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Versions: (draft-bryant-pwe3-mpls-transport) 00 01 02 03 04 RFC 5994

Network Working Group                                     S. Bryant, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                                 M. Morrow
Intended status: Informational                                G. Swallow
Expires: December 31, 2009                                 Cisco Systems
                                                            R. Cherukuri
                                                       Juniper Networks,
                                                               T. Nadeau
                                                             N. Harrison
                                                        B. Niven-Jenkins
                                                                      BT
                                                           June 29, 2009


     Application of Ethernet Pseudowires to MPLS Transport Networks
                   draft-ietf-pwe3-mpls-transport-04

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.  This document may contain material
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 31, 2009.



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Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2009 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents in effect on the date of
   publication of this document (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info).
   Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights
   and restrictions with respect to this document.

Abstract

   A requirement has been identified by the operator community for the
   transparent carriage of the MPLS(-TP) network of one party over the
   MPLS(-TP) network of another party.  This document describes a method
   of satisfying this need using the existing PWE3 Ethernet pseudowire
   standard RFC4448.

Requirements Language

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC2119 [RFC2119].



























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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   2.  PWE3 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
   3.  OAM  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     3.1.  VCCV profile 1: BFD without IP/UDP Headers . . . . . . . .  6
     3.2.  VCCV profile 2: BFD with IP/UDP Headers  . . . . . . . . .  7
   4.  MPLS Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     4.1.  External Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     4.2.  Control Plane Configuration  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
   5.  Congestion Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
   6.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
   7.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   8.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   9.  References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     9.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     9.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

































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1.  Introduction

   The operator community has identified the need for the transparent
   carriage of the MPLS(-TP) network of one party over the MPLS(-TP)
   network of another party [I-D.ietf-mpls-tp-requirements].  This
   document describes one mechanism to satisfy this requirement using
   existing IETF standards such as PWE3 Ethernet pseudowire standard
   [RFC4448] .  The mechanism described here fulfills the MPLS-TP
   requirements for transparent carriage (MPLS-TP requirements 30 & 31)
   of the Ethernet data plane.

   The key purpose of this document is to demonstrate that there is an
   existing IETF mechanism with known implementations that satisfies the
   requirements posed by the operator community.  It is recognised that
   it is possible to design a more efficient method of satisfying the
   requirements, and the IETF anticipates that improved solutions will
   be proposed in the future.

   Much of the notation used in this document is defined in [RFC3985] to
   which the reader is referred for definitions.

   The architecture required for this mechanism is illustrated in Figure
   1 below.




























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     +----------------------------------------------------------------+
     |                                                                |
     |                  IP/MPLS PSN (PHP may be enabled)              |
     |                            (client)                            |
     |                                                                |
     |                  +---------------------------+                 |
     |                  |                           |                 |
     |                  |      MPLS PSN (No PHP)    |                 |
     |                  |         (server)          |                 |
     |                  |                           |                 |
     |     CE1          |PE1                     PE2|           CE2   |
     |   +-----+      +-----+                   +-----+      +-----+  |
     |   | | | |      | | | |                   | | | |      | | | |  |
     |   | | | +------+ | | |                   | | | +------+ | | |  |
     |   | | | | 802.3| | | |                   | | | | 802.3| | | |  |
     |   +-----+      +-----+                   +-----+      +-----+  |
     |     |   |        |  |                      | |        |   |    |
     |     |   |        +-- ---------------------- -+        |   |    |
     +----- --- -------- -- ---------------------- - -------- --- ----+
           |   |        |  |<--MPLS LSP (no PHP)->| |        |   |
           |   |        |  |       (server)       | |        |   |
           |   |        |                           |        |   |
           |   |        |<------------PW----------->|        |   |
           |   |        |          (server)         |        |   |
           |   |                                             |   |
           |   |<-------------802.3 (Ethernet)-------------->|   |
           |   |                   (client)                  |   |
           |                                                     |
           |<---------IP/MPLS LSP (PHP may be supported)-------->|
           |                       (client)                      |


   Figure 1: Application Ethernet over MPLS PW to MPLS Transport
   Networks

   An 802.3 (Ethernet) circuit is established between CE1 and CE2.  This
   circuit may be used for the concurrent transport of MPLS packets as
   well as IPv4 and IPv6 packets.  The MPLS packets may carry IPv4,
   IPV6, or Pseudowire payloads, and Penultimate-Hop-Popping (PHP) may
   be used.  For clarity these paths are labeled as the client in Figure
   1.

   An Ethernet pseudowire (PW) is provisioned between PE1 and PE2 and
   used to carry the Ethernet from PE1 to PE2.  The Ethernet PW is
   carried over an MPLS packet switched Network (PSN), but this PSN MUST
   NOT be configured with PHP.  For clarity this Ethernet PW and the
   MPLS PSN are labeled as the server in Figure 1.  In the remainder of
   this draft call the server network a transport network.



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2.  PWE3 Configuration

   The PWE3 encapsulation used by this specification to satisfy the
   transport requirement is Ethernet [RFC4448].  This is used in "raw"
   mode.

   The Control Word MUST be used.  The Sequence number MUST be zero.

   The use of the Pseudowire Setup and Maintenance Label Distribution
   Protocol [RFC4447] is not required by the profile of the PWE3
   Ethernet pseudowire functionality defined in this document.

   The Pseudowire Label is statically provisioned.


3.  OAM

   Within a connection, traffic units sent from the single source are
   constrained to stay within the connection under defect-free
   conditions.  During misconnected defects, a connection can no longer
   be assumed to be constrained and traffic units (and by implication
   also OAM packets) can 'leak' unidirectionally outside a connection.
   Therefore during a misconnected state, it is not possible to rely on
   OAM which relies on a request/response mechanism ; and, for this
   reason such OAM should be treated with caution if used for diagnostic
   purposes.

   Further, when implementing an Equal Cost Multi-path (ECMP) function
   with MPLS, use of the label stack as the path selector such that the
   OAM and data are not in a co-path SHOULD be avoided, as any failure
   in the data path will note be reflected in the OAM path.  Therefore,
   an OAM that is carried within the data-path below the PW label such
   as Virtual Circuit Connectivity Verification (VCCV) is NOT vulnerable
   to the above failure mode.  For these reasons the OAM mechanism is
   [RFC5085], using Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD)
   [I-D.ietf-bfd-base] for connection verification (CV).  The method of
   using Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) as a CV method in VCCV
   is described in [I-D.ietf-pwe3-vccv-bfd].  One of the VCCV profiles
   described in Section 3.1 or Section 3.2 MUST be used.  Once a VCCV
   control channel is provisioned, and the operational status of the PW
   is UP, no other profile should be used until such time as the PW's
   operational status is set to DOWN.

3.1.  VCCV profile 1: BFD without IP/UDP Headers

   When PE1 and PE1 are not IP capable or have not been configured with
   IP addresses, the following VCCV mechanism SHOULD be used.




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   The connection verification method used by VCCV is BFD with
   diagnostics as defined in [I-D.ietf-pwe3-vccv-bfd].

   [RFC5085] specifies that the first nibble is set to 0x1 to indicate a
   channel associated with a pseudowire [RFC4385].

   The Version and the Reserved fields are set to zero, and the Channel
   Type is set to 0x7 to indicate that the payload carried is BFD
   without IP/UDP headers, as is defined in [I-D.ietf-pwe3-vccv-bfd].

3.2.  VCCV profile 2: BFD with IP/UDP Headers

   When PE1 and PE1 are IP capable and have been configured with IP
   addresses, the following VCCV mechanism may be used.

   The connection verification method used by VCCV is BFD with
   diagnostics as defined in [I-D.ietf-pwe3-vccv-bfd].

   [RFC5085] specifies that the first nibble is set to 0x1 to indicate a
   channel associated with a pseudowire [RFC4385].

   The Version and the Reserved fields are set to 0, and the Channel
   Type is set to 0x21 for IPv4 and 0x56 for IPv6 payloads [RFC4446].


4.  MPLS Layer

   The architecture of MPLS enabled networks is described in [RFC3031].
   This section describes a subset of the functionality of the MPLS
   enabled PSN.  There are two cases that need to be considered:

   1.  The case where external configuration is used.

   2.  The case where a control plane is available.

   Where the use of a control plane is desired this may be based on
   Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) [RFC3945]

4.1.  External Configuration

   The use of external provisioning is not precluded from being
   supported by the current MPLS specifications.  It is however
   explicitly described in this specification to address the
   requirements specified by the ITU [I-D.ietf-mpls-tp-requirements] to
   address the needs in a transport environment.

   The MPLS encapsulation is specified in [RFC3032].  All MPLS labels
   used in the server layer (Figure 1) MUST be statically provisioned.



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   Labels may be selected from either the per-platform or the per-
   interface label space.

   All transport Label Switched Paths (LSPs) utilized by the PWs
   described in section 2 MUST support both unidirectional and bi-
   directional point-to-point connections.

   The transport LSPs SHOULD support unidirectional point-to-multipoint
   connections.

   The forward and backward directions of a bi-directional connection
   SHOULD follow a symmetrically routed (reciprocal) LSP in the server
   network.

   Equal cost multi-path (ECMP) load balancing MUST NOT be configured on
   the transport LSPs utilized by the PWs described in sections 2.

   The merging of label switched paths is prohibited and MUST NOT be
   configured for the transport LSPs utilized by the PWs described in
   section 2.

   Penultimate hop popping by the transport label switched routers
   (LSRs) MUST be disabled on transport LSPs.

   Both EXP-Inferred-PSC LSPs (E-LSP) and Label-Only-Inferred-PSC LSPs
   (L-LSP) MUST be supported as defined in [RFC3270].

   For the MPLS EXP field [RFC3270] [RFC5462] only the pipe and short-
   pipe models are supported.

4.2.  Control Plane Configuration

   In this section we describe the control plane configuration
   when[RFC3209] "RSVP-TE: Extensions to RSVP for LSP Tunnels" or the
   bi-directional support in GMPLS [RFC3471] "Generalized Multi-Protocol
   Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Functional Description"
   and[RFC3473] "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)
   Signaling Resource Reservation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE)
   Extensions" are used to configure the transport MPLS PSN.  When these
   protocols are used to provide the control plane the following are
   automatically provided:

   1.  There is no label merging unless it is deliberately enabled to
       support Fast Re-route (FRR) [RFC3209].

   2.  A single path is provided end-to-end (there is no ECMP).





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   3.  Label switched paths may be unidirectional or bidirectional as
       required.

   Additionally the following configuration restrictions required to
   support external configuration MUST be applied:

   o  Penultimate hop popping by the LSRs MUST be disabled on LSPs
      providing PWE3 transport network functionality
      [I-D.ietf-mpls-rsvp-te-no-php-oob-mapping].

   o  Both E-LSP and L-LSP MUST be supported as defined in [RFC3270].

   o  The MPLS EXP [RFC5462] field is supported according to [RFC3270]
      for only when the pipe and short-pipe models are utilized.


5.  Congestion Considerations

   This draft describes a method of using the existing PWE3 Ethernet
   pseudowire [RFC4448] to solve a particular network application.  The
   congestion considerations associated with that pseudowire and all
   subsequent work on congestion considerations regarding Ethernet
   pseudowires are applicable to this draft.


6.  Security Considerations

   This draft is a description of the use of existing IETF proposed
   standards to solve a network problem, and raises no new security
   issues.

   The PWE3 security considerations are described in [RFC3985] and the
   Ethernet pseudowire security considerations of[RFC4448].

   The Ethernet pseudowire is transported on an MPLS PSN; therefore, the
   security of the pseudowire itself will only be as good as the
   security of the MPLS PSN.  The server MPLS PSN can be secured by
   various methods, as described in[RFC3031].

   The use of static configuration exposes an MPLS PSN to a different
   set of security risks to those found in a PSN using dynamic routing.
   If a path is misconfigured in a statically configured network the
   result can be a persistent black hole, or much worst, a persistent
   forwarding loop.  On the other hand most of the distributed
   components are less complex.  This is however offset by the need to
   provide fail-over and redundancy in the management and configuration
   system and the communications paths between those central systems and
   the LSRs.



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   Security achieved by access control of media access control (MAC)
   addresses , and the security of the client layers is out of the scope
   of this document.


7.  IANA Considerations

   There are no IANA actions required by this draft.


8.  Acknowledgements

   The authors wish to thank Matthew Bocci, John Drake, Adrian Farrel,
   Andy Malis, and Yaakov Stein for their review and proposed
   enhancements to the text.


9.  References

9.1.  Normative References

   [I-D.ietf-bfd-base]
              Katz, D. and D. Ward, "Bidirectional Forwarding
              Detection", draft-ietf-bfd-base-09 (work in progress),
              February 2009.

   [I-D.ietf-mpls-rsvp-te-no-php-oob-mapping]
              Ali, Z. and G. Swallow, "Non PHP Behavior and out-of-band
              mapping for RSVP-TE LSPs",
              draft-ietf-mpls-rsvp-te-no-php-oob-mapping-02 (work in
              progress), March 2009.

   [I-D.ietf-pwe3-vccv-bfd]
              Nadeau, T. and C. Pignataro, "Bidirectional Forwarding
              Detection (BFD) for the Pseudowire Virtual Circuit
              Connectivity Verification (VCCV)",
              draft-ietf-pwe3-vccv-bfd-05 (work in progress), June 2009.

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [RFC3031]  Rosen, E., Viswanathan, A., and R. Callon, "Multiprotocol
              Label Switching Architecture", RFC 3031, January 2001.

   [RFC3032]  Rosen, E., Tappan, D., Fedorkow, G., Rekhter, Y.,
              Farinacci, D., Li, T., and A. Conta, "MPLS Label Stack
              Encoding", RFC 3032, January 2001.




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   [RFC3209]  Awduche, D., Berger, L., Gan, D., Li, T., Srinivasan, V.,
              and G. Swallow, "RSVP-TE: Extensions to RSVP for LSP
              Tunnels", RFC 3209, December 2001.

   [RFC3270]  Le Faucheur, F., Wu, L., Davie, B., Davari, S., Vaananen,
              P., Krishnan, R., Cheval, P., and J. Heinanen, "Multi-
              Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) Support of Differentiated
              Services", RFC 3270, May 2002.

   [RFC3471]  Berger, L., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching
              (GMPLS) Signaling Functional Description", RFC 3471,
              January 2003.

   [RFC3473]  Berger, L., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching
              (GMPLS) Signaling Resource ReserVation Protocol-Traffic
              Engineering (RSVP-TE) Extensions", RFC 3473, January 2003.

   [RFC3945]  Mannie, E., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching
              (GMPLS) Architecture", RFC 3945, October 2004.

   [RFC4385]  Bryant, S., Swallow, G., Martini, L., and D. McPherson,
              "Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3) Control Word for
              Use over an MPLS PSN", RFC 4385, February 2006.

   [RFC4446]  Martini, L., "IANA Allocations for Pseudowire Edge to Edge
              Emulation (PWE3)", BCP 116, RFC 4446, April 2006.

   [RFC4447]  Martini, L., Rosen, E., El-Aawar, N., Smith, T., and G.
              Heron, "Pseudowire Setup and Maintenance Using the Label
              Distribution Protocol (LDP)", RFC 4447, April 2006.

   [RFC4448]  Martini, L., Rosen, E., El-Aawar, N., and G. Heron,
              "Encapsulation Methods for Transport of Ethernet over MPLS
              Networks", RFC 4448, April 2006.

   [RFC5085]  Nadeau, T. and C. Pignataro, "Pseudowire Virtual Circuit
              Connectivity Verification (VCCV): A Control Channel for
              Pseudowires", RFC 5085, December 2007.

   [RFC5462]  Andersson, L. and R. Asati, "Multiprotocol Label Switching
              (MPLS) Label Stack Entry: "EXP" Field Renamed to "Traffic
              Class" Field", RFC 5462, February 2009.

9.2.  Informative References

   [I-D.ietf-mpls-tp-requirements]
              Niven-Jenkins, B., Brungard, D., Betts, M., Sprecher, N.,
              and S. Ueno, "MPLS-TP Requirements",



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              draft-ietf-mpls-tp-requirements-09 (work in progress),
              June 2009.

   [RFC3985]  Bryant, S. and P. Pate, "Pseudo Wire Emulation Edge-to-
              Edge (PWE3) Architecture", RFC 3985, March 2005.


Authors' Addresses

   Stewart Bryant (editor)
   Cisco Systems
   250, Longwater, Green Park,
   Reading  RG2 6GB, UK
   UK

   Email: stbryant@cisco.com


   Monique Morrow
   Cisco Systems
   Glatt-com
   CH-8301 Glattzentrum
   Switzerland

   Email: mmorrow@cisco.com


   George Swallow
   Cisco Systems
   1414 Massachusetts Ave
   Boxborough, MA  01719

   Email: swallow@cisco.com


   Rao Cherukuri
   Juniper Networks,
   1194 N. Mathilda Ave
   Sunnyvale  CA 94089


   Thomas D. Nadeau
   BT


   Email: tom.nadeau@bt.com





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   Neil Harrison
   BT

   Email: neil.2.harrison@bt.com


   Ben Niven-Jenkins
   BT
   208 Callisto House, Adastral Park
   Ipswich, Suffolk  IP5 3RE
   UK

   Phone:
   Fax:
   Email: benjamin.niven-jenkins@bt.com
   URI:



































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