[Docs] [txt|pdf] [Tracker] [WG] [Email] [Diff1] [Diff2] [Nits]

Versions: (draft-bryskin-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp) 00 01 02 03 04 RFC 5394

Internet Draft                             Igor Bryskin (Movaz Networks)
Category: Informational                    Dimitri Papadimitriou (Alcatel)
Expiration Date: January 2007              Lou Berger (LabN Consulting, LLC)

                                                               July 2006


               Policy-Enabled Path Computation Framework


           draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt

Status of this Memo

   By submitting this Internet-Draft, each author represents that any
   applicable patent or other IPR claims of which he or she is aware
   have been or will be disclosed, and any of which he or she becomes
   aware will be disclosed, in accordance with Section 6 of BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
   other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
   Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/1id-abstracts.html

   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html

Abstract

   The PCE architecture [PCE-ARCH] introduces the concept of policy in
   the context of path computation. This document provides additional
   details on policy within the PCE Architecture and also provides
   context for the support of PCE Policy. This document introduces the
   use of the Policy Core Information Model (PCIM) as a framework for
   supporting path computation policy. This document also provides
   representative scenarios for the support of PCE Policy.












Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                 [Page 1]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


Contents

 1      Terminology  ...............................................   3
 2      Introduction  ..............................................   3
 3      Background  ................................................   4
 3.1    Motivations  ...............................................   4
 3.2    Representative Policy Scenarios  ...........................   6
 3.2.1  Scenario: Policy Configured Paths  .........................   6
 3.2.2  Scenario: Provider Selection Policy  .......................   7
 3.2.3  Scenario: Policy Based Constraints  ........................   8
 4      Requirements  ..............................................  10
 5      Path Computation Policy Information Model (PCPIM)  .........  11
 6      Policy-Enabled Path Computation Framework Components  ......  13
 7      Policy Component Configurations  ...........................  15
 7.1    PCC-PCE Configurations  ....................................  15
 7.2    Policy Repositories  .......................................  17
 7.3    Cooperating PCE Configurations  ............................  18
 7.4    Policy Configuration Management  ...........................  20
 8      Inter-Component Communication  .............................  20
 8.1    Policy Communication   .....................................  20
 8.2    PCE Discovery Policy Considerations  .......................  22
 9      Path Computation Sequence of Events  .......................  22
 9.1    Policy-enabled PCC, Policy-enabled PCE  ....................  23
 9.2    Policy-ignorant PCC, Policy-enabled PCE  ...................  24
10      Introduction of New Constraints  ...........................  25
11      Security Considerations  ...................................  26
12      Acknowledgements  ..........................................  27
13      IANA Considerations  .......................................  27
14      References  ................................................  27
14.1    Normative References  ......................................  27
14.2    Informative References  ....................................  28
15      Authors' Addresses  ........................................  28
16      Full Copyright Statement  ..................................  29
17      Intellectual Property  .....................................  29






Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                 [Page 2]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


Conventions used in this document

The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
"SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].


1. Terminology

   The reader is assumed to be familiar with the following terms:
   CSPF:    Constraint-based Shortest Path First, see [RFC3630].
   LSP:     Label Switched Path, see [RFC3031].
   LSR:     Label Switching Router, see [RFC3031].
   PCC:     Path Computation Client, see [PCE-ARCH].
   PCE:     Path Computation Element, see [PCE-ARCH].
   TE LSP:  Traffic Engineering MPLS Label Switched Path, see
            [RFC3209] and [RFC3473].
   CIM:     Common Information Model, see [DMTF].
   PCIM:    Policy Core Information Model, see [RFC3060].
   PC:      Path Computation.
   PCCIM:   Path Computation Core Information Model.
   QPIM:    QoS Policy Information Model, see [RFC3644].
   PBM:     Policy-based Management, see [RFC3198].
   PEP:     Policy Enforcement Points, see [RFC2753].
   PDP:     Policy Decision Points, see [RFC2753].
   COPS:    Common Open Policy Service, see [RFC2748].
   COPS-PR: COPS Usage for Policy Provisioning, see [RFC3084].


2. Introduction

   The PCE architecture is introduced in [PCE-ARCH]. This document
   describes the impact of policy on the PCE architecture and provides
   additional details on, and context for, policy within the PCE
   Architecture.

   Policy-based Management (PBM) enables network administrators to
   operate in a high-level manner through rule-based policies; the
   latter are translated automatically into individual device
   configuration directives, aimed at controlling a network as a whole.
   Two IETF Working Groups have considered policy networking in the
   past: The Resource Allocation Protocol working group and the Policy
   Framework working group.

   A framework for policy-based admission control [RFC2753] was defined
   and a protocol for use between Policy Enforcement Points (PEP) and
   Policy Decision Points (PDP) was specified: Common Open Policy
   Service (COPS) [RFC2748]. This document uses the terms PEP and PDP to



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                 [Page 3]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


   refer to the functions defined in the COPS context. This document
   makes no assumptions nor requires that the actual COPS protocol be
   used.

   The IETF has also produced a general framework for representing,
   managing, sharing, and reusing policies in a vendor independent,
   interoperable, and scalable manner. It has also defined an extensible
   information model for representing policies, called the Policy Core
   Information Model (PCIM) [RFC3060], and an extension to this model to
   address the need for QoS management, called the QoS Policy
   Information Model (QPIM) [RFC3644]. However, additional mechanisms
   are needed in order to specify policies related to the path
   computation logic as well as its control.

   This document introduces PCIM as a core component in a framework for
   providing policy-enabled path computation. This document also covers
   the other aspects of the framework. It also discusses related
   background to provide a context for this work. Specific PCIM
   definition to support path computation will be discussed in a
   separate document.


3. Background

   This section provides some general background on the use of policy
   within the PCE architecture. It presents some rational behind the use
   of policy, as well as representative policy usage scenarios. This
   information is intended to provide context for the presented policy
   framework. This section does not attempt to present an exhaustive
   list of rational or scenarios.


3.1. Motivations

   The PCE architecture is introduced in [PCE-ARCH]. It includes policy
   as an integral part of the PCE architecture. This section presents
   some of the rational for this inclusion.

   Network operators require a certain level of flexibility to shape the
   TE path computation process, so that the process can be aligned with
   their business and operational needs.  Many aspects of the path
   computation may be governed by policies. For example, a PCC may use
   policies configured by the operator to decide which optimizations,
   constraints, diversities and their relaxation strategies to request
   while computing path(s) for a particular service. Depending on SLAs,
   TE and cost/performance ratio goals, path computation requests may be
   built differently for different services. Service A, for instance,
   may require two SRLG-disjoint paths for building end-to-end recovery



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                 [Page 4]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


   scheme, while for service B link-disjoint paths may be sufficient.
   Service A may need paths with minimal end-to-end delay, while service
   B may be looking for shortest (minimal-cost) paths. Different
   constraint relaxation strategies may be applied while computing paths
   for service A and for service B, and so forth.

   Likewise, a PCE may apply policies to decide which algorithm or
   algorithms to use while performing path computations requested from a
   particular PCC or for a particular domain, see [PCECP-IA-REQ];
   whether to seek the cooperation of other PCEs to satisfy a particular
   request or to handle a request on its own (possibly responding with
   non explicit paths); or how the request should be modified before
   being sent to other member(s) of a group of cooperating PCEs, etc.

   Additional motivations for supporting policy within the PCE
   architecture can be described as follows. Historically, a path
   computation entity was an intrinsic part of an LSR's control plane
   and always co-located with the LSR's signaling and routing
   subsystems. This approach allowed for unlimited flexibility in
   providing various path computation enhancements, such as: adding new
   types of constraints, diversities and their relaxation strategies,
   adopting new objective functions and optimization criterions, etc.
   All that had to be done to support an enhancement was to upgrade the
   control plane software of a particular LSR (and no other LSRs or any
   other network elements).

   With the introduction of the PCE architecture, the introduction of
   new PCE capabilities becomes more complicated: it isn't enough for a
   PCE to upgrade its own software. In order to take advantage of a
   PCE's new capabilities, new advertising and signaling objects may
   need to be standardized, all PCCs may need to be upgraded with new
   software, and new interoperability problems may need to be resolved,
   etc.

   Within the context of the PCE architecture, it is therefore highly
   desirable to find a way to introduce new path computation
   capabilities without requiring modifying either the
   discovery/communication protocols or PCC software. One way to achieve
   this objective is to consider path selection constraints, their
   relaxations and objective functions, as path computation request
   specific policies. Furthermore that such policies may, on one hand,
   be configured and managed by an operator as any other policies or, on
   the other hand, may be interpreted in real time by PCCs and PCEs.

   There are a number of advantages and useful by-products of such an
   approach:

   - New path computation capabilities may be introduced without



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                 [Page 5]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


     changing PCE-PCC communication and discovery protocols or PCC
     software. Only the PCE module providing the path computation
     capabilities (referred in this document as path computation
     engine) needs to be updated.

   - Existing constraints, objective functions and their relaxations
     may be aggregated and otherwise associated together, thus,
     producing new more complex ones that do not require change of
     code even on PCEs supporting them.

   - Different elements such as conditions, actions, variables,
     etc. may be re-used by multiple constraints, diversities, and
     optimizations.

   - PCCs and PCEs need to handle other (that is, not request
     specific) policies. Path computation related policies of all
     types can be placed within the same policy repositories, can be
     managed by the same policy management tools and can be
     interpreted using the same mechanisms. Also policies need to be
     supported by PCCs and PCEs independently from peculiarities of a
     specific PCC-PCE communication protocol. Thus, introducing a new
     (request specific) type of policies describing constraints and
     other elements of a path computation request will be a natural
     and relatively inexpensive addition to the policy-enabled path
     computation architecture.


3.2. Representative Policy Scenarios

   This section provides example scenarios of how policy may be applied
   using the PCE policy framework within the PCE architecture context.
   Actual networks may use one of the scenarios discussed, some
   combination of the presented scenarios or other scenarios (not
   discussed). This section should not be viewed as limiting other
   applications of policy within the PCE architecture.


3.2.1. Scenario: Policy Configured Paths

   A very simple usage scenario for PCE policy would be to use PCE to
   centrally administer configured paths.  Configured paths are composed
   of strict and loose hops in the form of EROs (see [RFC3209]), and are
   used by one or more LSPs. Typically such paths are configured at the
   LSP ingress. In the context of policy-enabled path computation, an
   alternate approach is possible.

   In particular, service specific policies can be installed that will
   provide configured path(s) for a specific service request. The



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                 [Page 6]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


   request may be identified based on service parameters such as end-
   points, requested QoS or even a token that identifies the end-user.
   The configured path(s) would then be used as input to PCE computation
   process, which would return explicit routes by expanding of all
   specified loose hops.

   The described policies may be applied at either PCC or PCE, see
   Figure 5. In the PCC case, the configured path would be processed at
   the PCC and then passed to the PCE along with the PCE request,
   probably in the form of (inclusion) constraints. When applied at the
   PCE, the configured path would be used locally. Both cases require
   some method to configure and manage policies. In the PCC case, the
   real benefit would come when there is an automated policy
   distribution mechanism.

   Policy-configured paths may also be used in multiple PCE environments
   (see Figures 7 and 8). For example, consider the case when there is
   limited TE visibility and independent PCEs are used to determine
   path(s) within each area of the TE visibility. In such a case, it may
   not be possible (or desirable) to configure entire explicit path(s)
   on a single PCE. However, it is possible to configure explicit
   path(s) for each area of the TE visibility and each responsible PCE.
   One by one, the PCEs would then map an incoming signaling request to
   appropriate configured path(s). Note that to make such scenario work
   it would likely be necessary to start and finish the configured paths
   on TE domain boundary nodes. Clearly, consistent PC Policy
   Repositories are also critical in this example.


3.2.2. Scenario: Provider Selection Policy

   A potentially more interesting usage scenario is applying PC policies
   in multi-domain multi-provider networks. There are numerous
   interesting policy applications in such networks.  A rudimentary
   example is simple access control, that is, deciding which clients are
   permitted to request inter-domain path computation.

   A more complicated example is applying policy to determine which
   domain or provider network will be used to support a particular PCE
   request. Consider the topology presented in Figure 1. In this example
   there are multiple transit networks available to provide a path from
   a source domain to a destination domain. Furthermore, each transit
   network may have one or more options for reaching a particular
   domain. Each domain will need to select which of the multiple
   available paths will be used to satisfy a particular PCE request.

   Clearly, TE reachability, availability and optimality are the basic
   criterions for path selection, however, policies can provide an



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                 [Page 7]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


   important added consideration in the decision process. For example,
   transit network A may be more expensive and provide lower delay or
   loss than transit network C. Likewise, a transit network may wish to
   treat PCE requests from its own customers differently than requests
   from other providers. In both cases, computation based on traffic
   engineering databases will result in multiple transit networks that
   provide reachability, and policies can be used to govern which PCE
   requests get better service.

              +----------------+
              |Transit Domain A| +----------------+
              +----------------+ |Transit Domain D|
   +------+   +----------------+ +----------------+    +------+
   |Source|   |Transit Domain B| +----------------+    |Target|
   |Domain|   +----------------+ |Transit Domain E|    |Domain|
   +------+   +----------------+ +----------------+    +------+
              |Transit Domain C| +----------------+
              +----------------+ |Transit Domain F|
                                 +----------------+

       Figure 1: Multi-domain network with multiple transit options

   There are multiple options for differentiating which PCE requests use
   a particular transit domain and get a particular (better or worse)
   level of service. For example, a PCE in the source domain may use
   user and request specific policies to determine the level of service
   to provide.  A PCE in the source domain may also use domain specific
   policies to choose which transit domains are acceptable. A PCE in a
   transit domain may use request specific policies to determine if a
   request is from a direct customer or another provider, and then use
   domain specific policies to identify how the request should be
   processed.


3.2.3. Scenario: Policy Based Constraints

   Another usage scenario is the use of policy to provide new
   constraints in a PCE request. Consider an LSR with a policy enabled
   PCC, as shown in Figure 3, which receives a service request via
   signaling, including over a NNI or UNI reference point, or receives a
   configuration request over a management interface to establish a
   service. In either case the path(s) needed to support the service are
   not explicitly specified in the message/request, and hence path
   computation is needed.

   In this case, the PCC may apply user or service specific policies to
   decide how the path selection process should be constrained, that is,
   which constraints, diversities, optimizations and relaxations should



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                 [Page 8]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


   be applied in order for the service LSP(s) to have a likelihood to be
   successfully established and provide necessary QoS and resilience
   against network failures. When deciding on the set of constraints the
   PCC uses as an input all information it knows about the user and
   service, such as the contents of the received message, port ID over
   which message was received, associated VPN ID, signaling/reference
   point type, request time, etc. Once the constraints and other
   parameters of the required path computation are determined, the PCC
   generates a path computation request which includes the request-
   specific policies that describe the determined set of constraints,
   optimizations, and other parameters that indicate how the request is
   to be considered in the path computation process.

   The PCC may also apply server specific policies for each of the known
   (i.e., discovered or configured) PCEs in order to select which PCE to
   use. The PCC may also use server specific policies to form the
   request to match the PCE's capabilities so that the request will not
   be rejected and has a higher likelihood of being satisfied in an
   efficient way. An example of a request modification as the result of
   a server specific policy is removing a constraint not supported by
   the PCE. Once the policy processing is completed at the PCC, and the
   path computation request resulting from the original service request
   is updated by the policy processing, the request is sent to the PCE.

   The PCE that receives the request validates and otherwise processes
   the request, applying the policies found in the request as well as
   any policies that are available at the PCE, e.g., client and domain
   specific polices. As a result of the policy processing, the PCE may
   decide to reject the request. It also may decide to respond with one
   or several pre-computed paths if user or client specific polices
   instruct the PCE to do so. If the PCE decides to satisfy the request
   by performing a path computation, it determines if it needs the
   cooperation of other PCEs and defines parameters for path
   computations to be performed locally and remotely. After that, the
   PCE instructs a co-located path computation engine to perform the
   local path computation(s) and, if necessary, sends path computation
   requests to one or more other PCEs. It then waits for the responses
   from the local path computation engine and, when used, the remote
   PCE. It then combines the resulting paths and sends the result back
   to the requesting PCC. The response may indicate policies describing
   the resulting paths, their characteristics (summary cost, expected
   end-to-end delay, etc.) as well as additional information related to
   the request, e.g., which of constraints were honored, which were
   dismissed and which were relaxed and in what way.

   The PCC processes the response and instructs the LSR to encode the
   received path(s) into the outgoing signaling message(s).




Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                 [Page 9]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


4. Requirements

   The following requirements must be addressed by mechanisms and
   protocols that enable policy-based control over path computation
   requests and decisions:

   - (G)MPLS path computation-specific
     The mechanisms must meet the policy-based control requirements
     specific to the problem of path computation using RSVP-TE as the
     signaling protocol on MPLS and GMPLS LSRs.

   - Support for non (G)MPLS PCCs
     The mechanisms must be sufficiently generic to support
     non-(G)MPLS (LSR) clients such as an NMS, or network planner,
     etc.

   - Support for many policies
     The mechanisms must include support for many policies and policy
     configurations. In general, the determination and configuration
     of viable policies are the responsibility of the service
     provider.

   - Provision for monitoring and accounting information
     The mechanisms must include support for monitoring policy state,
     and provide access information. In particular, mechanisms must
     provide usage and access information that may be used for
     accounting purposes.

   - Fault tolerance and recovery
     The mechanisms must include provisions for fault tolerance and
     recovery from failure cases such as failure of PCC/PCE PDPs,
     disruption in communication that separate a PCC/PCE PDP from its
     associated PCC/PCE PEPs.

   - Support for policy-ignorant nodes
     The mechanisms should not be mandatory for every node in a
     network. Policy based path computation control may be enforced at
     a subset of nodes, for example, on boundary nodes within an
     administrative domain. These policy-capable nodes will function
     as trusted nodes from the point of view of the policy-ignorant
     nodes in that administrative domain. Alternatively, policy may be
     applied solely on PCEs with all PCCs being policy-ignorant nodes.

   - Scalability
     One of the important requirements for the mechanisms is
     scalability. The mechanisms must scale at least to the same
     extent that RSVP-TE signaling scales in terms of accommodating
     multiple LSPs and network nodes in the path of an LSP. There are



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 10]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


     several sensitive areas in terms of scalability of policy based
     path computation control. First, not every policy aware node in
     an infrastructure should be expected to contact a remote
     PDP. This would cause potentially long delays in verifying
     requests.  Additionally, the policy control architecture must
     scale at least as well as RSVP-TE protocol based on factors such
     as the size of RSVP-TE messages, the time required for the
     network to service an RSVP-TE request, local processing time
     required per node, and local memory consumed per node. These
     scaling considerations are of particular importance during
     re-routing of a set of LSPs.

   - Security and denial of service considerations
     The policy control architecture, protocols and mechanisms must be
     secure as far as the following aspects are concerned:

     o First, the mechanisms proposed must minimize theft and denial
       of service threats.

     o Second, it must be ensured that the entities (such as PEPs
       and PDPs) involved in policy control can verify each other's
       identity and establish necessary trust before communicating.

   - Inter-AS and inter-area requirements
     There are several inter-AS policy related requirements discussed
     in [RFC4216] and [INTERAS-PCEP], and inter-area policy related
     requirements discussed in [PCECP-IA-REQ].  These requirements
     must be addressed by policy-enabled PCE mechanisms and protocols.

   It should be noted that this document only outlines the communication
   elements and mechanisms needed to allow a wide variety of possible
   policies to be applied for path computation control. It does not
   include any discussion of any specific policy behavior. Nor does it
   define or require use of specific policies.


5. Path Computation Policy Information Model (PCPIM)

   The Policy Core Information Model (PCIM) introduced in [RFC3060] and
   expanded in [RFC3460] presents the object-oriented information model
   for representing general policy information.

   This model defines two hierarchies of object classes:

   - structural classes representing policy information and control of
     policies

   - association classes that indicate how instances of the structural



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 11]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


     classes are related to each other.

   These classes can be mapped to various concrete implementations, for
   example, to a directory that uses LDAPv3 as its access protocol.

   Figure 2 shows an abstract from the class inheritance hierarchy for
   PCIM.

   ManagedElement (abstract)
      |
      +--Policy (abstract)
      |  |
      |  +---PolicySet (abstract)
      |  |   |
      |  |   +---PolicyGroup
      |  |   |
      |  |   +---PolicyRule
      |  |
      |  +---PolicyCondition (abstract)
      |  |   |
      |  |   +---PolicyTimePeriodCondition
      |  |   |
      |  |   +---VendorPolicyCondition
      |  |   |
      |  |   +---SimplePolicyCondition
      |  |   |
      |  |   +---CompoundPolicyCondition
      |  |       |
      |  |       +---CompoundFilterCondition
      |  |
      |  +---PolicyAction (abstract)
      |  |   |
      |  |   +---VendorPolicyAction
      |  |   |
      |  |   +---SimplePolicyAction
      |  |   |
      |  |   +---CompoundPolicyAction
      |  |
      |  +---PolicyVariable (abstract)
      |  |   |
      |  |   +---PolicyExplicitVariable
      |  |   |
      |  |   +---PolicyImplicitVariable
      |  |       |
      |  |       +---(subtree of more specific classes)
      |  |
      |  +---PolicyValue (abstract)
      |      |



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 12]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


      |      +---(subtree of more specific classes)
      |

                     Figure 2: PCIM Class Inheritance

   The policy classes and associations defined in PCIM are sufficiently
   generic to allow them to represent policies related to anything.

   Policy models for application-specific areas such as the Path
   Computation Service may extend the PCIM in several ways. The
   preferred way is to use the PolicyGroup, PolicyRule, and
   PolicyTimePeriodCondition classes directly as a foundation for
   representing and communicating policy information. Then, specific
   subclasses derived from PolicyCondition and PolicyAction can capture
   application-specific definitions of conditions and actions of
   policies. Two subclasses, VendorPolicyCondition and
   VendorPolicyAction, are also defined to provide a standard extension
   mechanism for vendor-specific extensions to the Policy Core
   Information Model.

   Policy Quality of Service Information Model [RFC3644] further extends
   the PCIM to represent QoS policy information for large-scale policy
   domains. New classes introduced in this document describing QoS and
   RSVP related variables, conditions and actions can be used as a
   foundation for the PCPIM.

   Detailed description of the PCPIM will be provided in a separate
   documents.


6. Policy-Enabled Path Computation Framework Components

   The following components are defined as part of the framework to
   support policy-enabled path computation:

   - PC Policy Repository
     A database from which PC policies are available in the form of
     instances of PCPIM classes. PC Policies are configured and
     managed by PC Policy Management Tools.

   - PCE Policy Decision Point (PCE-PDP)
     A logical entity capable of retrieving relevant path computation
     policies from one or more Policy Repositories and delivering the
     information to associated PCE-PEP(s);

   - PCE Policy Enforcement Point (PCE-PEP)
     A logical entity capable of issuing device specific Path
     Computation Engine configuration requests for the purpose of



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 13]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


     enforcing the policies

   - PCC Policy Decision Point (PCC-PDP)
     A logical entity capable of retrieving relevant path computation
     policies from one or more Policy Repositories and delivering the
     information to associated PCC-PEP(s;

   - PCC Policy Enforcement Point (PCC-PEP)
     A logical entity capable of issuing device specific Path
     Computation Service User configuration requests for the purpose
     of enforcing the policies.

   From the policy perspective a PCC is logically decomposed into two
   parts: PCC-PDP and PCC-PEP. When present, a PCC-PEP is co-located
   with a Path Computation Service User entity that requires remote path
   computation (for example, the GMPLS control plane of an LSR). The
   PCC-PEP and PCC-PDP may be physically co-located (as per [RFC2748])
   or separated. In the later case they talk to each other via such
   protocols as COPS and/or COPS-PR [RFC3084].

   Likewise, a PCE is logically decomposed into two parts: PCE-PEP and
   PCE-PDP. When present, PCE-PEP is co-located with a Path Computation
   Engine entity that actually provides the Path Computation Service
   (that is, runs path computation algorithms). PCE-PEP and PCE-PDP may
   be physically co-located or separated. In the later case they
   communicate using such protocols as COPS and/or COPS-PR.

   PCC-PDP/PCE-PDP may be co-located with, or separated from, an
   associated PC Policy Repository. In the latter case, the PDPs use
   some access protocol (for example, LDAPv3 or SNMP). The task of PDPs
   is to retrieve policies from the repository(ies) and convey them to
   respective PEPs either in unsolicited way or upon the PEPs requests.

   A PCC-PEP may receive policy information not only from PCC-PDPs(s)
   but also from PCE-PEP(s) via PCC-PCE communication and/or PCE
   discovery protocols. Likewise, a PCE-PEP may receive policy
   information not only from PCE-PDPs(s) but also from PCC-PEP(s) via
   PCC-PCE communication protocol.

   Any given policy can be interpreted (that is, translated into a
   sequence of concrete device specific configuration requests) either
   on a PDP or on the associated PEP or partly on the PDP and partly on
   the PEP.

   Generally speaking, the task of the PCC-PEP is to select the PCE and
   build path computation requests applying service specific policies
   provided by the PCC-PDP. The task of the PCE-PEP is to control path
   computations by applying request-specific policies found in the



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 14]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


   requests as well as client-specific and domain-specific policies
   supplied by the PCE-PDP.


7. Policy Component Configurations

7.1. PCC-PCE Configurations

   The PCE policy architecture supports policy being applied at a PCC
   and at a PCE. While the architecture supports policy being applied at
   both, there is no requirement for policy to always be applied at
   both, or even at either.  The use of policy in a network, on PCCs and
   on PCEs, is a specific network design choice. Some networks may
   choose to apply policy only at PCCs (Figure 3), some at PCEs (Figure
   4), and others at both PCCs and PCEs (Figure 5). Regardless of where
   policy is applied it must be applied in a consistent fashion in order
   to achieve the intended results.

                         ........................
                         .                      .
                         . PC Policy Management .
                         .                      .
                         ........................
                                     .
                                     .
    ---------  Policy     ----------------------
   | PCC-PDP |<--------- | PC Policy Repository |
    ---------             ----------------------
        ^
        | e.g., COPS
        v
    ---------                                               ---------
   | PCC-PEP |<------------------------------------------->|   PCE   |
    ---------         PCC-PCE Communication Protocol        ---------

                Figure 3: Policies are applied on PCC only

   Along with supporting flexibility in where policy may be applied, the
   PCE architecture is also flexible in terms of where specific types of
   policies may be applied. Also the PCE architecture allows for the
   application of only a subset of policy types. [PCE-ARCH] defines
   several PC policy types. Each of these may be applied at either a PCC
   or a PCE or both. Clearly when policy is only applied at PCCs or at
   PCEs, all PC policy types used in the network must be applied at
   those locations.






Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 15]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


                         ........................
                         .                      .
                         . PC Policy Management .
                         .                      .
                         ........................
                                     .
                                     .
                          ----------------------  Policy    ---------
                         | PC Policy Repository | -------->| PCE-PDP |
                          ----------------------            ---------
                                                                ^
                                                     e.g., COPS |
                                                                v
    ---------                                               ---------
   |   PCC   |<------------------------------------------->| PCE-PEP |
    ---------         PCC-PCE Communication Protocol        ---------

                Figure 4: Policies are applied on PCE only

   In the case where policy is only applied at a PCE, it is expected
   that the PCC will pass to the PCE all information about the service
   that it can gather in the path computation request (most likely in
   the form of PCPIM policy variables). The PCE is expected to
   understand this information and apply appropriate policies while
   defining the actual parameters of the path computation to be
   performed. Note that in this scenario the PCC cannot apply server-
   specific or any other policies, and PCE selection is static.

   When applying policy at both PCC and PCE, it is necessary to select
   which types of policies are applied at each. In such configurations,
   it is likely that the application of policy types will be distributed
   across PCC and PCE rather than applying all of them at both. For
   example, user specific and server specific policies may be applied at
   a PCC, request and client specific policies may be applied at a PCE,
   while domain specific policies may be applied at both the PCC and
   PCE.

   In the case when policy is only applied at a PCC, the PCC must apply
   all the types of required policies, for example user, service, server
   and domain-specific policies. The PCC uses the policies to construct
   a path computation request that appropriately represents the applied
   policies. The request will necessarily be limited to the set of
   "basic" (that is, non-policy capable) constraints explicitly defined
   by the PCC-PCE communication protocol in use.







Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 16]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


7.2. Policy Repositories

   Within the policy-enabled path computation framework policy
   repositories may be used in a single or multiple PC policy repository
   configuration:

   o) Single PC Policy Repository

   In this configuration there is a single PC Policy Repository shared
   between PCCs and PCEs.

                         ........................
                         .                      .
                         . PC Policy Management .
                         .                      .
                         ........................
                                     .
                                     .
    ---------  Policy a   ----------------------  Policy b  ---------
   | PCC-PDP |<--------- | PC Policy Repository | -------->| PCE-PDP |
    ---------             ----------------------            ---------
        ^                                                       ^
        | e.g., COPS                                 e.g., COPS |
        v                                                       v
    ---------                                               ---------
   | PCC-PEP |<------------------------------------------->| PCE-PEP |
    ---------         PCC-PCE Communication Protocol        ---------

                Figure 5: Single PCC/PCE Policy Repository

   o) Multiple PC Policy Repositories

   The repositories in this case may be fully or partially synchronized
   by some discovery/ synchronization management protocol or may be
   completely independent. Note that the situation when PC Policy
   Repository A exactly matches PC Policy Repository B,  results in the
   single PC Policy Repository configuration case.














Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 17]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


             --------------                   --------------
            |  PC Policy   |                 |  PC Policy   |
         ---| Repository A |                 | Repository B |---
        |    --------------                   --------------    |
        |                                                       |
        | Policy a                                     Policy b |
        |                                                       |
        v                                                       v
    ---------                                               ---------
   | PCC-PDP |                                             | PCE-PDP |
    ---------                                               ---------
        ^                                                       ^
        | e.g., COPS                                 e.g., COPS |
        v                                                       v
    ---------                                               ---------
   | PCC-PEP |<------------------------------------------->| PCE-PEP |
    ---------         PCC-PCE Communication Protocol        ---------

              Figure 6: Multiple PCE/PCC Policy Repositories


7.3. Cooperating PCE Configurations

   The previous section shows the relationship between PCCs and PCEs. A
   parallel relationship exists between cooperating PCEs, and, in fact,
   this relationship can be viewed as the same as the relationship
   between PCCs and PCEs. The one notable difference is that there will
   be cases where having a shared PC Policy Repository will not be
   desirable, for example, when the PCEs are managed by different
   entities. Note that in this case it still remains necessary for the
   policies to be consistent across the domains in order to identify
   usable paths. The other notable difference is that a PCE, while
   processing a path computation request, may need to apply requestor-
   specific (that is, client-specific) policies in order to modify the
   request before sending it to other cooperating PCE(s). This
   relationship is particularly important as the PCE Architecture allows
   for configuration where all PCCs are not policy-enabled.

   The following are example configurations. These examples do not
   represent an exhaustive list and other configurations are expected.

   o) Single Policy Repository

   In this configuration there is a single PC Policy repository shared
   between PCEs. This configuration is likely to be useful within a
   single administrative domain where multiple PCEs are provided for
   redundancy or load distribution purposes.




Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 18]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


                         ........................
                         .                      .
                         . PC Policy Management .
                         .                      .
                         ........................
                                     .
                                     .
    ---------  Policy a   ----------------------  Policy b  ---------
   | PCE-PDP |<--------- | PC Policy Repository | -------->| PCE-PDP |
    ---------             ----------------------            ---------
        ^                                                       ^
        | e.g., COPS                                 e.g., COPS |
        v                                                       v
    ---------                                               ---------
   | PCE-PEP |<------------------------------------------->| PCE-PEP |
    ---------         PCE-PCE Communication Protocol        ---------

                  Figure 7: Single PCC Policy Repository

   o) Multiple Policy Repositories

   The repositories in this case may be fully or partially synchronized
   by some discovery/synchronization management protocol(s) or may be
   completely independent. In the multi-domain case it is expected that
   the repositories will be distinct, providing, however. consistent
   policies.

             --------------                   --------------
            |  PC Policy   |                 |  PC Policy   |
         ---| Repository A |                 | Repository B |---
        |    --------------                   --------------    |
        |                                                       |
        | Policy a                                     Policy b |
        |                                                       |
        v                                                       v
    ---------                                               ---------
   | PCE-PDP |                                             | PCE-PDP |
    ---------                                               ---------
        ^                                                       ^
        | e.g., COPS                                 e.g., COPS |
        v                                                       v
    ---------                                               ---------
   | PCE-PEP |<------------------------------------------->| PCE-PEP |
    ---------         PCC-PCE Communication Protocol        ---------

                Figure 8: Multiple PCC Policy Repositories





Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 19]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


7.4. Policy Configuration Management

   The management of path computation policy information used by PCCs
   and PCEs is largely out of scope of the described framework. The
   framework assumes that such information is installed, removed and
   otherwise managed using typical policy management techniques. Policy
   Repositories may be populated and managed via static configuration,
   standard and proprietary policy management tools, or even dynamically
   via policy management/discovery protocols and applications.


8. Inter-Component Communication

8.1. Policy Communication

   Flexibility in the application of policy types is imperative from the
   architecture perspective. However, this commodity implies added
   complexity on the part of the PCE related communication protocols.

   One added complexity is that PCE communication protocols must carry
   certain information to support various policy types that may be
   applied. For example, in the case where policy is only applied at a
   PCE, a PCC-PCE request must carry sufficient information for the PCE
   to apply service or user specific policies. This does imply that a
   PCC must have sufficient understanding of what policies can be
   applied at the PCE. Such information may be obtained via local
   configuration, static coding or even via a PCE discovery mechanism.
   The PCC must also have sufficient understanding to properly encode
   the required information for each policy type.

   Another added complexity is that PCE communication protocols must
   also be able to carry information that may result from a policy
   decision. For example, user or service specific policy applied at a
   PCC may result in policy related information that must be carried
   along with the request for use by a PCE. This complexity is
   particularly important as it may be used to introduce new path
   computation parameters (e.g. constraints, objection functions, etc.)
   without modification of the core PCC and PCE. This communication will
   likely simply require the PCE communication protocols to support
   opaque policy related information elements.

   A final added complexity is that PCE communication protocols must
   also be able to support updated or unsolicited responses from a PCE.
   For example, changes in PCE policy may force a change to a previously
   provided path. Such updated or unsolicited responses may contain
   information that the PCC must act on, and may contain policy
   information that must be provided to a PCC.




Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 20]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


   PCC-PEP and PCE-PEP or a pair of PCE-PEPs communicate via a request-
   response type PCC-PCE Communication Protocol. This document makes no
   assumptions as to what exact protocol is used to support this
   communication.  This document does assume that the semantics of a
   path computation request are sufficiently abstract and general, and
   support both PCE-PCC and PCE-PCE communication.

   A path computation request at minimum should include:
   o One or several source addresses;
   o One or several destination addresses;
   o Computation type (P2P, P2MP, MP2P, etc.);
   o Number of required paths;
   o Zero or more policy descriptors in the following format:
     <policy name>,
     <policy variable1 name>, <param11>, <param12>,...,<param1N>
     <policy variable2 name>, <param21>, <param12>,...,<param2N>
     ...
     <policy variableM name>, <paramM1>, <paramM2>,...,<paramMN>

   A successful path computation response, at minimum, should include
   the list of computed paths and may include policies (in the form of
   policy descriptors as in path computation request, see above) for use
   in evaluating and otherwise applying the computed paths.

   PCC-PCE Communication Protocol provides transport for policy
   information and should not understand nor make any assumptions about
   the semantics of policies specified in path computation requests and
   responses.

   Note: This document explicitly allows for (but does not require) the
   PCC to decide that all necessary constraints, objective functions,
   etc. pertinent to the computation of paths for the service in
   question are to be determined by the PCE performing the computation.
   In this case the PCC will use a set of policies (more precisely,
   PCPIM policy variables) describing the service specific information.
   These policies may be placed within the path computation request and
   delivered to the PCE via a PCC-PCE communication protocol. The PCE
   (more precisely, PCE-PEP) is expected to understand this information
   and use it to determine the constraints and optimization functions
   applying local policies (that is, policies locally configured or
   provided by the associated PCE-PDP(s)).










Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 21]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


8.2. PCE Discovery Policy Considerations

   Dynamic PCE discovery allows for PCCs and PCEs to automatically
   discover a set of PCEs (including information required for the PCE
   selection). It also allows for PCCs and PCEs to dynamically detect
   new PCEs or any modification of PCEs information. Policy can be
   applied in two ways in this context:

   1. Restricting the scope of information distribution for the
      mandatory set of information (in particular the PCE presence
      and location).

   2. Restricting the type and nature of the optional information
      distributed by the discovery protocol. The latter is also
      subject to policy since the PCE architecture allows for
      distributing this information using either PCE discovery
      protocol(s) or PCC-PCE communication protocol(s). One important
      policy decision in this context is the nature of the information
      to be distributed, especially, when this information is not
      strictly speaking a "discovery" information, rather, the PCE
      state changes. Client-specific and domain-specific policies may
      be applied when deciding whether this information should be
      distributed and to which clients of the path computation service
      (that is, which PCCs and/or PCEs)

   Another place where policy applies is at the administrative
   boundaries. In multi-domain networks multiple PCEs will communicate
   with each other and across administrative boundaries. In such cases,
   domain-specific polices would be applied to 1) filter the information
   exchanged between peering PCEs during the discovery process (to the
   bare minimum in most cases if at all allowed by the security policy)
   and 2) limit the content of information being passed in path
   computation request and responses.


9. Path Computation Sequence of Events

   This section presents representative scenarios; other scenarios are
   also possible.












Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 22]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


9.1. Policy-enabled PCC, Policy-enabled PCE

   When a GMPLS LSR receives a Setup (RSVP Path) message from an
   upstream LSR, the LSR may decide to use a remote Path Computation
   Entity. The following sequence of events occurs in this case:

   - A PCC-PEP co-located with the LSR applies the service specific
     policies to select a PCE for the service path computation as
     well as to build the path computation request (that is, to
     select a list of policies, their variables, conditions and
     actions expressing constraints, diversities, objective functions
     and relaxation strategies appropriate for the service path
     computation). The policies may be:

     a) Statically configured on the PCC-PEP;

     b) Communicated to the PCC-PEP by a remote or local PCC-PDP
        via protocol such as COPS either pro-actively (most of the
        cases) or upon an explicit request by the PCC-PEP in case when
        some specifics of the new service have not been covered yet by
        the policies so far known to the PCC-PEP)

     The input for the decision process on the PCC-PEP is the
     information found in the signaling message as well as any other
     service specific information such as port ID over which the message
     was received, associated VPN ID, the reference point type (UNI, E-
     NNI, etc.) and so forth. After the path computation request is
     built it is sent directly to the PCE-PEP using the PCC-PCE
     Communication Protocol.

   - PCE-PEP validates and otherwise processes the request applying
     the policies found in the request as well as client and domain
     specific polices. The latter, again, may be either statically
     configured on the PCE-PEP or provided by the associated local or
     remote PCE-PDP via a protocol such as COPS. The outcome of the
     decision process is the following information:

     a) Whether the request should be satisfied, rejected or
        dismissed.

     b) The sets of sources and destinations for which paths should
        be locally computed.

     c) The set of constraints, diversities, optimization functions
        and relaxations to be considered in each of locally performed
        path computation.

     d) The address of the next-in-chain PCE.



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 23]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


     e) The path computation request to be sent to the
        next-in-chain PCE.

     The PCE-PEP instructs a co-located path computation engine to
     perform the local path computation(s) and, if necessary, sends the
     path computation request to the next-in-chain PCE using a PCC-PCE
     Communication Protocol. Then it waits for the responses from the
     local path computation engine and the remote PCE, combines the
     resulting paths and sends them back to the PCC-PEP using the PCC-
     PCE Communication Protocol. The response contains the resulting
     paths as well as policies describing some additional information
     (for example, which of constraints were honored, which were
     dismissed and which were relaxed and in what way)

   - PCC-PEP instructs the signaling sub-system of the GMPLS LSR to
     encode the received path(s) into the outgoing Setup message(s).


9.2. Policy-ignorant PCC, Policy-enabled PCE

   This case parallels the previous example, but the user and service
   specific policies should be applied at the PCE as the PCC is policy
   ignorant. Again, when a GMPLS LSR has received a Setup (RSVP Path)
   message from an upstream LSR, the LSR may decide to use a non co-
   located Path Computation Entity.  The following sequence of events
   occurs in this case:

   - The PCC constructs a PCE request using information found in the
     signaling/provisioning message as well as any other service
     specific information such as port ID over which the message was
     received, associated VPN ID, the reference point type (UNI, E-
     NNI, etc.) and so forth. This information is encoded in the
     request in the form of policy variables. After the request is
     built it is sent directly to the PCE-PEP using a PCC-PCE
     Communication Protocol.

   - PCE-PEP validates and otherwise processes the request
     interpreting the policy variables found in the request and
     applying user, service- and also client- and domain- specific
     polices to build the actual path computation request. The
     policies, again, may be either statically configured on the
     PCE-PEP or provided by the associated local or remote PCE-PDP via
     a protocol such as COPS. The outcome of the decision process is
     the following information:

     a) Whether the request should be satisfied, rejected or
        dismissed.




Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 24]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


     b) The sets of sources and destinations for which paths should
        be locally computed.

     c) The set of constraints, diversities, optimization functions
        and relaxations to be considered in each of locally performed
        path computation.

     d) The address of the next-in-chain PCE.

     e) The path computation request to be sent to the next-in-
        chain PCE.

     The PCE-PEP instructs a co-located path computation engine to
     perform the local path computation(s) and, if necessary, sends the
     path computation request to the next-in-chain PCE using the PCC-PCE
     Communication Protocol. Then it waits for the responses from the
     local path computation engine and the remote PCE, combines the
     resulting paths and sends them back to the PCC-PEP using the PCC-
     PCE Communication Protocol. The response contains the resulting
     paths as well as policies describing some additional information
     (for example, which of constraints were honored, which were
     dismissed and which were relaxed and in what way)

   - PCC-PEP instructs the signaling sub-system of the GMPLS LSR to
     encode the received path(s) into the outgoing Setup message(s).


10. Introduction of New Constraints

   An important aspect of the policy-enable path computation framework
   discussed above is the ability to introduce new constraints with
   minimal impact.  In particular, only those components and mechanisms
   that will use a new constraint need to change in order to support a
   new constraints.  Importantly, those components and mechanisms that
   will not use a new constraint must not require change for a new
   constraint to be utilized.  For example, the PCE communication
   protocols must not require any changes to support a new constraint.
   Likewise, PCC and PCEs that will not process a new constraint must
   not require any modification.

   Consider the case where a PCE has been upgraded with software
   supporting optical physical impairment constraint, such as
   Polarization Mode Dispersion (PMD), that previously was not supported
   in the domain. In this case, one or more new policies will be
   installed in the PC Policy Repository (associated with the PCE)
   defining the constraint (rules that determine application criteria,
   set of policy variables, conditions, actions, etc.) and its
   relaxation strategy(ies). The new policies will be also propagated



Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 25]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


   into other PC Policy Repositories within the domain via discovery and
   synchronization protocols or via local configuration. PCE-PDPs and
   PCC-PDPs will then retrieve the corresponding policies from the
   repository(ies). From then on PCC-PDPs will instruct associated PCC-
   PEPs to add the new policy information into path computation requests
   for services with certain parameters (for example, for services
   provisioned in the OCh layer).

   It is important to note that policy-enabled path computation model
   naturally solves the PCE capability discovery issues. Suppose a PCE
   working in a single PC Policy Repository configuration starts to
   support a new constraint. Once a corresponding policy installed in
   the repository, it automatically becomes available for all repository
   users, that is, PCCs. In the multi-repository case some policy
   synchronization must be provided, however, this problem is one of the
   management plane which is solved already.


11. Security Considerations

   This document adds to the policy security considerations mentioned in
   [PCE-ARCH]. In particular it is now necessary to consider the
   security of policy information maintained in PC Policy Repositories
   and policy related transactions. The most notable issues, some of
   which are also listed in [PCE-ARCH], are:

   - Unauthorized access to the PC Policy Repositories;

   - Interception of policy information when it is retrieved from
     the repositories and/or transported from PDPs to PEPs;

   - Interception of policy related information in path computation
     requests and responses;

      o  Impersonation of user and client identities;

      o  Falsification of policy information and/or PCE capabilities;

      o  Denial of service attacks on policy related communication
      mechanisms.

   As with [PCE-ARCH], it is expected that PCE solutions will address
   these issues in detail.








Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 26]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


12. Acknowledgements

    We would like to thank Bela Berde for fruitful discussions on PBM
    and Policy-driven path computation.


13. IANA Considerations

    None.


14. References

14.1. Normative References

   [PCE-ARCH] Farrel, A., Vasseur, JP., Ash, J., "Path Computation
              Element (PCE) Architecture", April 2006.

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels," BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [RFC2753]  R. Yavatkar, D. Pendarakis, R. Guerin, A Framework for
              Policy Based Admission Control, RFC 2753, January 2000.

   [RFC2748]  D. Durham, et al., The COPS (Common Open Policy Service)
               protocol, RFC 2748, IETF, January 2000.

   [RFC3060]  B. Moore, et al., Policy Information Model Version1
              Specification, RFC 3060, February 2001.

   [RFC3209]  Awduche, D., et al., "Extensions to RSVP for LSP
              Tunnels", RFC 3209, December 2001.

   [RFC3460]  Moore, B. Ed., "Policy Core Information Model (PCIM)
              Extensions", RFC 3460, January 2003.

   [RFC3473]  Berger, L., et al., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label
              Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Resource ReserVation
              Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) Extensions", RFC
              3473, January 2003.

   [RFC3644]  Y. Snir, et al., Policy Quality of Service (QoS)
              Information Model, RFC 3644, November 2003.

   [RFC4216]  Zhang, R., Vasseur, J-P., Eds., "MPLS Inter-Autonomous
              System (AS) Traffic Engineering (TE) Requirements",
              RFC4216, November 2005.




Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 27]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


   [INTERAS-PCEP]  Bitar, N., Zhang, R., Kumaki, K., Eds., "Inter-AS
                   Requirements for the Path Computation Element
                   Communication Protocol (PCECP)", February 2006.

   [PCECP-IA-REQ]  Le Roux, J-L., Ed., "PCE Communication Protocol
                   (PCECP) Specific Requirements for Inter-Area
                   (G)MPLS Traffic Engineering", February 2006.


14.2. Informative References

   [DMTF]  Common Information Model (CIM) Schema, version 2.x.
           Distributed Management Task Force, Inc. The components
           of the CIM v2.x schema are available via links on the
           following DMTF web page:
           http://www.dmtf.org/standards/standard_cim.php.

   [RFC3031]  Rosen, E,. Viswanathan, V. Callon, R., "Multiprotocol
              Label Switching Architecture", RFC 3031, January 2001.

   [RFC3084] Chan, K., Seligson, J., Durham, D., Gai, S., McCloghrie,
             K., Herzog, S., Reichmeyer, F., Yavatkar, R. and A.
             Smith, "COPS Usage for Policy Provisioning (COPS-PR)",
             RFC 3084, February 2001.

   [RFC3198]  Westerinen, A., et al., "Terminology for Policy-Based
              Management", RFC 3198, November 2001.

   [RFC3630]  Katz, D., Kompella, K., Yeung., D., "Traffic Engineering
              (TE) Extensions to OSPF Version 2", RFC 3630, September
              2003.


15. Authors' Addresses

   Igor Bryskin
   Movaz Networks, Inc.
   7926 Jones Branch Drive
   Suite 615
   McLean, VA 22102
   Email: ibryskin@movaz.com

   Dimitri Papadimitriou (Alcatel)
   Fr. Wellesplein 1,
   B-2018 Antwerpen, Belgium
   Phone: +32 3 240-8491
   Email: dimitri.papadimitriou@alcatel.be




Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 28]

Internet Draft draft-ietf-pce-policy-enabled-path-comp-00.txt July 2006


   Lou Berger
   LabN Consulting, LLC
   Phone: +1 301 468 9228
   Email: lberger@labn.net



16. Full Copyright Statement

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2006).  This document is subject
   to the rights, licenses and restrictions contained in BCP 78, and
   except as set forth therein, the authors retain all their rights.

   This document and the information contained herein are provided on an
   "AS IS" basis and THE CONTRIBUTOR, THE ORGANIZATION HE/SHE REPRESENTS
   OR IS SPONSORED BY (IF ANY), THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND THE INTERNET
   ENGINEERING TASK FORCE DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
   INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE
   INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED
   WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.


17. Intellectual Property

   The IETF takes no position regarding the validity or scope of any
   Intellectual Property Rights or other rights that might be claimed to
   pertain to the implementation or use of the technology described in
   this document or the extent to which any license under such rights
   might or might not be available; nor does it represent that it has
   made any independent effort to identify any such rights.  Information
   on the procedures with respect to rights in RFC documents can be
   found in BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Copies of IPR disclosures made to the IETF Secretariat and any
   assurances of licenses to be made available, or the result of an
   attempt made to obtain a general license or permission for the use of
   such proprietary rights by implementers or users of this
   specification can be obtained from the IETF on-line IPR repository at
   http://www.ietf.org/ipr.

   The IETF invites any interested party to bring to its attention any
   copyrights, patents or patent applications, or other proprietary
   rights that may cover technology that may be required to implement
   this standard.  Please address the information to the IETF at ietf-
   ipr@ietf.org.






Bryskin, Papadimitriou & Berger                                [Page 29]
Generated on: Thu Jun 22 19:34:07 EDT 2006


Html markup produced by rfcmarkup 1.109, available from https://tools.ietf.org/tools/rfcmarkup/