node
       of this type within the minimum time to wrap it can use the
       initial value as a delta.  It is important for a management
       station to be aware of this minimum time and the actual time
       between polls, and to discard data if the actual time is too
       long or there is no defined minimum time.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the ZeroBasedCounter64 textual convention of the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC 2856: Textual Conventions for Additional High Capacity
                 Data Types";
   }

   typedef gauge32 {
     type uint32;
     description
      "The gauge32 type represents a non-negative integer, which
       may increase or decrease, but shall never exceed a maximum
       value, nor fall below a minimum value.  The maximum value
       cannot be greater than 2^32-1 (4294967295 decimal), and
       the minimum value cannot be smaller than 0.  The value of
       a gauge32 has its maximum value whenever the information
       being modeled is greater than or equal to its maximum
       value, and has its minimum value whenever the information
       being modeled is smaller than or equal to its minimum value.
       If the information being modeled subsequently decreases
       below (increases above) the maximum (minimum) value, the
       gauge32 also decreases (increases).

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the Gauge32 type of the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC 2578: Structure of Management Information Version 2 (SMIv2)";
   }

   typedef gauge64 {
     type uint64;



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     description
      "The gauge64 type represents a non-negative integer, which
       may increase or decrease, but shall never exceed a maximum
       value, nor fall below a minimum value.  The maximum value
       cannot be greater than 2^64-1 (18446744073709551615), and
       the minimum value cannot be smaller than 0.  The value of
       a gauge64 has its maximum value whenever the information
       being modeled is greater than or equal to its maximum
       value, and has its minimum value whenever the information
       being modeled is smaller than or equal to its minimum value.
       If the information being modeled subsequently decreases
       below (increases above) the maximum (minimum) value, the
       gauge64 also decreases (increases).

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the CounterBasedGauge64 SMIv2 textual convention defined
       in RFC 2856";
     reference
      "RFC 2856: Textual Conventions for Additional High Capacity
                 Data Types";
   }

   /*** collection of identifier related types ***/

   typedef object-identifier {
     type string {
       pattern '(([0-1](\.[1-3]?[0-9]))|(2\.(0|([1-9]\d*))))'
             + '(\.(0|([1-9]\d*)))*';
     }
     description
      "The object-identifier type represents administratively
       assigned names in a registration-hierarchical-name tree.

       Values of this type are denoted as a sequence of numerical
       non-negative sub-identifier values. Each sub-identifier
       value MUST NOT exceed 2^32-1 (4294967295). Sub-identifiers
       are separated by single dots and without any intermediate
       white space.

       Although the number of sub-identifiers is not limited,
       module designers should realize that there may be
       implementations that stick with the SMIv2 limit of 128
       sub-identifiers.

       This type is a superset of the SMIv2 OBJECT IDENTIFIER type
       since it is not restricted to 128 sub-identifiers.";
     reference
      "ISO/IEC 9834-1: Information technology -- Open Systems



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       Interconnection -- Procedures for the operation of OSI
       Registration Authorities: General procedures and top
       arcs of the ASN.1 Object Identifier tree";
   }

   typedef object-identifier-128 {
     type object-identifier {
       pattern '\d*(\.\d*){1,127}';
     }
     description
      "This type represents object-identifiers restricted to 128
       sub-identifiers.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the OBJECT IDENTIFIER type of the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC 2578: Structure of Management Information Version 2 (SMIv2)";
   }

   /*** collection of date and time related types ***/

   typedef date-and-time {
     type string {
       pattern '\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}T\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}(\.\d+)?'
             + '(Z|[\+|-]\d{2}:\d{2})';
     }
     description
      "The date-and-time type is a profile of the ISO 8601
       standard for representation of dates and times using the
       Gregorian calendar. The format is most easily described
       using the following ABFN (replacing double quotes with
       single quotes):

       date-fullyear   = 4DIGIT
       date-month      = 2DIGIT  ; 01-12
       date-mday       = 2DIGIT  ; 01-28, 01-29, 01-30, 01-31
       time-hour       = 2DIGIT  ; 00-23
       time-minute     = 2DIGIT  ; 00-59
       time-second     = 2DIGIT  ; 00-58, 00-59, 00-60
       time-secfrac    = '.' 1*DIGIT
       time-numoffset  = ('+' / '-') time-hour ':' time-minute
       time-offset     = 'Z' / time-numoffset

       partial-time    = time-hour ':' time-minute ':' time-second
                         [time-secfrac]
       full-date       = date-fullyear '-' date-month '-' date-mday
       full-time       = partial-time time-offset




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       date-time       = full-date 'T' full-time

       The date-and-time type is consistent with the semantics defined
       in RFC 3339. The date-and-time type is compatible with the
       dateTime XML schema type with the following two notable
       exceptions:

       (a) The date-and-time type does not allow negative years.

       (b) The date-and-time time-offset -00:00 indicates an unknown
           time zone (see RFC 3339) while -00:00 and +00:00 and Z all
           represent the same time zone in dateTime.

       (c) The canonical format (see below) of data-and-time values
           differs from the canonical format used by the dateTime XML
           schema type, which requires all times to be in UTC using the
           time-offset 'Z'.

       This type is not equivalent to the DateAndTime textual
       convention of the SMIv2 since RFC 3339 uses a different
       separator between full-date and full-time and provides
       higher resolution of time-secfrac.

       The canonical format for date-and-time values with a known time
       zone uses a numeric time zone offset that is calculated using
       the device's configured known offset to UTC time. A change of
       the device's offset to UTC time will cause date-and-time values
       to change accordingly.  Such changes might happen periodically
       in case a server follows automatically daylight saving time
       (DST) time zone offset changes. The canonical format for
       date-and-time values with an unknown time zone (usually refering
       to the notion of local time) uses the time-offset -00:00.";
     reference
      "RFC 3339: Date and Time on the Internet: Timestamps
       RFC 2579: Textual Conventions for SMIv2
       W3C REC-xmlschema-2-20041028: XML Schema Part 2: Datatypes
                 Second Edition";
   }

   typedef timeticks {
     type uint32;
     description
      "The timeticks type represents a non-negative integer which
       represents the time, modulo 2^32 (4294967296 decimal), in
       hundredths of a second between two epochs. When a schema
       node is defined which uses this type, the description of
       the schema node identifies both of the reference epochs.




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       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the TimeTicks type of the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC 2578: Structure of Management Information Version 2 (SMIv2)";
   }

   typedef timestamp {
     type yang:timeticks;
     description
      "The timestamp type represents the value of an associated
       timeticks schema node at which a specific occurrence happened.
       The specific occurrence must be defined in the description
       of any schema node defined using this type.  When the specific
       occurrence occurred prior to the last time the associated
       timeticks attribute was zero, then the timestamp value is
       zero.  Note that this requires all timestamp values to be
       reset to zero when the value of the associated timeticks
       attribute reaches 497+ days and wraps around to zero.

       The associated timeticks schema node must be specified
       in the description of any schema node using this type.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the TimeStamp textual convention of the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC 2579: Textual Conventions for SMIv2";
   }

   /*** collection of generic address types ***/

   typedef phys-address {
     type string {
       pattern '([0-9a-fA-F]{2}(:[0-9a-fA-F]{2})*)?';
     }
     description
      "Represents media- or physical-level addresses represented
       as a sequence octets, each octet represented by two hexadecimal
       numbers. Octets are separated by colons. The canonical
       representation uses lower-case characters.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the PhysAddress textual convention of the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC 2579: Textual Conventions for SMIv2";
   }

   typedef mac-address {
     type string {



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       pattern '[0-9a-fA-F]{2}(:[0-9a-fA-F]{2}){5}';
     }
     description
      "The mac-address type represents an IEEE 802 MAC address.
       The canonical representation uses lower-case characters.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent to
       the MacAddress textual convention of the SMIv2.";
     reference
       "IEEE 802: IEEE Standard for Local and Metropolitan Area
                  Networks: Overview and Architecture
        RFC 2579: Textual Conventions for SMIv2";
   }

   /*** collection of XML specific types ***/

   typedef xpath1.0 {
     type string;
     description
      "This type represents an XPATH 1.0 expression.

       When a schema node is defined which uses this type, the
       description of the schema node MUST specify the XPath
       context in which the XPath expression is evaluated.";
     reference
      "W3C REC-xpath-19991116: XML Path Language (XPath) Version 1.0";
   }

 }

   <CODE ENDS>




















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4.  Internet Specific Derived Types

   <CODE BEGINS> file "ietf-inet-types@2010-02-03.yang"

 module ietf-inet-types {

   namespace "urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:yang:ietf-inet-types-DRAFT-06";
   prefix "inet";

   organization
    "IETF NETMOD (NETCONF Data Modeling Language) Working Group";

   contact
    "WG Web:   <http://tools.ietf.org/wg/netmod/>
     WG List:  <mailto:netmod@ietf.org>

     WG Chair: David Partain
               <mailto:david.partain@ericsson.com>

     WG Chair: David Kessens
               <mailto:david.kessens@nsn.com>

     Editor:   Juergen Schoenwaelder
               <mailto:j.schoenwaelder@jacobs-university.de>";

   description
    "This module contains a collection of generally useful derived
     YANG data types for Internet addresses and related things.

     Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as
     the document authors.  All rights reserved.

     Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or
     without modification, is permitted pursuant to, and subject
     to the license terms contained in, the Simplified BSD License
     set forth in Section 4.c of the IETF Trust's Legal Provisions
     Relating to IETF Documents
     (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info).

     This version of this YANG module is part of RFC XXXX; see
     the RFC itself for full legal notices.";
   // RFC Ed.: replace XXXX with actual RFC number and remove this note

   // RFC Ed.: remove this note
   // Note: extracted from draft-ietf-netmod-yang-types-05.txt

   revision 2010-02-03 {
     description



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      "Initial revision.";
     reference
      "RFC XXXX: Common YANG Data Types";
   }
   // RFC Ed.: replace XXXX with actual RFC number and remove this note

   /*** collection of protocol field related types ***/

   typedef ip-version {
     type enumeration {
       enum unknown {
         value "0";
         description
          "An unknown or unspecified version of the Internet protocol.";
       }
       enum ipv4 {
         value "1";
         description
          "The IPv4 protocol as defined in RFC 791.";
       }
       enum ipv6 {
         value "2";
         description
          "The IPv6 protocol as defined in RFC 2460.";
       }
     }
     description
      "This value represents the version of the IP protocol.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the InetVersion textual convention of the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC  791: Internet Protocol
       RFC 2460: Internet Protocol, Version 6 (IPv6) Specification
       RFC 4001: Textual Conventions for Internet Network Addresses";
   }

   typedef dscp {
     type uint8 {
       range "0..63";
     }
     description
      "The dscp type represents a Differentiated Services Code-Point
       that may be used for marking packets in a traffic stream.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the Dscp textual convention of the SMIv2.";
     reference



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      "RFC 3289: Management Information Base for the Differentiated
                 Services Architecture
       RFC 2474: Definition of the Differentiated Services Field
                 (DS Field) in the IPv4 and IPv6 Headers
       RFC 2780: IANA Allocation Guidelines For Values In
                 the Internet Protocol and Related Headers";
   }

   typedef ipv6-flow-label {
     type uint32 {
       range "0..1048575";
     }
     description
      "The flow-label type represents flow identifier or Flow Label
       in an IPv6 packet header that may be used to discriminate
       traffic flows.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the IPv6FlowLabel textual convention of the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC 3595: Textual Conventions for IPv6 Flow Label
       RFC 2460: Internet Protocol, Version 6 (IPv6) Specification";
   }

   typedef port-number {
     type uint16 {
       range "1..65535";
     }
     description
      "The port-number type represents a 16-bit port number of an
       Internet transport layer protocol such as UDP, TCP, DCCP or
       SCTP. Port numbers are assigned by IANA.  A current list of
       all assignments is available from <http://www.iana.org/>.

       Note that the value zero is not a valid port number. A union
       type might be used in situations where the value zero is
       meaningful.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the InetPortNumber textual convention of the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC  768: User Datagram Protocol
       RFC  793: Transmission Control Protocol
       RFC 4960: Stream Control Transmission Protocol
       RFC 4340: Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP)
       RFC 4001: Textual Conventions for Internet Network Addresses";
   }




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   /*** collection of autonomous system related types ***/

   typedef as-number {
     type uint32;
     description
       "The as-number type represents autonomous system numbers
        which identify an Autonomous System (AS). An AS is a set
        of routers under a single technical administration, using
        an interior gateway protocol and common metrics to route
        packets within the AS, and using an exterior gateway
        protocol to route packets to other ASs'. IANA maintains
        the AS number space and has delegated large parts to the
        regional registries.

        Autonomous system numbers were originally limited to 16
        bits. BGP extensions have enlarged the autonomous system
        number space to 32 bits. This type therefore uses an uint32
        base type without a range restriction in order to support
        a larger autonomous system number space.

        This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
        to the InetAutonomousSystemNumber textual convention of
        the SMIv2.";
     reference
      "RFC 1930: Guidelines for creation, selection, and registration
                 of an Autonomous System (AS)
       RFC 4271: A Border Gateway Protocol 4 (BGP-4)
       RFC 4893: BGP Support for Four-octet AS Number Space
       RFC 4001: Textual Conventions for Internet Network Addresses";
   }

   /*** collection of IP address and hostname related types ***/

   typedef ip-address {
     type union {
       type inet:ipv4-address;
       type inet:ipv6-address;
     }
     description
      "The ip-address type represents an IP address and is IP
       version neutral. The format of the textual representations
       implies the IP version.";
   }

   typedef ipv4-address {
     type string {
       pattern '(([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9]|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.){3}'
             + '([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9]|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])'



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             + '(%[\p{N}\p{L}]+)?';
     }
     description
       "The ipv4-address type represents an IPv4 address in
        dotted-quad notation. The IPv4 address may include a zone
        index, separated by a % sign.

        The zone index is used to disambiguate identical address
        values.  For link-local addresses, the zone index will
        typically be the interface index number or the name of an
        interface. If the zone index is not present, the default
        zone of the device will be used.

        The canonical format for the zone index is the numerical
        format";
   }

   typedef ipv6-address {
     type string {
       pattern '((:|[0-9a-fA-F]{0,4}):)([0-9a-fA-F]{0,4}:){0,5}'
             + '((([0-9a-fA-F]{0,4}:)?(:|[0-9a-fA-F]{0,4}))|'
             + '(((25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9]?[0-9])\.){3}'
             + '(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9]?[0-9])))'
             + '(%[\p{N}\p{L}]+)?';
       pattern '(([^:]+:){6}(([^:]+:[^:]+)|(.*\..*)))|'
             + '((([^:]+:)*[^:]+)?::(([^:]+:)*[^:]+)?)'
             + '(%.+)?';
     }
     description
      "The ipv6-address type represents an IPv6 address in full,
       mixed, shortened and shortened mixed notation.  The IPv6
       address may include a zone index, separated by a % sign.

       The zone index is used to disambiguate identical address
       values.  For link-local addresses, the zone index will
       typically be the interface index number or the name of an
       interface. If the zone index is not present, the default
       zone of the device will be used.

       The canonical format of IPv6 addresses uses the compressed
       format described in RFC 4291 section 2.2 item 2 with the
       following additional rules: The :: substitution must be
       applied to the longest sequence of all-zero 16-bit chunks
       in an IPv6 address. If there is a tie, the first sequence
       of all-zero 16-bit chunks is replaced by ::. Single
       all-zero 16-bit chunks are not compressed. The canonical
       format uses lower-case characters and leading zeros are
       not allowed. The canonical format for the zone index is



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       the numerical format as described in RFC 4007 section 
       11.2.";
     reference
      "RFC 4291: IP Version 6 Addressing Architecture
       RFC 4007: IPv6 Scoped Address Architecture
       IDv6TREP: A Recommendation for IPv6 Address Text Representation";
   }

   typedef ip-prefix {
     type union {
       type inet:ipv4-prefix;
       type inet:ipv6-prefix;
     }
     description
      "The ip-prefix type represents an IP prefix and is IP
       version neutral. The format of the textual representations
       implies the IP version.";
   }

   typedef ipv4-prefix {
     type string {
       pattern '(([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9]|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.){3}'
             + '([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9]|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])'
             + '/(([0-9])|([1-2][0-9])|(3[0-2]))';
     }
     description
      "The ipv4-prefix type represents an IPv4 address prefix.
       The prefix length is given by the number following the
       slash character and must be less than or equal to 32.

       A prefix length value of n corresponds to an IP address
       mask which has n contiguous 1-bits from the most
       significant bit (MSB) and all other bits set to 0.

       The canonical format of an IPv4 prefix has all bits of
       the IPv4 address set to zero that are not part of the
       IPv4 prefix.";
   }

   typedef ipv6-prefix {
     type string {
       pattern '((:|[0-9a-fA-F]{0,4}):)([0-9a-fA-F]{0,4}:){0,5}'
             + '((([0-9a-fA-F]{0,4}:)?(:|[0-9a-fA-F]{0,4}))|'
             + '(((25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9]?[0-9])\.){3}'
             + '(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9]?[0-9])))'
             + '(/(([0-9])|([0-9]{2})|(1[0-1][0-9])|(12[0-8])))';
       pattern '(([^:]+:){6}(([^:]+:[^:]+)|(.*\..*)))|'
             + '((([^:]+:)*[^:]+)?::(([^:]+:)*[^:]+)?)'



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             + '(/.+)';
     }
     description
      "The ipv6-prefix type represents an IPv6 address prefix.
       The prefix length is given by the number following the
       slash character and must be less than or equal 128.

       A prefix length value of n corresponds to an IP address
       mask which has n contiguous 1-bits from the most
       significant bit (MSB) and all other bits set to 0.

       The IPv6 address should have all bits that do not belong
       to the prefix set to zero.

       The canonical format of an IPv6 prefix has all bits of
       the IPv6 address set to zero that are not part of the
       IPv6 prefix. Furthermore, IPv6 address is represented
       in the compressed format described in RFC 4291 section 
       2.2 item 2 with the following additional rules: The ::
       substitution must be applied to the longest sequence of
       all-zero 16-bit chunks in an IPv6 address. If there is
       a tie, the first sequence of all-zero 16-bit chunks is
       replaced by ::. Single all-zero 16-bit chunks are not
       compressed. The canonical format uses lower-case
       characters and leading zeros are not allowed.";
     reference
      "RFC 4291: IP Version 6 Addressing Architecture";
   }

   /*** collection of domain name and URI types ***/

   typedef domain-name {
     type string {
       pattern '((([a-zA-Z0-9_]([a-zA-Z0-9\-_]){0,61})?[a-zA-Z0-9]\.)*'
            +  '([a-zA-Z0-9_]([a-zA-Z0-9\-_]){0,61})?[a-zA-Z0-9]\.?)'
            +  '|\.';
       length "1..253";
     }
     description
      "The domain-name type represents a DNS domain name. The
       name SHOULD be fully qualified whenever possible.

       Internet domain names are only loosely specified. Section
       3.5 of RFC 1034 recommends a syntax (modified in section
       2.1 of RFC 1123). The pattern above is intended to allow
       for current practise in domain name use, and some possible
       future expansion. It is designed to hold various types of
       domain names, including names used for A or AAAA records



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       (host names) and other records, such as SRV records. Note
       that Internet host names have a stricter syntax (described
       in RFC 952) than the DNS recommendations in RFCs 1034 and
       1123, and that systems that want to store host names in
       schema nodes using the domain-name type are recommended to
       adhere to this stricter standard to ensure interoperability.

       The encoding of DNS names in the DNS protocol is limited
       to 255 characters. Since the encoding consists of labels
       prefixed by a length bytes and there is a trailing NULL
       byte, only 253 characters can appear in the textual dotted
       notation.

       The description clause of schema nodes using the domain-name
       type MUST describe when and how these names are resolved to
       IP addresses. Note that the resolution of a domain-name value
       may require to query multiple DNS records (e.g., A for IPv4
       and AAAA for IPv6). The order of the resolution process and
       which DNS record takes precedence can either be defined
       explicitely or it may depend on the configuration of the
       resolver.

       The canonical format for domain-name values uses the
       US-ASCII encoding and case-insensitive characters are set
       to lowercase.";
     reference
      "RFC  952: DoD Internet Host Table Specification
       RFC 1034: Domain Names - Concepts and Facilities
       RFC 1123: Requirements for Internet Hosts -- Application
                 and Support
       RFC 3490: Internationalizing Domain Names in Applications
                 (IDNA)";
   }

   typedef host {
     type union {
       type inet:ip-address;
       type inet:domain-name;
     }
     description
      "The host type represents either an IP address or a DNS
       domain name.";
   }

   typedef uri {
     type string;
     description
      "The uri type represents a Uniform Resource Identifier



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       (URI) as defined by STD 66.

       Objects using the uri type MUST be in US-ASCII encoding,
       and MUST be normalized as described by RFC 3986 Sections
       6.2.1, 6.2.2.1, and 6.2.2.2.  All unnecessary
       percent-encoding is removed, and all case-insensitive
       characters are set to lowercase except for hexadecimal
       digits, which are normalized to uppercase as described in
       Section 6.2.2.1.

       The purpose of this normalization is to help provide
       unique URIs.  Note that this normalization is not
       sufficient to provide uniqueness.  Two URIs that are
       textually distinct after this normalization may still be
       equivalent.

       Objects using the uri type may restrict the schemes that
       they permit.  For example, 'data:' and 'urn:' schemes
       might not be appropriate.

       A zero-length URI is not a valid URI.  This can be used to
       express 'URI absent' where required.

       This type is in the value set and its semantics equivalent
       to the Uri SMIv2 textual convention defined in RFC 5017.";
     reference
      "RFC 3986: Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax
       RFC 3305: Report from the Joint W3C/IETF URI Planning Interest
                 Group: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs), URLs,
                 and Uniform Resource Names (URNs): Clarifications
                 and Recommendations
       RFC 5017: MIB Textual Conventions for Uniform Resource
                 Identifiers (URIs)";
   }

 }

   <CODE ENDS>













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5.  IANA Considerations

   This document registers two URIs in the IETF XML registry [RFC3688].
   Following the format in RFC 3688, the following registration is
   requested.

     URI: urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:yang:ietf-yang-types
     URI: urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:yang:ietf-inet-types

     Registrant Contact: The NETMOD WG of the IETF.

     XML: N/A, the requested URI is an XML namespace.

   This document registers two YANG modules in the YANG Module Names
   registry [YANG].

     name:         ietf-yang-types
     namespace:    urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:yang:ietf-yang-types
     prefix:       yang
     reference:    RFCXXXX

     name:         ietf-inet-types
     namespace:    urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:yang:ietf-inet-types
     prefix:       inet
     reference:    RFCXXXX


























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6.  Security Considerations

   This document defines common data types using the YANG data modeling
   language.  The definitions themselves have no security impact on the
   Internet but the usage of these definitions in concrete YANG modules
   might have.  The security considerations spelled out in the YANG
   specification [YANG] apply for this document as well.












































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7.  Contributors

   The following people contributed significantly to the initial version
   of this draft:

    - Andy Bierman (Netconf Central)
    - Martin Bjorklund (Tail-f Systems)
    - Balazs Lengyel (Ericsson)
    - David Partain (Ericsson)
    - Phil Shafer (Juniper Networks)









































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8.  Acknowledgments

   The editor wishes to thank the following individuals for providing
   helpful comments on various versions of this document: Ladislav
   Lhotka, Lars-Johan Liman, Dan Romascanu.














































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9.  References

9.1.  Normative References

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [RFC3688]  Mealling, M., "The IETF XML Registry", BCP 81, RFC 3688,
              January 2004.

   [YANG]     Bjorklund, M., Ed., "YANG - A data modeling language for
              NETCONF", draft-ietf-netmod-yang-10 (work in progress).

9.2.  Informative References

   [IDv6TREP]
              Kawamura, S. and M. Kawashima, "A Recommendation for IPv6
              Address Text Representation",
              draft-ietf-6man-text-addr-representation-04 (work in
              progress).

   [IEEE802]  IEEE, "IEEE Standard for Local and Metropolitan Area
              Networks: Overview and Architecture", IEEE Std. 802-2001.

   [RFC0768]  Postel, J., "User Datagram Protocol", STD 6, RFC 768,
              August 1980.

   [RFC0791]  Postel, J., "Internet Protocol", STD 5, RFC 791,
              September 1981.

   [RFC0793]  Postel, J., "Transmission Control Protocol", STD 7,
              RFC 793, September 1981.

   [RFC0952]  Harrenstien, K., Stahl, M., and E. Feinler, "DoD Internet
              host table specification", RFC 952, October 1985.

   [RFC1034]  Mockapetris, P., "Domain names - concepts and facilities",
              STD 13, RFC 1034, November 1987.

   [RFC1123]  Braden, R., "Requirements for Internet Hosts - Application
              and Support", STD 3, RFC 1123, October 1989.

   [RFC1930]  Hawkinson, J. and T. Bates, "Guidelines for creation,
              selection, and registration of an Autonomous System (AS)",
              BCP 6, RFC 1930, March 1996.

   [RFC2460]  Deering, S. and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol, Version 6
              (IPv6) Specification", RFC 2460, December 1998.



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   [RFC2474]  Nichols, K., Blake, S., Baker, F., and D. Black,
              "Definition of the Differentiated Services Field (DS
              Field) in the IPv4 and IPv6 Headers", RFC 2474,
              December 1998.

   [RFC2578]  McCloghrie, K., Ed., Perkins, D., Ed., and J.
              Schoenwaelder, Ed., "Structure of Management Information
              Version 2 (SMIv2)", STD 58, RFC 2578, April 1999.

   [RFC2579]  McCloghrie, K., Ed., Perkins, D., Ed., and J.
              Schoenwaelder, Ed., "Textual Conventions for SMIv2",
              STD 58, RFC 2579, April 1999.

   [RFC2780]  Bradner, S. and V. Paxson, "IANA Allocation Guidelines For
              Values In the Internet Protocol and Related Headers",
              BCP 37, RFC 2780, March 2000.

   [RFC2856]  Bierman, A., McCloghrie, K., and R. Presuhn, "Textual
              Conventions for Additional High Capacity Data Types",
              RFC 2856, June 2000.

   [RFC3289]  Baker, F., Chan, K., and A. Smith, "Management Information
              Base for the Differentiated Services Architecture",
              RFC 3289, May 2002.

   [RFC3305]  Mealling, M. and R. Denenberg, "Report from the Joint W3C/
              IETF URI Planning Interest Group: Uniform Resource
              Identifiers (URIs), URLs, and Uniform Resource Names
              (URNs): Clarifications and Recommendations", RFC 3305,
              August 2002.

   [RFC3339]  Klyne, G., Ed. and C. Newman, "Date and Time on the
              Internet: Timestamps", RFC 3339, July 2002.

   [RFC3490]  Faltstrom, P., Hoffman, P., and A. Costello,
              "Internationalizing Domain Names in Applications (IDNA)",
              RFC 3490, March 2003.

   [RFC3595]  Wijnen, B., "Textual Conventions for IPv6 Flow Label",
              RFC 3595, September 2003.

   [RFC3986]  Berners-Lee, T., Fielding, R., and L. Masinter, "Uniform
              Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax", STD 66,
              RFC 3986, January 2005.

   [RFC4001]  Daniele, M., Haberman, B., Routhier, S., and J.
              Schoenwaelder, "Textual Conventions for Internet Network
              Addresses", RFC 4001, February 2005.



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   [RFC4007]  Deering, S., Haberman, B., Jinmei, T., Nordmark, E., and
              B. Zill, "IPv6 Scoped Address Architecture", RFC 4007,
              March 2005.

   [RFC4271]  Rekhter, Y., Li, T., and S. Hares, "A Border Gateway
              Protocol 4 (BGP-4)", RFC 4271, January 2006.

   [RFC4291]  Hinden, R. and S. Deering, "IP Version 6 Addressing
              Architecture", RFC 4291, February 2006.

   [RFC4340]  Kohler, E., Handley, M., and S. Floyd, "Datagram
              Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP)", RFC 4340, March 2006.

   [RFC4502]  Waldbusser, S., "Remote Network Monitoring Management
              Information Base Version 2", RFC 4502, May 2006.

   [RFC4741]  Enns, R., "NETCONF Configuration Protocol", RFC 4741,
              December 2006.

   [RFC4893]  Vohra, Q. and E. Chen, "BGP Support for Four-octet AS
              Number Space", RFC 4893, May 2007.

   [RFC4960]  Stewart, R., "Stream Control Transmission Protocol",
              RFC 4960, September 2007.

   [RFC5017]  McWalter, D., "MIB Textual Conventions for Uniform
              Resource Identifiers (URIs)", RFC 5017, September 2007.

   [RFC5226]  Narten, T. and H. Alvestrand, "Guidelines for Writing an
              IANA Considerations Section in RFCs", BCP 26, RFC 5226,
              May 2008.




















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Author's Address

   Juergen Schoenwaelder (editor)
   Jacobs University

   Email: j.schoenwaelder@jacobs-university.de













































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