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Versions: 00 01 02 03 RFC 3790

IPv6 Operations                                          C. Mickles, Ed.
Internet-Draft
Expires: March 31, 2004                                        P. Nesser
                                              Nesser & Nesser Consulting
                                                                Oct 2003


   Survey of IPv4 Addresses in Currently Deployed IETF Internet Area
                               Standards
                 draft-ietf-v6ops-ipv4survey-int-03.txt

Status of this Memo

   This document is an Internet-Draft and is in full conformance with
   all provisions of Section 10 of RFC2026.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that other
   groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at http://
   www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt.

   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.

   This Internet-Draft will expire on March 31, 2004.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2003). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   This document seeks to document all usage of IPv4 addresses in
   currently deployed IETF Internet Area documented standards.  In order
   to successfully transition from an all IPv4 Internet to an all IPv6
   Internet, many interim steps will be taken. One of these steps is the
   evolution of current protocols that have IPv4 dependencies.  It is
   hoped that these protocols (and their implementations) will be
   redesigned to be network address independent, but failing that will
   at least dually support IPv4 and IPv6.  To this end, all Standards
   (Full, Draft, and Proposed) as well as Experimental RFCs will be
   surveyed and any dependencies will be documented.



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Table of Contents

   1.     Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   2.     Document Organization  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   3.     Full Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   3.1    RFC 791 Internet Protocol  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   3.2    RFC 792 Internet Control Message Protocol  . . . . . . . .  11
   3.3    RFC 826 Ethernet Address Resolution Protocol . . . . . . .  11
   3.4    RFC 891 DCN Local-Network Protocols  . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   3.5    RFC 894 Standard for the transmission of IP datagrams
          over Ethernet networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   3.6    RFC 895 Standard for the transmission of IP datagrams
          over experimental Ethernet networks  . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   3.7    RFC 903 Reverse Address Resolution Protocol  . . . . . . .  11
   3.8    RFC 919 Broadcasting Internet Datagrams  . . . . . . . . .  11
   3.9    RFC 922 Broadcasting Internet datagrams in the presence
          of subnets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   3.10   RFC 950 Internet Standard Subnetting Procedure . . . . . .  12
   3.11   RFC 1034 Domain Names: Concepts and Facilities . . . . . .  12
   3.12   RFC 1035 Domain Names: Implementation and Specification  .  13
   3.13   RFC 1042 Standard for the transmission of IP datagrams
          over IEEE  802 networks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   3.14   RFC 1044 Internet Protocol on Network System's
          HYPERchannel:  Protocol Specification  . . . . . . . . . .  14
   3.15   RFC 1055 Nonstandard for transmission of IP datagrams
          over serial lines: SLIP  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   3.16   RFC 1088 Standard for the transmission of IP datagrams
          over NetBIOS networks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   3.17   RFC 1112 Host Extensions for IP Multicasting . . . . . . .  15
   3.18   RFC 1132 Standard for the transmission of 802.2 packets
          over IPX networks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   3.19   RFC 1201 Transmitting IP traffic over ARCNET networks  . .  15
   3.20   RFC 1209 The Transmission of IP Datagrams over the SMDS
          Service  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   3.21   RFC 1390 Transmission of IP and ARP over FDDI Networks . .  15
   3.22   RFC 1661 The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) . . . . . . . .  15
   3.23   RFC 1662 PPP in HDLC-like Framing  . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
   3.24   RFC 2427 Multiprotocol Interconnect over Frame Relay . . .  16
   4.     Draft Standards  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
   4.1    RFC 951 Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
   4.2    RFC 1188 Proposed Standard for the Transmission of IP
          Datagrams over FDDI Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
   4.3    RFC 1191 Path MTU discovery  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
   4.4    RFC 1356 Multiprotocol Interconnect on X.25 and ISDN . . .  18
   4.5    RFC 1534 Interoperation Between DHCP and BOOTP . . . . . .  18
   4.6    RFC 1542 Clarifications and Extensions for the
          Bootstrap Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
   4.7    RFC 1629 Guidelines for OSI NSAP Allocation in the



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          Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
   4.8    RFC 1762 The PPP DECnet Phase IV Control Protocol (DNCP) .  18
   4.9    RFC 1989 PPP Link Quality Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . .  18
   4.10   RFC 1990 The PPP Multilink Protocol (MP) . . . . . . . . .  18
   4.11   RFC 1994 PPP Challenge Handshake Authentication
          Protocol (CHAP)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
   4.12   RFC 2067 IP over HIPPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
   4.13   RFC 2131 Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol . . . . . . .  20
   4.14   RFC 2132 DHCP Options and BOOTP Vendor Extensions  . . . .  20
   4.15   RFC 2390 Inverse Address Resolution Protocol . . . . . . .  20
   4.16   RFC 2460 Internet Protocol, Version 6 (IPv6)
          Specification  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   4.17   RFC 2461 Neighbor Discovery for IP Version 6 (IPv6)  . . .  20
   4.18   RFC 2462 IPv6 Stateless Address Autoconfiguration  . . . .  20
   4.19   RFC 2463 Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMPv6) for
          the  Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Specification  . .  20
   4.20   RFC 3596 DNS Extensions to support IP version 6  . . . . .  20
   5.     Proposed Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
   5.1    RFC 1234 Tunneling IPX traffic through IP networks . . . .  21
   5.2    RFC 1256 ICMP Router Discovery Messages  . . . . . . . . .  22
   5.3    RFC 1277 Encoding Network Addresses to Support
          Operation over Non-OSI Lower Layers  . . . . . . . . . . .  22
   5.4    RFC 1332 The PPP Internet Protocol Control Protocol
          (IPCP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
   5.5    RFC 1377 The PPP OSI Network Layer Control Protocol
          (OSINLCP)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
   5.6    RFC 1378 The PPP AppleTalk Control Protocol (ATCP) . . . .  22
   5.7    RFC 1469 IP Multicast over Token-Ring Local Area
          Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
   5.8    RFC 1552 The PPP Internetworking Packet Exchange
          Control Protocol (IPXCP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
   5.9    RFC 1570 PPP LCP Extensions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23
   5.10   RFC 1598 PPP in X.25 PPP-X25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23
   5.11   RFC 1618 PPP over ISDN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23
   5.12   RFC 1663 PPP Reliable Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . .  23
   5.13   RFC 1752 The Recommendation for the IP Next Generation
          Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23
   5.14   RFC 1755 ATM Signaling Support for IP over ATM . . . . . .  23
   5.15   RFC 1763 The PPP Banyan Vines Control Protocol (BVCP)  . .  23
   5.16   RFC 1764 The PPP XNS IDP Control Protocol (XNSCP)  . . . .  23
   5.17   RFC 1973 PPP in Frame Relay  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23
   5.18   RFC 1981 Path MTU Discovery for IP version 6 . . . . . . .  23
   5.19   RFC 1982 Serial Number Arithmetic  . . . . . . . . . . . .  23
   5.20   5.21 RFC 1995 Incremental Zone Transfer in DNS . . . . . .  24
   5.21   RFC 1996 A Mechanism for Prompt Notification of Zone
          Changes (DNS NOTIFY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  24
   5.22   RFC 2003 IP Encapsulation within IP  . . . . . . . . . . .  24
   5.23   RFC 2004 Minimal Encapsulation within IP . . . . . . . . .  24



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   5.24   RFC 2005 Applicability Statement for IP Mobility Support .  24
   5.25   RFC 2022 Support for Multicast over UNI 3.0/3.1 based
          ATM Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  24
   5.26   RFC 2043 The PPP SNA Control Protocol (SNACP)  . . . . . .  24
   5.27   RFC 2097 The PPP NetBIOS Frames Control Protocol (NBFCP) .  24
   5.28   RFC 2113 IP Router Alert Option  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  24
   5.29   RFC 2125 The PPP Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) /
          The PPP Bandwidth Allocation Control Protocol (BACP) . . .  25
   5.30   RFC 2136 Dynamic Updates in the Domain Name System (DNS
          UPDATE)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25
   5.31   RFC 2181 Clarifications to the DNS Specification . . . . .  25
   5.32   RFC 2225 Classical IP and ARP over ATM . . . . . . . . . .  25
   5.33   RFC 2226 IP Broadcast over ATM Networks  . . . . . . . . .  25
   5.34   RFC 2241 DHCP Options for Novell Directory Services  . . .  25
   5.35   RFC 2242 NetWare/IP Domain Name and Information  . . . . .  26
   5.36   RFC 2290 Mobile-IPv4 Configuration Option for PPP IPCP . .  26
   5.37   RFC 2308 Negative Caching of DNS Queries (DNS NCACHE)  . .  26
   5.38   RFC 2331 ATM Signaling Support for IP over ATM - UNI
          Signaling 4.0 Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
   5.39   RFC 2332 NBMA Next Hop Resolution Protocol (NHRP)  . . . .  26
   5.40   RFC 2333 NHRP Protocol Applicability . . . . . . . . . . .  27
   5.41   RFC 2335 A Distributed NHRP Service Using SCSP . . . . . .  27
   5.42   RFC 2363 PPP Over FUNI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  27
   5.43   RFC 2364 PPP Over AAL5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  27
   5.44   RFC 2371 Transaction Internet Protocol Version 3.0
          (TIPV3)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  27
   5.45   RFC 2464 Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Ethernet
          Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29
   5.46   RFC 2467 Transmission of IPv6 Packets over FDDI Networks .  29
   5.47   RFC 2470 Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Token Ring
          Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29
   5.48   RFC 2472 IP Version 6 over PPP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29
   5.49   RFC 2473 Generic Packet Tunneling in IPv6 Specification  .  29
   5.50   RFC 2484 PPP LCP Internationalization Configuration
          Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29
   5.51   RFC 2485 DHCP Option for The Open Group's User
          Authentication Protocol  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29
   5.52   RFC 2486 The Network Access Identifier . . . . . . . . . .  29
   5.53   RFC 2491 IPv6 over Non-Broadcast Multiple Access (NBMA)
          networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29
   5.54   RFC 2492 IPv6 over ATM Networks  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29
   5.55   RFC 2497 Transmission of IPv6 Packets over ARCnet
          Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  30
   5.56   RFC 2507 IP Header Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  30
   5.57   RFC 2526 Reserved IPv6 Subnet Anycast Addresses  . . . . .  30
   5.58   RFC 2529 Transmission of IPv6 over IPv4 Domains without
          Explicit Tunnels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  30
   5.59   RFC 2563 DHCP Option to Disable Stateless



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          Auto-Configuration in IPv4 Clients . . . . . . . . . . . .  30
   5.60   RFC 2590 Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Frame Relay
          Networks Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  30
   5.61   RFC 2601 ILMI-Based Server Discovery for ATMARP  . . . . .  30
   5.62   RFC 2602 ILMI-Based Server Discovery for MARS  . . . . . .  30
   5.63   RFC 2603 ILMI-Based Server Discovery for NHRP  . . . . . .  30
   5.64   RFC 2610 DHCP Options for Service Location Protocol  . . .  30
   5.65   RFC 2615 PPP over SONET/SDH  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  31
   5.66   RFC 2625 IP and ARP over Fibre Channel . . . . . . . . . .  31
   5.67   RFC 2661 Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) . . . . . . .  31
   5.68   RFC 2671 Extension Mechanisms for DNS (EDNS0)  . . . . . .  31
   5.69   RFC 2672 Non-Terminal DNS Name Redirection . . . . . . . .  31
   5.70   RFC 2673 Binary Labels in the Domain Name System . . . . .  31
   5.71   RFC 2675 IPv6 Jumbograms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  31
   5.72   RFC 2684 Multiprotocol Encapsulation over ATM
          Adaptation Layer 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  31
   5.73   RFC 2685 Virtual Private Networks Identifier . . . . . . .  31
   5.74   RFC 2686 The Multi-Class Extension to Multi-Link PPP . . .  32
   5.75   RFC 2687 PPP in a Real-time Oriented HDLC-like Framing . .  32
   5.76   RFC 2688 Integrated Services Mappings for Low Speed
          Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  32
   5.77   RFC 2710 Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) for IPv6 . . .  32
   5.78   RFC 2711 IPv6 Router Alert Option  . . . . . . . . . . . .  32
   5.79   RFC 2728 The Transmission of IP Over the Vertical
          Blanking Interval of a Television Signal . . . . . . . . .  32
   5.80   RFC 2734 IPv4 over IEEE 1394 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  33
   5.81   RFC 2735 NHRP Support for Virtual Private Networks . . . .  33
   5.82   RFC 2765 Stateless IP/ICMP Translation Algorithm (SIIT)  .  33
   5.83   RFC 2766 Network Address Translation - Protocol
          Translation (NAT-PT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  33
   5.84   RFC 2776 Multicast-Scope Zone Announcement Protocol
          (MZAP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  33
   5.85   RFC 2782 A DNS RR for specifying the location of
          services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  33
   5.86   RFC 2794 Mobile IP Network Access Identifier Extension
          for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  33
   5.87   RFC 2834 ARP and IP Broadcast over HIPPI-800 . . . . . . .  33
   5.88   RFC 2835 IP and ARP over HIPPI-6400  . . . . . . . . . . .  35
   5.89   RFC 2855 DHCP for IEEE 1394  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  35
   5.90   RFC 2874 DNS Extensions to Support IPv6 Address
          Aggregation and Renumbering  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  35
   5.91   RFC 2893 Transition Mechanisms for IPv6 Hosts and
          Routers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  36
   5.92   RFC 2916 E.164 number and DNS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  36
   5.93   RFC 2937 The Name Service Search Option for DHCP . . . . .  36
   5.94   RFC 3004 The User Class Option for DHCP  . . . . . . . . .  36
   5.95   RFC 3011 The IPv4 Subnet Selection Option for DHCP . . . .  36
   5.96   RFC 3021 Using 31-Bit Prefixes for IPv4 P2P Links  . . . .  36



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   5.97   RFC 3024 Reverse Tunneling for Mobile IP, revised  . . . .  36
   5.98   RFC 3046 DHCP Relay Agent Information Option . . . . . . .  36
   5.99   RFC 3056 Connection of IPv6 Domains via IPv4 Clouds  . . .  36
   5.100  RFC 3068 An Anycast Prefix for 6to4 Relay Routers  . . . .  36
   5.101  RFC 3070 Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) over Frame
          Relay  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  37
   5.102  RFC 3074 DHC Load Balancing Algorithm  . . . . . . . . . .  37
   5.103  RFC 3077 A Link-Layer Tunneling Mechanism for
          Unidirectional Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  37
   5.104  RFC 3115 Mobile IP Vendor/Organization-Specific
          Extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  37
   5.105  RFC 3145 L2TP Disconnect Cause Information . . . . . . . .  37
   5.106  RFC 3344 IP Mobility Support for IPv4  . . . . . . . . . .  37
   5.107  RFC 3376 Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 3 . .  37
   5.108  RFC 3402 Dynamic Delegation Discovery System (DDDS)
          Part Two: The Algorithm  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  37
   5.109  RFC 3403 Dynamic Delegation Discovery System (DDDS)
          Part Three:  The Domain Name System (DNS) Database . . . .  37
   5.110  RFC 3513 IP Version 6 Addressing Architecture  . . . . . .  37
   5.111  RFC 3518 Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) Bridging Control
          Protocol (BCP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  38
   6.     Experimental RFCs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  39
   6.1    RFC 1149 Standard for the transmission of IP datagrams
          on avian carriers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  39
   6.2    RFC 1183 New DNS RR Definitions  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  39
   6.3    RFC 1226 Internet protocol encapsulation of AX.25 frames .  39
   6.4    RFC 1241 Scheme for an internet encapsulation protocol:
          Version 1  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  39
   6.5    RFC 1307 Dynamically Switched Link Control Protocol  . . .  39
   6.6    RFC 1393 Traceroute Using an IP Option . . . . . . . . . .  40
   6.7    RFC 1433 Directed ARP  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  40
   6.8    RFC 1464 Using the Domain Name System To Store
          Arbitrary String Attributes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  40
   6.9    RFC 1475 TP/IX: The Next Internet  . . . . . . . . . . . .  40
   6.10   RFC 1561 Use of ISO CLNP in TUBA Environments  . . . . . .  40
   6.11   RFC 1712 DNS Encoding of Geographical Location . . . . . .  41
   6.12   RFC 1735 NBMA Address Resolution Protocol (NARP) . . . . .  41
   6.13   RFC 1768 Host Group Extensions for CLNP Multicasting . . .  42
   6.14   RFC 1788 ICMP Domain Name Messages . . . . . . . . . . . .  42
   6.15   RFC 1797 Class A Subnet Experiment . . . . . . . . . . . .  42
   6.16   RFC 1819 Internet Stream Protocol Version 2 (ST2)
          Protocol Specification - Version ST2+  . . . . . . . . . .  42
   6.17   RFC 1868 ARP Extension - UNARP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  43
   6.18   RFC 1876 A Means for Expressing Location Information in
          the Domain Name System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  43
   6.19   RFC 1888 OSI NSAPs and IPv6  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  43
   6.20   RFC 2009 GPS-Based Addressing and Routing  . . . . . . . .  43
   6.21   RFC 2143 Encapsulating IP with the SCSI  . . . . . . . . .  43



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   6.22   RFC 2345 Domain Names and Company Name Retrieval . . . . .  43
   6.23   RFC 2443 A Distributed MARS Service Using SCSP . . . . . .  43
   6.24   RFC 2471 IPv6 Testing Address Allocation . . . . . . . . .  44
   6.25   RFC 2520 NHRP with Mobile NHCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  44
   6.26   RFC 2521 ICMP Security Failures Messages . . . . . . . . .  44
   6.27   RFC 2540 Detached Domain Name System (DNS) Information . .  44
   6.28   RFC 2823 PPP over Simple Data Link (SDL) using
          SONET/SDH with ATM-like framing  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  44
   6.29   RFC 3123 A DNS RR Type for Lists of Address Prefixes . . .  44
   6.30   RFC 3168 The Addition of Explicit Congestion
          Notification  (ECN) to IP  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  44
   6.31   RFC 3180 GLOP Addressing in 233/8  . . . . . . . . . . . .  44
   7.     Summary of the Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  45
   7.1    Standards  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  45
   7.1.1  RFC 791 Internet Protocol  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  45
   7.1.2  RFC 792 Internet Control Message Protocol  . . . . . . . .  45
   7.1.3  RFC 891 DCN Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  45
   7.1.4  RFC 894 IP over Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  45
   7.1.5  RFC 895 IP over experimental Ethernets . . . . . . . . . .  45
   7.1.6  RFC 922 Broadcasting Internet Datagrams in the Presence
          of Subnets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  45
   7.1.7  RFC 950 Internet Standard Subnetting Procedure . . . . . .  46
   7.1.8  RFC 1034 Domain Names: Concepts and Facilities . . . . . .  46
   7.1.9  RFC 1035 Domain Names: Implementation and Specification  .  46
   7.1.10 RFC 1042 IP over IEEE 802  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  46
   7.1.11 RFC 1044 IP over HyperChannel  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  46
   7.1.12 RFC 1088 IP over NetBIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  46
   7.1.13 RFC 1112 Host Extensions for IP Multicast  . . . . . . . .  46
   7.1.14 RFC 1122 Requirements for Internet Hosts . . . . . . . . .  46
   7.1.15 RFC 1201 IP over ARCNET  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  46
   7.1.16 RFC 1209 IP over SMDS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  47
   7.1.17 RFC 1390 Transmission of IP and ARP over FDDI Networks . .  47
   7.2    Draft Standards  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  47
   7.2.1  RFC 951 Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) . . . . . . . . . . . .  47
   7.2.2  RFC 1191 Path MTU Discovery  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  47
   7.2.3  RFC 1356 Multiprotocol Interconnect on X.25 and ISDN . . .  47
   7.2.4  RFC 1990 The PPP Multilink Protocol (MP) . . . . . . . . .  47
   7.2.5  RFC 2067 IP over HIPPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  47
   7.2.6  RFC 2131 DHCP  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  47
   7.3    Proposed Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  48
   7.3.1  RFC 1234 Tunneling IPX over IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  48
   7.3.2  RFC 1256 ICMP Router Discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  48
   7.3.3  RFC 1277 Encoding Net Addresses to Support Operation
          Over Non OSI Lower Layers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  48
   7.3.4  RFC 1332 PPP Internet Protocol Control Protocol (IPCP) . .  48
   7.3.5  RFC 1469 IP Multicast over Token Ring  . . . . . . . . . .  48
   7.3.6  RFC 2003 IP Encapsulation within IP  . . . . . . . . . . .  48
   7.3.7  RFC 2004 Minimal Encapsulation within IP . . . . . . . . .  48



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   7.3.8  RFC 2022 Support for Multicast over UNI 3.0/3.1 based
          ATM Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  48
   7.3.9  RFC 2113 IP Router Alert Option  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  48
   7.3.10 RFC 2165 SLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  49
   7.3.11 RFC 2225 Classical IP & ARP over ATM . . . . . . . . . . .  49
   7.3.12 RFC 2226 IP Broadcast over ATM . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  49
   7.3.13 RFC 2371 Transaction IPv3  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  49
   7.3.14 RFC 2625 IP and ARP over Fibre Channel . . . . . . . . . .  49
   7.3.15 RFC 2672 Non-Terminal DNS Redirection  . . . . . . . . . .  49
   7.3.16 RFC 2673 Binary Labels in DNS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  49
   7.3.17 IP over Vertical Blanking Interval of a TV Signal (RFC
          2728)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  49
   7.3.18 RFC 2734 IPv4 over IEEE 1394 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  49
   7.3.19 RFC 2834 ARP & IP Broadcasts Over HIPPI 800  . . . . . . .  49
   7.3.20 RFC 2835 ARP & IP Broadcasts Over HIPPI 6400 . . . . . . .  50
   7.3.21 RFC 3344 Mobility Support for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . .  50
   7.3.22 RFC 3376 Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 3 . .  50
   7.4    Experimental RFCs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  50
   7.4.1  RFC 1307 Dynamically Switched Link Control Protocol  . . .  50
   7.4.2  RFC 1393 Traceroute using an IP Option . . . . . . . . . .  50
   7.4.3  RFC 1735 NBMA Address Resolution Protocol (NARP) . . . . .  50
   7.4.4  RFC 1788 ICMP Domain Name Messages . . . . . . . . . . . .  50
   7.4.5  RFC 1868 ARP Extension - UNARP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  50
   7.4.6  RFC 2143 IP Over SCSI  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  51
   7.4.7  RFC 3180 GLOP Addressing in 233/8  . . . . . . . . . . . .  51
   8.     Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  52
   9.     Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  53
          Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  54
          Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  54
          Intellectual Property and Copyright Statements . . . . . .  55





















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1. Introduction

   This document is part of a document set aiming to document all usage
   of IPv4 addresses in IETF standards. In an effort to have the
   information in a manageable form, it has been broken into 7 documents
   conforming to the current IETF areas (Application,  Internet,
   Management & Operations, Routing, Security, Sub-IP and Transport).

   This specific document focuses on usage of IPv4 addresses within the
   Internet area.

   For a full introduction, please see the introduction [1] document.







































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2. Document Organization

   The following sections 3, 4, 5, and 6 each describe the raw analysis
   of Full, Draft, and Proposed Standards, and Experimental RFCs.  Each
   RFC is discussed in turn starting with RFC 1 and ending in (about)
   RFC 3100. The comments for each RFC are "raw" in nature.  That is,
   each RFC is discussed in a vacuum and problems or issues discussed do
   not "look ahead" to see if any of the issues raised have already been
   fixed.

   Section 7 is an analysis of the data presented in Sections 3, 4, 5,
   and 6.  It is here that all of the results are considered as a whole
   and the problems that have been resolved in later RFCs are
   correlated.





































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3. Full Standards

   Full Internet Standards (most commonly simply referred to as
   "Standards") are fully mature protocol specification that are widely
   implemented and used throughout the Internet.

3.1 RFC 791 Internet Protocol

   This specification defines IPv4 and is replaced by the IPv6
   specifications.

3.2 RFC 792 Internet Control Message Protocol

   This specification defines ICMP, and is inherently IPv4 dependent.

3.3 RFC 826 Ethernet Address Resolution Protocol

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

3.4 RFC 891 DCN Local-Network Protocols

   There are many implicit assumptions about the use of IPv4 addresses
   in this document.

3.5 RFC 894 Standard for the transmission of IP datagrams over Ethernet
    networks

   This specification specifically deals with the transmission of IPv4
   packets over Ethernet.

3.6 RFC 895 Standard for the transmission of IP datagrams over
    experimental Ethernet networks

   This specification specifically deals with the transmission of IPv4
   packets over experimental Ethernet.

3.7 RFC 903 Reverse Address Resolution Protocol

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

3.8 RFC 919 Broadcasting Internet Datagrams

   This specification defines broadcasting for IPv4; IPv6 uses multicast
   so this is not applicable.

3.9 RFC 922 Broadcasting Internet datagrams in the presence of subnets

   This specification defines how broadcasts should be treated in the



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   presence of subnets. IPv6 uses multicast so this is not applicable.

3.10 RFC 950 Internet Standard Subnetting Procedure

   This specification defines IPv4 subnetting; similar functionality is
   part of IPv6 addressing architecture to begin with.

3.11 RFC 1034 Domain Names: Concepts and Facilities

   In Section 3.6, "Resource Records", the definition of A record is:

     RDATA           which is the type and sometimes class dependent
                     data which describes the resource:

                     A         For the IN class, a 32 bit IP address

   And Section 5.2.1, "Typical functions" defines:

     1. Host name to host address translation.

        This function is often defined to mimic a previous HOSTS.TXT
        based function.  Given a character string, the caller wants
        one or more 32 bit IP addresses.  Under the DNS, it
        translates into a request for type A RRs.  Since the DNS does


        not preserve the order of RRs, this function may choose to
        sort the returned addresses or select the "best" address if
        the service returns only one choice to the client.  Note that
        a multiple address return is recommended, but a single
        address may be the only way to emulate prior HOSTS.TXT
        services.

     2. Host address to host name translation

        This function will often follow the form of previous
        functions.  Given a 32 bit IP address, the caller wants a
        character string.  The octets of the IP address are reversed,
        used as name components, and suffixed with "IN-ADDR.ARPA".  A
        type PTR query is used to get the RR with the primary name of
        the host.  For example, a request for the host name
        corresponding to IP address 1.2.3.4 looks for PTR RRs for
        domain name "4.3.2.1.IN-ADDR.ARPA".

   There are, of course, numerous examples of IPv4 addresses scattered
   throughout the document.





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3.12 RFC 1035 Domain Names: Implementation and Specification

   Section 3.4.1, "A RDATA format", defines the format for A records:


         +--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+
         |                    ADDRESS                    |
         +--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+

     where:

     ADDRESS         A 32 bit Internet address.

     Hosts that have multiple Internet addresses will have
     multiple A records.

     A records cause no additional section processing.  The
     RDATA section of an A line in a master file is an Internet
     address expressed as four decimal numbers separated by dots
     without any imbedded spaces (e.g.,"10.2.0.52" or "192.0.5.6").


   And Section 3.4.2, "WKS RDATA", format is:


     +--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+
     |                    ADDRESS                    |
     +--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+
     |       PROTOCOL        |                       |
     +--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+                       |
     |                                               |
     /                   <BIT MAP>                   /

     /                                               /
     +--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+--+

       where:

       ADDRESS         An 32 bit Internet address

       PROTOCOL        An 8 bit IP protocol number

       <BIT MAP>       A variable length bit map.  The bit map
                   must be a multiple of 8 bits long.

       The WKS record is used to describe the well known services
       supported by a particular protocol on a particular internet
       address.  The PROTOCOL field specifies an IP protocol number,



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       and the bit map has one bit per port of the specified protocol.
       The first bit corresponds to port 0, the second to port 1, etc.
       If the bit map does not include a bit for a protocol of
       interest, that bit is assumed zero.  The appropriate values and
       mnemonics for ports and protocols are specified in [RFC-1010].

       For example, if PROTOCOL=TCP (6), the 26th bit corresponds to
       TCP port 25 (SMTP).  If this bit is set, a SMTP server should be
       listening on TCP port 25; if zero, SMTP service is not supported
       on the specified address.

       The purpose of WKS RRs is to provide availability information for
       servers for TCP and UDP.  If a server supports both TCP and UDP,
       or has multiple Internet addresses, then multiple WKS RRs are
       used.

       WKS RRs cause no additional section processing.


   Section 3.5, "IN-ADDR.ARPA domain", describes reverse DNS lookups and
   is clearly IPv4 dependent.

   There are, of course, numerous examples of IPv4 addresses scattered
   throughout the document.

3.13 RFC 1042 Standard for the transmission of IP datagrams over IEEE
     802 networks

   This specification specifically deals with the transmission of IPv4
   packets over IEEE 802 networks.

3.14 RFC 1044 Internet Protocol on Network System's HYPERchannel:
     Protocol Specification

   There are a variety of methods used in this standard to map IPv4
   addresses to 32 bits fields in the HYPERchannel headers.  This
   specification does not support IPv6.

3.15 RFC 1055 Nonstandard for transmission of IP datagrams over serial
     lines: SLIP

   This specification is more of a analysis of the shortcomings of SLIP
   which is unsurprising.  The introduction of PPP as a general
   replacement of SLIP has made this specification essentially unused.
   No update need be considered.






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3.16 RFC 1088 Standard for the transmission of IP datagrams over NetBIOS
     networks

   This specification documents a technique to encapsulate IP packets
   inside NetBIOS packets.

   The technique presented of using NetBIOS names of the form
   IP.XX.XX.XX.XX will not work for IPv6 addresses since the length of
   IPv6 addresses will not fit within the NetBIOS 15 octet name
   limitation.

3.17 RFC 1112 Host Extensions for IP Multicasting

   This specification defines IP multicast.  Parts of the document are
   IPv4 dependent.

3.18 RFC 1132 Standard for the transmission of 802.2 packets over IPX
     networks

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

3.19 RFC 1201 Transmitting IP traffic over ARCNET networks

   The major concerns of this specification with respect to IPv4
   addresses occur in the resolution of ARCnet 8bit addresses to IPv4
   addresses in an "ARPlike" method.  This is incompatible with IPv6.

3.20 RFC 1209 The Transmission of IP Datagrams over the SMDS Service

   This specification defines running IPv4 and ARP over SMDS.  The
   methods described could easily be extended to support IPv6 packets.

3.21 RFC 1390 Transmission of IP and ARP over FDDI Networks

   This specification defines the use of IPv4 address on FDDI networks.
   There are numerous IPv4 dependencies in the specification.

   In particular the value of the Protocol Type Code (2048 for IPv4) and
   a corresponding Protocol Address length (4 bytes for IPv4) needs to
   be created.  A discussion of broadcast and multicast addressing
   techniques is also included, and similarly must be updated for IPv6
   networks.  The defined MTU limitation of 4096 octets of data (with
   256 octets reserved header space) should remain sufficient for IPv6.

3.22 RFC 1661 The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.




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3.23 RFC 1662 PPP in HDLC-like Framing

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

3.24 RFC 2427 Multiprotocol Interconnect over Frame Relay

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.












































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4. Draft Standards

   Draft Standards represent the penultimate standard level in the IETF.
   A protocol can only achieve draft standard when there are multiple,
   independent, interoperable implementations.  Draft Standards are
   usually quite mature and widely used.

4.1 RFC 951 Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)

   This protocol is designed specifically for use with IPv4, for
   example:

    Section 3. Packet Format

    All numbers shown are decimal, unless indicated otherwise.  The
    BOOTP packet is enclosed in a standard IP [8] UDP [7] datagram.  For
    simplicity it is assumed that the BOOTP packet is never fragmented.
    Any numeric fields shown are packed in 'standard network byte
    order', i.e. high order bits are sent first.

    In the IP header of a bootrequest, the client fills in its own IP
    source address if known, otherwise zero.  When the server address is
    unknown, the IP destination address will be the 'broadcast address'
    255.255.255.255.  This address means 'broadcast on the local cable,
    (I don't know my net number)' [4].

         FIELD   BYTES   DESCRIPTION
         -----   -----   ---

     [...]
            ciaddr  4       client IP address;
                            filled in by client in bootrequest if known.

            yiaddr  4       'your' (client) IP address;
                            filled by server if client doesn't
                            know its own address (ciaddr was 0).

            siaddr  4       server IP address;
                            returned in bootreply by server.

            giaddr  4       gateway IP address,
                            used in optional cross-gateway booting.

   Since the packet format is a fixed 300 bytes in length, an updated
   version of the specification could easily accommodate an additional
   48 bytes (4 IPv6 fields of 16 bytes to replace the existing 4 IPv4
   fields of 4 bytes).




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4.2 RFC 1188 Proposed Standard for the Transmission of IP  Datagrams
    over FDDI Networks

   This document is clearly informally superceded by RFC 1390,
   "Transmission of IP and ARP over FDDI Networks", even though no
   formal deprecation has been done.  Therefore, this specification is
   not considered further in this memo.

4.3 RFC 1191 Path MTU discovery

   The entire process of PMTU discovery is predicated on the use of the
   DF bit in the IPv4 header, an ICMP message (also IPv4 dependent) and
   TCP MSS option.  This is not compatible with IPv6.

4.4 RFC 1356 Multiprotocol Interconnect on X.25 and ISDN

   Section 3.2 defines an NLPID for IP as follows:

      The value hex CC (binary 11001100, decimal 204) is IP [6].
      Conformance with this specification requires that IP be supported.
      See section 5.1 for a diagram of the packet formats.

   Clearly a new NLPID would need to be defined for IPv6 packets.

4.5 RFC 1534 Interoperation Between DHCP and BOOTP

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

4.6 RFC 1542 Clarifications and Extensions for the Bootstrap Protocol

   There are no new issues other than those presented in Section 4.1.

4.7 RFC 1629 Guidelines for OSI NSAP Allocation in the Internet

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

4.8 RFC 1762 The PPP DECnet Phase IV Control Protocol (DNCP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

4.9 RFC 1989 PPP Link Quality Monitoring

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

4.10 RFC 1990 The PPP Multilink Protocol (MP)

   Section 5.1.3, "Endpoint Discriminator Option", defines a Class
   header field:



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      Class
         The Class field is one octet and indicates the identifier

         address space.  The most up-to-date values of the LCP Endpoint
         Discriminator Class field are specified in the most recent
         "Assigned Numbers" RFC [7].  Current values are assigned as
         follows:

           0    Null Class

           1    Locally Assigned Address

           2    Internet Protocol (IP) Address

           3    IEEE 802.1 Globally Assigned MAC Address

           4    PPP Magic-Number Block

           5    Public Switched Network Directory Number

   A new class field needs to be defined by the IANA for IPv6 addresses.

4.11 RFC 1994 PPP Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

4.12 RFC 2067 IP over HIPPI

   Section 5.1, "Packet Formats", contains the following excerpt:

    EtherType (16 bits) SHALL be set as defined in Assigned Numbers [8]:
    IP = 2048 ('0800'h), ARP = 2054 ('0806'h), RARP = 32,821 ('8035'h).

   Section 5.5, "MTU", has the following definition:

     The MTU for HIPPI-SC LANs is 65280 bytes.

     This value was selected because it allows the IP packet to fit in
     one 64K byte buffer with up to 256 bytes of overhead.  The overhead
     is 40 bytes at the present time; there are 216 bytes of room for
     expansion.

            HIPPI-FP Header                  8 bytes
            HIPPI-LE Header                 24 bytes
            IEEE 802.2 LLC/SNAP Headers      8 bytes
            Maximum IP packet size (MTU) 65280 bytes
                                         ------------
                              Total      65320 bytes (64K - 216)



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   This definition is not applicable for IPv6 packets since packets can
   be larger than the IPv4 limitation of 65280 bytes.

4.13 RFC 2131 Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol

   This version of DHCP is highly assumptive of IPv4.  It is not
   compatible with IPv6.

4.14 RFC 2132 DHCP Options and BOOTP Vendor Extensions

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.

4.15 RFC 2390 Inverse Address Resolution Protocol

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

4.16 RFC 2460 Internet Protocol, Version 6 (IPv6) Specification

   This document defines IPv6 and has no IPv4 issues.

4.17 RFC 2461 Neighbor Discovery for IP Version 6 (IPv6)

   This document defines an IPv6 related specification and has no IPv4
   issues.

4.18 RFC 2462 IPv6 Stateless Address Autoconfiguration

   This document defines an IPv6 related specification and has no IPv4
   issues.

4.19 RFC 2463 Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMPv6) for the
     Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Specification

   This document defines an IPv6 related specification and has no IPv4
   issues.

4.20 RFC 3596 DNS Extensions to support IP version 6

   This specification defines the AAAA record for IPv6 as well as PTR
   records using the ip6.arpa domain, and as such has no IPv6 issues.











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5. Proposed Standards

   Proposed Standards are introductory level documents.  There are no
   requirements for even a single implementation.  In many cases
   Proposed are never implemented or advanced in the IETF standards
   process.  They therefore are often just proposed ideas that are
   presented to the Internet community.  Sometimes flaws are exposed or
   they are one of many competing solutions to problems.  In these later
   cases, no discussion is presented as it would not serve the purpose
   of this discussion.

5.1 RFC 1234 Tunneling IPX traffic through IP networks

   The section "Unicast Address Mappings" has the following text:

    For implementations of this memo, the first two octets of the host
    number will always be zero and the last four octets will be the
    node's four octet IP address.  This makes address mapping trivial
    for unicast transmissions: the first two octets of the host number
    are discarded, leaving the normal four octet IP address.  The
    encapsulation code should use this IP address as the destination
    address of the UDP/IP tunnel packet.

   This mapping will not be able to work with IPv6 addresses.

   There are also numerous discussions on systems keeping a "peer list"
   to map between IP and IPX addresses.  The specifics are not discussed
   in the document and are left to the individual implementation.

   The section "Maximum Transmission Unit" also has some implications on
   IP addressing:

    Although larger IPX packets are possible, the standard maximum
    transmission unit for IPX is 576 octets.  Consequently, 576 octets
    is the recommended default maximum transmission unit for IPX packets
    being sent with this encapsulation technique.  With the eight octet
    UDP header and the 20 octet IP header, the resulting IP packets will
    be 604 octets long.  Note that this is larger than the 576 octet
    maximum size IP implementations are required to accept [3].  Any IP
    implementation supporting this encapsulation technique must be
    capable of receiving 604 octet IP packets.

    As improvements in protocols and hardware allow for larger,
    unfragmented IP transmission units, the 576 octet maximum IPX packet
    size may become a liability.  For this reason, it is recommended
    that the IPX maximum transmission unit size be configurable in
    implementations of this memo.




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5.2 RFC 1256 ICMP Router Discovery Messages

   This specification defines a mechanism very specific to IPv4.

5.3 RFC 1277 Encoding Network Addresses to Support Operation over
    Non-OSI Lower Layers

   Section 4.5, "TCP/IP (RFC 1006) Network Specific Format" describes a
   structure that reserves 12 digits for the textual representation of
   an IP address.

   This 12 octet field for decimal versions of IP addresses is
   insufficient for a decimal version of IPv6 addresses.  It is possible
   to define a new encoding using the 20 digit long IP Address + Port +
   Transport Set fields in order to accommodate a binary version of an
   IPv6 address, port number and Transport Set.  There are several
   schemes that could be envisioned.

5.4 RFC 1332 The PPP Internet Protocol Control Protocol (IPCP)

   This specification defines a mechanism for devices to assign IPv4
   addresses to PPP clients once PPP negotiation is completed.  Section
   3, "IPCP Configuration Options", defines IPCP option types which
   embed the IP address in 4-byte long fields.  This is clearly not
   enough for IPv6.

   However, the specification is clearly designed to allow new Option
   Types to be added and Should offer no problems for use with IPv6 once
   appropriate options have been defined.

5.5 RFC 1377 The PPP OSI Network Layer Control Protocol (OSINLCP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.6 RFC 1378 The PPP AppleTalk Control Protocol (ATCP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.7 RFC 1469 IP Multicast over Token-Ring Local Area Networks

   This document defines the usage of IPv4 multicast over IEEE 802.5
   Token Ring networks.  This is not compatible with IPv6.

5.8 RFC 1552 The PPP Internetworking Packet Exchange Control Protocol
    (IPXCP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.




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5.9 RFC 1570 PPP LCP Extensions

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.10 RFC 1598 PPP in X.25 PPP-X25

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.11 RFC 1618 PPP over ISDN

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.12 RFC 1663 PPP Reliable Transmission

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.13 RFC 1752 The Recommendation for the IP Next Generation Protocol

   This document defines a roadmap for IPv6 development and is not
   relevant to this discussion.

5.14 RFC 1755 ATM Signaling Support for IP over ATM

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.15 RFC 1763 The PPP Banyan Vines Control Protocol (BVCP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.16 RFC 1764 The PPP XNS IDP Control Protocol (XNSCP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.17 RFC 1973 PPP in Frame Relay

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.18 RFC 1981 Path MTU Discovery for IP version 6

   This specification describes an IPv6 related specification and is not
   discussed in this document.

5.19 RFC 1982 Serial Number Arithmetic

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.






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5.20 5.21 RFC 1995 Incremental Zone Transfer in DNS

   Although the examples used in this document use IPv4 addresses,
   (i.e., A records) there is nothing in the specification to preclude
   full and proper functionality using IPv6.

5.21 RFC 1996 A Mechanism for Prompt Notification of Zone Changes (DNS
     NOTIFY)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.22 RFC 2003 IP Encapsulation within IP

   This document is designed for use in IPv4 networks.  There are many
   references to a specified IP version number of 4 and 32-bit
   addresses.  This is incompatible with IPv6.

5.23 RFC 2004 Minimal Encapsulation within IP

   This document is designed for use in IPv4 networks.  There are many
   references to a specified IP version number of 4 and 32-bit
   addresses.  This is incompatible with IPv6.

5.24 RFC 2005 Applicability Statement for IP Mobility Support

   This specification documents the interoperation of IPv4 Mobility
   Support; this is not relevant to this discussion.

5.25 RFC 2022 Support for Multicast over UNI 3.0/3.1 based ATM Networks

   This specification specifically maps IPv4 multicast in UNI based ATM
   networks.  This is incompatible with IPv6.

5.26 RFC 2043 The PPP SNA Control Protocol (SNACP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.27 RFC 2097 The PPP NetBIOS Frames Control Protocol (NBFCP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.28 RFC 2113 IP Router Alert Option

   This document provides a new mechanism for IPv4. This is incompatible
   with IPv6.






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5.29 RFC 2125 The PPP Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) / The PPP
     Bandwidth Allocation Control Protocol (BACP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.30 RFC 2136 Dynamic Updates in the Domain Name System (DNS UPDATE)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.31 RFC 2181 Clarifications to the DNS Specification

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.  The only
   reference to IP addresses discuss the use of an anycast address, so
   but one can assume that these techniques are IPv6 operable.

5.32 RFC 2225 Classical IP and ARP over ATM

   From the many references in this document it is clear that this
   document is designed for IPv4 only.  It is only later in the document
   that it is implicitly stated, as in:

       ar$spln -  length in octets of the source protocol address. Value
                  range is 0 or 4 (decimal).  For IPv4 ar$spln is 4.

       ar$tpln -  length in octets of the target protocol address. Value
                  range is 0 or 4 (decimal).  For IPv4 ar$tpln is 4.

   and:

     For backward compatibility with previous implementations, a null
     IPv4 protocol address may be received with length = 4 and an
     allocated address in storage set to the value 0.0.0.0.  Receiving
     stations must be liberal in accepting this format of a null IPv4
     address.  However, on transmitting an ATMARP or InATMARP packet, a
     null IPv4 address must only be indicated by the length set to zero
     and must have no storage allocated.


5.33 RFC 2226 IP Broadcast over ATM Networks

   This document is limited to IPv4 multicasting.  This is incompatible
   with IPv6.

5.34 RFC 2241 DHCP Options for Novell Directory Services

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.





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5.35 RFC 2242 NetWare/IP Domain Name and Information

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification, for example:

     PREFERRED_DSS (code 6)

         Length is (n * 4) and the value is an array of n IP addresses,
         each four bytes in length. The maximum number of addresses is 5
         and therefore the maximum length value is 20. The list contains
         the addresses of n NetWare Domain SAP/RIP Server (DSS).

     NEAREST_NWIP_SERVER (code 7)

         Length is (n * 4) and the value is an array of n IP addresses,
         each four bytes in length. The maximum number of addresses is 5
         and therefore the maximum length value is 20. The list contains
         the addresses of n Nearest NetWare/IP servers.

     PRIMARY_DSS (code 11)

         Length of 4, and the value is a single IP address.  This field

         identifies the Primary Domain SAP/RIP Service server (DSS) for
         this NetWare/IP domain. NetWare/IP administration utility uses
         this value as Primary DSS server when configuring a secondary
         DSS server.


5.36 RFC 2290 Mobile-IPv4 Configuration Option for PPP IPCP

   This document is designed for use with Mobile IPv4.  There are
   numerous referrals to other IP "support" mechanisms (i.e. ICMP Router
   Discover Messages) that specifically refer to the IPv4 of ICMP.

5.37 RFC 2308 Negative Caching of DNS Queries (DNS NCACHE)

   Although there are numerous examples in this document that use IPv4
   "A" records, there is nothing in the specification that limits its
   effectiveness to IPv4.

5.38 RFC 2331 ATM Signaling Support for IP over ATM - UNI Signaling 4.0
     Update

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.39 RFC 2332 NBMA Next Hop Resolution Protocol (NHRP)

   This document is very generic in its design and seems to be able to



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   support numerous layer 3 addressing schemes and should include both
   IPv4 and IPv6.

5.40 RFC 2333 NHRP Protocol Applicability

   This document is very generic in its design and seems to be able to
   support numerous layer 3 addressing schemes and should include both
   IPv4 and IPv6.

5.41 RFC 2335 A Distributed NHRP Service Using SCSP

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.42 RFC 2363 PPP Over FUNI

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.43 RFC 2364 PPP Over AAL5

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.44 RFC 2371 Transaction Internet Protocol Version 3.0 (TIPV3)

   This document states:


     TIP transaction manager addresses take the form:

        <hostport><path>

     The <hostport> component comprises:

        <host>[:<port>]

     where <host> is either a <dns name> or an <ip address>; and <port>
     is a decimal number specifying the port at which the transaction
     manager (or proxy) is listening for requests to establish TIP
     connections. If the port number is omitted, the standard TIP port
     number (3372) is used.

     A <dns name> is a standard name, acceptable to the domain name
     service. It must be sufficiently qualified to be useful to the
     receiver of the command.

     An <ip address> is an IP address, in the usual form: four decimal
     numbers separated by period characters.





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   And further along it states:


     A TIP URL takes the form:

        tip://<transaction manager address>?<transaction string>

     where <transaction manager address> identifies the TIP transaction
     manager (as defined in Section 7 above); and <transaction string>
     specifies a transaction identifier, which may take one of two forms
     (standard or non-standard):

     i. "urn:" <NID> ":" <NSS>

       A standard transaction identifier, conforming to the proposed
       Internet Standard for Uniform Resource Names (URNs), as specified
       by RFC2141; where <NID> is the Namespace Identifier, and <NSS> is
       the Namespace Specific String. The Namespace ID determines the
       syntactic interpretation of the Namespace Specific String. The
       Namespace Specific String is a sequence of characters representin
       a transaction identifier (as defined by <NID>). The rules for the
       contents of these fields are specified by [6] (valid characters,
       encoding, etc.).

       This format of <transaction string> may be used to express global
       transaction identifiers in terms of standard representations.
       Examples for <NID> might be <iso> or <xopen>. e.g.


          tip://123.123.123.123/?urn:xopen:xid

       Note that Namespace Ids require registration. See [7] for details
       on how to do this.

     ii. <transaction identifier>

       A sequence of printable ASCII characters (octets with values in
       the range 32 through 126 inclusive (excluding ":") representing a
       transaction identifier. In this non-standard case, it is the
       combination of <transaction manager address> and <transaction
       identifier> which ensures global uniqueness. e.g.

          tip://123.123.123.123/?transid1


   These are incompatible with IPv6.





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5.45 RFC 2464 Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Ethernet Networks

   This specification documents a method for transmitting IPv6 packets
   over Ethernet and is not considered in this discussion.

5.46 RFC 2467 Transmission of IPv6 Packets over FDDI Networks

   This specification documents a method for transmitting IPv6 packets
   over FDDI and is not considered in this discussion.

5.47 RFC 2470 Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Token Ring Networks

   This specification documents a method for transmitting IPv6 packets
   over Token Ring and is not considered in this discussion.

5.48 RFC 2472 IP Version 6 over PPP

   This specification documents a method for transmitting IPv6 packets
   over PPP and is not considered in this discussion.

5.49 RFC 2473 Generic Packet Tunneling in IPv6 Specification

   This specification documents an IPv6 aware specification and is not
   considered in this discussion.

5.50 RFC 2484 PPP LCP Internationalization Configuration Option

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.51 RFC 2485 DHCP Option for The Open Group's User Authentication
     Protocol

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.

5.52 RFC 2486 The Network Access Identifier

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.53 RFC 2491 IPv6 over Non-Broadcast Multiple Access (NBMA) networks

   This specification documents a method for transmitting IPv6 packets
   over NBMA networks and is not considered in this discussion.

5.54 RFC 2492 IPv6 over ATM Networks

   This specification documents a method for transmitting IPv6 packets
   over ATM networks and is not considered in this discussion.




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5.55 RFC 2497 Transmission of IPv6 Packets over ARCnet Networks

   This specification documents a method for transmitting IPv6 packets
   over ARCnet networks and is not considered in this discussion.

5.56 RFC 2507 IP Header Compression

   This specification is both IPv4 and IPv6 aware.

5.57 RFC 2526 Reserved IPv6 Subnet Anycast Addresses

   This specification documents IPv6 addressing and is not discussed in
   this document.

5.58 RFC 2529 Transmission of IPv6 over IPv4 Domains without Explicit
     Tunnels

   This specification documents IPv6 transmission methods and is not
   discussed in this document.

5.59 RFC 2563 DHCP Option to Disable Stateless Auto-Configuration in
     IPv4 Clients

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.

5.60 RFC 2590 Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Frame Relay Networks
     Specification

   This specification documents IPv6 transmission method over Frame
   Relay and is not discussed in this document.

5.61 RFC 2601 ILMI-Based Server Discovery for ATMARP

   This specification is both IPv4 and IPv6 aware.

5.62 RFC 2602 ILMI-Based Server Discovery for MARS

   This specification is both IPv4 and IPv6 aware.

5.63 RFC 2603 ILMI-Based Server Discovery for NHRP

   This specification is both IPv4 and IPv6 aware.

5.64 RFC 2610 DHCP Options for Service Location Protocol

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.





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5.65 RFC 2615 PPP over SONET/SDH

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.66 RFC 2625 IP and ARP over Fibre Channel

   This document states:

     Objective and Scope:

      The major objective of this specification is to promote
      interoperable implementations of IPv4 over FC. This specification
      describes a method for encapsulating IPv4 and Address Resolution
      Protocol (ARP) packets over FC.

   This is incompatible with IPv6.

5.67 RFC 2661 Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.68 RFC 2671 Extension Mechanisms for DNS (EDNS0)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.69 RFC 2672 Non-Terminal DNS Name Redirection

   This document is only defined for IPv4 addresses.  An IPv6
   specification may be needed.

5.70 RFC 2673 Binary Labels in the Domain Name System

   This document is only defined for IPv4 addresses.  An IPv6
   specification may be needed.

5.71 RFC 2675 IPv6 Jumbograms

   This document defines a IPv6 packet format and is therefore not
   discussed in this document.

5.72 RFC 2684 Multiprotocol Encapsulation over ATM Adaptation Layer 5

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.73 RFC 2685 Virtual Private Networks Identifier

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.




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5.74 RFC 2686 The Multi-Class Extension to Multi-Link PPP

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.75 RFC 2687 PPP in a Real-time Oriented HDLC-like Framing

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.76 RFC 2688 Integrated Services Mappings for Low Speed Networks

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.77 RFC 2710 Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) for IPv6

   This document defines an IPv6 specific specification and is not
   discussed in this document.

5.78 RFC 2711 IPv6 Router Alert Option

   This document defines an IPv6 specific specification and is not
   discussed in this document.

5.79 RFC 2728 The Transmission of IP Over the Vertical Blanking Interval
     of a Television Signal

   The following data format is defined:



        0                   1                   2                   3
        0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |0|    group    |         uncompressed IP header (20 bytes)     |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+                                               +
       |                                                               |
       :                             ....                              :
       +               +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |               |        uncompressed UDP header (8 bytes)      |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+                                               +
       |                                                               |
       +               +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |               |              payload  (<1472 bytes)           |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+                                               +
       |                                                               |
       :                              ....                             :
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |                              CRC                              |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+



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   This is incompatible with IPv6.

5.80 RFC 2734 IPv4 over IEEE 1394

   This specification is IPv4 only.

5.81 RFC 2735 NHRP Support for Virtual Private Networks

   This specification implies only IPv4 operations, but does not seem to
   present any reason that it would not function for IPv6.

5.82 RFC 2765 Stateless IP/ICMP Translation Algorithm (SIIT)

   This specification defines a method for IPv6 transition and is not
   discussed in this document.

5.83 RFC 2766 Network Address Translation - Protocol Translation
     (NAT-PT)

   This specification defines a method for IPv6 transition and is not
   discussed in this document.

5.84 RFC 2776 Multicast-Scope Zone Announcement Protocol (MZAP)

   This specification is both IPv4 and IPv6 aware and needs no changes.

5.85 RFC 2782 A DNS RR for specifying the location of services

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.86 RFC 2794 Mobile IP Network Access Identifier Extension for IPv4

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.

5.87 RFC 2834 ARP and IP Broadcast over HIPPI-800

   This document uses the generic term "IP Address" in the text but it
   also contains the text:













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     The HARP message has several fields that have the following format
     and values:

      Data sizes and field meaning:
        ar$hrd  16 bits  Hardware type
        ar$pro  16 bits  Protocol type of the protocol fields below
        ar$op   16 bits  Operation code (request, reply, or NAK)
        ar$pln   8 bits  byte length of each protocol address
        ar$rhl   8 bits  requester's HIPPI hardware address length (q)
        ar$thl   8 bits  target's HIPPI hardware address length (x)
        ar$rpa  32 bits  requester's protocol address
        ar$tpa  32 bits  target's protocol address
        ar$rha  qbytes   requester's HIPPI Hardware address
        ar$tha  xbytes   target's HIPPI Hardware address

     Where :
        ar$hrd  - SHALL contain 28. (HIPARP)

        ar$pro  - SHALL contain the IP protocol code 2048 (decimal).

        ar$op   - SHALL contain the operational value (decimal):
                  1  for   HARP_REQUESTs
                  2  for   HARP_REPLYs
                  8  for InHARP_REQUESTs
                  9  for InHARP_REPLYs
                  10 for   HARP_NAK
        ar$pln  - SHALL contain 4.

   And later:

       31    28        23  21          15        10     7         2   0
       +-----+---------+-+-+-----------+---------+-----+---------+-----+
     0 |      04       |1|0|         000         |      03       |  0  |
       +---------------+-+-+---------------------+---------------+-----+
     1 |                              45                               |
       +-----+-+-------+-----------------------+-----------------------+
     2 |[LA] |W|MsgT= 0|          000          |   Dest. Switch Addr   |
       +-----+-+-------+-----------------------+-----------------------+
     3 |   2   |   2   |          000          |  Source Switch Addr   |
       +---------------+---------------+-------+-----------------------+
     4 |             00 00             |                               |
       +-------------------------------+                               |
     5 |                      Destination ULA                          |
       +-------------------------------+-------------------------------+
     6 |             [LA]              |                               |
       +-------------------------------+                               |
     7 |                         Source ULA                            |
       +===============+===============+===============+===============+



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     8 |       AA      |      AA       |       03      |       00      |
       +---------------+---------------+---------------+---------------+
     9 |       00      |      00       |        Ethertype (2054)       |
       +---------------+---------------+-------------------------------+
    10 |              hrd (28)         |           pro (2048)          |
       +---------------+---------------+---------------+---------------+
    11 |             op (ar$op)        |     pln (6)   |   rhl (q)     |
       +---------------+---------------+---------------+---------------+
    12 |    thl = (x)  |   Requester IP Address upper  (24 bits)       |
       +---------------------------------------------------------------+
    13 | Req. IP lower |      Target IP Address upper  (24 bits)       |
       +---------------+-----------------------------------------------+
    14 | Tgt. IP lower | Requester HIPPI Hardware Address bytes 0 - 2  |
       +---------------+-----------------------------------------------+
    15 |         Requester HIPPI Hardware Address bytes 3 - 6          |
       +-----------------------------------------------+---------------+
    16 |         Requester HW Address bytes 7 - q      | Tgt HW byte 0 |
       +---------------+---------------+---------------+---------------+
    17 |          Target  HIPPI Hardware Address bytes 1 - 4           |
       +---------------------------------------------------------------+
    18 |          Target  HIPPI Hardware Address bytes 5 - 8           |
       +---------------+---------------+---------------+---------------+
    19 |Tgt HW byte 9-x|     FILL      |     FILL      |     FILL      |
       +---------------+---------------+---------------+---------------+
                            HARP - InHARP Message

   This is incompatible with IPv6.

5.88 RFC 2835 IP and ARP over HIPPI-6400

   This document states:

     The Ethertype value SHALL be set as defined in Assigned Numbers
     [18]:

     IP           0x0800  2048  (16 bits)

   This is limited to IPv4, and similar to the previous section,
   incompatible with IPv6. There are numerous other points in the
   documents that confirm this assumption.

5.89 RFC 2855 DHCP for IEEE 1394

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.

5.90 RFC 2874 DNS Extensions to Support IPv6 Address Aggregation and
     Renumbering




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   This document defines a specification to interact with IPv6 and is
   not considered in this document.

5.91 RFC 2893 Transition Mechanisms for IPv6 Hosts and Routers

   This document defines a transition mechanism for IPv6 and is not
   considered in this document.

5.92 RFC 2916 E.164 number and DNS

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.93 RFC 2937 The Name Service Search Option for DHCP

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.

5.94 RFC 3004 The User Class Option for DHCP

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.

5.95 RFC 3011 The IPv4 Subnet Selection Option for DHCP

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.

5.96 RFC 3021 Using 31-Bit Prefixes for IPv4 P2P Links

   This specification is specific to IPv4 address architecture, where a
   modification was needed to use both addresses of a 31-bit prefix.
   This is possible by IPv6 address architecture, but in most cases not
   recommended; see RFC 3627, Use of /127 Prefix Length Between Routers
   Considered Harmful.

5.97 RFC 3024 Reverse Tunneling for Mobile IP, revised

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.

5.98 RFC 3046 DHCP Relay Agent Information Option

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.

5.99 RFC 3056 Connection of IPv6 Domains via IPv4 Clouds

   This is an IPv6 related document and is not discussed in this
   document.

5.100 RFC 3068 An Anycast Prefix for 6to4 Relay Routers

   This is an IPv6 related document and is not discussed in this



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   document.

5.101 RFC 3070 Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) over Frame Relay

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.102 RFC 3074 DHC Load Balancing Algorithm

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.103 RFC 3077 A Link-Layer Tunneling Mechanism for Unidirectional Links

   This specification is both IPv4 and IPv6 aware and needs no changes.

5.104 RFC 3115 Mobile IP Vendor/Organization-Specific Extensions

   This is an extension to an IPv4-only specification.

5.105 RFC 3145 L2TP Disconnect Cause Information

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.106 RFC 3344 IP Mobility Support for IPv4

   There are IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.107 RFC 3376 Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 3

   This document describes of version of IGMP used for IPv4 multicast.
   This is not compatible with IPv6.

5.108 RFC 3402 Dynamic Delegation Discovery System (DDDS) Part Two: The
      Algorithm

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.109 RFC 3403 Dynamic Delegation Discovery System (DDDS) Part Three:
      The Domain Name System (DNS) Database

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

5.110 RFC 3513 IP Version 6 Addressing Architecture

   This specification documents IPv6 addressing and is not discussed in
   this document.






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5.111 RFC 3518 Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) Bridging Control  Protocol
      (BCP)

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.















































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6. Experimental RFCs

   Experimental RFCs typically define protocols that do not have
   widescale implementation or usage on the Internet.  They are often
   propriety in nature or used in limited arenas.  They are documented
   to the Internet community in order to allow potential
   interoperability or some other potential useful scenario.  In a few
   cases they are presented as alternatives to the mainstream solution
   to an acknowledged problem.

6.1 RFC 1149 Standard for the transmission of IP datagrams on avian
    carriers

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.  In fact the
   flexibility of this specification is such that all versions of IP
   should function within its boundaries, presuming that the packets
   remain small enough to be transmitted with the 256 milligrams weight
   limitations.

6.2 RFC 1183 New DNS RR Definitions

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

6.3 RFC 1226 Internet protocol encapsulation of AX.25 frames

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

6.4 RFC 1241 Scheme for an internet encapsulation protocol: Version 1

   This specification defines a specification that assumes IPv4 but does
   not actually have any limitations which would limit its operation in
   an IPv6 environment.

6.5 RFC 1307 Dynamically Switched Link Control Protocol

   This specification is IPv4 dependent, for example:















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     3.1  Control Message Format

        0                   1                   2                   3
        0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |  Identifier                   |   Total length                |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |  Function                     |   Event Status                |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |                Endpoint 1                                     |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |                Endpoint 2                                     |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |                       Message                                 |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |                       Body                                    |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

      Endpoint addresses: 32 bits each

          The internet addresses of the two communicating parties for
          which the link is being prepared.


6.6 RFC 1393 Traceroute Using an IP Option

   This document uses an IPv4 option.  It is therefore limited to IPv4
   networks, and is incompatible with IPv6.

6.7 RFC 1433 Directed ARP

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

6.8 RFC 1464 Using the Domain Name System To Store Arbitrary String
    Attributes

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

6.9 RFC 1475 TP/IX: The Next Internet

   This document defines IPv7 and has been abandoned by the IETF as a
   feasible design.  It is not considered in this document.

6.10 RFC 1561 Use of ISO CLNP in TUBA Environments

   This document defines the use of NSAP addressing and does not use any
   version of IP, so there are no IPv4 dependencies in this
   specification.



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6.11 RFC 1712 DNS Encoding of Geographical Location

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

6.12 RFC 1735 NBMA Address Resolution Protocol (NARP)

   This document defines a specification that is IPv4 specific, for
   example:

    4. Packet Formats

    NARP requests and replies are carried in IP packets as protocol type
    54.  This section describes the packet formats of NARP requests and
    replies:

    NARP Request

        0                   1                   2                   3
        0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |    Version    |   Hop Count   |          Checksum             |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |     Type      |    Code       |           Unused              |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |                    Destination IP address                     |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |                      Source IP address                        |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       | NBMA length   |                NBMA address                   |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+                                               |
       |                  (variable length)                            |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

      Source and Destination IP Addresses
        Respectively, these are the IP addresses of the NARP requestor
        and the target terminal for which the NBMA address is desired.

   And:













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    NARP Reply

        0                   1                   2                   3
        0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |    Version    |   Hop Count   |          Checksum             |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |     Type      |      Code     |           Unused              |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |                    Destination IP address                     |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       |                      Source IP address                        |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
       | NBMA length   |                NBMA address                   |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+                                               |
       |                  (variable length)                            |
       +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

      Source and Destination IP Address
        Respectively, these are the IP addresses of the NARP requestor
        and the target terminal for which the NBMA address is desired.

   This is incompatible with IPv6.

6.13 RFC 1768 Host Group Extensions for CLNP Multicasting

   This specification defines multicasting for CLNP, which is not an IP
   protocol, and therefore has no IPv4 dependencies.

6.14 RFC 1788 ICMP Domain Name Messages

   This specification is used for updates to the in-addr.arpa reverse
   DNS maps, and is limited to IPv4.

6.15 RFC 1797 Class A Subnet Experiment

   This document is specific to IPv4 address architecture, and as such,
   has no IPv6 dependencies.

6.16 RFC 1819 Internet Stream Protocol Version 2 (ST2) Protocol
     Specification - Version ST2+

   This specification is IPv4 limited.  In fact it is the definition of
   IPv5.  It has been abandoned by the IETF as feasible design, and is
   not considered in this discussion.






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6.17 RFC 1868 ARP Extension - UNARP

   This specification defines an extension to IPv4 ARP to delete entries
   from ARP caches on a link.

6.18 RFC 1876 A Means for Expressing Location Information in the Domain
     Name System

   This document defines a methodology for applying this technology
   which is IPv4 dependent.  The specification itself has no IPv4
   dependencies.

6.19 RFC 1888 OSI NSAPs and IPv6

   This is an IPv6 related document and is not discussed in this
   document.

6.20 RFC 2009 GPS-Based Addressing and Routing

   The document states:

     The future version of IP (IP v6) will certainly have a sufficient
     number of bits in its addressing space to provide an address for
     even smaller GPS addressable units.  In this proposal, however, we
     assume the current version of IP (IP v4) and we make sure that we
     manage the addressing space more economically than that.  We will
     call the smallest GPS addressable unit a GPS-square.

   This specification does not seem to have real IPv4 dependencies.

6.21 RFC 2143 Encapsulating IP with the SCSI

   This specification will only operate using IPv4.  As stated in the
   document:

     It was decided that the ten byte header offers the greatest
     flexibility for encapsulating version 4 IP datagrams for the
     following reasons: [...]

   This is incompatible with IPv6.

6.22 RFC 2345 Domain Names and Company Name Retrieval

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

6.23 RFC 2443 A Distributed MARS Service Using SCSP

   This document gives default values for use on IPv4 networks, but is



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   designed to be extensible so it will work with IPv6 with appropriate
   IANA definitions.

6.24 RFC 2471 IPv6 Testing Address Allocation

   This is an IPv6 related document and is not discussed in this
   document.

6.25 RFC 2520 NHRP with Mobile NHCs

   This specification is both IPv4 and IPv6 aware and needs no changes.

6.26 RFC 2521 ICMP Security Failures Messages

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

6.27 RFC 2540 Detached Domain Name System (DNS) Information

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

6.28 RFC 2823 PPP over Simple Data Link (SDL) using SONET/SDH with
     ATM-like framing

   There are no IPv4 dependencies in this specification.

6.29 RFC 3123 A DNS RR Type for Lists of Address Prefixes

   This specification is both IPv4 and IPv6 aware and needs no changes.

6.30 RFC 3168 The Addition of Explicit Congestion Notification  (ECN) to
     IP

   This specification is both IPv4 and IPv6 aware and needs no changes.

6.31 RFC 3180 GLOP Addressing in 233/8

   This document is specific to IPv4 multicast addressing.














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7. Summary of the Results

   In the initial survey of RFCs 52 positives were identified out of a
   total of 186, broken down as follows:

      Standards                          17 of 24 or 70.83%

      Draft Standards                     6 of 20 or 30.00%

      Proposed Standards                 22 of 111 or 19.91%

      Experimental RFCs                  7 of 31 or 22.58%

   Of those identified many require no action because they document
   outdated and unused protocols, while others are document protocols
   that are actively being updated by the appropriate working groups.
   Additionally there are many instances of standards that should be
   updated but do not cause any operational impact if they are not
   updated.

7.1 Standards

7.1.1 RFC 791 Internet Protocol

   RFC 791 has been updated in the definition of IPv6 in RFC 2460.

7.1.2 RFC 792 Internet Control Message Protocol

   RFC 792 has been updated in the definition of ICMPv6 in RFC 2463.

7.1.3 RFC 891 DCN Networks

   DCN has long since been ceased to be used, so this specification is
   no longer relevant.

7.1.4 RFC 894 IP over Ethernet

   This problem has been fixed by RFC2464, A Method for the Transmission
   of IPv6 Packets over Ethernet Networks.

7.1.5 RFC 895 IP over experimental Ethernets

   It is believed that experimental Ethernet networks are not being used
   anymore, so the specification is no longer relevant.

7.1.6 RFC 922 Broadcasting Internet Datagrams in the Presence of Subnets

   Broadcasting is not used in IPv6, but similar functionality has been



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   included in RFC 3513, IPv6 Addressing Architecture.

7.1.7 RFC 950 Internet Standard Subnetting Procedure

   Broadcasting is not used in IPv6, but similar functionality has been
   included in RFC 3513, IPv6 Addressing Architecture.

7.1.8 RFC 1034 Domain Names: Concepts and Facilities

   The problems have been fixed by defining new resource records for
   IPv6 addresses.

7.1.9 RFC 1035 Domain Names: Implementation and Specification

   The problems have been fixed by defining new resource records for
   IPv6 addresses.

7.1.10 RFC 1042 IP over IEEE 802

   This problem has been fixed by RFC2470, Transmission of IPv6 Packets
   over Token Ring Networks.

7.1.11 RFC 1044 IP over HyperChannel

   No updated document exists for this specification.  It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.1.12 RFC 1088 IP over NetBIOS

   No updated document exists for this specification.  It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.1.13 RFC 1112 Host Extensions for IP Multicast

   The IPv4-specific parts of RFC 1112 have been updated in RFC 2710,
   Multicast Listener Discovery for IPv6.

7.1.14 RFC 1122 Requirements for Internet Hosts

   RFC 1122 is essentially a requirements document for IPv4 hosts.
   Similar work is in progress
   (draft-ietf-ipv6-node-requirements-xx.txt).

7.1.15 RFC 1201 IP over ARCNET

   This problem has been fixed by RFC 2497, A Method for the
   Transmission of IPv6 Packets over ARCnet Networks.




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7.1.16 RFC 1209 IP over SMDS

   No updated document exists for this specification.  It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.1.17 RFC 1390 Transmission of IP and ARP over FDDI Networks

   This problem has been fixed by RFC 2467, "Transmission of IPv6
   Packets over FDDI Networks".

7.2 Draft Standards

7.2.1 RFC 951 Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)

   This problem has been fixed by RFC 2462, IPv6 Stateless Address
   Autoconfiguration, and RFC3315, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
   for IPv6 (DHCPv6).

7.2.2 RFC 1191 Path MTU Discovery

   This problem has been fixed in RFC 1981, Path MTU Discovery for IP
   version 6.

7.2.3 RFC 1356 Multiprotocol Interconnect on X.25 and ISDN

   This problem can be fixed by defining a new NLPID for IPv6. Note that
   an NLPID has already been defined in RFC 2427, Multiprotocol
   Interconnect over Frame Relay.

7.2.4 RFC 1990 The PPP Multilink Protocol (MP)

   A new class identifier ("6") for IPv6 packets has been registered
   with the IANA by the original author, fixing this problem.

7.2.5 RFC 2067 IP over HIPPI

   No updated document exists for this specification.  It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.2.6 RFC 2131 DHCP

   This problem has been fixed in RFC 3315, Dynamic Host Configuration
   Protocol for IPv6 (DHCPv6).

   Further, the consensus of the DHC WG has been that the options
   defined for DHCPv4 will not be automatically "carried forward" to
   DHCPv6.  Therefore, any further analysis of additionally specified
   DHCPv4 Options has been omitted from this memo.



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7.3 Proposed Standards

7.3.1 RFC 1234 Tunneling IPX over IP

   No updated document exists for this specification.  In practice, the
   similar effect can be achieved by the use of a layer 2 tunneling
   protocol. It is unclear whether an updated document is needed.

7.3.2 RFC 1256 ICMP Router Discovery

   This problem has been resolved in RFC 2461, Neighbor Discovery for IP
   Version 6 (IPv6).

7.3.3 RFC 1277 Encoding Net Addresses to Support Operation Over Non OSI
      Lower Layers

   No updated document exists for this specification; the problem might
   be resolved by the creation of a new encoding scheme if necessary. It
   is unclear whether an update is needed.

7.3.4 RFC 1332 PPP Internet Protocol Control Protocol (IPCP)

   This problem has been resolved in RFC 2472, IP Version 6 over PPP.

7.3.5 RFC 1469 IP Multicast over Token Ring

   The functionality of this specification has been essentially covered
   in RFC 2470, Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Token Ring Networks.

7.3.6 RFC 2003 IP Encapsulation within IP

   This problem has been fixed by defining different IP-in-IP
   encapsulation, for example, RFC 2473, Generic Packet Tunneling in
   IPv6 Specification.

7.3.7 RFC 2004 Minimal Encapsulation within IP

   No updated document exists for this specification. It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.3.8 RFC 2022 Support for Multicast over UNI 3.0/3.1 based ATM Networks

   No updated document exists for this specification. It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.3.9 RFC 2113 IP Router Alert Option

   This problem has been fixed in RFC 2711, IPv6 Router Alert Option.



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7.3.10 RFC 2165 SLP

   The problems have been addressed in RFC 3111, Service Location
   Protocol Modifications for IPv6.

7.3.11 RFC 2225 Classical IP & ARP over ATM

   The problems have been resolved in RFC 2492, IPv6 over ATM Networks.

7.3.12 RFC 2226 IP Broadcast over ATM

   The problems have been resolved in RFC 2492, IPv6 over ATM Networks.

7.3.13 RFC 2371 Transaction IPv3

   No updated document exists for this specification. It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.3.14 RFC 2625 IP and ARP over Fibre Channel

   There is work in progress to fix these problems
   (draft-desanti-ipv6-over-fibre-channel-02.txt).

7.3.15 RFC 2672 Non-Terminal DNS Redirection

   No updated document exists for this specification. It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.3.16 RFC 2673 Binary Labels in DNS

   No updated document exists for this specification. It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.3.17 IP over Vertical Blanking Interval of a TV Signal (RFC 2728)

   No updated document exists for this specification. It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.3.18 RFC 2734 IPv4 over IEEE 1394

   This problem has been fixed by RFC 3146, Transmission of IPv6 Packets
   Over IEEE 1394 Networks.

7.3.19 RFC 2834 ARP & IP Broadcasts Over HIPPI 800

   No updated document exists for this specification. It is unclear
   whether one is needed.




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7.3.20 RFC 2835 ARP & IP Broadcasts Over HIPPI 6400

   No updated document exists for this specification. It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.3.21 RFC 3344 Mobility Support for IPv4

   The problems have been resolved by two upcoming RFCs, already waiting
   publication (draft-ietf-mobileip-ipv6-24.txt and
   draft-ietf-mobileip-mipv6-ha-ipsec-06.txt).

   Since the first Mobile IPv4 specification in RFC 2002, a number of
   extensions to it have been specified.  As all of these depend on on
   MIPv4, they have been omitted from further analysis in this memo.

7.3.22 RFC 3376 Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 3

   This problem is being fixed by MLDv2 specification
   (draft-vida-mld-v2-xx.txt).

7.4 Experimental RFCs

7.4.1 RFC 1307 Dynamically Switched Link Control Protocol

   No updated document exists for this specification. It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.4.2 RFC 1393 Traceroute using an IP Option

   This specification relies on the use of an IPv4 option. No
   replacement document exists, and it is unclear whether one is needed.

7.4.3 RFC 1735 NBMA Address Resolution Protocol (NARP)

   This functionality has been defined in RFC 2491, IPv6 over
   Non-Broadcast Multiple Access (NBMA) networks and RFC 2332, NBMA Next
   Hop Resolution Protocol (NHRP).

7.4.4 RFC 1788 ICMP Domain Name Messages

   No updated document exists for this specification. However, DNS
   Dynamic Updates should provide similar functionality, so an update
   does not seem necessary.

7.4.5 RFC 1868 ARP Extension - UNARP

   This mechanism defined a mechanism to purge ARP caches on a link.
   That functionality already exists in RFC 2461, Neighbor Discovery for



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   IPv6.

7.4.6 RFC 2143 IP Over SCSI

   No updated document exists for this specification. It is unclear
   whether one is needed.

7.4.7 RFC 3180 GLOP Addressing in 233/8

   Similar functionality is provided by RFC 3306, Unicast-Prefix-based
   IPv6 Multicast Addresses, and no action is necessary.








































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8. Security Considerations

   This memo examines the IPv6-readiness of specifications; this does
   not have security considerations in itself.















































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9. Acknowledgements

   The author would like to acknowledge the support of the Internet
   Society in the research and production of this document. Additionally
   the author would like to thanks his partner in all ways, Wendy M.
   Nesser.

   The editor, Cleveland Mickles, would like to thank Steve Bellovin and
   Russ Housley for their comments and Pekka Savola for his comments and
   guidance during the editing of this document.  Additionally he would
   like to thank his wife, Lesia, for her patient support.

   Pekka Savola helped in editing the latest versions of the document.






































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Normative References

   [1]  II, P. and A. Bergstrom, "Introduction to the Survey of IPv4
        Addresses in Currently Deployed IETF  Standards",
        draft-ietf-v6ops-ipv4survey-intro-04 (work in progress), October
        2003.


Authors' Addresses

   Cleveland Mickles (editor)

   Reston, VA  20191
   USA

   EMail: cmickles.ee88@gtalumni.org


   Philip J. Nesser II
   Nesser & Nesser Consulting
   13501 100th Ave NE, #5202
   Kirkland, WA  98034
   USA

   EMail: phil@nesser.com


























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Intellectual Property Statement

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   intellectual property or other rights that might be claimed to
   pertain to the implementation or use of the technology described in
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   HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
   MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.


Acknowledgment

   Funding for the RFC Editor function is currently provided by the
   Internet Society.











































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