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Versions: 00 01 02 RFC 3944

Internet Draft                                               T. Johnson
Document: draft-johnson-h350-directory-serv-       U. of North Carolina
00.txt
Category: Informational                                        S. Okubo
Expires: May 2004                                     Waseda University
                                                               S.Campos
                                                                  ITU-T
                                                          November 2003


                        H.350 Directory Services


Status of this Memo

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   with RFC 3668.

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   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
   other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
   Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six
   months and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents
   at any time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet- Drafts as
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   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
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   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
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Abstract

   The International Telecommunications Union Standardization Sector
   (ITU-T) has created the H.350 series of Recommendations that specify
   directory services architectures in support of multimedia
   conferencing protocols. The goal of the architecture is to
   'directory enable' multimedia conferencing so that these services
   can leverage existing identity management and enterprise
   directories. A particular goal is to enable an enterprise or service
   provider to maintain a canonical source of users and their
   multimedia conferencing systems, so that multiple call servers from
   multiple vendors, supporting multiple protocols, can all access the
   same data store.

   Because SIP is an IETF standard, the contents of H.350 and H.350.4
   are made available via this document to the IETF community.

Table of Contents

   H.350 Directory Services...........................................1
   Status of this Memo................................................1
   Abstract...........................................................2
   Table of Contents..................................................2
   1.   Scope.........................................................3
   2.   Terminology...................................................4
   3.   Conventions used in this document.............................4
   4.   H.350.........................................................5
   4.1.   Scope.......................................................5
   4.1.1.  Design Goals...............................................6
   4.1.2.  Extending the Schema.......................................7
   4.2.   commURIObject Definition...................................10
   4.2.1.  commURIObject.............................................10
   4.2.2.  commURI...................................................10
   4.3.   CommObject Definition......................................11
   4.3.1.  commObject................................................11
   4.3.2.  commUniqueId..............................................11
   4.3.3.  commOwner.................................................12
   4.3.4.  commPrivate...............................................12
   4.4.   CommObject LDIF Files......................................13
   4.4.1.  LDIF for commURIObject....................................13
   4.4.2.  LDIF for commObject.......................................15
   4.5.   H.350 Annex A Indexing Profile.............................16
   5.   H.350.4......................................................17
   5.1.   Scope......................................................17
   5.1.1.  Extending the schema......................................18
   5.2.   Object class definitions...................................18



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   5.2.1.  SIPIdentity...............................................18
   5.2.2.  SIPIdentitySIPURI.........................................18
   5.2.3.  SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress...............................19
   5.2.4.  SIPIdentityProxyAddress...................................19
   5.2.5.  SIPIdentityAddress........................................20
   5.2.6.  SIPIdentityPassword.......................................20
   5.2.7.  SIPIdentityUserName.......................................21
   5.2.8.  SIPIdentityServiceLevel...................................22
   5.3.   SIPIdentity LDIF Files.....................................22
   5.4.   H.350.4 Annex A Indexing profile...........................25
   6.   Acknowledgments..............................................25
   7.   Normative References.........................................26
   8.   Informative References.......................................26
   9.   Security Considerations......................................27
   10.  Contact Information..........................................27

1. Scope
   The International Telecommunications Union Standardization Sector
   (ITU-T) has created the H.350 series of Recommendations that specify
   directory services architectures in support of multimedia
   conferencing protocols. The goal of the architecture is to
   'directory enable' multimedia conferencing so that these services
   can leverage existing identity management and enterprise
   directories. A particular goal is to enable an enterprise or service
   provider to maintain a canonical source of users and their
   multimedia conferencing systems, so that multiple call servers from
   multiple vendors, supporting multiple protocols, can all access the
   same data store.

   H.350 architectures are not intended to change the operation of
   multimedia conferencing protocols in any way. Rather, they are meant
   to standardize the way the already defined protocol elements are
   stored in a directory, so that they can be accessed in a
   standardized manner.

   In the H.350 series, Recommendation H.350 specifies the base
   architecture and object classes, while subordinate Recommendations
   specify elements that are specific to individual protocols.
   Currently, the Recommendations include:

   H.350 ¡ Directory Services Architecture for Multimedia Conferencing
   H.350.1 - Directory Services Architecture for H.323
   H.350.2 - Directory Services Architecture for H.235
   H.350.3 - Directory Services Architecture for H.320
   H.350.4 - Directory Services Architecture for SIP
   H.350.5 - Directory Services Architecture for Non-Standard Protocols

   Because SIP is an IETF standard, the contents of H.350 and H.350.4
   are made available via this document to the IETF community.




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2. Terminology

   The following terms are used throughout the document:

   *  call server: a protocol-specific signalling engine that routes
      video or voice calls on the network. In H.323 this entity is a
      gatekeeper. In SIP, this entity is a SIP Proxy Server. Note that
      not all signalling protocols use a call server.

   *  endpoint: a logical device that provides video and/or voice media
      encoding/decoding, and signalling functions. Examples include:

      *  a group teleconferencing appliance that is located in a
         conference room
      *  an IP telephone.
      *  a software program that takes video and voice from a camera
         and microphone and encodes it and applies signalling using a
         host computer.

   *  enterprise directory: A canonical collection of information about
      users in an organization. Typically this information is collected
      from a variety of organizational units to create a whole. For
      example, Human Resources may provide name and address,
      Telecommunications may provide the telephone number, Information
      Technology may provide the email address, etc. For the purposes
      of this architecture, it is assumed that an enterprise directory
      is accessible via LDAP.

   *  White Pages: An application that allows end users to look up the
      address of another user. This may be web-based or use some other
      user interface.

3. Conventions used in this document

   Conventions in this document conform to ITU-T guidelines. In this
   Recommendation, the following conventions are used:

   "Shall" indicates a mandatory requirement.

   "Should" indicates a suggested but optional course of action.

   "May" indicates an optional course of action rather than a
   recommendation that something take place.

   References to clauses, sub clauses, annexes and appendices refer to
   those items within this Recommendation unless another specification
   is explicitly listed.





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4. H.350

   The normative text of H.350 is reproduced in this section.

4.1. Scope

   This Recommendation describes a directory services architecture for
   multimedia conferencing using LDAP. Standardized directory services
   can support association of persons with endpoints, searchable white
   pages, and clickable dialling. Directory services can also assist in
   the configuration of endpoints, and user authentication based on
   authoritative data sources. This document describes a standardized
   LDAP schema to represent endpoints on the network and associate
   those endpoints with users. It discusses design and implementation
   considerations for the inter-relation of video and voice-specific
   directories, enterprise directories, call servers and endpoints.

   The use of a common, authoritative data source for call server,
   endpoint, user, authentication and white pages information is an
   important aspect of large scale multimedia conferencing
   environments. Without a common data source, service providers must
   create separate processes to manage each of these functions. By
   standardizing the LDAP schema used to represent the underlying data,
   products from different system vendors can be deployed together to
   create an overall application environment. For example, a white
   pages search engine developed by one provider could serve directory
   information to IP telephones produced by a second provider, with
   signalling managed by a call server produced by yet a third
   provider. Each of these disparate systems can access the same
   underlying data source, reducing or eliminating the need to
   coordinate separate management of each system. A significant benefit
   to the user is that the management of this data can be incorporated
   into existing customer management tools, allowing for quick and
   flexible scaling up of applications. Indeed, many technology
   providers have already incorporate LDAP into their products, but
   have been forced to do so without benefit of a standardized schema.
   This Recommendation represents an effort to standardize those
   representations to improve interoperability and performance.

   While URLs are already standardized for several conferencing
   protocols, their representation in a directory is not. This
   Recommendation supports a standardized way for URLs to be searched
   and located. This is a necessary step to support 'clickable
   dialling'.

   Management of endpoint configurations can be improved if the correct
   settings are stored by the service provider in a location that is
   accessible to both service provider and endpoint. LDAP provides a
   convenient storage location that can be accessed by both call server
   and endpoint; thus it is possible to use the directory to support



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   endpoint configuration, which is important for simplified operation
   and supporting user mobility. Note that other technologies also
   support endpoint configuration, notably the use of SNMP for complete
   configuration and SRV records for obtaining registration server
   addresses. Therefore, H.350 should be viewed not as an authoritative
   endpoint configuration architecture, but rather one tool that can
   assist with this task. Note that the use of H.350 has as a feature
   endpoint specific configuration, where it is desirable that each
   endpoint has a unique configuration.

   This architecture uses a generic object class, called commObject, to
   represent attributes common to any video or voice protocol.
   Auxiliary classes represent specific protocols, such as H.323,
   H.235, or H.320, as described in the H.350.x series of
   Recommendations. Multiple H.350.x classes can be combined to
   represent endpoints that support more than one protocol. For
   example, endpoints that support H.323, H.235 and H.320 would include
   H.350, H.350.1, H.350.2, and H.350.3 in their LDAP representations.
   Further, each entry should contain commObject to serve as the
   entry's structural object class.

   There are two basic components in the architecture. The commURI
   object is a class whose only purpose is to link a person or resource
   to a commObject. By placing a commURI 'pointer' in an individual's
   directory entry, that individual becomes associated with the
   particular targeted commObject. Similarly, commObject contains a
   pointer, called commOwner, which points to the individual or
   resource that is associated with the commObject. In this way, people
   or resources can be associated with endpoints. The only change
   required in the enterprise directory is the addition of the simple
   object class commURI. CommObject data may be instantiated in the
   same or in entirely separate directories, thus allowing flexibility
   in implementation.

4.1.1.  Design Goals

   Large-scale deployments of IP video and voice services have
   demonstrated the need for complementary directory services
   middleware. Service administrators need call servers that are aware
   of enterprise directories to avoid duplication of account management
   processes. Users need 'white pages' to locate other users with whom
   they wish to communicate. All of these processes should pull their
   information from canonical data sources in order to reduce redundant
   administrative processes and ensure information accuracy. The
   following design criteria are established for this architecture. The
   architecture will:

   1)   enable endpoint information to be associated with people.
   Alternately it enables endpoint information to be associated with
   resources such as conference rooms or classrooms;



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   2)   enable online searchable "white pages" where dialling
   information (e.g. endpoint addresses) can be found, along with other
   "traditional" directory information about a user, such as name,
   address, telephone, email, etc.;

   3)   enable all endpoint information to be stored in a canonical
   data source (the Directory), rather than local to the call server,
   so that endpoints can be managed through manipulations of an
   enterprise directory, rather than by direct entry into the call
   server;

   4)   support the creation of very large-scale distributed
   directories. These include white pages "portals" that allow
   searching for users across multiple institutional directories. In
   this application, each enterprise directory registers itself with
   (or is unknowingly discovered by) a directory of directories that is
   capable of searching across multiple LDAP directories;

   5)   be able to support multiple instances of endpoints per user or
   resource;

   6)   represent endpoints that support more than one protocol, for
   example, endpoints that are both H.320 and H.323;

   7)   store enough information about endpoint configuration so that
   correct configuration settings can be documented to end users on a
   per-endpoint basis, as a support tool, or loaded automatically into
   the endpoint;

   8)   be extendable as necessary to allow implementation-specific
   attributes to be included;

   9)   be non-invasive to the enterprise directory, so that support
        for multimedia conferencing can be added in a modular fashion
        without significant changes to the enterprise directory.

   The scope of this Recommendation does not include extensions of
   functionality to protocols as defined within the protocols
   themselves. It is not the intent of the Recommendation to add
   features, but merely to represent existing protocol attributes. The
   exception to this case is when functionality is implied by the
   directory itself, such as the commPrivate attribute.

4.1.2.  Extending the Schema

   H.350 object classes may be extended as necessary for specific
   implementations. For example, a class may be extended to support
   billing reference codes. Extensions to the schema are not considered
   as part of the Recommendation and do not signify compliance.



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   In some cases it may be necessary to extend the H.350 schemas in
   order to represent more information than is supported by the
   Recommendations. This may be important for developers that implement
   proprietary endpoint functionality that needs to be represented by
   attributes in the directory. It may also be important for enterprise
   applications. For example 'modelNumber', and 'accountNumber' are
   examples of attributes that are not defined in the Recommendation
   but may be useful if implemented. Adding attributes to this
   architecture must be done in a way that does not break compatibility
   with this Recommendation.

   A full discussion of schema design and extension is beyond the scope
   of this Recommendation. See IETF RFC 2252 for details. Two basic
   approaches to schema extension that do not break compatibility with
   this Recommendation, are extension through subclass and extension
   through the use of auxiliary classes.

4.1.2.1.  Extension Through Subclass

   It is possible to create a subclass of an existing predefined object
   class in order to add new attributes to it. To create a subclass, a
   new object class must be defined, that is a subclass of the existing
   one, by indicating in the definition of the new class that the
   existing class is its superior. Once the subclass is created, new
   attributes can be defined within it.

   The following example shows how the commObject class can be
   subclassed in order to add an attribute to represent a billing
   account and a billing manager.

   objectclass ( BillingInfo-OID
   NAME 'BillingInfo'
   DESC 'Billing Reference Information'
   SUP commObject STRUCTURAL
   MAY ( BillingAccount $ BillingManager $ )
   )

   Note that BillingInfo-OID must be replaced by an actual OID. Also
   note that, whenever a structural class is extended, its subclass
   must also be structural.

   The following sample entry shows the newly created attributes. This
   example also uses ITU-T Rec. H.350.1 for h323Identity.

   dn: commUniqueId=2000,ou=h323identity, dc=company, dc=com
   objectclass: top
   objectclass: commObject
   objectclass: h323Identity
   objectclass: BillingInfo



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   commUniqueId: 2000
   BillingAccount: 0023456
   BillingManager: John Smith

   Note that this example and approach demonstrate extension of the
   general commObject object class, and not any individual H.350.x
   classes. If it is desired to extend an H.350.x auxiliary class, then
   that should be accomplished through the definition of additional
   auxiliary classes that support the desired attributes, as described
   in section 4.1.2.2.

4.1.2.2.  Extension Through The Use Of Auxiliary Classes

   It is possible to add attributes to an LDAP entry by defining an
   auxiliary class containing the new attributes and applying those
   attributes to instantiated values in the directory. The auxiliary
   class will not be subclassed from any existing object class. Note
   that it should have the special class top as its superior. The
   following example creates the same billing account and billing
   manager attributes as the previous example, but does so by defining
   them in their own auxiliary class.

   objectclass ( BillingInfo-OID
   NAME 'BillingInfo'
   DESC 'Billing Reference Information'
   SUP top AUXILIARY
   MAY ( BillingAccount $ BillingManager $ )
   )

   Note how the superior was changed from commObject to top and the
   object class changed from being a structural to auxiliary.

   It is recommended that all attributes in the auxiliary class be
   optional rather than mandatory. In this way, the auxiliary object
   class itself can be associated with an entry regardless of whether
   any values for its attributes are present.

   The following example shows a sample endpoint that utilizes the new
   auxiliary class and attributes. This example also uses H.350.1 for
   h323Identity.

   dn: commUniqueId=2000,ou=h323identity, dc=company, dc=com
   objectclass: top
   objectclass: commObject
   objectclass: BillingInfo
   commUniqueId: 2000
   BillingAccount: 0023456
   BillingManager: John Smith




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4.1.2.3.  Object Identifiers

   An attribute's Object Identifier (OID) is a unique numerical
   identifier usually written as a sequence of integers separated by
   dots. For example, the OID for the commUniqueId is
   0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.1. All attributes must have an OID. OIDs can be
   obtained from anyone who has one and is willing to delegate a
   portion of it as an arc, keeping a record of the arc to avoid
   duplication. Further, the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA)
   gives out OIDs to any organization that asks.

4.2. commURIObject Definition

   Auxiliary object class that contains the commURI attribute. This
   attribute is added to a person or resource object to associate one
   or more commObject instances with that object. Its values are LDAP
   URIs that point to the associated commObjects, for example, to a
   user's H.323 conferencing station and SIP IP phone. Note that
   multiple instances of commURI need not point to the same commObject
   directory. In fact, each commURI instance could point to an endpoint
   managed by a different service provider.

4.2.1.  commURIObject

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.1.2.1
   objectclasses: (0.0.8.350.1.1.1.2.1
   NAME 'commURIObject'
   DESC 'object that contains the URI attribute type'
   SUP top AUXILIARY
   MAY ( commURI )
   )

4.2.2.  commURI

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.1.1.1
   attributetypes:( 0.0.8.350.1.1.1.1.1
   NAME 'commURI'
   DESC 'Labeled URI format to point to the distinguished name of the
   commUniqueId'
   EQUALITY caseExactMatch
   SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.15 )
   Application utility class
        Standard
   Number of values
        multi
   Definition
        Labelled URI containing an LDAP URL identifying the directory
   containing the referenced commObject instance. The search filter
   specified by this LDAP URL shall specify an equality search of the
   commUniqueId attribute of the commObject class.



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   Permissible values (if controlled)
   Notes
        Used to find the endpoint of the user in question. The label
   field may be used to represent the function of the endpoint, such as
   'home IP phone' or 'desktop video' for user interface display
   purposes.
        Note that the label portion of the field may contain spaces as
   in the example below showing 'desktop video'.
   Semantics
   Example applications for which this attribute would be useful
   Example (LDIF fragment)
   commURI:
   ldap://directory.acme.com/dc=acme,dc=com??sub?(commUniqueId=bob)
   desktop video

4.3. CommObject Definition

   Abstraction of video or voice over IP device. The commObject class
   permits an endpoint (H.323 endpoint or SIP user agent or other
   protocol endpoint) and all their aliases to be represented by a
   single entry in a directory. Note that every directory entry should
   contain commObject as the entry's structural object class. That
   entry may also contain H.350.x auxiliary classes.

4.3.1.  commObject

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.2.2.1
   objectclasses: (0.0.8.350.1.1.2.2.1
   NAME 'commObject'
   DESC 'object that contains the Communication attributes'
   SUP top STRUCTURAL
   MUST commUniqueId
   MAY ( commOwner $ commPrivate )
   )

4.3.2.  commUniqueId

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.1
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.1
   NAME 'commUniqueId'
   DESC 'To hold the endpoints unique Id'
   EQUALITY caseIgnoreIA5Match
   SUBSTR caseIgnoreIA5SubstringsMatch
   SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )
   Application utility class
        standard
   Number of values
        multi
   Definition
        The endpoint's unique ID.



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   Permissible values (if controlled)
   Notes
        This is the RDN of this object. In practice, there will always
   be one and only one commUniqueId for every endpoint. This attribute
   uniquely identifies an endpoint in the commObject directory. It must
   be unique within that directory, but need not be unique globally.
   This attribute has no relationship to the enterprise directory.
   Semantics
   Example applications for which this attribute would be useful
   Example (LDIF fragment)
   commUniqueId: bob

4.3.3.  commOwner

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.2
   attributetypes: 0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.2
   NAME 'commOwner'
   DESC 'Labeled URI to point back to the original owner'
   EQUALITY caseExactMatch
   SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.15 )
   Application utility class
        Standard
   Number of values
        multi
   Definition
        Labelled URI format to point back to the person or resource
   object associated with this entry.
   Permissible values (if controlled)
   Notes
        Used as a reverse entry finder of the owner(s). This attribute
   may point to groups. Note that this URI can point to a cn, but in
   applications where it is desired to bind authentication information
   across both the commObject and enterprise directories, it may be
   desirable that commOwner points to a dn rather than a cn, thus
   uniquely identifying the owner of the commObject.
   Semantics
   Example applications for which this attribute would be useful
   Example (LDIF fragment)
   commOwner:
   ldap://directory.acme.com/dc=acme,dc=com??sub?(cn=bob%20smith)
   commOwner: uid=bob,ou=people,dc=acme,dc=com

4.3.4.  commPrivate

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.3
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.3
   NAME 'commPrivate'
   DESC 'To decide whether the entry is visible to world or not'
    SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )
   Application utility class



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        Standard
   Number of values
        multi
   Definition
        To be used by the user and indicate privacy options for an
   endpoint,  i.e. unlisted number.
   Permissible values (if controlled)
   Notes
        This attribute is defined as Boolean. Future version of this
   Recommendation may develop a controlled vocabulary for this
   attribute to accommodate multiple types of privacy.
   Semantics
   Example applications for which this attribute would be useful
   Example (LDIF fragment)
   commPrivate: true

4.4. CommObject LDIF Files

   This section contains a schema configuration file for commURIObject
   and commObject that can be used to configure an LDAP server to
   support these classes.

4.4.1.  LDIF for commURIObject

   # Communication Object Schema
   #
   # Schema for Representing Communication Objects in an LDAP Directory
   #
   # Abstract
   #
   # This document defines the schema for representing Communication
   # objects in an LDAP directory [LDAPv3].  It defines schema elements
   # to represent a communication object URI [commURIObject].
   #
   #
   #
   #                     .1 = Communication related work
   #                     .1.1 = commURIObject
   #                     .1.1.1 = attributes
   #                     .1.1.2 = objectclass
   #                     .1.1.3 = syntax
   #
   # Attribute Type Definitions
   #
   #    The following attribute types are defined in this document:
   #
   #        commURI
   dn: cn=schema
   changetype: modify
   #



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   # if you need to change the definition of an attribute,
   #            then first delete and re-add in one step
   #
   # if this is the first time you are adding the commObject
   # objectclass using this LDIF file, then you should comment
   # out the delete attributetypes modification since this will
   # fail. Alternatively, if your ldapmodify has a switch to continue
   # on errors, then just use that switch -- if you're careful
   #
   delete: attributetypes
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.1.1.1 NAME 'commURI' )
   -
   #
   # re-add the attributes -- in case there is a change of definition
   #
   #
   add: attributetypes
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.1.1.1
        NAME 'commURI'
        DESC 'Labeled URI format to point to the distinguished name of
   the commUniqueId'
        EQUALITY caseExactMatch
        SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.15 )
   -
   # Object Class Definitions
   #
   #    The following object classes are defined in this document:
   #
   #        commURIObject
   #
   # commURIObject
   #
   #    This auxiliary object class represents a URI attribute type
   #
   #
   delete: objectclasses
   objectclasses: (0.0.8.350.1.1.1.2.1 NAME 'commURIObject' )
   -
   add: objectclasses
   objectclasses: (0.0.8.350.1.1.1.2.1
        NAME 'commURIObject'
        DESC 'object that contains the URI attribute type'
        SUP top AUXILIARY
        MAY ( commURI )
           )
   -
   #
   # end of LDIF
   #




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4.4.2.  LDIF for commObject

   # Communication Object Schema
   #
   # Schema for Representing Communication Objects in an LDAP Directory
   #
   # Abstract
   #
   # This document defines the schema for representing Communication
   # objects in an LDAP directory [LDAPv3].  It defines schema elements
   # to represent a communication object [commObject].
   #
   #
   #                     .1 = Communication related work
   #                     .1.2 = commObject
   #                     .1.2.1 = attributes
   #                     .1.2.2 = objectclass
   #                     .1.2.3 = syntax
   #
   #
   # Attribute Type Definitions
   #
   #    The following attribute types are defined in this document:
   #
   #        commUniqueId
   #        commOwner
   #        commPrivate
   dn: cn=schema
   changetype: modify
   #
   # if you need to change the definition of an attribute,
   #            then first delete and re-add in one step
   #
   # if this is the first time you are adding the commObject
   # objectclass using this LDIF file, then you should comment
   # out the delete attributetypes modification since this will
   # fail. Alternatively, if your ldapmodify has a switch to continue
   # on errors, then just use that switch -- if you're careful
   #
   delete: attributetypes
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.1 NAME 'commUniqueId' )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.2 NAME 'commOwner' )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.3 NAME 'commPrivate' )
   -
   #
   # re-add the attributes -- in case there is a change of definition
   #
   #
   add: attributetypes
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.1



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        NAME 'commUniqueId'
        DESC 'To hold the endpoints unique Id'
        EQUALITY caseIgnoreIA5Match
        SUBSTR caseIgnoreIA5SubstringsMatch
        SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.2
        NAME 'commOwner'
        DESC 'Labeled URI to point back to the original owner'
        EQUALITY caseExactMatch
        SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.15 )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.2.1.3
        NAME 'commPrivate'
        DESC 'To decide whether the entry is visible to world or not'
        SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )
   -
   # Object Class Definitions
   #
   #    The following object classes are defined in this document:
   #
   #        commObject
   #
   # commObject
   #
   #
   delete: objectclasses
   objectclasses: (0.0.8.350.1.1.2.2.1 NAME 'commObject' )
   -
   add: objectclasses
   objectclasses: (0.0.8.350.1.1.2.2.1
        NAME 'commObject'
        DESC 'object that contains the Communication attributes'
        SUP top STRUCTURAL
        MUST commUniqueId
        MAY ( commOwner $ commPrivate )
        )
   -
   #
   # end of LDIF
   #

4.5. H.350 Annex A Indexing Profile

   Indexing of attributes is an implementation-specific activity and
   depends upon the desired application. Non-indexed attributes can
   result in search times sufficiently long to render some applications
   unusable. Notably, user and alias lookup should be fast. The Annex A
   Indexing Profile describes an indexing configuration for commObject
   directories that will be optimized for use in directory of
   directories applications. Use of this profile is optional.




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   commURI: no recommendation

   commUniqueId: equality

   commOwner: presence

   commPrivate: presence

5. H.350.4

   The normative text of H.350 is reproduced in this section.

5.1. Scope

   This Recommendation describes an LDAP directory services
   architecture for multimedia conferencing using SIP. In particular,
   it defines an LDAP schema to represent SIP User Agents (UAs) on the
   network and associate those endpoints with users.

   This Recommendation is intended to supplement the CommObject
   directory architecture as discussed in ITU-T Rec. H.350, and not
   intended to be used as a stand-alone architecture. The
   implementation of this LDAP schema, together with the use of the
   H.350 CommObject architecture, facilitates the integration of SIP
   User Agents and conferencing devices into existing Enterprise
   Directories, thus allowing the user to perform white page lookups
   and access clickable dialling supported by SIP devices. The primary
   reasons for implementing this schema include those listed in ITU-T
   Rec. H.350 (the CommObject class definition) as they apply
   specifically to the use of SIP UAs, and to facilitate vendors making
   SIP services more readily available to their users.

   The scope of this Recommendation includes recommendations for the
   architecture to integrate endpoint information for endpoints using
   SIP into existing enterprise directories and white pages.

   The scope of this Recommendation does not include normative methods
   for the use of the LDAP directory itself or the data it contains.
   The purpose of the schema is not to represent all possible data
   elements in the SIP protocol, but rather to represent the minimal
   set required to accomplish the design goals enumerated in ITU-T Rec.
   H.350.

   Note that SIP provides well-defined methods for discovering
   registrar addresses and locating users on the network. Some of the
   attributes defined here are intended for more trivial or manual
   implementations and may not be needed for all applications. For
   example, SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress and SIPIdentityAddress may not
   be needed for many applications, but are included here for
   completeness. Thus, SIPIdentitySIPURI is the primary attribute of



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   interest that will be served out, especially for white page
   directory applications.

5.1.1.  Extending the schema

   The SIPIdentity classes may be extended as necessary for specific
   implementations. See the base of ITU-T Rec. H.350 for a discussion
   on schema extension.

5.2. Object class definitions

   The SIPIdentity object class represents SIP User Agents (UAs). It is
   an auxiliary class and is derived from the commObject class, which
   is defined in the ITU-T Rec. H.350.

5.2.1.  SIPIdentity

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.6.2.1
   objectclasses: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.2.1
   NAME 'SIPIdentity'
   DESC 'SIPIdentity object'
   SUP top AUXILIARY
   MAY ( SIPIdentitySIPURI $ SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress $
      SIPIdentityProxyAddress $ SIPIdentityUserName $
      SIPIdentityPassword $ SIPIdentityServiceLevel $
      userSMIMECertificate )
   )

5.2.2.  SIPIdentitySIPURI

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.1
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.1
   NAME 'SIPIdentitySIPURI'
   DESC 'Universal Resource Indicator of the SIP UA'
   EQUALITY caseExactMatch
   SUBSTR caseExactSubstringsMatch
   SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.15 )
   Application utility class
        standard
   Number of values
        multi
   Definition
        Uniform Resource Identifier that identifies a communication
   resource in SIP. Usually contains a user name and a host name and is
   often similar in format to an email address.
   Permissible values (if controlled)
   Notes
        This URI may institute SIP or SIPS (secure). In the event that
   SIPS is instituted, the URI must reflect that it is using SIPS as
   opposed to SIP. See Examples below.



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   Semantics
   Example applications for which this attribute would be useful
        Online representation of most current listing of a user's
   SIP(S) UA.
   Example
   SIPIdentitySIPURI: sip:alice@foo.com          // SIP example
   SIPIdentitySIPURI: sip:alice@152.2.158.212    // SIP example
   SIPIdentitySIPURI: sips:bob@birmingham.edu    // SIPS example

5.2.3.  SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.2
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.2
   NAME 'SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress'
   DESC 'specifies the location of the registrar'
   EQUALITY caseIgnoreIA5Match
   SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )
   Application utility class
        Standard
   Number of values
        multi
   Definition
        Address for the domain to which the server that handles
   REGISTER requests and forwarding to the location server for a
   particular domain belongs.
   Permissible values (if controlled)
   Notes
        Note that RFC 3261 states that user agents can discover their
   registrar address by configuration, using the address-of-record, or
   by multicast. The first scenario, by configuration, is noted as out
   of scope for RC 3261. This attribute may be used for the first
   scenario. It can be accomplished manually, (e.g. a web page that
   displays a user's correct registrar address) or automatically with
   an H.350.4 aware user agent.
   Semantics
   Example applications for which this attribute would be useful
        white pages, a web page that displays a user's correct
   configuration information.
   Example (LDIF fragment)
   SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress: 152.2.15.22     //IP address example
   SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress: sipregistrar.unc.edu  //FQDN example

5.2.4.  SIPIdentityProxyAddress

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.3
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.3
   NAME 'SIPIdentityProxyAddress'
   DESC 'Specifies the location of the SIP Proxy'
   EQUALITY caseIgnoreIA5Match
   SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )



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   Application utility class
        Standard
   Number of values
        multi
   Definition
        Address which specifies the domain location of SIP proxy within
   a domain. RFC 3261 defines the role of the SIP proxy.
   Permissible values (if controlled)
   Notes
        SIP User Agents are not REQUIRED to use a proxy, but will in
   many cases.
   Semantics
   Example applications for which this attribute would be useful
        white pages, a web page that displays a user's correct
   configuration information.
   Example (LDIF fragment)
   SIPIdentityProxyAddress: 172.2.13.234     //IP address example
   SIPIdentityProxyAddress: sipproxy.unc.edu  //FQDN example

5.2.5.  SIPIdentityAddress

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.4
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.4
   NAME 'SIPIdentityAddress'
   DESC 'IP address or FQDN of the UA'
   EQUALITY caseIgnoreIA5Match
   SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )
   Application utility class
        standard
   Number of values
        multi
   Definition
        Specifies the IP address or fully qualified domain name of the
   UA.
   Permissible values (if controlled)
   Notes
        This attribute may be useful for applications in which UA to UA
   communication is direct, not involving a proxy or registrar.
   Example applications for which this attribute would be useful
        A web page that displays a user's proper user agent
   configuration information.
   Example (LDIF fragment)
   SIPIdentityAddress: 152.2.121.36       // IP address example
   SIPIdentityAddress: ipPhone.foo.org    // FQDN example

5.2.6.  SIPIdentityPassword

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.5
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.5
   NAME 'SIPIdentityPassword'



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   DESC 'The user agent SIP password '
   EQUALITY octetStringMatch
   SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.40 )
   Application utility class
        Standard
   Number of values
        multi
   Definition
        The SIP user agent's password, used for the HTTP digest
   authentication scheme as defined in RFC 2617.
   Permissible values (if controlled)
   Notes
        Because RFC 2069, which was made obsolete by RFC 2617, was used
   as the basis for HTTP Digest in RFC 2543, any SIP servers supporting
   RFC 2617 must ensure backward compatibility with RFC 2069.
        This SIPIdentityUserName, together with SIPIdentityPassword,
   are reserved for the purpose of use with Digest Access
   Authentication, and not intended for use with Basic Authentication
   methods.
        LDAP provides one method to store user passwords for reference.
   If passwords are stored in LDAP it makes the LDAP server a
   particularly valuable target for attack. Implementors are encouraged
   to exercise caution and implement appropriate security procedures
   such as encryption, access control, and transport layer security for
   access to this attribute.
   Semantics
   Example applications for which this attribute would be useful
   Example (LDIF fragment)
   SIPIdentityPassword: 36zxJmCIB18dM0FVAj

5.2.7.  SIPIdentityUserName

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.6
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.6
   NAME 'SIPIdentityUserName'
   DESC 'The user agent user name.'
   EQUALITY caseIgnoreMatch
   SUBSTR caseIgnoreSubstringsMatch
   SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.15 )
   Application utility class
        Standard
   Number of values
        multi
   Definition
        The SIP user agent's user name, used for the HTTP digest
   authentication scheme as defined in RFC 2617.
   Permissible values (if controlled)
   Notes
        Because RFC 2069, which was made obsolete by RFC 2617, was used
   as the basis for HTTP Digest Authentication in RFC 2543, any SIP



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   servers supporting HTTP Digest Authentication as defined in RFC 2617
   must ensure backward compatibility with RFC 2069.
        This SIPIdentityUserName, together with SIPIdentityPassword,
   are reserved for the purpose of use with Digest Access
   Authentication, and not intended for use with Basic Authentication
   methods.
        Note that in many cases the user name will be parsed from the
   user@proxy.domain portion of the SIP URI. In that case it may not be
   necessary to populate this attribute.
   Semantics
   Example applications for which this attribute would be useful
   Example (LDIF fragment)
   SIPIdentityUserName: nelkhour

5.2.8.  SIPIdentityServiceLevel

   OID: 0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.7
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.7
   NAME 'SIPIdentityServiceLevel'
   DESC 'To define services that a user can belong to.'
   EQUALITY caseIgnoreIA5Match
   SUBSTR caseIgnoreIA5SubstringsMatch
   SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )
   Application utility class
        Standard
   Number of values
        multi
   Definition
        This describes the level of services a user can belong to.
   Permissible values (if controlled)
   Notes
        This attribute does not represent a data element found in SIP.
   SIP itself does not support distinctions in service levels. Instead,
   this attribute provides a mechanism for the storage of service level
   information directly in LDAP. This mapping allows service providers
   to adapt to an existing LDAP directory without changing the values
   of the SIPIdentityServiceLevel instances in the directory.
   Semantics
   Example applications for which this attribute would be useful
   Example (LDIF fragment)
   SIPIdentityServiceLevel: premium

5.3. SIPIdentity LDIF Files

   This clause contains a schema configuration file for SIPIdentity
   that can be used to configure an LDAP server to support this class.

   # SIPIdentity Object Schema
   #
   # Schema for representing SIPIdentity Object in an LDAP Directory



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   #
   # Abstract
   #
   # This Recommendation defines the schema for representing
   SIPIdentity
   # object in an LDAP directory [LDAPv3].  It defines schema elements
   # to represent an SIPIdentity object [SIPIdentity].
   #
   #                     .1 = Communication related work
   #                     .1.6 = SIPIdentity
   #                     .1.6.1 = attributes
   #                     .1.6.2 = objectclass
   #                     .1.6.3 = syntax
   #
   #
   #
   # Attribute Type Definitions
   #
   #    The following attribute types are defined in this
   Recommendation:
   #
   #     SIPIdentitySIPURI
   #     SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress
   #     SIPIdentityProxyAddress
   #     SIPIdentityAddress
   #     SIPIdentityPassword
   #     SIPIdentityUserName
   #     SIPIdentityServiceLevel
   dn: cn=schema
   changetype: modify
   #
   # if you need to change the definition of an attribute,
   #            then first delete and re-add in one step
   #
   # if this is the first time you are adding the SIPIdentity
   # objectclass using this LDIF file, then you should comment
   # out the delete attributetypes modification since this will
   # fail. Alternatively, if your ldapmodify has a switch to continue
   # on errors, then just use that switch -- if you are careful
   #
   delete: attributetypes
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.1 NAME 'SIPIdentitySIPURI' )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.2 NAME
   'SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress' )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.3 NAME 'SIPIdentityProxyAddress'
   )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.4 NAME 'SIPIdentityAddress' )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.5 NAME 'SIPIdentityPassword' )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.6 NAME 'SIPIdentityUserName' )



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   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.7 NAME 'SIPIdentityServiceLevel'
   )
   -
   #
   # re-add the attributes -- in case there is a change of definition
   #
   #
   add: attributetypes
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.1
        NAME 'SIPIdentitySIPURI'
        DESC 'Universal Resource Indicator of the SIP UA'
        EQUALITY caseExactMatch
        SUBSTR caseExactSubstringsMatch
        SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.15 )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.2
        NAME 'SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress'
        DESC 'specifies the location of the registrar'
        EQUALITY caseIgnoreIA5Match
        SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.3
        NAME 'SIPIdentityProxyAddress'
        DESC 'Specifies the location of the SIP Proxy'
        EQUALITY caseIgnoreIA5Match
        SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.4
        NAME 'SIPIdentityAddress'
        DESC 'IP address of the UA'
        EQUALITY caseIgnoreIA5Match
        SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.5
        NAME 'SIPIdentityPassword'
        DESC 'The user agent SIP password '
        EQUALITY octetStringMatch
        SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.40 )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.6
        NAME 'SIPIdentityUserName'
        DESC 'The user agent user name.'
        EQUALITY caseIgnoreMatch
        SUBSTR caseIgnoreSubstringsMatch
        SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.15 )
   attributetypes: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.1.7
        NAME 'SIPIdentityServiceLevel'
        DESC 'To define services that a user can belong to.'
        EQUALITY caseIgnoreIA5Match
        SUBSTR caseIgnoreIA5SubstringsMatch
        SYNTAX 1.3.6.1.4.1.1466.115.121.1.26 )
   -
   # Object Class Definitions
   #
   #    The following object class is defined in this Recommendation:



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   #
   #        SIPIdentity
   #
   # SIPIdentity
   #
   #
   delete: objectclasses
   objectclasses: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.2.1 NAME 'SIPIdentity' )
   -
   add: objectclasses
   objectclasses: (0.0.8.350.1.1.6.2.1
        NAME 'SIPIdentity'
        DESC 'SIPIdentity object'
        SUP top AUXILIARY
        MAY ( SIPIdentitySIPURI $ SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress $
             SIPIdentityProxyAddress $ SIPIdentityAddress $
             SIPIdentityPassword $ SIPIdentityUserName $
             SIPIdentityServiceLevel $ userSMIMECertificate )
        )
   -
   #
   # end of LDIF
   #

5.4. H.350.4 Annex A Indexing profile

   Indexing of attributes is an implementation-specific activity and
   depends upon the desired application. Non-indexed attributes can
   result in search times sufficiently long to render some applications
   unusable. Notably, user and alias lookup should be fast. The Annex A
   Indexing Profile describes an indexing configuration for SIPIdentity
   directories that will be optimized for use in directory of
   directories applications. Use of this profile is optional.

   SIPIdentitySIPURI: equality

   SIPIdentityRegistrarAddress: no recommendation

   SIPIdentityProxyAddress: no recommendation

   SIPIdentityAddress: equality

   SIPIdentityUserName: equality

   SIPIdentityPassword: no recommendation

   SIPIdentityServiceLevel: equality

6. Acknowledgments




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   We are grateful to numerous colleagues for reaching across multiple
   boundaries of standards bodies, research networks, academia and
   private industry in order to produce an architecture that works
   toward integrating multimedia conferencing deployments. In
   particular, standards from both IETF and ITU-T were drawn from
   extensively, and the architecture is meant to serve all communities.

   This work developed out of the Video Conferencing Middleware
   (VidMid-VC) working group, a joint effort of Internet2
   (www.internet2.edu) and the Video Development Initiative
   (www.vide.net). The architecture was developed in response to
   deployment challenges discovered in the ViDeNet
   (https//:videnet.unc.edu) academic test bed providing video and
   voice over IP infrastructure across research networks
   internationally.

   This work was supported in part by a grant from the United States
   National Science Foundation contract number ANI-0222710.

7. Normative References

   [1]  Hodges, J., Morgan, R., "Lightweight Directory Access Protocol
        (v3): Technical Specification," RFC 3377, September 2002.

   [2]  ITU-T Recommendation H.350, "Directory services architecture
        for multimedia conferencing," 2003.

   [3]  ITU-T Recommendation H.350.4, "Directory services architecture
        for SIP," 2003.

   [4]  Franks, J., Hallam-Baker P., Hostetler, J., Lawrence, S.,
        Leach, P., Luotonen, A., Stewart, L., "HTTP Authentication:
        Basic and Digest Access Authentication," RFC 2617, June 1999.

   [5]  Rosenberg, J., Schulzrinne, H., Camarillo, G., Johnston, A.,
        Peterson, J., Sparks, R., Handley, M., Schooler, E., "SIP:
        Session Initiation Protocol," RFC 3261, June 2002.

   [6]  Rosenberg, J., Schulzrinne, H., "Session Initiation Protocol
        (SIP): Locating SIP Servers," RFC 3263, June 2002.

8. Informative References

   [7]  Hodges, J., Morgan, R., "Lightweight Directory Access Protocol
        (v3): Technical Specification," RFC 3377, September 2002.

   [8]  ITU-T Recommendation H.350.1, " Directory services architecture
        for H.323," 2003.




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   [9]  ITU-T Recommendation H.350.2, " Directory services architecture
        for H.235," 2003.

   [10] ITU-T Recommendation H.350.3, " Directory services architecture
        for H.320," 2003.

   [11] ITU-T Recommendation H.350.5, " Directory services architecture
        for Non-Standard Protocols," 2003.

   [12] Howes T. and Smith, M., "Understanding And Deploying LDAP
        Directory Services," New Riders Publishing, ISBN: 1578700701,
        1999.

   [13] Howes T. and Smith, M., " LDAP Programming Directory-Enabled
        Applications with Lightweight Directory Access Protocol," New
        Riders Publishing, ISBN: 1578700000, 1997.

9. Security Considerations

   H.350 does not alter the security architectures of any particular
   protocol. However, it does offer a standardized place to store
   authentication credentials where appropriate. It should be noted
   that both H.323 and SIP support shared secret authentication (H.235
   Annex D and HTTP Digest, respectively). These approaches require
   that the call server have access to the password. Thus, if the call
   server or H.350 directory is compromised, passwords also may become
   compromised. These weaknesses may be due to weaknesses in the
   systems (H.350 directory or call servers) and their operation rather
   than in H.350 per se.

   It is strongly encouraged that call servers and an H.350 directory
   mutually authenticate each other before sharing information.
   Further, it is strongly encouraged that communications between H.350
   directories and call servers or endpoints happen over secure
   communication channels such as SSL or TLS.

   Finally, access control lists on LDAP servers are a matter of policy
   and are not a part of the standard. System administrators are
   advised to use common sense when setting access control on H.350
   attributes. For example, password attributes should only be
   accessible by the authenticated user, while address attributes might
   be publicly available.

10.     Contact Information

   Tyler Johnson
   Editor, H.350
   University of North Carolina
   Chapel Hill, NC 27599
   Tel: +1.919.843.7004



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       Internet Draft  H.350 Directory Services        April 2004


   Email: Tyler_Johnson@unc.edu

   Sakae Okubo
   Rapporteur for Q.4/16, ITU-T SG16
   Waseda University
   YRP Ichibankan, 3-4 Hikarinooka
   Yokosuka-shi, 239-0847 Japan
   Tel: +81 46 847 5406
   e-mail: sokubo@waseda.jp

   Simƒo Ferraz de Campos Neto
   Counsellor, ITU-T SG 16
   International Telecommunication Union
   Place des Nations
   Geneva CH1211 - Switzerland
   Tel:    +41-22-730-6805
   E-mail: simao.campos@itu.int


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