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Versions: 00 01 02 03 04 05 RFC 6860

OSPF Working Group                                               Y. Yang
Internet-Draft                                             Cisco Systems
Intended status: Standards Track                               A. Retana
Expires: December 3, 2011                            Hewlett-Packard Co.
                                                                  A. Roy
                                                           Cisco Systems
                                                            June 1, 2011

                  Hiding Transit-only Networks in OSPF
                 <draft-ietf-ospf-prefix-hiding-00.txt>

Abstract

   A transit-only network is defined as a network connecting routers
   only.  In OSPF, transit-only networks are usually configured with
   routable IP addresses, which are advertised in LSAs but not needed
   for data traffic.  In addition, remote attacks can be launched
   against routers by sending packets to these transit-only networks.
   This document presents a mechanism to hide transit-only networks to
   speed up network convergence and minimize remote attack
   vulnerability.


Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 3, 2011.












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Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.





































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Table of Contents

   1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
      1.1. Requirements notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   2. Hiding IPv4 Transit-only Networks in OSPFv2  . . . . . . . . . . 4
      2.1. Point-to-Point Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
         2.1.1. Advertising Point-to-Point Networks  . . . . . . . . . 4
         2.1.2. Hiding Point-to-Point Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
      2.2. Broadcast Networks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
         2.2.1. Advertising Broadcast Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
         2.2.2. Hiding Broadcast Networks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
            2.2.2.1. Sending Network LSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
            2.2.2.2. Receiving Network LSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
               2.2.2.2.1. Backward Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . 6
      2.3. Non-Broadcast Networks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
         2.3.1. NBMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
         2.3.2. Point-to-MultiPoint  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
            2.3.2.1. Advertising Point-to-MultiPoint Networks  . . . . 8
            2.3.2.2. Hiding Point-to-MultiPoint Networks . . . . . . . 8
   3. Hiding IPv6 Transit-only Networks in OSPFv3  . . . . . . . . . . 9
   4. Hiding AF Enabled Transit-only Networks in OSPFv3  . . . . . . . 9
   5. Operational Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   6. Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   7. IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   8. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
      8.1. Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
      8.2. Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   Appendix A. Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11


1. Introduction

   A transit-only network is defined as a network connecting routers
   only.  In OSPF, transit-only networks are usually configured with
   routable IP addresses, which are advertised in LSAs but not needed
   for data traffic.  In addition, remote attacks can be launched
   against routers by sending packets to these transit-only networks.
   This document presents a mechanism to hide transit-only networks to
   speed up network convergence and minimize remote attack
   vulnerability.

   Hiding transit-only networks will not impact reachability to the end
   hosts.

1.1. Requirements notation

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",



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   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [KEYWORD].


2. Hiding IPv4 Transit-only Networks in OSPFv2

   In [OSPFv2], networks are classified as point-to-point, broadcast, or
   non-broadcast.  In the following sections, we will review how these
   OSPF networks are being advertised and discuss how to hide them
   consequently.


2.1. Point-to-Point Networks

   A point-to-point network joins a single pair of routers. Figure 1
   shows a point-to-point network connecting routers RT1 and RT2.

               +---+.1      10.1.1.0/30      .2+---+
               |RT1|---------------------------|RT2|
               +---+                           +---+

               Figure 1 Physical point-to-point network


2.1.1. Advertising Point-to-Point Networks

   For each numbered point-to-point network, a router has 2 link
   descriptions in its router LSA, one Type 1 link (point-to-point)
   regarding the neighboring router, and one Type 3 link (stub)
   regarding the assigned IPv4 address.

   An example of router LSA originated by RT1 would look like

      LS age = 0                        ;newly (re)originated
      LS type = 1                       ;router-LSA
      Link State ID = 1.1.1.1           ;RT1's Router ID
      Advertising Router = 1.1.1.1      ;RT1's Router ID
      #links = 2
         Link ID = 2.2.2.2              ;RT2's Router ID
         Link Data = 10.1.1.1           ;Interface IP address
         Type = 1                       ;connects to RT2
         Metric = 10

         Link ID= 10.1.1.0              ;Interface IP address
         Link Data = 255.255.255.252    ;Subnet's mask
         Type = 3                       ;Connects to stub network
         Metric = 10




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   The Type 1 link will be used for SPF calculation while the Type 3
   link will be used for RIB installation.


2.1.2. Hiding Point-to-Point Networks

   To hide a transit-only point-to-point network, the Type 3 link MUST
   be removed from the router LSA.

   An example of router LSA originated by RT1, hiding the point-to-point
   network depicted in Figure 1, would look like

      LS age = 0                        ;newly (re)originated
      LS type = 1                       ;router-LSA
      Link State ID = 1.1.1.1           ;RT1's Router ID
      Advertising Router = 1.1.1.1      ;RT1's Router ID
      #links = 1
         Link ID = 2.2.2.2              ;RT2's Router ID
         Link Data = 10.1.1.1           ;Interface IP address
         Type = 1                       ;connects to RT2
         Metric = 10


2.2. Broadcast Networks

   A broadcast networks joins many (more than two) routers, and supports
   the capability to address a single physical message to all of the
   attached routers. Figure 2 shows a broadcast network connecting
   router RT3, RT4, and RT5.

                      +---+                 +---+
                      |RT3|                 |RT4|
                      +---+                 +---+
                        |.3   10.2.2.0/24   .4|
                     +---------------------------+
                                    |.5
                                  +---+
                                  |RT5|
                                  +---+

                       Figure 2 Broadcast network

2.2.1. Advertising Broadcast Networks

   For each broadcast network, a designated router (DR) describes it in
   its network LSA. Assuming RT3 is elected as the DR in Figure 2, an
   example of the network LSA originated by RT3 would look like




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      LS age = 0                        ;newly (re)originated
      LS type = 2                       ;network-LSA
      Link State ID = 10.2.2.3          ;IP address of the DR (RT3)
      Advertising Router = 3.3.3.3      ;RT3's Router ID
      Network Mask = 255.255.255.0
         Attached Router = 3.3.3.3      ;Router ID
         Attached Router = 4.4.4.4      ;Router ID
         Attached Router = 5.5.5.5      ;Router ID

   OSPF obtains the IP network number from the combination of the Link
   State ID and the Network Mask.  In addition, Link State ID is also
   being used for 2-way connectivity check.

2.2.2. Hiding Broadcast Networks

2.2.2.1. Sending Network LSA

   To hide a transit-only broadcast network, a special network mask
   value 255.255.255.255 MUST be used in the network LSA.  While a
   broadcast network connects more than routers, using 255.255.255.255
   will not hide an access broadcast network accidentally.

   As there is no change of the Link State ID, the 2-way connectivity
   check would proceed normally.

   An example of network LSA originated by RT3, hiding the broadcast
   network depicted in Figure 2, would look like

      LS age = 0                        ;newly (re)originated
      LS type = 2                       ;network-LSA
      Link State ID = 10.2.2.3          ;IP address of the DR (RT3)
      Advertising Router = 3.3.3.3      ;RT3's Router ID
      Network Mask = 255.255.255.255    ;special subnet mask
         Attached Router = 3.3.3.3      ;Router ID
         Attached Router = 4.4.4.4      ;Router ID
         Attached Router = 5.5.5.5      ;Router ID

2.2.2.2. Receiving Network LSA

   It's RECOMMENDED that all routers in an area be upgraded as a whole
   to process the modified network LSA correctly and consistently.

   When a router receives a network LSA, it MUST check the 2-way
   connectivity as normal. However, if the network mask in the network
   LSA is 255.255.255.255, the router MUST NOT install the route in the
   RIB.

2.2.2.2.1. Backward Compatibility



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   When a not-yet-upgraded router receives a modified network LSA, as
   specified in section 2.2.2.1, a host route to the originating DR will
   be installed.  This is not ideal but better than the current result,
   which exposes the whole subnet.

   In a partial deployment scenario, upgraded routers and not-yet-
   upgraded routers may mix up.  The former do not have the host routes
   aforementioned, while the latter do have.  Such inconsistence creates
   routing black holes, which should be avoided normally.  In this case,
   however, as packets destined for the transit-only networks are
   dropped somewhere in the network, the black holes actually help DRs
   defend from the remote attacks.

   In summary, the modification of the network LSA, as specified in
   section 2.2.2.1, is backward compatible with the current
   specification of [OSPFv2], even in a partial deployment case.


2.3. Non-Broadcast Networks

   A non-broadcast networks joins many (more than two) routers, but does
   NOT support the capability to address a single physical message to
   all of the attached routers.  As mentioned in [OSPFv2], OSPF runs in
   one of two modes over non-broadcast networks: NBMA or Point-to-
   MultiPoint.

2.3.1. NBMA

   In NBMA mode, OSPF emulates operation over a broadcast network: a
   Designated Router is elected for the NBMA network, and the Designated
   Router originates an LSA for the network.

   To hide a NBMA transit-only network, OSPF adopts the same
   modification over the broadcast transit-only network, as defined in
   section 2.2.2.

2.3.2. Point-to-MultiPoint

   In point-to-MultiPoint mode, OSPF treats the non-broadcast network as
   a collection of point-to-point links.

   Figure 3 shows a non-broadcast network connecting router RT6, RT7,
   RT8, and RT9. In this network, all routers can communicate directly,
   except for routers RT7 and RT8.







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                      +---+                 +---+
                      |RT6|                 |RT7|
                      +---+                 +---+
                        |.6   10.3.3.0/24   .7|
                     +---------------------------+
                        |.8                 .9|
                      +---+                 +---+
                      |RT8|                 |RT9|
                      +---+                 +---+

                     Figure 3 Non-Broadcast network


2.3.2.1. Advertising Point-to-MultiPoint Networks

   For a point-to-multipoint network, a router has multiple link
   descriptions in its router LSA, one Type 1 link (point-to-point) for
   EACH directly communicable router, and one Type 3 link (stub)
   regarding the assigned IPv4 address.

   An example of router LSA originated by RT7 would look like

      LS age = 0                        ;newly (re)originated
      LS type = 1                       ;router-LSA
      Link State ID = 7.7.7.7           ;RT7's Router ID
      Advertising Router = 7.7.7.7      ;RT7's Router ID
      #links = 3
         Link ID = 6.6.6.6              ;RT6's Router ID
         Link Data = 10.3.3.7           ;Interface IP address
         Type = 1                       ;connects to RT6
         Metric = 10

         Link ID = 9.9.9.9              ;RT9's Router ID
         Link Data = 10.3.3.7           ;Interface IP address
         Type = 1                       ;connects to RT9
         Metric = 10

         Link ID= 10.3.3.7              ;Interface IP address
         Link Data = 255.255.255.255    ;Subnet's mask
         Type = 3                       ;Connects to stub network
         Metric = 0

2.3.2.2. Hiding Point-to-MultiPoint Networks

      To hide a transit-only point-to-multipoint network, the Type 3
      link MUST be removed from the router LSA.

      An example of router LSA originated by RT7, hiding the point-to-



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      point network depicted in Figure 3, would look like

      LS age = 0                        ;newly (re)originated
      LS type = 1                       ;router-LSA
      Link State ID = 7.7.7.7           ;RT7's Router ID
      Advertising Router = 7.7.7.7      ;RT7's Router ID
      #links = 2
         Link ID = 6.6.6.6              ;RT6's Router ID
         Link Data = 10.3.3.7           ;Interface IP address
         Type = 1                       ;connects to RT6
         Metric = 10

         Link ID = 9.9.9.9              ;RT9's Router ID
         Link Data = 10.3.3.7           ;Interface IP address
         Type = 1                       ;connects to RT9
         Metric = 10


3. Hiding IPv6 Transit-only Networks in OSPFv3

   In [OSPFv3], addressing semantics have been removed from the OSPF
   protocol packets and the main LSA types, leaving a network-protocol-
   independent core.

   More specifically, Router-LSAs and network-LSAs no longer contain
   network addresses, but simply express topology information.  A new
   LSA called the intra-area-prefix-LSA has been introduced.  This LSA
   carries all IPv6 prefix information that in [OSPFv2] is included in
   router-LSAs and network-LSAs.

   Such changes simplify the process to hide the IPv6 addresses of the
   transit-only networks in [OSPFv3] -- simply removing the
   correspondent IPv6 unicast prefixes from the intra-area-prefix-LSA
   will do the trick.


4. Hiding AF Enabled Transit-only Networks in OSPFv3

   [OSPF-AF] supports multiple address families (AFs) by by mapping each
   AF to a separate Instance ID and OSPFv3 instance.

   In the meantime, each prefix advertised in OSPFv3 has a prefix Length
   field [OSPFV3], which facilitates advertising prefixes of different
   lengths in different AFs.  The existing LSAs defined in OSPFv3 are
   used for prefix advertising and there is no need to define new LSAs.

   In other words, intra-area-prefix-LSAs are still being used to
   advertise the attached networks, and same method explained in section



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   3 can also be used to hide those AF enabled transit-only networks.


5. Operational Considerations

   By eliminating the ability to reach transit-only networks, the
   ability to manage these interfaces may be reduced.  In order to not
   reduce the functionality and capability of the overall network, it is
   recommended that extensions such as RFC5837 be also implemented.


6. Security Considerations

   One motivation for this document is to reduce remote attack
   vulnerability by hiding transit-only networks.  The result should
   then be that fewer OSPF core networks will be exposed to un-
   authorized access.

   While the steps described in this document are meant to be applied to
   transit-only networks ONLY, they could be used to hide other networks
   as well.  It is expected that the same care that users put on the
   configuration of other routing protocol parameters is used in the
   configuration of this extension.


7. IANA Considerations

   No actions are required from IANA as result of the publication of
   this document.


8. References

8.1. Normative References

   [KEYWORD]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [OSPFv2]   Moy, J., "OSPF Version 2", RFC 2328, April 1998.

   [OSPFv3]   Coltun, R., Ferguson, D., Moy, J., and A. Lindem , "OSPF
              for IPv6", RFC 5340, July 2008.

   [OSPF-AF]  Lindem, A., Mirtorabi, S., Roy, A., Barnes, M., and R.
              Aggarwal, "Support of Address Families in OSPFv3",
              RFC5838, April 2010.

8.2. Informative References



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   [RFC5837]  Atlas, A., Bonica, R., Pignataro, C., Shen, N., and JR.
              Rivers, "Extending ICMP for Interface and Next-Hop
              Identification", RFC5837, April 2010.


Appendix A. Acknowledgments

   The draft text was produced using Stefan Santesson's NroffEdit
   application.

   The idea of using a special subnet mask to hide broadcast networks in
   OSPF was originally introduced in the US patent "Apparatus and method
   to hide transit only multi-access networks in OSPF" (patent number:
   7,929,524), by Yi Yang, Alvaro Retana, James Ng, Abhay Roy, Alfred
   Lindem, Sina Mirtorabi, Timothy Gage, and Khalid Raza.


Authors' Addresses

   Yi Yang
   Cisco Systems
   7025 Kit Creek Road
   RTP, NC 27709
   USA

   Email: yiya@cisco.com


   Alvaro Retana
   Hewlett-Packard Co.
   2610 Wycliff Road
   Raleigh, NC  27607
   USA

   Email: alvaro.retana@hp.com


   Abhay Roy
   Cisco Systems
   225 West Tasman Drive
   San Jose, CA  95134
   USA

   Email: akr@cisco.com







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