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Versions: 00 01 02

Network Working Group                                        M. Amundsen
Internet-Draft                                     CA Technologies, Inc.
Expires: September 1, 2015                                 L. Richardson

                                                               M. Foster
                                                                  Apiary
                                                       February 28, 2015


               Application-Level Profile Semantics (ALPS)
               draft-amundsen-richardson-foster-alps-01

Abstract

   This document describes ALPS, a data format for defining simple
   descriptions of application-level semantics, similar in complexity to
   HTML microformats.  An ALPS document can be used as a profile to
   explain the application semantics of a document with an application-
   agnostic media type (such as HTML, HAL, Collection+JSON, Siren,
   etc.).  This increases the reusability of profile documents across
   media types.

Editorial Note (To be removed by RFC Editor)

   Distribution of this document is unlimited.  Comments should be sent
   to the IETF Media-Types mailing list (see [1]).

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
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   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on September 1, 2015.








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Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2015 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.1.  Notational Conventions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.2.  Motivation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
       1.2.1.  Describing Domain-Specific Semantics  . . . . . . . .   4
       1.2.2.  ALPS-based Server Implementations . . . . . . . . . .   4
       1.2.3.  ALPS-based Client Implementations . . . . . . . . . .   4
     1.3.  A Simple ALPS Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     1.4.  Identifying an ALPS Document  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   2.  ALPS Documents  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     2.1.  Compliance  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     2.2.  ALPS Document Properties  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
       2.2.1.  'alps'  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
       2.2.2.  'doc' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
       2.2.3.  'descriptor'  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
       2.2.4.  'ext' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
       2.2.5.  'format'  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
       2.2.6.  'href'  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
       2.2.7.  'id'  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
       2.2.8.  'link'  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
       2.2.9.  'name'  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
       2.2.10. 'rel' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
       2.2.11. 'rt'  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
       2.2.12. 'type'  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
       2.2.13. 'value' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
       2.2.14. 'version' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
     2.3.  ALPS Representations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
       2.3.1.  Sample HTML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
       2.3.2.  XML Representation Example  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
       2.3.3.  JSON Representation Example . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
   3.  Applying ALPS documents to Existing Media Types . . . . . . .  21
     3.1.  Linking to ALPS Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22



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   4.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
     4.1.  application/alps+xml  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
     4.2.  application/alps+json . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  24
   5.  Internationalization Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25
   6.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25
   7.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25
     7.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25
     7.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25
   Appendix A.  Frequently Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
     A.1.  Why are there no URLs in ALPS?  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
     A.2.  Why is there no workflow component in the ALPS
           specification?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26
     A.3.  Why is there no way to indicate ranges for semantic
           descriptors?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26

1.  Introduction

   This document describes ALPS, a media type for defining simple
   descriptions of application-level semantics, similar in complexity to
   HTML microformats.  These descriptions contain both human-readable
   and machine-readable explanations of the semantics.  An ALPS document
   can be used as a profile to explain the application semantics of a
   document with an application-agnostic media type (such as HTML, HAL,
   Collection+JSON, Siren. etc.).

   This document identifies a registry for ALPS documents, (The ALPS
   Profile Registry or APR).  The details of this registry, its goals,
   and operations are covered in a separate document (TBD).

   This document also identifies a process for authoring, publishing,
   and sharing normative human-readable instructions on applying an ALPS
   document as a profile to responses of a given media type.  For
   example, a document that describes how to apply the semantics of an
   ALPS profile to an HTML document.

   This document registers two media-type identifiers with the IANA:
   'application/alps+xml' ('ALPS+XML') and 'application/alps+json'
   ('ALPS+JSON').

1.1.  Notational Conventions

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in[RFC2119].







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1.2.  Motivation

   When implementing a hypermedia client/server application using a
   general media type (HTML, Atom, Collection+JSON, etc.), client and
   server instances need to share an understanding of domain-specific
   information such as data element names, link relation values, and
   state transfer parameters.  This information is directly related to
   the application being implemented (e.g. accounting, contact
   management, etc.) rather than the media type used in the
   representations.

1.2.1.  Describing Domain-Specific Semantics

   Instead of creating and registering an entirely new media type (i.e.
   'application/accounting'), representation authors can create an ALPS
   document that describes a 'profile' of the target domain; one that
   explains the vital domain-specific semantic descriptors and state
   transitions.  This profile can then be consistently applied to a wide
   range of media types by server implementors and successfully consumed
   by client applications.  The focus on defining application-level
   semantics, independent of transfer protocol or media type, makes it
   possible to serve application-specific representations using an
   application-agnostic media type.

1.2.2.  ALPS-based Server Implementations

   Server implementors can use ALPS documents as a basis for building
   domain-specific solutions without having to create their own custom
   media type or re-invent the vocabulary and transition set for a
   common domain (e.g.  accounting, microblogging, etc.).  Using a
   preexisting ALPS profile as a guide, servers can map internal data to
   commonly-understood semantic descriptors and state transitions,
   increasing the likelihood that existing client applications (those
   who share the same understanding of the ALPS document) will be able
   to successfully interact with that server.

1.2.3.  ALPS-based Client Implementations

   Armed with a document's ALPS profile, client applications can
   associate the ALPS descriptor 'id' and/or 'name' attribute values
   with the appropriate elements within the document.  Client
   applications can 'code for the profile' and better adjust to detailed
   changes to the response layout, or even the wholesale replacement of
   one media type with another.







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1.3.  A Simple ALPS Example

   Below is an ALPS document that describes elements of a simple
   request/response interaction in a contact management application.
   The profile defines a semantic descriptor called 'contact', and three
   subordinate descriptors ('fullName', 'email', and 'phone').

   The ALPS document also defines a single, safe state transition, to be
   represented by a hypermedia control (e.g.  HTML.GET form) with the
   'id' value of 'collection.'  This hypermedia control has one input
   value ('nameSearch').  When executed, the response will contain one
   or more 'contact' type items.

    <alps version="1.0">
     <doc format="text">A contact list.</doc>

     <!-- a hypermedia control for returning contacts -->
     <descriptor id="collection" type="safe" rt="contact">
       <doc>
         A simple link/form for getting a list of contacts.
       </doc>
       <descriptor id="nameSearch" type="semantic">
         <doc>Input for a search form.</doc>
       </descriptor>
     </descriptor>

     <!--  a contact: one or more of these may be returned -->
     <descriptor id="contact" type="semantic">
       <descriptor id="item" type="safe">
         <doc>A link to an individual contact.</doc>
       </descriptor>
       <descriptor id="fullName" type="semantic" />
       <descriptor id="email"    type="semantic" />
       <descriptor id="phone"    type="semantic" />
     </descriptor>
   </alps>

                       ALPS Contact Profile document

   Implementing the ALPS profile above requires implementing the
   descriptors defined by the ALPS document.  In this case, there are
   two 'top level' descriptors: the safe state transition ('collection')
   and the semantic descriptor 'contact'.  Below is a single HTML
   document that shows both these elements in a representation.

   <html>
     <head>
       <link href="http://alps.io/profiles/contact"



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         rel="profile" />
       <link href="http://alps.io/profiles/contact#contact"
         rel="type" />
     </head>
     <body>
       <form class="collection"
         method="get"
         action="http://example.org/contacts/">
         <label>Name:</label>
         <input name="nameSearch" value="" />
         <input type="submit" value="Search" />
       </form>

       <table>
         <tr class="contact">
           <td>
             <a href="http://example.org/contacts/1"
               rel="item">
               <span class="fullName">Ann Arbuckle</span>
             </a>
           </td>
           <td>
             <span class="email">aa@example.org</span>
           </td>
           <td>
             <span class="phone">123.456.7890</span>
           </td>
         </tr>

         <tr>
           <td>
             <a href="http://example.org/contacts/100"
               rel="item">
               <span class="fullName">Zelda Zackney</span>
             </a>
           </td>
           <td>
             <span class="email">zz@example.org</span>
           </td>
           <td>
             <span class="phone">098.765.4321</span>
           </td>
         </tr>
       </table>
     </body>
   </html>

                     HTML ALPS Contact Representation



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   HTML representations implement most ALPS elements using HTML's
   'class' attribute.  The 'collection' ID has become the CSS class of
   an HTML form's submit button.  The 'contact' ID has become the CSS
   class of the TR elements in an HTML table.  The subordinate
   descriptors 'fullname','email', and 'phone' are rendered as the TD
   elements of each TR.

   This HAL document uses the same profile to express the same
   application-level semantics as the HTML document.

   <resource href="http://example.org/contacts/">
     <link href="http://alps.io/profiles/contacts#contact"
       rel="type" />
     <link rel="collection"
       href="http://example.org/contacts/{?nameSearch}"
       templated="true" />
     <resource rel="item" href="http://example.org/contacts/1">
       <link href="http://alps.io/profiles/contacts#contact"
         rel="type" />
       <fullName>Ann Arbuckle</fullName>
       <email>aa@example.org</email>
       <phone>123.456.7890</phone>
     </resource>
     <resource rel="item" href="http://example.org/contacts/100">
       <link href="http://alps.io/profiles/contacts#contact"
         rel="type" />
       <fullName>Zelda Zackney</fullName>
       <email>zz@example.org</email>
       <phone>987.664.3210</phone>
     </resource>
   </resource>

                      HAL XML Contacts Representation

   In a HAL representation, all state transitions ('collection' and
   'item', in this case) are represented as link relations.  All data
   descriptors ('fullName', 'email', and 'phone') are represented as XML
   tags named after the descriptors.

   This Collection+JSON document uses the ALPS profile to express the
   same application-level semantics as the HTML and HAL documents.

   {
     "collection" : {
       "version" : "1.0",
       "href" : "http://example.org/contacts/",

       "links" : [



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         {
           "rel" : "profile",
           "href" : "http://alps.io/profiles/contacts"
         },
         {
           "rel" : "type",
           "href" : "http://alps.io/profiles/contacts#contact"
         }
       ],

       "queries" : [
         {
           "rel" : "collection",
           "rt" : "contact",
           "href" : "http://example.org/contacts/",
           "data" : [
             {
               "name" : "nameSearch",
               "value" : "",
               "prompt" :  "Search Name"
             }
           ]
         }
       ],

       "items" : [
         {
           "href" : "http://example.org/contacts/1",
           "rel" : "item",
           "rt" : "contact",
           "data" : [
             {"name" : "fullName", "value" : "Ann Arbuckle"},
             {"name" : "email", "value" : "aa@example.org"},
             {"name" : "phone", "value" : "123.456.7890"}
           ],
           "links" : [
             {
               "rel" : "type",
               "href" : "http://alps.io/profiles/contacts#contact"
             }
           ]
         },
         {
           "href" : "http://example.org/contacts/100",
           "rel" : "item",
           "rt" : "contact",
           "data" : [
             {



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               "name" : "fullName",
               "value" : "Zelda Zackney"
             },
             {
               "name" : "email",
               "value" : "zz@example.org"
             },
             {
               "name" : "phone",
               "value" : "987.654.3210"
             }
           ],
           "links" : [
             {
               "rel" : "type",
               "href" : "http://alps.io/profiles/contacts#contact"
             }
           ]
         }
       ]
     }
   }


                  Collection+JSON Contacts Representation

   The descriptor 'collection' has become the link relation associated
   with a Collection+JSON query.  The descriptors 'fullName', 'email',
   and 'phone' have become the names of key-value pairs in the items in
   a Collection+JSON collection.

1.4.  Identifying an ALPS Document

   An ALPS vocabulary is identified by a unique URL.  This URL SHOULD be
   assumed to be dereferencable.  All ALPS URLs MUST be unique and all
   ALPS documents intended for public consumption SHOULD be registered
   in an ALPS Registry [TK: add text on where/how to find registries
   -mamund].

   In order to reduce load on servers responding to ALPS document
   requests, it is RECOMMENDED that servers use cache control directives
   that instruct client apps to locally cache the results.  Clients
   making these ALPS document requests SHOULD honor the server's caching
   directives.







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2.  ALPS Documents

   An ALPS document contains a machine-readable collection of
   identifying strings and their human-readable explanations.  An ALPS
   document can be represented in either XML or JSON format.  This
   section identifies the general elements and properties of an ALPS
   document, their meaning, and their use, independent of how the
   document is represented.  Section 2.3 provides specific details on
   constructing a valid ALPS document in XML and in JSON format.

2.1.  Compliance

   An implementation is not compliant if it fails to satisfy one or more
   of the MUST or REQUIRED level requirements.  An implementation that
   satisfies all the MUST or REQUIRED level and all the SHOULD level
   requirements is said to be 'unconditionally compliant'; one that
   satisfies all the MUST level requirements but not all the SHOULD
   level requirements is said to be 'conditionally compliant.'

2.2.  ALPS Document Properties

   The ALPS media type defines a small set of properties.  These
   properties appear in both the XML and JSON formats.  Below is a list
   of the properties that can appear in an ALPS document.

2.2.1.  'alps'

   Indicates the root of the ALPS document.  This property is REQUIRED,
   and it SHOULD have one or more 'descriptor' child properties.

   Examples:

   XML:  <alps>...</alps>

   JSON:  { "alps" : ... }

2.2.2.  'doc'

   A text field that contains free-form, usually human-readable, text.
   The 'doc' element MAY have two properties: 'href' and 'format'.  If
   the 'href' property appears it SHOULD contain a dereferencable URL
   that points to human-readable text.  If the 'format' property appears
   it SHOULD contain one of the following values: 'text', 'html',
   'asciidoc', or 'markdown'.  Any program processing 'doc' elements
   SHOULD honor the 'format' directive and parse/render the content
   appropriately.  If the value in the 'format' property is not
   recognized and/or supported, the processing program MUST treat the




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   content as plain text.  If no 'format' property is present, the
   content SHOULD be treated as plain text.

   XML:  <doc format="html"> <h1>Date of Birth</h1> <p>...</p> </doc>

   JSON:  { "doc" : { "format" : "text" : "value" : "Date of Birth ..."
      } }

   A 'doc' element SHOULD appear as a child of 'descriptor'.  When
   present, it describes the meaning and use of the related
   'descriptor'.

   XML:  <descriptor ... > <doc>...</doc> </descriptor>

   JSON:  { "descriptor" : { { "doc" : { "value" : "..." } ...  } }

   The 'doc' element MAY appear as a child of 'alps'.  When present, it
   describes the purpose of the ALPS document as a whole.

   XML:  <alps> <doc>...</doc> ...  </apls>

   JSON:  { "alps : "doc" : { "value" : "..." }, ...  }

2.2.3.  'descriptor'

   A 'descriptor' element defines the semantics of specific data
   elements or state transitions that MAY exist in an associated
   representation.

   One or more 'descriptor' elements SHOULD appear as children of
   'alps'.  It may also appear as a child of itself; that is, the
   'descriptor' property may be nested.

   The 'descriptor' property SHOULD have either an 'id' or 'href'
   attribute.  It MAY have both.  Additionally, the 'descriptor' MAY
   have any of the following attributes:

   1.  'doc'

   2.  'ext'

   3.  'name'

   4.  'type'

   If present, the 'href' property MUST be a dereferenceable URL, that
   points to another 'descriptor' either within the current ALPS
   document or in another ALPS document.



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   If 'descriptor' has an 'href' attribute, then 'descriptor' is
   inheriting all the attributes and sub-properties of the descriptor
   pointed to by 'href'.  When 'descriptor' has a property defined
   locally, that property value takes precedence over any inherited
   property value.  Since there is no limit to the nesting of elements
   -- even ones linked remotely -- it is important to process 'all
   descriptor' chains starting from the bottom to make sure you have
   collected all the available properties and have established the
   correct value for each of them.

   If 'descriptor' is declared at the top level of an ALPS document,
   then a client SHOULD assume that 'descriptor' can appear anywhere in
   a runtime message.

   If 'descriptor' is nested, i.e. declared as a child of another
   descriptor, then:

   1.  A client SHOULD assume them to appear in any sibling 'descriptor'
       element and recursively in their child descriptors.

   2.  A client SHOULD NOT assume that it can appear anywhere outside of
       parent descriptor, unless it was explicitly referenced by another
       descriptor in 'href' attribute.  In that case the same rules are
       applied to 'descriptor' containing 'href' attribute.

2.2.3.1.  'Descriptors and Link Relation Types'

   When a representation is generated that includes state transitions,
   valid values for link relation types are:

   1.  A registered IANA link relation type (e.g. rel="edit", a short
       string).

   2.  An extension link relation type as defined by [RFC5988] whose
       value is the fully-qualified URI of an associated document
       describing the relation type.  This includes URI fragment
       identifiers of ALPS descriptors (e.g.
       rel="http://alps.io/profiles/item#purchased-by", a URI) per the
       conventions of Section 2.2.7.2.

   3.  The 'id' property of a state transition descriptor of an
       associated ALPS document (e.g. rel="purchased-by", a short
       string) per the conventions of section Section 2.2.7.1 and
       Section 2.2.7.3 if the representation includes an ALPS profile.







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2.2.4.  'ext'

   The 'ext' element can be used to extend the ALPS document with
   author-specific information.  It provides a way to customize ALPS
   documents with additional properties not covered in this
   specification.  This is an OPTIONAL element.

   The 'ext' element has the following properties.

   1.  'id'

   2.  'href'

   3.  'value'

   The 'id' property is REQUIRED.  The 'href' is RECOMMENDED and it
   SHOULD point to documentation that explains the use and meaning of
   this 'ext' element.  The 'value' property is OPTIONAL.  The content
   is undetermined; its meaning and use SHOULD be explained by the
   document found by de-referencing the 'href' property.

   Examples:

   XML:  <ext id="directions" href="http://alps.io/ext/directions"
      value="north south east west" >

   JSON:  { "ext" : { "id" : "directions", "href" : "http://alps.io/ext/
      directions", value="north south east west" } }

   The 'ext' element MAY appear as a child of the following elements:

   1.  'alps'

   2.  'descriptor'

   Since the 'ext' element has no specific meaning within this
   specification, it MUST be ignored by any application that does not
   understand its meaning.

2.2.5.  'format'

   Indicates how the text content should be parsed and/or rendered.
   This specification identifies a range of possible values for
   'format':

   o  'text', for plain text, MUST be supported.

   o  'html', for HTML, SHOULD be supported.



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   o  'asciidoc', for AsciiDoc, MAY be supported.

   o  'markdown', per The text/markdown Media Type
      [I-D.ietf-appsawg-text-markdown], MAY be supported.

   Any other values for this attribute are undefined and SHOULD be
   treated as plain text.  If the program does not recognize the value
   of the 'format' property and/or the 'format' property is missing, the
   content SHOULD be treated as plain text.

   This property MAY appear as an attribute of the 'doc' element.

2.2.6.  'href'

   Contains a resolvable URL.

   When it appears as an attribute of a 'descriptor', 'href' points to
   another 'descriptor' either within the existing ALPS document as a
   fragment or in another ALPS document as an absolute URL.  The URL
   MUST contain a fragment per Section 2.2.7.2 referencing the related
   'descriptor'.

   When it appears as an attribute of 'ext', 'href' points to an
   external document which provides the defintion of the extension.

   When it appears as an attribute of 'link', 'href' points to an
   external document whose relationship to the current document or
   'descriptor' is described by the associated 'rel' property.

   When it appears as an attribute of 'doc', 'href' points to a document
   that contains human-readable text that describes the associated
   'descriptor' or ALPS document.

2.2.7.  'id'

   A document-wide unique identifier for the related element.  This
   SHOULD appear as an attribute of a 'descriptor'.

   The value of this attribute MAY be used as an identifier in the
   related runtime hypermedia representation.  In the example below the
   ALPS descriptor with an 'id' of 'q' is used to identify an HTML input
   element:

   'id' in ALPS...  <descriptor id="q" type="semantic" />

   ...becomes the 'class' in HTML  <input class="q" type="text" value=""
      />




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   It should be noted that the exact mapping from ALPS elements (e.g.
   'id') to elements within a particular media type (HTML,
   Collection+JSON, etc.) is covered in separate documents (to be
   specified).

2.2.7.1.  ALPS 'id' and 'name' Properties

   In some cases, media types support non-unique identifiers (e.g.
   HTML's 'name' property) or will allow the same identifier value for
   multiple elements in the same representation (e.g. <div id="search"
   ... /> and <input type="submit" class="search" .../> and <input
   name="search" ... />).  In those cases, translating that
   representation into ALPS documents could result in multiple 'id'
   properties with the same value.

   To avoid this, ALPS document designers can add the 'name' property to
   a 'descriptor' to hold the common value ('search') while still using
   the 'id' property to hold a document-wide unique value.  For example:

   <!-- HTML -->
   <div id="search">
     <form action="..." method="get">
       <input name="search" value="..." type="text" />
       <input type="submit" class="search" />
     </form>
   </div>

                HTML Representation of a Search Transition

   <!-- ALPS -->
   <descriptor id="search-block" type="semantic" name="search">
     <descriptor id="search-form" type="safe" name="search">
       <descriptor id="search-data" type="semantic" name="search" />
     </descriptor>
   </descriptor>

              ALPS Description of the same Search Transition

2.2.7.2.  Fragment Identifiers and 'id'

   When applied to an ALPS document, a URI fragment identifier points to
   the 'descriptor' whose 'id' is the value of the fragment.  For
   example, the fragment identifier 'customer' in the URI
   http://example.com/my-alps-document#customer refers to an ALPS
   'descriptor' with 'id' set to 'customer'.






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   A relative URL with a fragment identifier within an ALPS document
   (e.g. href="#customer") refers to a local 'descriptor' within the
   document containing the reference.

   The complete URI to an ALPS 'descriptor' (including the fragment)
   forms an 'abstract semantic type' identifier.  This is a resolvable
   URI (URL) that can be used to indicate the type of a resource; for
   instance, it can be used as the value of the IANA-registered relation
   type 'type'.

2.2.7.3.  Link Relation Values and 'id' or 'name'

   Since a state transition 'descriptor' may define a relation type
   value, it is important to avoid creating conflicts with existing
   IANA-registered values.  If the resulting link relation type is the
   same as a registered relation type, the descriptor MUST not change
   the meaning of the IANA relation type.

   Further, since the 'id' of a 'descriptor' may define a link relation
   value per Section 2.2.3.1, if a conflict exists in defining such a
   descriptor's document-wide unique 'id' with another 'descriptor', the
   conflicting 'descriptor' MUST define a unique 'id' and MAY specify a
   'name' property to resolve the conflict.

   If it is unclear whether a registered link relation type in a
   representation document refers to a relation registered with IANA or
   a relation registered in an ALPS profile, the semantics of that link
   are undefined.

2.2.8.  'link'

   An element that identifies a link between the current ALPS element
   and some other (possibly external) resource.  MAY be a child element
   of the 'alps' and the 'descriptor' elements.

   The 'link' element MUST define the two attributes 'href' and 'rel'.

2.2.9.  'name'

   Indicates the name of the 'descriptor' as found in generic
   representations.  It MAY appear as a property of 'descriptor'.

   This is used when the name of the 'descriptor' is used as an 'id'
   value elsewhere in the ALPS document.  For instance, if a single ALPS
   document defines a semantic descriptor (data element) called
   'customer' and a safe descriptor (transition element) also called
   'customer', they cannot both have 'id="customer"' in the ALPS




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   document.  One of them needs to have some other 'id', and to set
   'name="customer"'.

   The use of the 'name' property usually indicates an ambiguity in the
   application semantics.  Thus, it SHOULD only be used when creating an
   ALPS profile that describes an existing design.

2.2.10.  'rel'

   Contains a [RFC5988] approved value: either an extension relation
   type (a URI) or a registered relation type (a short string).

   Appears as a property of'link'.

2.2.11.  'rt'

   Indicates the resource type that will be returned when executing the
   specified network request.  The 'rt' attribute SHOULD appear only on
   a 'descriptor' with a 'type' value of 'safe', 'unsafe', or
   'idempotent.'

   The 'rt' attribute is OPTIONAL and is an opaque string and MAY match
   the 'id' of an existing'descriptor'.

2.2.12.  'type'

   Indicates the type of hypermedia control to which the element is
   applied within the resulting representation.  This SHOULD appear for
   each 'descriptor' element.  The four valid values are:

   'semantic'  A state element (e.g.  HTML.SPAN, HTML.INPUT, etc.).

   'safe'  A hypermedia control that triggers a safe, idempotent state
      transition (e.g.  HTTP.GET or HTTP.HEAD).

   'idempotent'  A hypermedia control that triggers an unsafe,
      idempotent state transition (e.g.  HTTP.PUT or HTTP.DELETE).

   'unsafe'  A hypermedia control that triggers an unsafe, non-
      idempotent state transition (e.g.  HTTP.POST).

   If no 'type' attribute is associated with the element, then
   'type="semantic"' is implied.








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2.2.13.  'value'

   Contains a string value.  It MAY appear as an attribute of the 'doc'
   and the 'ext' elements.

2.2.14.  'version'

   Indicates the version of the ALPS specification used in the document.
   This SHOULD appear as a property of the 'alps' element.  Currently
   the only valid value is '1.0'.  If no value appears, then
   'version="1.0"' is implied.

2.3.  ALPS Representations

   An ALPS document may be represented in either XML or JSON format.
   This section contains notes on how the ALPS elements and attributes
   appear in each format, along with examples to guide ALPS document
   authors.

2.3.1.  Sample HTML

   Below is a simple HTML document that contains a handful of semantic
   descriptors and transition instructions.  This document was generated
   from the XML and JSON ALPS documents that follow.  Use this HTML
   document as a guide when evaluating the XML and JSON examples.

   <!-- sample HTML document -->
   <html>
     <head>
       <link rel="profile" href="http://alps.io/documents/search" />
     </head>
     <body>
       <form class="search" action="..." method="get">
         <input type="text" name="search" value="..." />
           <select name="resultType">
             <option value="summary" />
             <option value="detailed" />
           </select>
         <input type="submit" />
       </form>
     </body>
   </html>

                                HTML Sample







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2.3.2.  XML Representation Example

   In the XML version of an ALPS document, the following ALPS properties
   always appear as XML elements: 'alps', 'doc', 'descriptor', and
   'ext'.  All other ALPS properties appear as XML attributes.

2.3.2.1.  Complete XML Representation

   Below is an example of an application/alps+xml representation.

   <?xml version="1.0"?>
   <alps version="1.0">
     <doc href="http://example.org/samples/full/doc.html" />

     <descriptor id="search" type="safe">
       <doc format="text">A search form with two inputs.</doc>
       <descriptor href="#resultType" />
       <descriptor id="value" name="search" type="semantic">
         <doc>input for search</doc>
       </descriptor>
     </descriptor>

     <descriptor id="resultType" type="semantic">
       <doc>results format</doc>
       <ext
         href="http://alps.io/ext/range"
         value="summary,detail" />
     </descriptor>
   </alps>

                        Complete XML Representation

2.3.3.  JSON Representation Example

   When representing ALPS documents in JSON format, the 'descriptor' and
   'ext' properties are always expressed as arrays of anonymous objects
   - even when there is only one member in the array.














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   For example:

   "descriptor" : [
     {
       "id" : "value",
       "name" : "search",
       "type" : "descriptor",
       "doc" : { "value" : "input for search" }
     },
     { "href" : "#resultType" }
   ]

                            Arrays in ALPS+JSON

   The 'doc' property is always expressed as a named object.

   For example:

   {
     "doc" : {
       "format" : "text",
       "value" : "Rules are important"
     }
   }

                         Descriptions in ALPS+JSON

2.3.3.1.  Complete JSON Representation

   Below is a example of the application/alps+json representation of an
   ALPS document.




















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   {
     "alps" : {
       "version" : "1.0",
       "doc" : {
         "href" : "http://example.org/samples/full/doc.html"
       },
       "descriptor" : [
         {
           "id" : "search",
           "type" : "safe",
           "doc" : {"value" :
             "A search form with a two inputs"
           },
           "descriptor" : [
             {
               "id" : "value",
               "name" : "search",
               "type" : "descriptor",
               "doc" : { "value" : "input for search" }
             },
             { "href" : "#resultType" }
           ]
         },
         {
           "id" : "resultType",
           "type" : "descriptor",
           "description" : {"value" : "results format"},
           "ext" : [
             {
               "href" : "http://alps.io/ext/range",
               "value" : "summary,detail"
             }
           ]
         }
       ]
     }
   }

                     Complete ALPS+JSON Representation

3.  Applying ALPS documents to Existing Media Types

   An ALPS document can be applied to many existing media types as long
   as there exists an agreed mapping between ALPS and the target media
   type.  Section 1.3 gave some informative examples of this.
   Normative, up-to-date guidance on applying ALPS documents to existing
   media types are available at the official ALPS Web site at




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   (http://alps.io/docs/mapping).  [TK : this page does not yet exist.
   -mamund]

   Not all media types can faithfully represent all ALPS descriptors.
   For instance, the 'application/json' media type has no standard way
   of representing hyperlinks.  The [details of how to apply ALPS to
   such a media type will necesarily be incomplete, and it will not be
   possible to represent some aspects of an ALPS profile in documents in
   that media type.

3.1.  Linking to ALPS Documents

   To indicate that an ALPS profile describes the semantics of some
   representation document, the representation document SHOULD be linked
   to the ALPS document.  The 'profile' link relation [RFC6906] MUST be
   used when creating this link.  If the media type of the
   representation document has no native ability to link to other
   resources, or no ability to express link relations, the HTTP header
   'Link' [RFC5988] MAY be used to connect the representation document
   and the ALPS profile.  If the media type of the representation
   document defines a parameter for linking the document to a profile,
   that parameter MAY be used to connect the representation document and
   the ALPS profile.

   A single representation document may be described by more than one
   ALPS profile.  If two ALPS profiles give conflicting semantics for
   the same element, the document linked to earlier in the
   representation SHOULD take precedence.  A profile linked to using the
   'Link' header takes precedence over a profile linked to within the
   representation document itself.  A profile linked to using a media
   type parameter takes precedence over a profile linked to using the
   'Link' header and a profile linked to within the representation
   document itself.

4.  IANA Considerations

   This specification establishes two media types: 'application/
   alps+xml' and 'application/alps+json'

4.1.  application/alps+xml

   Type name:  application

   Subtype name:  alps+xml

   Required parameters:  None

   Optional parameters:



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      charset  This parameter has identical semantics to the charset
         parameter of the 'application/xml' media type as specified
         in[RFC3023].

      profile  A whitespace-separated list of IRIs identifying specific
         constraints or conventions that apply to an ALPS document.  A
         profile must not change the semantics of the resource
         representation when processed without profile knowledge, so
         that clients both with and without knowledge of a profiled
         resource can safely use the same representation.  The profile
         parameter may also be used by clients to express their
         preferences in the content negotiation process.  It is
         recommended that profile IRIs are dereferenceable and provide
         useful documentation at that IRI.

   Encoding considerations:

      binary  Same as encoding considerations of application/xml as
         specified in[RFC3023].

   Security considerations:  This format shares security issues common
      to all XML content types.  It does not provide executable content.
      Information contained in ALPS documents do not require privacy or
      integrity services.

   Interoperability considerations:  ALPS is not described by a DTD and
      applies only the well-formedness rules of XML.  It should only be
      parsed by a non-validating parser.

   Published specification:  This Document

   Applications that use this media type:  Various

   Additional information:

      magic number(s):  none

      file extensions:  .xml

      macintosh type file code:  TEXT

      object idenfiers:  none

   person to contact for further information:

      Name:  Mike Amundsen

      Email:  mca@amundsen.com



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   Intended usage:  Common

   Author/change controller:  Mike Amundsen

4.2.  application/alps+json

   Type name:  application

   Subtype name:  alps+json

   Required parameters:  None

   Optional parameters:

      profile  A whitespace-separated list of IRIs identifying specific
         constraints or conventions that apply to an ALPS document.  A
         profile must not change the semantics of the resource
         representation when processed without profile knowledge, so
         that clients both with and without knowledge of a profiled
         resource can safely use the same representation.  The profile
         parameter may also be used by clients to express their
         preferences in the content negotiation process.  It is
         recommended that profile IRIs are dereferenceable and provide
         useful documentation at that IRI.

   Encoding considerations:  binary

   Security considerations:  This media type shares security issues
      common to all JSON content types.  See [RFC4627] Section #6 for
      additional information.  ALPS+JSON does not provide executable
      content.  Information contained in ALPS+JSON documents do not
      require privacy or integrity services.

   Interoperability considerations:  None

   Published specification:  This Document

   Applications that use this media type:  Various

   Additional information:

      magic number(s):  none

      file extensions:  .json

      macintosh type file code:  TEXT

      object idenfiers:  none



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   person to contact for further information:

      Name:  Mike Amundsen

      Email:  mca@amundsen.com

   Intended usage:  Common

   Author/change controller:  Mike Amundsen

5.  Internationalization Considerations

   [TK]

   [[CREF1: insert text (consider rfc 5987)]]

6.  Acknowledgements

   The following people made contributions to this specification:

7.  References

7.1.  Normative References

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [RFC3023]  Murata, M., St. Laurent, S., and D. Kohn, "XML Media
              Types", RFC 3023, January 2001.

   [RFC4627]  Crockford, D., "The application/json Media Type for
              JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)", RFC 4627, July 2006.

   [RFC5988]  Nottingham, M., "Web Linking", RFC 5988, October 2010.

   [RFC6906]  Wilde, E., "The 'profile' Link Relation Type", RFC 6906,
              March 2013.

   [RFC7320]  Nottingham, M., "URI Design and Ownership", BCP 190, RFC
              7320, July 2014.

7.2.  Informative References

   [I-D.ietf-appsawg-text-markdown]
              Leonard, S., "The text/markdown Media Type", draft-ietf-
              appsawg-text-markdown-05 (work in progress), December
              2014.




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Appendix A.  Frequently Asked Questions

A.1.  Why are there no URLs in ALPS?

   ALPS is meant to describe a service in a universal way.  The same
   ALPS description document can be used by many ALPS-compliant servers.
   Since each service implementation is in charge of their own URL
   space, ALPS descriptions do not include URLs.  See URI Design and
   Ownership [RFC7320] for more on this principle.

   When implementing ALPS-compliant servers, implementors are free to
   use any URL design they wish.  All that is required is that
   implementors use the same ALPS profile descriptor 'id' and 'name'
   properties in the representations.  When implementing ALPS-compliant
   client applications, the URLs will be supplied at runtime by the
   server represetentations.  Client apps only need to recognize the
   descriptor 'id' and 'name' values from the referenced ALPS profile
   document.

A.2.  Why is there no workflow component in the ALPS specification?

   ALPS is not designed to describe workflows or execution paths for a
   service.  Instead, ALPS is designed to describe a shared set of data
   and actions elements that server MAY implement in order to create a
   service.  Each action descriptor (where the descriptor's type
   property is set to 'safe', 'unsafe', or 'idemponent') SHOULD describe
   a state transition that a ALPS-compliant client application can
   invoke when it is available.  Servers are free to implement the
   transitions they find useful and to arrange them in any order they
   wish.  ALPS-compliant client applications SHOULD be able to recognize
   these descriptors when they appear and are free to act upon them
   directly, render them for humans to invoke, or ignore/hide them
   completely.

A.3.  Why is there no way to indicate ranges for semantic descriptors?

   For most all service implementations, there are cases where it would
   be helpful to document a range of possible values for a semantic
   element.  For example, when implementing the descriptor {"id":"size",
   ...}, one service might want to indicate the list of supported values
   such as: 'small', 'meduim', 'large', etc.  However, another service
   might have a very different list of possible values such as
   'standard', 'oversized', 'undersized', etc.  And there may be a
   service that only supports a single value here and will always supply
   it ('onesize').

   Since ALPS is meant to provide a single description that can be used
   by multiple services, establishing ranges within the ALPS description



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   is considered over-constraining service implementations.  Services
   are free to supply this information within representations at run
   time.  But including them in the global ALPS profile is discouraged.

Authors' Addresses

   Mike Amundsen
   CA Technologies, Inc.

   EMail: mca@amundsen.com
   URI:   http://amundsen.com


   Leonard Richardson

   EMail: leonardr@segfault.org
   URI:   http://crummy.com


   Mark W. Foster
   Apiary

   EMail: mwf@fosrias.com




























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