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Versions: 00 01 02 03 04 draft-ietf-trill-resilient-trees

INTERNET-DRAFT                                              Mingui Zhang
Intended Status: Proposed Standard                                Huawei
Expires: April 24, 2014                               Tissa Senevirathne
Updates: RFC 6325                                                  CISCO
                                                    Janardhanan Pathangi
                                                                    DELL
                                                           Ayan Banerjee
                                                        Insieme Networks
                                                          Anoop Ghanwani
                                                                    DELL
                                                         Donald Eastlake
                                                                  Huawei
                                                        October 21, 2013

                   TRILL Resilient Distribution Trees
                draft-zhang-trill-resilient-trees-04.txt

Abstract

   TRILL protocol provides layer 2 multicast data forwarding using IS-IS
   link state routing. Distribution trees are computed based on the link
   state information through Shortest Path First calculation. When a
   link on the distribution tree fails, a campus-wide recovergence of
   this distribution tree will take place, which can be time consuming
   and may cause considerable disruption to the ongoing multicast
   service.

   This document proposes to build the backup distribution tree to
   protect links on the primary distribution tree. Since the backup
   distribution tree is built up ahead of the link failure, when a link
   on the primary distribution tree fails, the pre-installed backup
   forwarding table will be utilized to deliver multicast packets
   without waiting for the campus-wide recovergence, which minimizes the
   service disruption.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that other
   groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."



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   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.


Table of Contents

   1. Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     1.1. Conventions used in this document . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     1.2. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   2. Usage of Affinity Sub-TLV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     2.1. Allocating Affinity Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     2.2. Distribution Tree Calculation with Affinity Links . . . . .  6
   3. Resilient Distribution Trees Calculation  . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     3.1. Designating Roots for Backup Trees  . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
       3.1.1. Conjugate Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
       3.1.2. Explicitly Advertising Tree Roots . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     3.2. Backup DT Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
       3.2.1. Backup DT Calculation with Affinity Links . . . . . . .  8
         3.2.1.1. Algorithm for Choosing Affinity Links . . . . . . .  9
         3.2.1.2. Affinity Links Advertisement  . . . . . . . . . . . 10
       3.2.2. Backup DT Calculation without Affinity Links  . . . . . 10
   4. Resilient Distribution Trees Installation . . . . . . . . . . . 10
     4.1. Pruning the Backup Distribution Tree  . . . . . . . . . . . 11
     4.2. RPF Filters Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
   5. Protection Mechanisms with Resilient Distribution Trees . . . . 12
     5.1. Global 1:1 Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
     5.2. Global 1+1 Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
       5.2.1. Failure Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
       5.2.2. Traffic Forking and Merging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14



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     5.3. Local Protection  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
       5.3.1. Start Using the Backup Distribution Tree  . . . . . . . 15
       5.3.2. Duplication Suppression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       5.3.3. An Example to Walk Through  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
     5.4. Switching Back to the Primary Distribution Tree . . . . . . 16
   6. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
   7. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
   Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
   8. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     8.1. Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     8.2. Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
   Author's Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19







































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1. Introduction

   Lots of multicast traffic is generated by interrupt latency sensitive
   applications, e.g., video distribution, including IP-TV, video
   conference and so on. Normally, a network fault will be recovered
   through a network wide reconvergence of the forwarding states, but
   this process is too slow to meet the tight Service Level Agreement
   (SLA) requirements on the service disruption duration. What is worse,
   updating multicast forwarding states may take significantly longer
   than unicast convergence since multicast states are updated based on
   control-plane signaling [mMRT].

   Protection mechanisms are commonly used to reduce the service
   disruption caused by network faults. With backup forwarding states
   installed in advance, a protection mechanism is possible to restore
   an interrupted multicast stream in tens of milliseconds which
   guarantees the stringent SLA on service disruption. Several
   protection mechanisms for multicast traffic have been developed for
   IP/MPLS networks [mMRT] [MoFRR]. However, the way TRILL constructs
   distribution trees (DT) is different from the way multicast trees are
   computed under IP/MPLS, therefore a multicast protection mechanism
   suitable for TRILL is required.

   This document proposes "Resilient Distribution Trees" (RDT) in which
   backup trees are installed in advance for the purpose of fast failure
   repair. Three types of protection mechanisms are proposed.

   o  Global 1:1 protection is used to refer to the mechanism that the
      multicast source RBridge normally injects one multicast stream
      onto the primary DT. When interruption of this stream is detected,
      the source RBridge switches to the backup DT to inject subsequent
      multicast streams until the primary DT is recovered.

   o  Global 1+1 protection is used to refer to the mechanism that the
      multicast source RBridge always injects two copies of multicast
      streams onto the primary DT and backup DT respectively. In the
      normal case, multicast receivers pick the stream sent along the
      primary DT and egress it to its local link. When a link failure
      interrupts the primary stream, the backup one will be picked until
      the primary DT is recovered.

   o  Local protection refers to the mechanism that the RBridge attached
      to the failed link locally repairs the failure.

   RDT may greatly reduce the service disruption caused by link
   failures. In the global 1:1 protection, the time cost by DT
   recalculation and installation can be saved. The global 1+1
   protection and local protection further save the time spent on



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   failure propagation. A failed link can be repaired in tens of
   milliseconds. Although it's possible to make use of RDT to achieve
   load balance of multicast traffic, this document leaves that for
   future study.

   [6326bis] defines the Affinity TLV. An "Affinity Link" can be
   explicitly assigned to a distribution tree or trees. This offers a
   way to manipulate the calculation of distribution trees. With
   intentional assignment of Affinity Links, a backup distribution tree
   can be set up to protect links on a primary distribution tree.

1.1. Conventions used in this document

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].

1.2. Terminology

   IS-IS: Intermediate System to Intermediate System
   TRILL: TRansparent Interconnection of Lots of Links
   DT: Distribution Tree
   RPF: Reverse Path Forwarding
   RDT: Resilient Distribution Tree
   SLA: Service Level Agreement
   PLR: Point of Local Repair, in this document, it is the multicast
     upstream RBridge connecting the failed link. It's valid only for
     local protection.

2. Usage of Affinity Sub-TLV

   This document uses the Affinity Sub-TLV [6326bis] to assign a parent
   to an RBridge in a tree as discussed below.

2.1. Allocating Affinity Links

   Affinity Sub-TLV explicitly assigns parents for RBridges on
   distribution trees. They are advertised in the Affinity Sub-TLV and
   recognized by each RBridge in the campus. The originating RBridge
   becomes the parent and the nickname contained in the Affinity Record
   identifies the child. This explicitly provides an "Affinity Link" on
   a distribution tree or trees. The "Tree-num of roots" of the Affinity
   Record identify the distribution trees that adopt this Affinity Link
   [6326bis].

   Affinity Links may be configured or automatically determined using a
   certain algorithm [CMT]. Suppose link RB2-RB3 is chosen as an
   Affinity Link on the distribution tree rooted at RB1. RB2 should send



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   out the Affinity Sub-TLV with an Affinity Record like {Nickname=RB3,
   Num of Trees=1, Tree-num of roots=RB1}. In this document, RB3 does
   not have to be a leaf node on a distribution tree, therefore an
   Affinity Link can be used to identify any link on a distribution
   tree. This kind of assignment offers a flexibility to RBridges in
   distribution tree calculation: they are allowed to choose child for
   which they are not on the shortest paths from the root. This
   flexibility is leveraged to increase the reliability of distribution
   trees in this document.

   An Affinity Sub-TLV which tries to connect two RBridges that are not
   adjacent MUST be ignored.

2.2. Distribution Tree Calculation with Affinity Links

   When RBridges receive an Affinity Sub-TLV with Affinity Link which is
   an incoming link of RB2 (i.e., RB2 is the child on this Affinity
   Link), RB2's incoming links other than the Affinity Link are removed
   from the full graph of the campus to get a sub graph. RBridges
   perform Shortest Path First calculation to compute the distribution
   tree based on the sub graph. In this way, the Affinity Link will
   surely appear on the distribution tree.





























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          Root                         Root
          +---+ -> +---+ -> +---+      +---+ -> +---+ -> +---+
          |RB1|    |RB2|    |RB3|      |RB1|    |RB2|    |RB3|
          +---+ <- +---+ <- +---+      +---+ <- +---+ <- +---+
           ^ |      ^ |      ^ |        ^ |      ^        ^ |
           | v      | v      | v        | v      |        | v
          +---+ -> +---+ -> +---+      +---+ -> +---+ -> +---+
          |RB4|    |RB5|    |RB6|      |RB4|    |RB5|    |RB6|
          +---+ <- +---+ <- +---+      +---+ <- +---+    +---+

                 Full Graph                    Sub Graph


                Root 1                       Root 1
                    / \                          / \
                   /   \                        /   \
                  4     2                      4     2
                       / \                     |     |
                      /   \                    |     |
                     5     3                   5     3
                     |                         |
                     |                         |
                     6                         6

   Shortest Path Tree of Full Graph   Shortest Path Tree of Sub Graph

       Figure 2.1: DT Calculation with the Affinity Link RB4-RB5

   Take Figure 2.1 as an example. Suppose RB1 is the root and link RB4-
   RB5 is the Affinity Link. RB5's other incoming links RB2-RB5 and RB6-
   RB5 are removed from the Full Graph to get the Sub Graph. Since RB4-
   RB5 is the unique link to reach RB5, the Shortest Path Tree
   inevitably contains this link.

3. Resilient Distribution Trees Calculation

   RBridges leverage IS-IS to detect and advertise network faults. A
   node or link failure will trigger a campus-wide reconvergence of
   distribution trees. The reconvergence generally includes the
   following procedures:

   1. Failure detected through IS-IS control messages (HELLO) exchanging
      or some other method such as BFD [rbBFD];

   2. IS-IS state flooding so each RBridge learns about the failure;

   3. Each RBridge recalculates affected distribution trees
      independently;



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   4. RPF filters are updated according to the new distribution trees.
      The recomputed distribution trees are pruned per VLAN and
      installed into the multicast forwarding tables.

   The slow reconvergence can be as long as tens of seconds, which will
   cause disruption to ongoing multicast traffic. In protection
   mechanisms, alternative paths prepared ahead of potential node or
   link failures are used to detour the failures upon the failure
   detection, therefore service disruption can be minimized.

   This document will focus only on link protection. The construction of
   backup DT for the purpose of node protection is out the scope of this
   document. In order to protect a node on the primary tree, a backup
   tree can be setup without this node [mMRT]. When this node fails, the
   backup tree can be safely used to forward multicast traffic to make a
   detour. However, TRILL distribution trees are shared among all VLANs
   and Fine Grained Labels [FGL] and they have to cover all RBridge
   nodes in the campus [RFC6325]. A DT that does not span all RBridges
   in the campus may not cover all receivers of many multicast groups.
   (This is different from the multicast trees construction signaled by
   PIM [RFC4601] or mLDP [RFC6388].)

3.1. Designating Roots for Backup Trees

   Operators MAY manually configure the roots for the backup DTs.
   Nevertheless, this document aims to provide a mechanism with minimum
   configuration. Two options are offered as follows.

3.1.1. Conjugate Trees

   [RFC6325] and [ClearC] has defined how distribution tree roots are
   selected. When a backup DT is computed for a primary DT, its root is
   set to be the root of this primary DT. In order to distinguish the
   primary DT and the backup DT, the root RBridge MUST own multiple
   nicknames.

3.1.2. Explicitly Advertising Tree Roots

   RBridge RB1 having the highest root priority nickname might
   explicitly advertise a list of nicknames to identify the roots of the
   primary and backup tree roots (See [RFC6325] Section 4.5).

3.2. Backup DT Calculation

3.2.1. Backup DT Calculation with Affinity Links






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                          2                  1
                         /                    \
                   Root 1___                ___2 Root
                       /|\  \              /  /|\
                      / | \  \            /  / | \
                     3  4  5  6          3  4  5  6
                     |  |  |  |           \/    \/
                     |  |  |  |           /\    /\
                     7  8  9  10         7  8  9  10

                      Primary DT          Backup DT

        Figure 3.1: An Example of a Primary DT and its Backup DT

   TRILL allows RBridges to compute multiple distribution trees. With
   the intentional assignment of Affinity Links in DT calculation, this
   document proposes a method to construct Resilient Distribution Trees
   (RDT). For example, in Figure 3.1, the backup DT is set up maximally
   disjoint to the primary DT (The full topology is a combination of
   these two DTs, which is not shown in the figure.). Except for the
   link between RB1 and RB2, all other links on the primary DT do not
   overlap with links on the backup DT. It means that every link on the
   primary DT, except link RB1-RB2, can be protected by the backup DT.

3.2.1.1. Algorithm for Choosing Affinity Links

   Operators MAY configure Affinity Links to intentionally protect a
   specific link, such as the link connected to a gateway. But it is
   desirable that every RBridge independently computes Affinity Links
   for a backup DT across the whole campus. This enables a distributed
   deployment and also minimizes configuration.

   Algorithms for Maximally Redundant Trees [mMRT] may be used to figure
   out Affinity Links on a backup DT which is maximally disjointed to
   the primary DT but it only provides a subset of all possible
   solutions, i.e., the conjugate trees described in Section 3.1.1. In
   TRILL, RDT does not restrict the root of the backup DT to be the same
   as that of the primary DT. Two disjoint (or maximally disjointed)
   trees may root from different nodes, which significantly augments the
   solution space.

   This document RECOMMENDS achieving the independent method through a
   slight change to the conventional DT calculation process of TRILL.
   Basically, after the primary DT is calculated, the RBridge will be
   aware of which links will be used. When the backup DT is calculated,
   each RBridge increases the metric of these links by a proper value
   (for safety, it's recommended to used the summation of all original
   link metrics in the campus but not more than 2**23), which gives



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   these links a lower priority being chosen by the backup DT by
   performing Shortest Path First calculation. All links on this backup
   DT can be assigned as Affinity Links but this is unnecessary. In
   order to reduce the amount of Affinity Sub-TLVs flooded across the
   campus, only those not picked by conventional DT calculation process
   ought to be recognized as Affinity Links.

3.2.1.2. Affinity Links Advertisement

   Similar to [CMT], every parent RBridge of an Affinity Link takes
   charge of announcing this link in an Affinity Sub-TLV. When this
   RBridge plays the role of parent RBridge for several Affinity Links,
   it is natural to have them advertised together in the same Affinity
   Sub-TLV and each Affinity Link is structured as one Affinity Record.

   Affinity Links are announced in the Affinity Sub-TLV that is
   recognized by every RBridge. Since each RBridge computes distribution
   trees as the Affinity Sub-TLV requires, the backup DT will be built
   up consistently.

3.2.2. Backup DT Calculation without Affinity Links

   This section provides an alternative method to set up the disjointed
   backup DT.

   After the primary DT is calculated, each RBridge increases the cost
   of those links which are already in the primary DT by a multiplier
   (For safety, 64x is RECOMMENDED.). It would ensure that a link
   appears in both trees if and only if there is no other way to reach
   the node (i.e. the graph would become disconnected if it were pruned
   of the links in the first tree.). In other words, the two trees will
   be maximally disjointed.

   The above algorithm is similar as that defined in Section 3.2.1.1.
   All RBridges MUST agree on the same algorithm, then the backup DT can
   be calculated by each RBridge consistently and configuration is
   unnecessary.

4. Resilient Distribution Trees Installation

   As specified in [RFC6325] Section 4.5.2, an ingress RBridge MUST
   announce the distribution trees it may choose to ingress multicast
   frames. Thus other RBridges in the campus can limit the amount of
   states which are necessary for RPF check. Also, [RFC6325] recommends
   that an ingress RBridge by default chooses the DT or DTs whose root
   or roots are least cost from the ingress RBridge. To sum up, RBridges
   do pre-compute all the trees that might be used so they can properly
   forward multi-destination packets, but only install RPF state for



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   some combinations of ingress and tree.

   This document states that the backup DT MUST be contained in an
   ingress RBridge's DT announcement list and included in this ingress
   RBridge's LSP. In order to reduce the service disruption time,
   RBridges SHOULD install backup DTs in advance, which also includes
   the RPF filters that need to be set up for RPF Check.

   Since the backup DT is intentionally built up maximally disjointed to
   the primary DT, when a link fails and interrupts the ongoing
   multicast traffic sent along the primary DT, it is probable that the
   backup DT is not affected. Therefore, the backup DT installed in
   advance can be used to deliver multicast packets immediately.

4.1. Pruning the Backup Distribution Tree

   The backup DT SHOULD be pruned per-VLAN. But the way a backup DT is
   pruned is different from the way that the primary DT is pruned. Even
   though a branch contains no downstream receivers, it is probable that
   it should not be pruned for the purpose of protection. The rule for
   backup DT pruning is that the backup DT should be pruned per-VLAN,
   eliminating branches that have no potential downstream RBridges which
   appear on the pruned primary DT.

   It is probably that the primary DT is not optimally pruned in
   practice. In this case, the backup DT SHOULD be pruned presuming that
   the primary DT is optimally pruned. Those redundant links that ought
   to be pruned will not be protected.

                                              1
                                               \
                    Root 1___                ___2 Root
                        / \  \              /  /|\
                       /   \  \            /  / | \
                      3     5  6          3  4  5  6
                      |     |  |            /    \/
                      |     |  |           /     /\
                      7     9  10         7     9  10
                    Pruned Primary DT   Pruned Backup DT

  Figure 4.1: The Backup DT is Pruned Based on the Pruned Primary DT.

   Suppose RB7, RB9 and RB10 constitute a multicast group MGx. The
   pruned primary DT and backup DT are shown in Figure 4.1. Referring
   back to Figure 3.1, branches RB2-RB1 and RB4-RB1 on the primary DT
   are pruned for the distribution of MGx traffic since there are no
   potential receivers on these two branches. Although branches RB1-RB2
   and RB3-RB2 on the backup DT have no potential multicast receivers,



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   they appear on the pruned primary DT and may be used to repair link
   failures of the primary DT. Therefore they are not pruned from the
   backup DT. Branch RB8-RB3 can be safely pruned because it does not
   appear on the pruned primary DT.

4.2. RPF Filters Preparation

   RB2 includes in its LSP the information to indicate which trees RB2
   might choose to ingress multicast frames [RFC6325]. When RB2
   specifies the trees it might choose to ingress multicast traffic, it
   SHOULD include the backup DT. Other RBridges will prepare the RPF
   check states for both the primary DT and backup DT. When a multicast
   packet is sent along either the primary DT or the backup DT, it will
   pass the RPF Check. This works when global 1:1 protection is used.
   However, when global 1+1 protection or local protection is applied,
   traffic duplication will happen if multicast receivers accept both
   copies of the multicast packets from two RPF filters. In order to
   avoid such duplication, egress RBridge multicast receivers MUST act
   as merge points to activate a single RPF filter and discard the
   duplicated packets from the other RPF filter. In normal case, the RPF
   state is set up according to the primary DT. When a link fails, the
   RPF filter based on the backup DT should be activated.

5. Protection Mechanisms with Resilient Distribution Trees

   Protection mechanisms can be developed to make use of the backup DT
   installed in advance. But protection mechanisms already developed
   using PIM or mLDP for multicast of IP/MPLS networks are not
   applicable to TRILL due to the following fundamental differences in
   their distribution tree calculation.

   o  The link on a TRILL distribution tree is bidirectional while the
      link on a distribution tree in IP/MPLS networks is unidirectional.

   o  In TRILL, a multicast source node does not have to be the root of
      the distribution tree. It is just the opposite in IP/MPLS
      networks.

   o  In IP/MPLS networks, distribution trees are constructed for each
      multicast source node as well as their backup distribution trees.
      In TRILL, a small number of core distribution trees are shared
      among multicast groups. A backup DT does not have to share the
      same root as the primary DT.

   Therefore a TRILL specific multicast protection mechanism is needed.

   Global 1:1 protection, global 1+1 protection and local protection are
   developed in this section. In Figure 4.1, assume RB7 is the ingress



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   RBridge of the multicast stream while RB9 and RB10 are the multicast
   receivers. Suppose link RB1-RB5 fails during the multicast
   forwarding. The backup DT rooted at RB2 does not include link RB1-
   RB5, therefore it can be used to protect this link. In global 1:1
   protection, RB7 will switch the subsequent multicast traffic to this
   backup DT when it's notified about the link failure. In the global
   1+1 protection, RB7 will inject two copies of the multicast stream
   and let multicast receivers RB9 and RB10 merge them. In the local
   protection, when link RB1-RB5 fails, RB1 will locally replicate the
   multicast traffic and send it on the backup DT.

5.1. Global 1:1 Protection

   In the global 1:1 protection, the ingress RBridge of the multicast
   traffic is responsible for switching the failure affected traffic
   from the primary DT over to the backup DT. Since the backup DT has
   been installed in advance, the global protection need not wait for
   the DT recalculation and installation. When the ingress RBridge is
   notified about the failure, it immediately makes this switch over.

   This type of protection is simple and duplication safe. However,
   depending on the topology of the RBridge campus, the time spent on
   the failure detection and propagation through the IS-IS control plane
   may still cause considerable service disruption.

   BFD (Bidirectional Forwarding Detection) protocol can be used to
   reduce the failure detection time [rbBFD]. Link failures can be
   rapidly detected with one-hop BFD. Multi-destination BFD extends BFD
   mechanism to include the fast failure detection of multicast paths
   [mBFD]. It can be used to reduce both the failure detection and
   propagation time in the global protection. In multi-destination BFD,
   ingress RBridge need to send BFD control packets to poll each
   receiver, and receivers return BFD control packets to the ingress as
   response. If no response is received from a specific receiver for a
   detection time, the ingress can judge that the connectivity to this
   receiver is broken. In this way, multi-destination BFD detects the
   connectivity of a path rather than a link. The ingress RBridge will
   determine a minimum failed branch which contains this receiver. The
   ingress RBridge will switch ongoing multicast traffic based on this
   judgment. For example, on figure 4.1, if RB9 does not response while
   RB10 still responds, RB7 will presume that link RB1-RB5 and RB5-RB9
   are failed. Multicast traffic will be switched to a backup DT that
   can protect these two links. Accurate link failure detection might
   help ingress RBridges to make smarter decision but it's out of the
   scope of this document.

5.2. Global 1+1 Protection




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   In the global 1+1 protection, the multicast source RBridge always
   replicates the multicast packets and sends them onto both the primary
   and backup DT. This may sacrifice the capacity efficiency but given
   there is much connection redundancy and inexpensive bandwidth in Data
   Center Networks, such kind of protection can be popular [MoFRR].

5.2.1. Failure Detection

   Egress RBridges (merge points) SHOULD realize the link failure as
   early as possible so that failure affected egress RBridges may update
   their RPF filters quickly to minimize the traffic disruption. Three
   options are provided as follows.

   1. Egress RBridges assume a minimum known packet rate for a given
      data stream [MoFRR]. A failure detection timer Td are set as the
      interval between two continuous packets. Td is reinitialized each
      time a packet is received. If Td expires and packets are arriving
      at the egress RBridge on the backup DT (within the time frame Td),
      it updates the RPF filters and starts to receive packets forwarded
      on the backup DT.

   2. With multi-destination BFD, when a link failure happens, affected
      egress RBridges can detect a lack of connectivity from the ingress
      [mBFD]. Therefore these egress RBridges are able to update their
      RPF filters promptly.

   3. Egress RBridges can always rely on the IS-IS control plane to
      learn the failure and determine whether their RPF filters should
      be updated.

5.2.2. Traffic Forking and Merging

   For the sake of protection, transit RBridges SHOULD activate both
   primary and backup RPF filters, therefore both copies of the
   multicast packets will pass through transit RBridges.

   Multicast receivers (egress RBridges) MUST act as "merge points" to
   egress only one copy of these multicast packets. This is achieved by
   the activation of only a single RPF filter. In normal case, egress
   RBridges activate the primary RPF filter. When a link on the pruned
   primary DT fails, ingress RBridge cannot reach some of the receivers.
   When these unreachable receivers realize it, they SHOULD update their
   RPF filters to receive packets sent on the backup DT.

5.3. Local Protection

   In the local protection, the Point of Local Repair (PLR) happens at
   the upstream RBridge connecting the failed link. It is this RBridge



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   that makes the decision to replicate the multicast traffic to recover
   this link failure. Local protection can further save the time spent
   on failure notification through the flooding of LSPs across the
   campus. In addition, the failure detection can be speeded up using
   [rbBFD], therefore local protection can minimize the service
   disruption within 50 milliseconds.

   Since the ingress RBridge is not necessarily the root of the
   distribution tree in TRILL, a multicast downstream point may not be
   the descendants of the ingress point on the distribution tree.
   Moreover, distribution trees in TRILL are bidirectional and do not
   share the same root. There are fundamental differences between the
   distribution tree calculation of TRILL and those used in PIM and
   mLDP, therefore local protection mechanisms used for PIM and mLDP,
   such as [mMRT] and [MoFRR], are not applicable here.

5.3.1. Start Using the Backup Distribution Tree

   The egress nickname TRILL header field of the replicated multicast
   TRILL data packets specifies the tree on which they are being
   distributed. This field will be rewritten to the backup DT's root
   nickname by the PLR. But the ingress of the multicast frame MUST
   remain unchanged. This is a halfway change of the DT for multicast
   packets. Afterwards, the PLR begins to forward multicast traffic
   along the backup DT. This is a change from [RFC6325] which specifies
   that the egress nickname in the TRILL header of a multi-destination
   TRILL data packet must not be changed by transit RBridges.

   In the above example, if PLR RB1 decides to send replicated multicast
   packets according to the backup DT, it will send it to the next hop
   RB2. .

5.3.2. Duplication Suppression

   When a PLR starts to send replicated multicast packets on the backup
   DT, some multicast packets are still being sent along the primary DT.
   Some egress RBridges might receive duplicated multicast packets. The
   traffic forking and merging method in the global 1+1 protection can
   be adopted to suppress the duplication.

5.3.3. An Example to Walk Through

   The example used in the above local protection is put together to get
   a whole "walk through" below.

   In the normal case, multicast frames ingressed by RB7 with pruned
   distribution on primary DT rooted at RB1 are being received by RB9
   and RB10. When the link RB1-RB5 fails, the PLR RB1 begins to



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   replicate and forward subsequent multicast packets using the pruned
   backup DT rooted at RB2. When RB2 gets the multicast packets from the
   link RB1-RB2, it accepts them since the RPF filter {DT=RB2,
   ingress=RB7, receiving links=RB1-RB2, RB3-RB2, RB4-RB2, RB5-RB2 and
   RB6-RB2} is installed on RB2. RB2 forwards the replicated multicast
   packets to its neighbors except RB1. When the multicast packets reach
   RB6 where both RPF filters {DT=RB1, ingress=RB7, receiving link=RB1-
   RB6} and {DT=RB2, ingress=RB7, receiving links=RB2-RB6 and RB9-RB6}
   are active. RB6 will let both multicast streams through. Multicast
   packets will finally reach RB9 where the RPF filter is updated from
   {DT=RB1, ingress=RB7, receiving link=RB5-RB9} to {DT=RB2,
   ingress=RB7, receiving link=RB6-RB9}. RB9 will egress the multicast
   packets on to the local link.

5.4. Switching Back to the Primary Distribution Tree

   Assume an RBridge receives the LSP that indicates a link failure.
   This RBridge starts to calculate the new primary DT based on the
   topology with the failed link. Suppose the new primary DT is
   installed at t1.

   The propagation of LSPs around the campus takes time. For safety, we
   assume all RBridges in the campus have converged to the new primary
   DT at t1+Ts. By default, Ts (the "settling time") is set to 30s but
   is configurable. At t1+Ts, the ingress RBridge switches the traffic
   from the backup DT back to the new primary DT.

   After another Ts (at t1+2*Ts), no multicast packets are being
   forwarded along the old primary DT. The backup DT should be updated
   according to the new primary DT. The process of this update under
   different protection types are discussed as follows.

   a) For the global 1:1 protection, the backup DT is simply updated at
      t1+2*Ts.

   b) For the global 1+1 protection, the ingress RBridge stops
      replicating the multicast packets onto the old backup DT at t1+Ts.
      The backup DT is updated at t1+2*Ts. It MUST wait for another Ts,
      during which time period all RBridges converge to the new backup
      DT. At t1+3*Ts, the ingress RBridge MAY start to replicate
      multicast packets onto the new backup DT.

   c) For the local protection, the PLR stops replicating and sending
      packets on the old backup DT at t1+Ts. It is safe for RBridges to
      start updating the backup DT at t1+2*Ts.

6. Security Considerations




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   This document raises no new security issues for TRILL.

   For general TRILL Security Considerations, see [RFC6325].

7. IANA Considerations

   No new registry or registry entries are requested to be assigned by
   IANA. The Affinity Sub-TLV has already been defined in [6326bis].
   This document does not change its definition. RFC Editor: please
   remove this section before publication.

Acknowledgements

   The careful review from Gayle Noble is gracefully acknowledged. The
   authors would like to thank the comments and suggestions from Erik
   Nordmark, Donald Eastlake, Fangwei Hu, Hongjun Zhai and Xudong Zhang.

8. References

8.1. Normative References


   [6326bis] D. Eastlake, T. Senevirathne, et al., "Transparent
             Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) Use of IS-IS",
             draft-ietf-isis-rfc6326bis-01.txt, work in Progress.

   [CMT]     T. Senevirathne, J. Pathangi, et al, "Coordinated Multicast
             Trees (CMT) for TRILL", draft-ietf-trill-cmt-02.txt, work
             in progress.

   [RFC6325] R. Perlman, D. Eastlake, et al, "RBridges: Base Protocol
             Specification", RFC 6325, July 2011.

   [RFC4601] Fenner, B., Handley, M., Holbrook, H., and I. Kouvelas,
             "Protocol Independent Multicast - Sparse Mode (PIM-SM):
             Protocol Specification (Revised)", RFC 4601, August 2006.

   [RFC6388] Wijnands, IJ., Minei, I., Kompella, K., and B. Thomas,
             "Label Distribution Protocol Extensions for Point-to-
             Multipoint and Multipoint-to-Multipoint Label Switched
             Paths", RFC 6388, November 2011.

   [rbBFD]   V. Manral, D. Eastlake, et al, "TRILL (Transparent
             Interconnetion of Lots of Links): Bidirectional Forwarding
             Detection (BFD) Support", draft-ietf-trill-rbridge-bfd-
             07.txt, work in progress.

   [ClearC]  Eastlake, D., M. Zhang, A. Ghanwani, V. Manral, A.



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             Banerjee, "TRILL: Clarifications, Corrections, and Updates"
             draft-ietf-trill-clear-correct, in RFC Editor's queue.

8.2. Informative References

   [mMRT]    A. Atlas, R. Kebler, et al., "An Architecture for Multicast
             Protection Using Maximally Redundant Trees", draft-atlas-
             rtgwg-mrt-mc-arch-02.txt, work in progress.

   [MoFRR]   A. Karan, C. Filsfils, et al., "Multicast only Fast Re-
             Route", draft-ietf-rtgwg-mofrr-02.txt, work in progress.

   [mBFD]    D. Katz, D. Ward, "BFD for Multipoint Networks", draft-
             ietf-bfd-multipoint-02.txt, work in progress.

   [FGL]     D. Eastlake, M. Zhang, P. Agarwal, R. Perlman, D. Dutt,
             "TRILL (Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links):
             Fine-Grained Labeling", draft-ietf-trill-fine-labeling, in
             RFC Editor's queue.
































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Author's Addresses

   Mingui Zhang
   Huawei Technologies Co.,Ltd
   Huawei Building, No.156 Beiqing Rd.
   Beijing 100095 P.R. China

   Email: zhangmingui@huawei.com

   Tissa Senevirathne
   Cisco Systems
   375 East Tasman Drive,
   San Jose, CA 95134

   Phone: +1-408-853-2291
   Email: tsenevir@cisco.com

   Janardhanan Pathangi
   Dell/Force10 Networks
   Olympia Technology Park,
   Guindy Chennai 600 032

   Phone: +91 44 4220 8400
   Email: Pathangi_Janardhanan@Dell.com

   Ayan Banerjee
   Insieme Networks
   210 W Tasman Dr,
   San Jose, CA 95134

   Email: ayabaner@gmail.com

   Anoop Ghanwani
   Dell
   350 Holger Way
   San Jose, CA 95134

   Phone: +1-408-571-3500
   Email: Anoop@alumni.duke.edu

   Donald E. Eastlake, 3rd
   Huawei Technologies
   155 Beaver Street
   Milford, MA 01757 USA

   Phone: +1-508-333-2270
   Email: d3e3e3@gmail.com




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