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Versions: 00 01

XCON Working Group                                             M. Barnes
Internet-Draft                                                    Nortel
Intended status: Informational                                C. Boulton
Expires: January 8, 2009                                           Avaya
                                                              L. Miniero
                                                             S P. Romano
                                                    University of Napoli
                                                            July 7, 2008


Centralized Conferencing Manipulation Protocol (CCMP) Call Flow Examples
                   draft-barnes-xcon-examples-00.txt

Status of this Memo

   By submitting this Internet-Draft, each author represents that any
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 8, 2009.

Abstract

   This document provides detailed call flows for the scenarios
   documented in the Centralized Conferencing (XCON) Framework and the
   XCON Scenarios.  The call flows document the use of the interface
   between a conference control client and a conference control server
   using the Centralized Conferencing Manipulation Protocol (CCMP).  The
   objective is to provide a base reference for both protocol
   researchers and developers.




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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.  Conventions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   3.  Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   4.  Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     4.1.  A Practical Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
       4.1.1.  Conferencing Control Client Overview . . . . . . . . .  5
       4.1.2.  Conferencing Control Server Overview . . . . . . . . .  5
   5.  Conference Creation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     5.1.  Basic Conference Creation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     5.2.  Basic Conference Creation for a specific instance of
           Conference Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     5.3.  Basic Conference Creation - Cloning an existing
           Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
     5.4.  Conference Creation using Blueprints . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   6.  General Conference scenarios and examples  . . . . . . . . . . 14
     6.1.  Conference Announcements and Recordings  . . . . . . . . . 14
     6.2.  Monitoring for DTMF  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
     6.3.  Adding a Party . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
     6.4.  Joining a Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
     6.5.  Muting a Party . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
     6.6.  Internal Sidebar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
     6.7.  External Sidebar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
     6.8.  Floor control using sidebars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
     6.9.  Whispering or Private Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
     6.10. Observing and Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
   7.  Removing participants and deleting conferences . . . . . . . . 24
     7.1.  Removing a Party . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
     7.2.  Deleting a Conference  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
   8.  Additional Conference Scenarios and Examples . . . . . . . . . 26
     8.1.  Chat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
       8.1.1.  Basic Chat Operations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
       8.1.2.  Additional Operations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
       8.1.3.  Advanced Operations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
   9.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
   10. Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
   11. Change Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
   12. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
   13. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
     13.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
     13.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
   Appendix A.  IM Chat and Conferencing Identifier Relationships . . 39
   Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
   Intellectual Property and Copyright Statements . . . . . . . . . . 43






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1.  Introduction

   This document provides detailed call flows for the scenarios
   documented in the Centralized Conferencing (XCON) Framework [RFC5239]
   and the XCON Scenarios [RFC4597].  The XCON scenarios describe a
   broad range of use cases making use of the advanced conferencing
   capabilities provided by a system realization of the XCON framework.
   The call flows document the use of the interface between a conference
   control client and a conference control server using the Centralized
   Conferencing Manipulation Protocol (CCMP)[I-D.ietf-xcon-ccmp].

   Due to the broad range of functionality provided by the XCON
   Framework and the flexibility of the CCMP messaging, these call flows
   should not be considered inclusive of all the functionality that can
   provided by the XCON Framework and protocol implementations.  These
   flows represent a sample in order to provide an overview of the
   feature rich capabilities of the XCON framework and CCMP messaging.
   The objective is to provide some concrete examples for both
   implementors and protocol researchers.


2.  Conventions

   In this document, the key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED",
   "SHALL", "SHALL NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "NOT
   RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" are to be interpreted as
   described in BCP 14, RFC 2119 [RFC2119] and indicate requirement
   levels for compliant implementations.  In this document, these key
   words are used when describing normative functionality based on the
   XCON Framework and CCMP.

   Note that due to RFC formatting conventions, this document often
   splits message details whose content would exceed 72 characters.  A
   backslash character marks where this line folding has taken place.
   This backslash and its trailing CRLF and whitespace would not appear
   in the actual protocol contents.


3.  Terminology

   This document uses the same terminology as found in the referenced
   documents, with the following terms and abbreviations used in the
   call flows.  Also, note that the term "call flows" is used in a very
   generic sense in this document since the media is not limited to
   voice.  The calls supported by the XCON framework and CCMP can
   consist of media such as text, voice and video, including multiple
   media types in a single active conference.




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   Conferencing and Media Client Client (CMCC):  This client may be an
      integral part of a User Agent Client (UAC) per [RFC3261].  In the
      flows in this document, the CMCC is logically equivalent to the
      use of UAC as the client notation in the media control call flows
      [I-D.miniero-mediactrl-escs].

   Conferencing Server (ConfS):  In this document, the conferencing
      server is used interchangeably with the term Application Server
      (AS) in the Media Control framework
      [I-D.ietf-mediactrl-architecture] to simplify the call flows.
      However, these need not be the same entities in an implementation.

   Media Server (MS):  Media Server.  Per its definition in the Media
      Control Architecture.


4.  Overview

   This document provides a sampling of detailed call flows that can be
   implemented based on a system realization of [RFC5239] and
   implementation of [I-D.ietf-xcon-ccmp].  This is intended to be a
   simple guide on the use of the conference control protocol between
   the Conference Server and the Conference Control Client.  It is
   expected that this document provides a helpful base reference for
   other implementors and protocol researchers.

   This document focuses on the interaction between the Conference (and
   Media) Control Client and the Conferencing system, specifically the
   Conference Server.  The initial scenarios chosen are based on the
   ones described in the XCON framework, many of which are based on the
   advanced conferencing capabilities described in the XCON scenarios.
   Additional scenarios have been added to provide examples of other
   real life scenarios that are anticipated to be supported by the
   framework and to document the conference control that complements
   some of the Media Control Call Flows [I-D.miniero-mediactrl-escs].

   Rather than repeat the details associated with the media control,
   this document references the media control call flow examples
   [I-D.miniero-mediactrl-escs] by Figure title to aid the user in
   finding the flows in that document.  This approach was taken rather
   than integrating the two documents due to dependencies in completing
   working group items and because the messages for the two protocols
   provide fairly discrete operations.  In addition, the scenarios for
   which floor control are used also do not include details of the
   Binary Floor Control Protocol (BFCP) [RFC4582], but rather refer to
   that document for further details for clients that also implement
   BFCP for floor control.




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   In the following sections some approaches and choices by which one
   can implement the XCON framework and the related protocols are
   described.  This provides the context for the ordering of the flows.
   The physical client can implement all the client side protocols in a
   single device or the protocols might exist in multiple places, such
   as a separate device supporting the media interface and another for
   conference control (e.g., video along with a web based interface for
   conference control).  This section should not be considered a
   mandatory approach to the implementation of the XCON framework.  It
   is only meant to ease the understanding of how the framework works
   from a practical point of view.

4.1.  A Practical Approach

   This section provides a logical overview of an implementation
   approach for a a conference control client and conference server
   implementing CCMP.  This section is not normative, however, it's
   anticipated that it gives an implementor an idea of the overall
   general functionality that can be implemented to support the XCON
   framework and CCMP.

4.1.1.  Conferencing Control Client Overview

   A basic conferencing control client can integrate all the
   functionality including media, conference and floor control into a
   single client.  However, this diagram is focused on the processing
   directly associated with CCMP, with annotations/callouts when media
   control or floor interaction might be necessary or would be allowed.
   It's entirely an implementation choice how a client might implement
   those interactions, however, it's recommended that the implementor
   consider the possible distributed nature of the various control
   protocols.



                           (Figure not available yet).


         Figure 1: Conferencing Control Client CCMP State Diagram

4.1.2.  Conferencing Control Server Overview

   A conferencing system can integrate all the functionality including
   conference control, floor control and even Application Server
   functionality to support media control into a single client.
   However, this diagram is focused on the processing directly
   associated with CCMP, with annotations/callouts when media control or
   floor interaction might be necessary or would be allowed.  It's



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   entirely an implementation choice how a client might implement those
   interactions, however, it's recommended that the implementor consider
   the possible distributed nature of the various control protocols.



                           (Figure not available yet).


              Figure 2: Conference Server CCMP State Diagram


5.  Conference Creation

   This section provides the details associated with the various ways in
   which a conference can be created using CCMP and the XCON framework
   constructs.  As previously mentioned the details of the media control
   and floor control protocols, where applicable, are annotated in the
   flows without showing all the details.  However, for clarification
   purposes, the first example Section 5.1 provides the details of the
   media control messaging along with an example of the standard
   annotation used throughout the remainder of this document.  [Editors'
   Note: should we add the call control signaling (i.e., SIP) to the
   annotated example, as well.  There is already a reference to the call
   control signaling in the text description - is that sufficient?]

   The term conferenceing server (ConfS) is shown in the diagrams in
   this document as opposed to the more generic application server (AS)
   in the media control flow document [I-D.miniero-mediactrl-escs].
   Also, note that the term conferencing and media control client (CMCC)
   in these call flows may be an integral part of a User Agent Client
   (UAC) per [RFC3261], which is the client notation used in the media
   control call flow document.  However, in the context of XCON, the
   conferencing and media control client can be independent of the call
   signaling client.

5.1.  Basic Conference Creation

   The simplest manner in which a conference can be created is
   accomplished by the client sending a "confRequest" message with the
   "create" operation as the only parameter to the conference server.
   This results in the creation of a default conference, with an XCON-
   URI in the form of the "confObjID" parameter, the XCON-UserID in the
   form of the "confUserID" parameter and the data for the conference
   object in the "conference-info" parameter all returned in the
   "confResponse" message.  This example also activates the conference
   upon creation, thus the call signaling interactions to add the CMCC
   to the conference are completed prior to returning the confResponse



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   message.  The media interactions handled when the confResponse
   message is sent.


   CMCC                    ConfS                          MS
    |                        |                             |
    |(1) confRequest(create) |                             |
    |----------------------->|                             |
    |                        |1.CONTROL (create conference)|
    |                        |+++++++++++++++++++++++++++>>|
    |                        |                             |--+(a)create
    |                        |                             |  | conf and
    |                        |      2. 200 OK (with confID)|<-+ its ID
    |                        |<<+++++++++++++++++++++++++++|
    |                        |--+                          |
    |                        |  | (b)Setup call signaling  |
    |                        |  |    and media to CMCC     |
    |(2)confResponse(create,\|<-+    via Focus             |
    |<-----------------------|                             |
    | confObjID, confUserID,\|                             |
    |  conference-info)      |                             |
    |                        |                             |
    |                        |3.CONTROL(join CMCC<->confID)|
    |                        |+++++++++++++++++++++++++++>>|
    |                        |                             |--+ (c) join
    |                        |                             |  | CMCC &
    |                        |4. 200 OK                    |<-+ confID
    |                        |<<+++++++++++++++++++++++++++|
    |                        |                             |
    |                        |                             |
    |<<##################################################>>|
    |    Now the CMCC is mixed in the conference           |
    |<<##################################################>>|
    .                        .                             .
    .                        .                             .


             Figure 3: Create Basic Conference - Complete flow













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            CMCC                            ConfS
             |                               |
             | (1) confRequest(create)       |
             |------------------------------>|
             |                               |--+
             |                               |  |(a) Create conf
             |                               |  |    and ID
             |                               |  |(b) Setup call
             |                               |  |    signaling and
             |                               |  |    media interface
             |                               |  |    to CMCC
             |  (2) confResponse(create,\    |<-+    via Focus
             |<------------------------------|
             |      confObjID, confUserID,\  |--+
             |      conference-info)         |  |(c) Join CMCC
             |                               |  |  and media
             |                               |<-+
             |                               |
             .                               .
             .                               .


            Figure 4: Create Basic Conference - Annotated Flow



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


     Figure 5: Create Basic Conference (Annotated) Detailed Messaging

5.2.  Basic Conference Creation for a specific instance of Conference
      Information

   A conference can also be created by the client sending a
   "confRequest" message with the "create" operation, along with the
   desired data in the form of the "conference-info" parameter for the
   conference to be created.  An example where this approach might be
   applicable would be in the case where a conference user might need to
   use a different conferencing system than is typically used (e.g., one
   that is more geographically appropriate for some participants that
   perhaps do not support advanced conferencing functionality).  If the
   specific conferencing system can support that specific type of
   conference (capabilities, etc.), then the request results in the
   creation of a conference.  In this success case, an XCON-URI in the
   form of the "confObjID" parameter and the XCON-UserID in the form of
   the "confUserID" parameter are returned in the "confResponse"
   message.  The "conference-info" is not returned unless changes have



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   been made, in which case the "responseCode" is "modified".  This
   example also activates the conference upon creation, thus the call
   signaling interactions to add the CMCC to the conference are
   completed prior to returning the confResponse message.  The media
   interactions handled when the confResponse message is sent.


   CMCC "Alice"                        ConfS
    |                               |
    | (1) confRequest(create,\      |
    |------------------------------>|(a') Validate user/
    |      conference-info)         | conference-info data
    |                               |--+
    |                               |  |(a) Create conf
    |                               |  |    and ID
    |                               |  |(b) Setup call
    |                               |  |    signaling and
    |                               |  |    media interface
    |                               |  |    to CMCC
    |                               |<-+
    |  (2) confResponse(create,\    |
    |<------------------------------|
    |      confObjID, confUserID)   |--+
    |                               |  | (c) Join CMCC
    |                               |  |  and media
    |                               |<-+
    |                               |
    .                               .
    .                               .


   Figure 6: Create Basic Conference from user provided conference-info



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


           Figure 7: Create Basic Conference Detailed Messaging

5.3.  Basic Conference Creation - Cloning an existing Conference

   A client can also create another conference by cloning an existing
   conference, such as an active conference or conference reseravation.
   In this example, the client sends a "confRequest" message with the
   "create" operation, along with a specific "confObjID", from which a
   new conference is to be created by cloning an existing conference.




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   An example of how a client can create a conference based on a
   blueprint is provided in Section 5.4.  The manner by which a client
   in this example might learn about a conference reservation or active
   conferences is similar to the first step in the blueprint example,
   with the exception of specifying querying for different types of
   conference objects supported by the specific conferencing system.
   For example, in this example, the client clones a conference
   reservation, thus the client would include the appropriate
   "confObjState" parameter.  [Note: we don't currently have this
   parmeter in the XML schema in CCMP, BUT this functionality is
   documented in the text.]

   If the conferencing system can support a new instance of the specific
   type of conference(capabilities, etc.), then the request results in
   the creation of a conference, with an XCON-URI in the form of the
   "confObjID" parameter to reflect the newly cloned conference object
   and the XCON-UserID in the form of the "confUserID" parameter
   returned in the "confResponse" message.  The "conference-info" is not
   returned unless there had been changes, in which case the
   "responseCode" is "modified".  This example also activates the
   conference upon creation, thus the call signaling interactions to add
   the CMCC to the conference are completed prior to returning the
   confResponse message.  The media interactions handled when the
   confResponse message is sent.


   CMCC "Alice"                   ConfS
    |                               |
    | (1) confRequest(create,\      |
    |------------------------------>|(a') Validate user
    |      confObjID, child)        |     and confObjID
    |                               |--+
    |                               |  |(a) Create conf
    |                               |  |    and ID
    |                               |  |(b) Setup call
    |                               |  |    signaling and
    |                               |  |    media interface
    |                               |  |    to CMCC
    |                               |<-+
    |  (2) confResponse(create,\    |
    |<------------------------------|
    |      confObjID, confUserID)   |--+
    |                               |  | (c) Join CMCC
    |                               |  |  and media
    |                               |<-+
    |                               |
    .                               .
    .                               .



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                 Figure 8: Create Basic Conference - Clone

   1.  "Alice" sends a confRequest message to clone a conference based
   on an existing conference reservation.  "Alice" indicates this
   conference should be a "child" of the parent conference represented
   by the "confObjID" in the request.

   2.  Upon receipt of the confRequest message containing a "create"
   operation and "confObjID", the conferencing system ensures that the
   "confObjID" received is valid.  The conferencing system determines
   the appropriate read/write access of any users to be added to a
   conference based on this confObjID(using membership, roles, etc.).
   The conferencing system uses the received confObjID to clone a
   conference reservation.  The conferencing system also reserves or
   allocates a new confObjID to be used for the cloned conference
   object.  Any subsequent protocol requests from any of the members of
   the conference.  The conferencing system maintains the mapping
   between this conference ID and the parent conference object ID
   associated with the reservation through the conference instance.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


       Figure 9: Create Basic Conference (Clone) Detailed Messaging

5.4.  Conference Creation using Blueprints

   Figure 10 provides an example of one client "Alice" determining the
   conference blueprints available for a particular conferencing system
   and creating a conference based on the desired blueprint.



















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   CMCC "Alice"                   ConfS
    |                               |
    | (1) optionsRequest            |
    |------------------------------>|
    |                               |
    |           (2) optionsResponse |
    |<------------------------------|
    |--+                            |
    |  | choose preferred           |
    |  | blueprint from the         |
    |  | list (blueprintName)       |
    |<-+                            |
    | (3) confRequest(create,\      |
    |------------------------------>|(a')Validate user
    |      blueprintName,           |    and confObjID
    |      confObjID, child)        |--+
    |                               |  |(a)Create conf
    |                               |  |   and ID
    |                               |<-+
    |  (4) confResponse(create,\    |
    |<------------------------------|
    |      confObjID, confUserID)   |
    |                               |
    |                               |
    |                               |
    .                               .
    .                               .



         Figure 10: Client Creation of Conference using Blueprints

   1.  "Alice" first sends an "optionsRequest" message to the
   conferencing system identified by the conference server discovery
   process (details TBD).  Upon receipt of the "optionsRequest", the
   conferencing system would first authenticate "Alice" (and allocate a
   conference user identifier, if necessary) and then ensure that
   "Alice" has the appropriate authority based on system policies to
   receive any blueprints supported by that system.  Any blueprints that
   "Alice" is authorized to use are returned in a "optionsResponse"
   message in the "blueprints" attribute, along with the "confUserID"
   parameter.

   2.  Upon receipt of the "optionsResponse" containing the blueprints,
   "Alice" determines which blueprint to use for the conference to be
   created.  "Alice" creates a conference object based on the blueprint
   (i.e., clones) and modifies applicable fields, such as membership
   list and start time.



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   3.  "Alice" then sends a "confRequest" with a "create" operation to
   the conferencing system to create a conference reservation based upon
   the updated blueprint, including the appropriate "blueprintName" and
   associated "confObjID".

   Note: This conference is created as independent of the parent
   (blueprint), but there are no hard and fast requirements as to
   whether conference from blueprints are always independent or whether
   the conferences cloned from conference reservations or active
   conferences are also children.  The protocol is flexible enough to
   allow all the variations, thus any limitations would be specific to a
   conferencing system.

   Upon receipt of the "confRequest" message with a "create" operation
   and an "action" to "reserve" a conference based upon the blueprint in
   the request, the conferencing system ensures that the blueprint
   received is a valid blueprint (i.e. the values of the various field
   are within range).  [Note: we don't currently have this "action"
   field defined for the "confRequest" message.]  The conferencing
   system determines the appropriate read/write access of any users to
   be added to a conference based on this blueprint (using membership,
   roles, etc.).  The conferencing system uses the received blueprint to
   clone a conference reservation.  The conferencing system also
   reserves or allocates a conference ID to be used for any subsequent
   CCMP requests from any of the members of the conference.  The
   conferencing system maintains the mapping between this conference ID
   and the "confObjID" associated with the reservation through the
   conference instance.

   4.  The conferencing server then sends a "confResponse" message
   including the "confObjID" associated with the reserved conference.
   Upon receipt of the "confResponse" message, "Alice" can now create an
   active conference using that reservation or create additional
   reservations based upon the existing reservation.

   5.  In this example, "Alice" has reserved a meetme conference bridge.
   Thus, "Alice" provides the conference information, including the
   necessary "confObjID", to desired participants.  Note, that this
   interface is entirely outside the scope of the XCON framework,
   protocols and this document.  When the first participant, "Alice" in
   this example, then requests to be added to the conference by sending
   a "userRequest" ....

   6.  Upon receipt of the "userRequest" message, the conference is
   activated and the focus is created.  The focus is associated with the
   "confObjID" received in the request.  Any participants that have the
   authority to manipulate the conference would receive the "confObjID"
   in any responses.  The conference server then sends "userResponse"



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   message....



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


        Figure 11: Create Conference (Blueprint) Detailed Messaging


6.  General Conference scenarios and examples

   The following scenarios are based on those documented in the XCON
   framework.  The examples assume that a conference has already been
   correctly established, with media, if applicable, per one of the
   examples in Section 5.

6.1.  Conference Announcements and Recordings

   In this example, as shown in Figure 12 "Alice" is joining "Bob"'s
   conference that requires that she first enter a pass code.  After
   successfully entering the passcode, an announcement prompts "Alice to
   speak her name so it can be recorded.  When "Alice" is added to the
   active conference, the recording is played back to all the existing
   participants.



                           (Figure not available yet).


                  Figure 12: Recording and Announcements

   1.  Upon receipt of the userRequest from "Alice" to be added to
   "Bob's" conference, the conferencing system maps the identifier
   received in the request to the conference object representing "Bob's"
   active conference.  The conferencing system determines that a
   password is required for this specific conference, thus an
   announcement asking "Alice" to enter the password is provided to
   "Alice".  Once "Alice" enters the password, it is validated against
   the policies associated with "Bob's" active conference.  The
   conferencing system then connects to a server which prompts and
   records "Alice's" name.  The conferencing system must also determine
   whether "Alice" is already a user of this conferencing system or
   whether she is a new user.

   2.  "Alice" is a new user for this conferencing system, so a
   conference user identifier is created for "Alice".  Based upon the



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   addressing information provided by "Alice", the call signaling to add
   "Alice" to the conference is instigated through the Focus.  In
   addition, "Alice" is sent a userResponse message which includes the
   "confUserID" assigned by the conferencing system for "Alice".  This
   would allow "Alice" to later perform operations on the conference (if
   she were to have the appropriate policies), including registering for
   event notifications associated with the conference.

   3.  Once the call signaling indicates that "Alice" has been
   successfully added to the specific conference, per updates to the
   state, and depending upon the policies, other participants (e.g.,
   "Bob") are notified of the addition of "Alice" to the conference via
   the conference notification service and an announcement is provided
   to all the participants indicating that "Alice" has joined the
   conference.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


                 Figure 13: Announcement Messaging Details

6.2.  Monitoring for DTMF

   The conferencing system also needs the capability to monitor for DTMF
   from each individual participant.  This would typically be used to
   enter the identifier and/or access code for joining a specific
   conference.

   An example of DTMF monitoring, within the context of the framework
   elements, is shown in Figure 12.

6.3.  Adding a Party

   Figure 14 provides an example of one client "Alice" impacting the
   state of another client "Bob".  This example assumes an established
   conference.  In this example, "Alice" wants to add "Bob" to the
   conference.


   To do.


        Figure 14: Client Manipulation of Conference - Add a party

   1.  Upon receipt of the Conference Control Protocol request to "add"
   a party ("Bob") in the specific conference as identified by the



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   conference object ID, the conferencing system ensures that "Alice"
   has the appropriate authority based on the policies associated with
   that specific conference object to perform the operation.  The
   conferencing system must also determine whether "Bob" is already a
   user of this conferencing system or whether he is a new user.

   2.  If "Bob" is a new user for this conferencing system, a Conference
   User Identifier is created for Bob. Based upon the addressing
   information provided for "Bob" by "Alice", the call signaling to add
   "Bob" to the conference is instigated through the Focus.

   3.  Once the call signaling indicates that "Bob" has been
   successfully added to the specific conference, per updates to the
   state, and depending upon the policies, other participants (including
   "Bob") may be notified of the addition of "Bob" to the conference via
   the Conference Notification Service.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


                   Figure 15: Add Party Message Details

6.4.  Joining a Conference

   Figure 16 provides an example of one client "Duck" joining an active
   conference with "Alice", "Bob" and "Claire" as participants.  Using
   SIP as a call control protocol such as SIP, "Duck" joins the
   conference without using any CCMP messaging since the required
   interactions are specific to the conferencing system via a trigger
   from the focus upon receipt of the SIP message.  The the conferencing
   system does the following to join "Duck" to the active conference:
   adds "Duck" as a user, authorizes "Duck" to join the conference,
   modifies the appropriate conference data, and provides the
   notifications to the participants that have registered for such.


   To do.


              Figure 16: Client Joining an Active Conference

   1.  Upon receipt of the SIP request to "join" a party ("Duck") to the
   specific conference as identified by the Focus.  The conferencing
   system determines the appropriate conference object ID.  The
   conferencing system then determines whether "Bob" is already a user
   of this conferencing system or whether he is a new user.  If "Bob" is



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   a new user for this conferencing system, a Conference User Identifier
   is created for Bob. Based upon the addressing information provided
   for "Bob" by "Alice", the call signaling to add "Bob" to the
   conference is instigated through the Focus.

   2.  Once the call signaling indicates that "Duck" has been
   successfully added to the specific conference, per updates to the
   state, and depending upon the policies, other participants (including
   "Duck") may be notified of the addition of "Duck" to the conference
   via the Conference Notification Service.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


                      Figure 17: Join Message Details

6.5.  Muting a Party

   This section provides an example of the muting of a party in an
   active conference.  The unmuting would involve the identical CCMP
   message flow.  Although, in the case that floor control is involved,
   whether or not a particular conference client can unmute themselves
   must be considered by the conferencing system.

   Figure 18 provides an example of one client "Alice" impacting the
   media state of another client "Bob".  This example assumes an
   established conference.  In this example, the client, "Alice" whose
   Role is "moderator" of the conference, wants to mute "Bob" on a
   medium-size multi-party conference, as his device is not muted (and
   he's obviously not listening to the call) and background noise in his
   office environment is disruptive to the conference.



     (To be added).





        Figure 18: Client Manipulation of Conference - Mute a party

   1.  Upon receipt of the Conference Control Protocol request to "mute"
   a party ("Bob") in the specific conference as identified by the
   conference object ID, the Conference Server ensures that "Alice" has
   the appropriate authority based on the policies associated with that



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   specific conference object to perform the operation.  "Bob"'s status
   is marked as "recvonly" and the conference object is updated to
   reflect that "Bob"s media is not to be "mixed" with the conference
   media.  In case the Conference Server relies on a remote Media Server
   for its multimedia functionality, it subsequently changes "Bob"'s
   media profile accordingly by means of the related protocol
   interaction with the MS.  An example describing a possible way of
   dealing with such a situation using the Media Server Control
   architecture is described in [I-D.miniero-mediactrl-escs], at "Simple
   Bridging: Framework Transactions (2)".

   2...x.  Depending upon the policies, other participants (including
   "Bob") may be notified of this change via the Conference Notification
   Service.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


                      Figure 19: Mute Message Details

6.6.  Internal Sidebar

   Figure 20 provides an example of one client "Alice" involved in
   active conference with "Bob" and "Carol".  "Alice" wants to create a
   sidebar to have a side discussion with "Bob" while still viewing the
   video associated with the main conference.  Alternatively, the audio
   from the main conference could be maintained at a reduced volume.
   "Alice" initiates the sidebar by sending a request to the
   conferencing system to create a conference reservation based upon the
   active conference object.  "Alice" and "Bob" would remain on the
   roster of the main conference, such that other participants could be
   aware of their participation in the main conference, while an
   internal-sidebar conference is occurring.



    (To be added).


            Figure 20: Client Creation of a Sidebar Conference

   1.  Upon receipt of the Conference Control Protocol request to
   "reserve" a new sidebar conference, based upon the active conference
   received in the request, the conferencing system uses the received
   active conference to clone a conference reservation for the sidebar.
   The sidebar reservation is NOT independent of the active conference



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   (i.e., parent).  The conferencing system also reserves or allocates a
   conference ID to be used for any subsequent protocol requests from
   any of the members of the conference.

   2.  Upon receipt of the conference control protocol response to
   reserve the conference, "Alice" can now create an active conference
   using that reservation or create additional reservations based upon
   the existing reservations.  In this example, "Alice" wants only "Bob"
   to be involved in the sidebar, thus she manipulates the membership.
   "Alice" also only wants the video from the original conference and
   wants the audio to be restricted to the participants in the sidebar.
   Alternatively, "Alice" could manipulate the media values to recieve
   the audio from the main conference at a reduced volume.  "Alice"
   sends a conference control protocol request to update the information
   in the reservation and to create an active conference.

   3.  Upon receipt of the conference control protocol request to update
   the reservation and to create an active conference for the sidebar,
   as identified by the conference object ID, the conferencing system
   ensures that "Alice" has the appropriate authority based on the
   policies associated with that specific conference object to perform
   the operation.  The conferencing system must also validate the
   updated information in the reservation, ensuring that a member like
   "Bob" is already a user of this conferencing system.

   4...x.  Depending upon the policies, the initiator of the request
   (i.e., "Alice") and the participants in the sidebar (i.e., "Bob") may
   be notified of his addition to the sidebar via the conference
   notification service.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


               Figure 21: Internal Sidebar Messaging Details

6.7.  External Sidebar

   Figure 22 provides an example of one client "Alice" involved in an
   active conference with "Bob", "Carol", "David" and "Ethel".  "Alice"
   gets an important text message via a whisper from "Bob" that a
   critical customer needs to talk to "Alice", "Bob" and "Ethel".
   "Alice" creates a sidebar to have a side discussion with the customer
   "Fred" including the participants in the current conference with the
   exception of "Carol" and "David", who remain in the active
   conference.  "Alice" initiates the sidebar by sending a request to
   the conferencing system to create a conference reservation based upon



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   the active conference object.  "Alice", "Bob" and "Ethel" would
   remain on the roster of the main conference in a hold state.  Whether
   or not the hold state of these participants is visible to other
   participants depends upon the individual and local policy.



     (To be Detailed).



             Figure 22: Client Creation of an External Sidebar

   1.  Upon receipt of the Conference Control Protocol request to
   "reserve" a new sidebar conference, based upon the active conference
   received in the request, the conferencing system uses the received
   active conference to clone a conference reservation for the sidebar.
   The sidebar reservation is NOT independent of the active conference
   (i.e., parent).  The conferencing system also reserves or allocates a
   conference ID to be used for any subsequent protocol requests from
   any of the members of the conference.  The conferencing system
   maintains the mapping between this conference ID and the conference
   object ID associated with the sidebar reservation through the
   conference instance.

   2.  Upon receipt of the conference control protocol response to
   reserve the conference, "Alice" wants only "Bob" and "Ethel", along
   with the new participant "Fred" to be involved in the sidebar, thus
   she manipulates the membership.  "Alice" sets the media in the
   conference-info such that the participants in the sidebar don't
   receive any media from the main conference.

   3.  "Alice" sends a conference control protocol request to update the
   information in the reservation and to create an active conference.

   4.  Upon receipt of the conference control protocol request to update
   the reservation and to create an active conference for the sidebar
   the conferencing system ensures that "Alice" has the appropriate
   authority based on the policies associated with that specific
   conference object to perform the operation.  The conferencing system
   also validates the updated information in the reservation.  Since
   "Fred" is a new user for this conferencing system, a conference user
   identifier is created for "Fred".  Based upon the addressing
   information provided for "Fred" by "Alice", the call signaling to add
   "Fred" to the conference is instigated through the Focus.

   5...x.  Depending upon the policies, the initiator of the request
   (i.e., "Alice") and the participants in the sidebar (i.e., "Bob" and



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   "Ethel") may be notified of his addition to the sidebar via the
   conference notification service.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


               Figure 23: External Sidebar Messaging Details

6.8.  Floor control using sidebars

   Floor control with sidebars can be used to realize conferencing
   scenario such as an analyst briefing.  In this scenario, the
   conference call has a panel of speakers who are allowed to talk in
   the main conference.  The other participants are the analysts, who
   are not allowed to speak unless they have the floor.  To request
   access to the floor, they have to join a new sidebar with the
   moderator and ask their question.  The moderator can also whisper to
   each analyst what their status/position in the floor control queue,
   similar to the example in Figure 26.  It should be noted that other
   mechanisms which don't make use of sidebars could be used for floor
   control such as those detailed in BFCP.  [Editor's note: Should we
   add detailed flows for BFCP to this document and show additional
   floor control scenarios?

   Figure 24 provides an example of the configuration involved for this
   type of conference.  As in the previous sidebar examples, there is
   the main conference along with a sidebar.  "Alice" and "Bob" are the
   main participants in the conference, with "A1", "A2" and "A3"
   representing the analysts.  The sidebar remains active throughout the
   conference, with the moderator, "Carol", serving as the chair.  As
   discussed previously, the sidebar conference is NOT independent of
   the active conference (i.e., parent).  The analysts are provided the
   conference object ID associated with the active sidebar when they
   join the main conference.  The conferencing system also allocates a
   conference ID to be used for any subsequent manipulations of the
   sidebar conference.  The conferencing system maintains the mapping
   between this conference ID and the conference object ID associated
   with the active sidebar conference through the conference instance.
   The analysts are permanently muted while in the main conference.  The
   analysts are moved to the sidebar when they wish to speak.  Only one
   analyst is given the floor at a given time.  All participants in the
   main conference receive audio from the sidebar conference, as well as
   audio provided by the panelists in the main conference.






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      (To Be added).



                  Figure 24: Floor Control with sidebars

   1.  "A1" wishes to ask a question, so he sends a Floor Request
   message to the floor control server.

   2.  Upon receipt of the request, the floor control server notifies
   the moderator, "Carol" of the active sidebar conference, whose
   serving as the floor chair.

   3.  Since no other analysts have yet requested the floor, "Carol"
   indicates to the floor control server that "A1" may be granted the
   floor.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


                Figure 25: Floor Control Messaging Details

6.9.  Whispering or Private Messages

   The case of private messages can be handled as a sidebar with just
   two participants, similar to the example in section Section 6.6, but
   rather than using audio within the sidebar, "Alice" could add an
   additional text based media stream to the sidebar.  The other
   context, referred to as whisper, in this document refers to
   situations involving one time media targetted to specific user(s).
   An example of a whisper would be an announcement injected only to the
   conference chair or to a new participant joining a conference.

   Figure 26 provides an example of one user "Alice" whose chairing a
   fixed length conference with "Bob" and "Carol".  The configuration is
   such that only the chair is providing a warning when there is only 10
   minutes left in the conference.  At that time, "Alice" is moved into
   a sidebar created by the conferencing system and only "Alice"
   receives the announcement.




          (To Be completed).





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                            Figure 26: Whisper

   1.  When the conferencing system determines that there is only 10
   minutes left in the conference which "Alice" is chairing, the
   conferencing system directly creates an active sidebar conference,
   based on the active conference associated with "Alice".  This sidebar
   conference is NOT independent of the active conference (i.e.,
   parent).  The conferencing system also allocates a conference ID to
   be used for any subsequent manipulations of the sidebar conference.

   2.  Immediately upon creation of the active sidebar conference, the
   announcement media is provided to "Alice".  Depending upon the
   policies, Alice may be notified of her addition to the sidebar via
   the conference notification service.  "Alice" continues to receive
   the media from the main conference.

   3.  Upon completion of the announcement, "Alice" is removed from the
   siebar and the sidebar conference is deleted.

   4.  "Alice" is notified of her removal from the sidebar via the
   conference notification service.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


                   Figure 27: Whisper Messaging Details

6.10.  Observing and Coaching

   An example of observing and coaching is shown in figure Figure 28.
   In this example, call center agent "Bob" is involved in a conference
   with customer "Carol".  Since "Bob" is a new agent and "Alice" sees
   that he has been on the call with "Carol" for longer than normal, she
   decides to observe the call and coach "Bob" as necessary.



                           (Figure not available yet).


      Figure 28: Supervisor Creating a Sidebar for Observing/Coaching

   Upon receipt of the Conference Control Protocol request from "Alice"
   to "reserve" a new sidebar conference, based upon the active
   conference received in the request, the conferencing system uses the
   received active conference to clone a conference reservation for the



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   sidebar.  The conferencing system also reserves or allocates a
   conference ID to be used for any subsequent protocol requests from
   any of the members of the conference.  The conferencing system
   maintains the mapping between this conference ID and the conference
   object ID associated with the sidebar reservation through the
   conference instance.

   Upon receipt of the conference control protocol response to reserve
   the conference, "Alice" can now create an active conference using
   that reservation or create additional reservations based upon the
   existing reservations.  In this example, "Alice" wants only "Bob" to
   be involved in the sidebar, thus she manipulates the membership.
   "Alice" also wants the audio to be received by herself and "Bob" from
   the original conference, but wants any outgoing audio from herself to
   be restricted to the participants in the sidebar, whereas "Bob's"
   outgoing audio should go to the main conference, so that both "Alice"
   and the customer "Carol" hear the same audio from "Bob".  "Alice"
   sends a conference control protocol request to update the information
   in the reservation and to create an active conference.

   Upon receipt of the conference control protocol request to update the
   reservation and to create an active conference for the sidebar, as
   identified by the conference object ID, the conferencing system
   ensures that "Alice" has the appropriate authority based on the
   policies associated with that specific conference object to perform
   the operation.  Based upon the addressing information provided for
   "Bob" by "Alice", the call signaling to add "Bob" to the sidebar with
   the appropriate media characteristics is instigated through the
   Focus.

   "Bob" is notified of his addition to the sidebar via the conference
   notification service, thus he is aware that "Alice" the supervisor is
   available for coaching him through this call.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


            Figure 29: Coaching and Observing Messaging details


7.  Removing participants and deleting conferences

   The following scenarios detail the basic operations associated with
   removing participants from conferences and entirely deleting
   conferences.  The examples assume that a conference has already been
   correctly established, with media, if applicable, per one of the



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   examples in Section 5.

7.1.  Removing a Party

   Figure 30 provides an example of one client "Alice" removing another
   participant "Bob" from a conference.  This example assumes an
   established conference with "Alice", "Bob", "Claire" and "Duck".  In
   this example, "Alice" wants to remove "Bob" from the conference so
   that the group can continue in the same conference without "Bob"'s
   participation.


                           (Figure not available yet).


       Figure 30: Client Manipulation of Conference - Remove a party

   1.  Upon receipt of the confUsersRequest message, with a "change"
   operation to remove "Bob" from the "allowed-users-list" for the
   conference identified by the "confObjID" in the request, the
   conferencing system ensures that "Alice" has the appropriate
   authority based on the policies associated with that specific
   conference object to perform the operation.

   2.  Based upon the addressing and media information in the conference
   object for "Bob" in the "user" element, the conferencing system
   instigates the process to remove "Bob" (e.g., the call signaling to
   remove "Bob" from the conference is instigated through the Focus).
   In addition, the "conference-info" in the conference object is
   modified to remove "Bob" from the "users" list.

   3.  Once the call signaling indicates that "Bob" has been
   successfully removed from the specific conference, per updates to the
   state, and depending upon the policies, other participants (including
   "Bob") may be notified of the removal of "Bob" from the conference
   via the Conference Notification Service.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


            Figure 31: Removing a Participant Messaging Details








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7.2.  Deleting a Conference

   Details to be added.


                           (Figure not available yet).


                     Figure 32: Deleting a conference

   (Text description to be added).



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet).


            Figure 33: Deleting a Conference Messaging Details


8.  Additional Conference Scenarios and Examples

   The following are additional scenarios making use of the XCON
   framework and associated protocols.  In some cases, these examples
   make use of some of the building block scenarios detailed in the
   previous example sections, in which case the appropriate scenario is
   referenced rather than duplicating details.  In addition, in cases
   where the scenarios make use of other protocols, as in the previous
   section, the appropriate reference in the form of a title to the
   specific flow in the appropriate protocol document is included.

8.1.  Chat

   The chat functionality described in this section of the document
   allows clients that use the XCON framework and protocols for other
   media types (e.g. voice/video) to utilize the same conference control
   mechanisms and conferencing system to establish, update and delete a
   conference instance associated with an Instant Messaging (IM) chat
   session, independent of the IM chat protocol.  In some cases(e.g.,
   Message Session Relay Protocol (MSRP) chat), this would provide
   additional capabilities, such as sidebars.  This approach also allows
   the conferencing system to provide a natural interworking point for
   various IM protocols, the details of the interworking are outside the
   scope of this document.

   An IM client wishing to join a conference uses standardized
   centralized conferencing mechanisms for creating and joining a
   conference, as identified in the previous sections.  The request to



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   send an IM to an IM media session is specific to the IM protocol
   (e.g., MSRP SEND), just as there is specific media control messaging
   for other types of sessions.  An IM client connecting to a
   conferencing system has a 1:1 relationship with the IM media
   signaling entity in the conferencing system.  This relationship is
   referred to as an IM session.  Further details of the correlation of
   the IM session identifiers with the XCON session identifiers is
   provided in Appendix A.  The IM media signaling entity is responsible
   for distribution of all the messages to the other participants.

   As with the other example conferences created, each IM session is
   logically associated with a specific conference.  The conference
   itself has a specific identifier in the form of the XCON-URI, which
   is passed in the "confObjID" element in the CCMP messages.  This
   provides the relevant association between IM session and a
   centralized conference.

   An IM client wishing to delete a chat room uses standardized
   mechanisms for deleting a conference instance, such as those detailed
   in Section 7.2.

8.1.1.  Basic Chat Operations

   This section provides details of the realization of the Multi-party
   IM (chat) within the context of the centralized conferencing
   framework.  A brief discussion and diagrams are provided for
   creating, joining, and deleting a chat based conference.  The
   discovery of chat rooms available on a specific conferencing system
   is inherent in the blueprint capability provided by the conferencing
   system.  The objective of this section is to further illustrate the
   model, mechanisms and protocols presented in the previous sections
   and also serves to validate that the model, mechanisms and protocols
   are sufficient to support IM chat.

   It should be noted that not all entities impacted by the request are
   shown in the diagram (e.g., Focus), but rather the emphasis is on the
   new entities introduced by this centralized conferencing framework.
   [Editor's Note: Ideally, this section will be updated with details
   once the protocol is agreed.]

8.1.1.1.  Creating a Chat Room

   There are different ways to create a conference.  A participant can
   create a conference using call signaling means only, such as SIP, as
   detailed in [RFC4579].  For a conferencing client to have more
   flexibility in defining the charaterisitics and capabilities of a
   chat based conference, a conferencing client would implement a
   conference control protocol client.  By using a conference control



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   protocol, the client can determine the capabilities of a conferencing
   system and its various resources.

   Figure 34 provides an example of one client "Alice" determining the
   conference blueprints available to support various types of chat
   rooms for a particular conferencing system and creating a chat based
   conference using the desired blueprint.



      Details to be added.




                  Figure 34: Client Creation of Chat room

   Upon receipt of the Conference Control Protocol request for
   blueprints associated with chat rooms, the conferencing system would
   first authenticate "Alice" (and allocate a conference user
   identifier, if necessary) and then ensure that "Alice" has the
   appropriate authority based on system policies to receive any chat
   room based blueprints supported by that system.  Any blueprints that
   "Alice" is authorized to use are returned in a response, along with
   the conference user ID.

   Upon receipt of the Conference Control Protocol response containing
   the blueprints, "Alice" determines which blueprint to use for the
   conference to be created.  "Alice" creates a conference object based
   on the blueprint (i.e., clones) and modifies applicable fields, such
   as membership list, topic details, and start time.  "Alice" then
   sends a request to the conferencing system to create a conference
   reservation based upon the updated blueprint.

   Upon receipt of the Conference Control Protocol request to "create" a
   conference based upon the blueprint in the request, the conferencing
   system ensures that the blueprint received is a valid blueprint (i.e.
   the values of the various field are within range).  The conferencing
   system determines the appropriate read/write access of any users to
   be added to a conference based on this blueprint (using membership,
   roles, etc.).  The conferencing system uses the received blueprint to
   clone a conference reservation.  The conferencing system also
   reserves or allocates a conference ID to be used for any subsequent
   protocol requests from any of the members of the conference.  The
   conferencing system maintains the mapping between this conference ID
   and the conference object ID associated with the reservation through
   the conference instance.




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   Upon receipt of the conference control protocol response to reserve
   the conference, "Alice" now creates an active chat room using that
   reservation.  "Alice" provides the conference information, including
   the necessary conference ID, to desired participants to allow them to
   join the chat room.  "Alice" may also add other users to the chat
   room.  When the first participant, including "Alice", requests to be
   added to the conference, an active conference and focus are created.
   The focus is associated with the conference ID received in the
   request.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet.
          Plan is to reference detailed flows in
          previous sections and add MSRP messaging
          in the example.)


              Figure 35: Chatroom Creation Messaging Details

8.1.1.2.  Joining a Chat Room

   A participant can join and leave the conference using call signaling
   means only, such as SIP.  However, in order to perform richer
   conference control a user client can implement a conference control
   protocol client.  By using a conference control protocol, the client
   can affect its own state and the state of other participants,
   depending upon policies, which may indirectly affect the state of any
   of the conference participants.

   In the example in section Section 8.1.1.1, "Alice" has reserved a
   chat room .  "Alice" has also already joined the conference and made
   the chat room active.  "Alice" can either add additional participants
   to the chat room or provide the conference information, including the
   necessary conference ID, to desired participants and allow them to
   request to join themselves.  Any participants that have the authority
   to manipulate the conference would receive the conference object
   identifier of the active conference object in the response to their
   request to join.

   Figure 36 provides an example of "Bob" joining the chat room using
   the conference ID provided by "Alice" (e.g., in an IM).



     Details to be added.





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                      Figure 36: Joining a chat room

   Upon receipt of the Conference Control Protocol request to "add" a
   party ("Bob") in the specific conference as identified by the
   conference object ID, the conferencing system must determine whether
   "Bob" is already a user of this conferencing system or whether he is
   a new user.  If "Bob" is a new user for this conferencing system, a
   Conference User Identifier is created for Bob. The conferencing
   system must also ensure that "Bob" has the appropriate authority
   based on the policies associated with that specific conference object
   to perform the operation.

   Once "Bob" has been successfully added to the chat room, a response
   is sent to "Bob".  Depending upon the policies, other participants
   (including "Bob") may be notified of the addition of "Bob" to the
   conference via the Conference Notification Service.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet.
         Plan is to reference detailed flows in
          previous sections as appropriate and add MSRP messaging
          in the example.)


                Figure 37: Chatroom Join Messaging Details

8.1.1.3.  Deleting a Chat Room

   Depending upon the conferencing system policies and policies specific
   to the chat room, the creator of the chat would typically be the
   participant authorized to delete the chat room.

   In the example in section Section 8.1.1.1, "Alice" has created a chat
   room and provided the conference information, including the necessary
   conference ID, to desired participants and allow them to request to
   join themselves.  "Bob" and others are participants in the chat.
   Figure 38 provides an example of "Alice" later deleting this same
   chat room.


   Details to be added.


                      Figure 38: Deleting a chat room

   Upon receipt of the Conference Control Protocol request to "delete"
   the specific chat room as identified by the conference object ID, the



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   conferencing system must determine whether "Alice" has the authority
   to delete this conference.  Since "Alice" is the creator of the
   conference, the "delete" operation is performed, with the appropriate
   signaling sent to the participants, including a response to "Alice"
   indicating that the chat room has been deleted.

   One step in the deletion of the chat room may include notifitying the
   participants (including "Bob") that they have been removed via the
   Conference Notification Service.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet.
          Plan is to reference detailed flows in
          previous sections and add MSRP messaging
          in the example.)


              Figure 39: Chatroom Deletion Messaging Details

8.1.2.  Additional Operations

   This section discusses additional operations or features required to
   provide chat room functionality.  Most of the operations are not
   explicitly specified in the centralized conferencing framework.
   However, some of the features and operations are achievable using
   data maintained by a conferencing system based on the framework.

8.1.2.1.  Nicknames

   Nicknames allow a user to define a text string that uniquely
   identifies the user within a particular chatroom without necessarily
   reflecting any protocol specific identity (e.g., SIP URI, Conference
   User Indentifier, etc.).  It is also important to note that the
   functionality to provide nicknames is not limited to users involved
   in chatrooms, thus it should be a general feature of the conferencing
   system.  However, the mechanism to allow a user to negotiate a
   nickname with a conferencing system is additional functionality
   beyond the centralized conferencing framework, and thus is described
   in [ref:TBD].

   Within a conferencing system, all nicknames should map to a
   conference user identifier.  There may be multiple nicknames
   associated with a single conference user identifier (e.g., a user
   that has different nicknames for different chat rooms and/or voice/
   video conferences).





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8.1.2.2.  Logging

   A common chat feature involves logging the history of a chat room.
   This provides a record of a chat room that can be used when a user
   first joins a chat room as discussed in Section 8.1.2.3.  It can also
   be used to provide a complete capture of a specific chat room
   session.  The centralized conferencing framework does not fully
   describe the role of recording or logging of active conferences.
   However, this functionality can be realized with the manipulation of
   the appropriate elements in the data model using the general
   conference control protocol operations.  One approach for
   implementing this function would be to have it be based on specific
   manipulation of the conference by a user with the appropriate
   permissions (e.g., CHANGE operation to start and stop recording).
   Another mechanism for implementing this function would be to have a
   specific user as part of the conference to perform this function, by
   defining a specific role such as "observer" and having the media
   proxied to a logging device.

8.1.2.3.  History

   A common chat feature allows users to view the past history of chat
   rooms.  This operation is common when a user first joins a chat room
   that is underway.  A user is often offered the option to review a
   specific number of past messages.  Conferencing systems that maintain
   the history associated with specific chat rooms through logging, as
   described in Section 8.1.2.2, should provide a mechanism, using the
   conference identifier, to access the specific information requested
   by a user based on a specific timestamp.  The user request for the
   information and the rendering of the information is specific to the
   user's session based messaging protocol and may not be supported by
   all the messaging protocols.

8.1.2.4.  Indicating Alternate Venue

   Another chat room feature provides the details of an alternate chat
   room venue for previously active chat rooms that have been closed,
   with a related topic.  While not detailed in the centralized
   conferencing framework, this functionality can be accomplished by
   creating the new chat room as a child or sibling of the previous chat
   room and providing the Active chat conference object identifier to
   any valid users that attempt to join a previous chat room.  The
   information about the new chat room can also be provided at the end
   of a chat room that is being de-activated at the end of the session.







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8.1.3.  Advanced Operations

   This section provides details of the realization of advanced chat
   features, such as sidebars and private messages, within the context
   of the centralized conferencing framework.  As with Section 8.1.1,
   the objective of this section is to further illustrate the model,
   mechanisms and protocols presented in the previous sections and also
   serves to validate that the model, mechanisms and protocols are
   sufficient to support advance IM chat features.

8.1.3.1.  Text Sidebar

   The concept of a 'sidebar' in conferencing system is fully described
   in the Sidebar section and related subsections within the
   Conferencing Scenarios Realization section of the centralized
   conferencing framework document [RFC5239].  The creation,
   manipulation and deletion of sidebars for chat rooms follows the same
   principles.

   A conference object representing a sidebar is created by cloning the
   parent associated with the existing conference and updating any
   information specific to the sidebar.  A sidebar conference object is
   implicitly linked to the parent conference object (i.e. it is not an
   independent object) and is associated with the parent conference
   object identifier.  A conferencing system manages and enforces the
   parent and appropriate localized restrictions on the sidebar
   conference object (e.g., no members from outside the parent
   conference instance can join, sidebar conference can not exist if
   parent conference is terminated, etc.).

   Figure 40 provides an example of one client "Alice" involved in
   active chat room with "Bob" and "Carol".  "Alice" wants to create a
   sidebar to have a side discussion with "Bob" while still receiving
   the session based messaging associated with the main chat room.
   Whether the text is interleaved with the main chat or whether a
   separate window is created for the sidebar is implementation
   specific.  "Alice" initiates the sidebar by sending a request to the
   conferencing system to create a conference chat reservation based
   upon the active chat conference object.  "Alice" and "Bob" would
   remain on the roster of the main conference, such that other
   participants could be aware of their participation in the main
   conference, while the text sidebar conference is occurring.




       Details to be added.




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            Figure 40: Client Creation of a Sidebar Conference

   Upon receipt of the Conference Control Protocol request to "reserve"
   a new sidebar chat conference, based upon the active chat conference
   received in the request, the conferencing system uses the received
   active chat conference to clone a conference chat reservation for the
   sidebar.  As discussed previously, the sidebar reservation is NOT
   independent of the active conference (i.e., parent).  The
   conferencing system also reserves or allocates a conference ID to be
   used for any subsequent protocol requests from any of the members of
   the conference.  The conferencing system maintains the mapping
   between this conference ID and the conference object ID associated
   with the sidebar reservation through the conference instance.

   Upon receipt of the conference control protocol response to reserve
   the conference, "Alice" can now create an active chat conference
   using that reservation or create additional reservations based upon
   the existing reservations.  In this example, "Alice" wants only "Bob"
   to be involved in the sidebar, thus she manipulates the membership.
   "Alice" also only wants the text from the original conference, but
   wants the text within the sidebar to be restricted to the
   participants in the sidebar.  "Alice" sends a conference control
   protocol request to update the information in the reservation and to
   create an active conference.

   Upon receipt of the conference control protocol request to update the
   reservation and to create an active chat conference for the sidebar,
   as identified by the conference object ID, the conferencing system
   ensures that "Alice" has the appropriate authority based on the
   policies associated with that specific conference object to perform
   the operation.  The conferencing system must also validate the
   updated information in the reservation, ensuring that a member like
   "Bob" is already a user of this conferencing system.

   Depending upon the policies, the initiator of the request (i.e.,
   "Alice") and the participants in the sidebar (i.e., "Bob") may be
   notified of his addition to the sidebar via the conference
   notification service.



                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet.
          Plan is to reference detailed flows in
          previous sections.)


               Figure 41: Chatroom Sidebar Messaging Details




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8.1.3.2.  Private Message

   The case of private messages can be handled as a sidebar with just
   two participants, identical to the example in section
   Section 8.1.3.1.  The other context, referred to as whisper, in this
   document refers to situations involving one time media targetted to
   specific user(s).  An example of a whisper would be a text message
   injected only to the conference chair or to a new participant joining
   a conference.

   Figure 42 provides an example of one user "Alice" who's chairing a
   fixed length conference with "Bob" and "Carol".  The configuration is
   such that only the chair is providing a warning when there is only 10
   minutes left in the conference.  At that time, "Alice" is moved into
   a sidebar created by the conferencing system and only "Alice"
   receives that text message announcing the 10 minute warning.




         Details to be added.


                            Figure 42: Whisper

   When the conferencing system determines that there is only 10 minutes
   left in the conference which "Alice" is chairing, rather than
   creating a reservation as was done for the sidebar in
   Section 8.1.3.1, the conferencing system directly creates an active
   chat sidebar conference, based on the active chat conference
   associated with "Alice".  As discussed previously, the sidebar
   conference is NOT independent of the active conference (i.e.,
   parent).  The conferencing system also allocates a conference ID to
   be used for any subsequent manipulations of the sidebar chat
   conference.  The conferencing system maintains the mapping between
   this conference ID and the conference object ID associated with the
   active sidebar conference through the conference instance.

   Immediately upon creation of the active chat sidebar conference, the
   text announcement is provided to "Alice".  Depending upon the
   policies, Alice may be notified of her addition to the sidebar via
   the conference notification service.  "Alice" continues to receive
   the text messages from the main conference.

   Upon delivery of the text announcement, "Alice" is removed from the
   sidebar and the sidebar conference is deleted.  Depending upon the
   policies, "Alice" may be notified of her removal from the sidebar via
   the conference notification service.



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                           (CCMP Messaging details not available yet.
          Plan is to reference detailed flows in
          previous sections.)


               Figure 43: Chatroom Sidebar Messaging Details


9.  IANA Considerations

   This document has no IANA considerations.


10.  Security Considerations

   The security considerations applicable to the implementation of these
   call flows is documented in the XCON Framework, with additional
   security considerations documented in the CCMP document.  Where
   applicable, statements with regards to the necessary security are
   discussed in particular flows, however, since this is only an
   informational document, readers are strongly recommended to carefully
   consider the security considerations defined in the XCON Framework
   and the CCMP document.


11.  Change Summary

   The following are the major changes between the 00 and the 01
   versions of the draft:

   o  TBD based on WG feedback.



12.  Acknowledgements

   The detailed content for this document is derived from the prototype
   work of Lorenzo Miniero, Simon Pietro-Romano, Tobia Castaldi and
   their colleagues at the University of Napoli.


13.  References

13.1.  Normative References

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.




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   [RFC5239]  Barnes, M., Boulton, C., and O. Levin, "A Framework for
              Centralized Conferencing", RFC 5239, June 2008.

   [I-D.ietf-xcon-ccmp]
              Barnes, M., Boulton, C., Romano, S., and H. Schulzrinne,
              "Centralized Conferencing Manipulation Protocol",
              draft-ietf-xcon-ccmp-00 (work in progress), June 2008.

13.2.  Informative References

   [RFC3261]  Rosenberg, J., Schulzrinne, H., Camarillo, G., Johnston,
              A., Peterson, J., Sparks, R., Handley, M., and E.
              Schooler, "SIP: Session Initiation Protocol", RFC 3261,
              June 2002.

   [RFC3264]  Rosenberg, J. and H. Schulzrinne, "An Offer/Answer Model
              with Session Description Protocol (SDP)", RFC 3264,
              June 2002.

   [RFC3550]  Schulzrinne, H., Casner, S., Frederick, R., and V.
              Jacobson, "RTP: A Transport Protocol for Real-Time
              Applications", STD 64, RFC 3550, July 2003.

   [RFC4574]  Levin, O. and G. Camarillo, "The Session Description
              Protocol (SDP) Label Attribute", RFC 4574, August 2006.

   [RFC4145]  Yon, D. and G. Camarillo, "TCP-Based Media Transport in
              the Session Description Protocol (SDP)", RFC 4145,
              September 2005.

   [RFC4579]  Johnston, A. and O. Levin, "Session Initiation Protocol
              (SIP) Call Control - Conferencing for User Agents",
              BCP 119, RFC 4579, August 2006.

   [RFC4597]  Even, R. and N. Ismail, "Conferencing Scenarios",
              RFC 4597, August 2006.

   [RFC4582]  Camarillo, G., Ott, J., and K. Drage, "The Binary Floor
              Control Protocol (BFCP)", RFC 4582, November 2006.

   [RFC5018]  Camarillo, G., "Connection Establishment in the Binary
              Floor Control Protocol (BFCP)", RFC 5018, September 2007.

   [I-D.ietf-xcon-event-package]
              Camarillo, G., Srinivasan, S., Even, R., and J.
              Urpalainen, "Conference Event Package Data Format
              Extension for Centralized Conferencing  (XCON)",
              draft-ietf-xcon-event-package-00 (work in progress),



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              February 2008.

   [I-D.ietf-xcon-common-data-model]
              Novo, O., Camarillo, G., Morgan, D., and R. Even,
              "Conference Information Data Model for Centralized
              Conferencing (XCON)", draft-ietf-xcon-common-data-model-11
              (work in progress), June 2008.

   [I-D.miniero-mediactrl-escs]
              Amirante, A., Castaldi, T., Miniero, L., and S. Romano,
              "Media Control Channel Framework (CFW) Call Flow
              Examples", draft-miniero-mediactrl-escs-02 (work in
              progress), June 2008.

   [I-D.ietf-mediactrl-architecture]
              Melanchuk, T., "An Architectural Framework for Media
              Server Control", draft-ietf-mediactrl-architecture-03
              (work in progress), April 2008.

   [I-D.ietf-mediactrl-sip-control-framework]
              Boulton, C., Melanchuk, T., and S. McGlashan, "Media
              Control Channel Framework",
              draft-ietf-mediactrl-sip-control-framework-02 (work in
              progress), April 2008.

   [I-D.boulton-mmusic-sdp-control-package-attribute]
              Boulton, C., "A Session Description Protocol (SDP) Control
              Package Attribute",
              draft-boulton-mmusic-sdp-control-package-attribute-02
              (work in progress), February 2008.

   [I-D.boulton-ivr-control-package]
              Boulton, C., Melanchuk, T., and S. McGlashan, "A Basic
              Interactive Voice Response (IVR) Control Package for the
              Media  Control Channel Framework",
              draft-boulton-ivr-control-package-06 (work in progress),
              February 2008.

   [I-D.boulton-conference-control-package]
              Boulton, C., Melanchuk, T., McGlashan, S., and A.
              Shiratzky, "A Conference Control Package for the Media
              Control Channel Framework",
              draft-boulton-conference-control-package-04 (work in
              progress), February 2008.

   [I-D.miniero-bfcp-control-package]
              Miniero, L., Amirante, A., Castaldi, T., and S. Romano, "A
              Binary Floor Control Protocol (BFCP) Control Package for



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              the Session  Initiation Protocol (SIP)",
              draft-miniero-bfcp-control-package-00 (work in progress),
              February 2008.

   [RFC2810]  Kalt, C., "Internet Relay Chat: Architecture", RFC 2810,
              April 2000.

   [RFC3920]  Saint-Andre, P., Ed., "Extensible Messaging and Presence
              Protocol (XMPP): Core", RFC 3920, October 2004.

   [RFC4353]  Rosenberg, J., "A Framework for Conferencing with the
              Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)", RFC 4353,
              February 2006.

   [RFC4975]  Campbell, B., Mahy, R., and C. Jennings, "The Message
              Session Relay Protocol (MSRP)", RFC 4975, September 2007.

   [I-D.ietf-simple-chat]
              Niemi, A., Garcia-Martin, M., and G. Sandbakken, "Multi-
              party Instant Message (IM) Sessions Using the Message
              Session Relay  Protocol (MSRP)", draft-ietf-simple-chat-02
              (work in progress), February 2008.


Appendix A.  IM Chat and Conferencing Identifier Relationships

   When referring to IM session ID's this document is making reference
   to the locally (at conferencing system) generated session ID used for
   IM session signaling identification.  In the case of MSRP, this
   session ID is inserted into the local path SDP attribute.  An
   important concept is the creation and management of IM sessions.  It
   is important that each IM session created, as identified by a unique
   IM session ID, is explicitly tied to an associated conference,
   represented by the conference identifier, represented by the
   "confObjID" in the protocol and data model.  This provides the
   relevant association between IM session and a centralized conference.
   A generic example representation is illustrated by the rows contained
   in Figure 44.



             -------------------------------------------
             |           Conference Identifier         |
             -------------------------------------------
             |         IM Session  ID=8asjdhk          |
             |         IM Session  ID=38iuhds          |
             |         IM Session  ID=djiowid          |
             |         IM Session  ID=389hewu          |



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       -------------------------------------------



                   Figure 44: Simple Session Association

   When a user joins a conference instance through the signaling
   protocol, it is allocated an appropriate conference user identifer
   either through authentication or system allocation.  The conference
   user identifer MUST be used in conjunction with an IM session
   identifier to internally represent a participant in a conference
   instance.  Figure 44 is then expanded to look like Figure 45.  Again
   a row in the table representing a single entry.



   ----------------------------------------------------------------
   |                 Conference Identifier                        |
   ----------------------------------------------------------------
   |         IM Session ID=8asjdhk  |  confUserID=839ULjj         |
   |         IM Session ID=38iuhds  |  confUserID=0283hHu         |
   |         IM Session ID=djiowid  |  confUserID=ncH37H          |
   |         IM Session ID=389hewu  |  confUserID=pakdjjH         |
   ----------------------------------------------------------------



                  Figure 45: Advanced Session Association

   A more complex session association is necessary due to potential for
   a user to have multiple IM sessions in a single conference instance,
   such as multi-lingual conference support.  In an example with SIP and
   MSRP, the conference representation in Figure 45 allows for such
   functionality when separate SIP dialogs represent MSRP sessions.
   This process becomes complex when multiple SDP MSRP media sessions
   (m=) are defined in a single payload.  This internal representation
   now needs expanding to enable a conferencing system to explicitly
   associate a media session (m=).  This involves including the media
   label, as defined in [RFC4574], to maintain the internal conference
   association.  An example is illustrated in Figure 46.











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   ---------------------------------------------------------------------
   |                  Conference Identifier                            |
   ---------------------------------------------------------------------
   | MSRP Session ID=8asjdhk  | Conf User ID=839ULjj | Label=iede3     |
   | MSRP Session ID=38iuhds  | Conf User ID=0283hHu | Label=8heus     |
   | MSRP Session ID=838unaH  | Conf User ID=0283hHu | Label=3cnu7     |
   | MSRP Session ID=djiowid  | Conf User ID=ncH37Hs | Label=jd38J     |
   | MSRP Session ID=389hewu  | Conf User ID=pakdj7H | Label=U83hd     |
   | MSRP Session ID=Ko03jdk  | Conf User ID=pakdj7H | Label=ehy3h     |
   ---------------------------------------------------------------------



           Figure 46: Advanced Session Association + Media Label

   In Figure 46, conference user identifiers '0283hHu' and 'pakdj7H'
   appear twice.  The combination of multiple conference user
   identifiers and a unique MSRP session ID enables the conference
   system to clearly identify a specific MSRP instance.  The
   representation also includes the media label, as defined in
   [RFC4574],for identification purposes.  This added property, which is
   extracted from the SDP media line, enables clear identification when
   multi SDP media (m=) lines appear in the same SDP payload.

   A client MUST include the media label attribute defined in [RFC4574]
   when including multiple MSRP sessions in the same SDP payload.  Even
   in the simplest conferencing system, where users are allowed to enter
   anonymously, the internal representation described in this section
   should be observed.  In this case, the conferencing system would
   still internally create a conference user identifier for participant
   reference purposes.


Authors' Addresses

   Mary Barnes
   Nortel
   2201 Lakeside Blvd
   Richardson, TX

   Email: mary.barnes@nortel.com










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   Chris Boulton
   Avaya
   Building 3
   Wern Fawr Lane
   St Mellons
   Cardiff, South Wales  CF3 5EA

   Email: cboulton@avaya.com


   Lorenzo Miniero
   University of Napoli
   Via Claudio 21
   Napoli  80125
   Italy

   Email: lorenzo.miniero@unina.it


   Simon Pietro Romano
   University of Napoli
   Via Claudio 21
   Napoli  80125
   Italy

   Email: spromano@unina.it

























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Full Copyright Statement

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