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Internet Engineering Task Force                              S. Kawamura
Internet-Draft                                         NEC BIGLOBE, Ltd.
Intended status: Informational                             June 11, 2010
Expires: December 13, 2010


            A Basic Guideline for Listing ISPs that Run IPv6
                  draft-kawamura-ipv6-isp-listings-00

Abstract

   There are many web sites that give listings of IPv6 enabled service
   providers, or rate ISPs according to their IPv6 enabledness.  This
   document intends to gather information about currently known sites
   and their methods of checking an ISPs enabledness.  This document
   also summarizes a basic guideline that these listings may consider
   when checking an ISPs IPv6 enabledness.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
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   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 13, 2010.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as



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   described in the Simplified BSD License.


1.  Introduction

   There are many web sites that give listings of IPv6 enabled service
   providers, or rate ISPs according to their IPv6 enabledness.  The
   following are few examples of currently known programs.

      IPv6 Enabled Program http://ipv6forum.org/ipv6_enabled/

      IPv6 Ripeness http://labs.ripe.net/content/ipv6-ripeness/

      SixXS http://www.sixxs.net/wiki/IPv6_Enabled_Service_Providers

      IPv6 to Standard http://ipv6-to-standard.org/

      Hurricane Electric Free IPv6 Certification
      http://ipv6.he.net/certification/

   There are several motivations for these listings which benefit both
   the ISPs and the users.  It gives ISPs a goal to work for in turning
   up IPv6.  It also can be used by ISPs for publicity (in telling the
   world that their service is ready for IPv4 address exhaustion).
   Listings can also be a guide for users when they choose their ISP.

   This document intends to gather information about currently known
   listings, and to summarize a basic guideline that can be used when
   starting a new program of the like.  There are many reason (such as
   localization) that a new listing is started albeit the fact that
   there already is one.  A presence of a guideline would help those
   that intend to start such programs.  It may also help in keeping one
   listing or rating guideline from being widely different from another,
   so it would not confuse users who decided to choose ISPs on the basis
   that the ISP is on one of these IPv6 enabled service provider
   listings.

1.1.  Requirements Language

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].


2.  Summary of the Current Situation

   The following are the list of currently known programs that list or
   rate ISPs according to a guideline that each has determined.



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      IPv6 Enabled Program http://ipv6forum.org/ipv6_enabled/

      IPv6 Ripeness http://labs.ripe.net/content/ipv6-ripeness/

      SixXS http://www.sixxs.net/wiki/IPv6_Enabled_Service_Providers

      IPv6 to Standard http://ipv6-to-standard.org/

      Hurricane Electric Free IPv6 Certification
      http://ipv6.he.net/certification/

   note: the following description of each program is not yet complete.

2.1.  IPv6 Enabled Program

   The IPv6 enabled program lists ISPs at two levels: basic and
   advanced.  At the time of this writing, the advanced level list has
   not been started yet.  The basic requirements for being listed in the
   basic list are, to have a prefix assigned or allocated (IPv6 enabled
   program does not check if the prefix is an assignment or allocation),
   have a global AS route it, and keep reachability as much as possible.

   The IPv6 Enabled Program checks the following.

2.1.1.  Network Accessibility Ability

   The ISP's AS number is checked against a database to see if the AS
   exists and is unique.

2.1.2.  Active IPv6 Address Requirement

   The ISP's IPv6 prefix is checked against a database to see if the
   applying ISP is the rightful owner.  Actual traffic to the prefix
   from a customer is also checked.  Checking at the time of writing is
   done by using a script that the ISP will paste to a web site, and the
   script checks if it was accessed via IPv6.

2.1.3.  Persistence of IPv6 service Ability

   The check noted in the previous section is done periodically to check
   global reachability.

2.2.  IPv6 Ripeness

   IPv6 Ripeness is part of a study conducted by RIPE NCC.  Stars are
   given to LIRs registered in the RIPE NCC service region by checking
   there status in IPv6 deployment.




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2.2.1.  Criteria

   Stars are earned by checking the following criteria.

   o  Have an IPv6 prefix allocated or a PI assigned.

   o  Prefix is visible in the Routing Information System(RIS).

   o  A route6 object is registered in the RIPE database.

   o  Reverse DNS is setup for the IPv6 prefix.

2.3.  Summary of the Checking Criteria

   The programs discussed in this section share these criteria in
   common.

   o  Have an IPv6 prefix allocated or a PI assigned.

   o  Prefix is visible in a routing database.

   IPv6 Ripeness also checks if a route6 is registered (have good
   routing manners), and a reverse DNS is set up.  IPv6 Enabled Program
   checks for actual traffic which requires the presence of an active
   web server inside the ISP.


3.  Guidelines for Listing an IPv6 Enabled ISP

3.1.  Scope of the Guideline

   This guideline can be used to check any LIR or a PI address holder,
   that claims to be an ISP.  The guideline is only intended to check an
   ISP's network accessibility.  In turn, this guideline can also be
   used as a minimum requirement checklist by ISPs who want to newly
   turn up IPv6 in their network.

3.2.  Levels of the Listing

   We divide the listing into two levels, basic and advanced.  Basic
   level is what is absolutely necessary for any ISP to claim that they
   have some form of IPv6 working.  The basic level will not guarantee
   that the ISP has a fully working or production quality IPv6 network.
   The advanced level will take the requirements one step further in
   bring the level of deployment closer to the quality of the IPv4
   network.  It checks for the basics needed to achieve any of the
   service types defined in the General Terminology section in
   [RFC4084].



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3.3.  Basic

   The basic level listing checks an ISP to meet the following criteria.

   o  Have an IPv6 prefix allocated or a PI assigned.

   o  Prefix is visible in at least one routing database.

   o  Have at least one server with an IPv6 address where accessibility
      can be checked.

3.4.  Advanced

   The advanced level listing checks an ISP to meet the following
   criteria.

   o  Reverse DNS for is set up for allocated prefixes.

   o  DNS cache servers are accessible via IPv6 transport.

   o  Path MTU discovery [RFC1981] is functional and is not filtered.

   o  Prefix visibility is seen in at least two routing databases
      belonging in different regions of the world.

3.5.  Considerations

   The listings can be made more useful if checking is done according to
   the target users of the ISP service.  ISP for residential, ISP for
   ISPs (transit providers), ISP for enterprises, and ISP for data
   centers have different requirements.  This document does not go into
   discussing the requirements for each type of services are.  This
   document intends to discuss the requirements that should be common to
   any services provided by any ISP.


4.  Security Considerations

   None.


5.  IANA Considerations

   None.







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6.  Acknowledgements

   The author would like to thank the Task Force on IPv4 Address
   Exhaustion, Japan.  Parts of this document was inspired from work by
   Brian Carpenter and Sheng Jiang.


7.  References

7.1.  Normative References

7.2.  Informative References

   [RFC1981]  McCann, J., Deering, S., and J. Mogul, "Path MTU Discovery
              for IP version 6", RFC 1981, August 1996.

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [RFC4084]  Klensin, J., "Terminology for Describing Internet
              Connectivity", BCP 104, RFC 4084, May 2005.


Author's Address

   Seiichi Kawamura
   NEC BIGLOBE, Ltd.
   14-22, Shibaura 4-chome
   Minatoku, Tokyo  108-8558
   JAPAN

   Phone: +81 3 3798 6085
   Email: kawamucho@mesh.ad.jp


















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