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IPPM                                                         M. Cociglio
Internet-Draft                                                   M. Nilo
Intended status: Informational                             F. Bulgarella
Expires: April 30, 2021                             Telecom Italia (TIM)
                                                             G. Fioccola
                                                     Huawei Technologies
                                                        October 27, 2020


                    User Devices Explicit Monitoring
          draft-cnbf-ippm-user-devices-explicit-monitoring-00

Abstract

   This document describes a methodology to monitor network performance
   exploiting user devices.  This can be achieved using the Explicit
   Flow Measurement Techniques, protocol independent methods that employ
   few marking bits, inside the header of each packet, for loss and
   delay measurement.  User devices and servers, marking the traffic,
   signal these metrics to intermediate network observers allowing them
   to measure connection performance, and to locate the network segment
   where impairments happen.  In addition or in alternative to network
   observers, a probe can be installed on the user device with
   remarkable benefits in terms of hardware deployment and measurement
   scalability.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
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   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
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   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 30, 2021.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2020 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.




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   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Notational Conventions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   3.  Explicit Performance Open Issues  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Explicit Performance Probes on User Devices . . . . . . . . .   3
   5.  Device Owner Activates Explicit Performance Measurement . . .   3
   6.  Who Will Handle the Performance Data? . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   7.  The Explicit Performance App  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   9.  Privacy Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   10. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   11. Change Log  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   12. Contributors  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   13. Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   14. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     14.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     14.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6

1.  Introduction

   Explicit Performance Monitoring enables a passive observer (a probe)
   to measure delay and loss just watching the marking (a few header
   bits) of live traffic packets.  It works on client-server protocols:
   e.g.  QUIC [QUIC-TRANSPORT], TCP [TCP].  The different methods are
   described in [EXPLICIT-FLOW-MEASUREMENTS].

   This document explains how to employ the methods described in
   [EXPLICIT-FLOW-MEASUREMENTS] by proposing the user device as a
   convenient place for the Explicit Performance Observer.

2.  Notational Conventions

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].




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3.  Explicit Performance Open Issues

   There are some open issues to consider for the deployment of
   [EXPLICIT-FLOW-MEASUREMENTS]:

   -  Who decides whether to mark traffic?  Explicit measures only work
      if both the server and the client mark the production traffic.

   -  What about scalability?  Could network probes monitor all the
      connections?  If they cannot, which ones to choose?

   -  Which connections to monitor within the network?  Network probes
      need an effective way to identify which connections really need to
      be monitored.

   -  How to monitor both traffic directions?  Not always possible for
      network probes (asymmetric connections).

4.  Explicit Performance Probes on User Devices

   This document proposes the user device (e.g. mobile phones, PCs) as a
   convenient place where to put the Explicit Performance Observer.

   The placement of the observer on the user device helps to mitigate
   the issues reported in the previous section, in particular:

   -  The device should decide whether to mark the traffic or not.

   -  Regarding the scalability issue, on the user device there are few
      connections to monitor so it becomes less relevant.

   -  Connections eligible for monitoring should be the impaired ones.
      User devices and network probes can cooperate to achieve this
      goal.  It is possible to set alarm thresholds on the user device
      and to signal to the network probes only the sessions with
      impairments.  This allows to segment the performance measurements
      and to locate the faults.  In this way network probes, that could
      also be embedded into network nodes, have to monitor a limited
      number of connections.

   -  Monitoring both directions is always possible on the user device.

5.  Device Owner Activates Explicit Performance Measurement

   The decision whether to activate the marking (e.g.  [SPIN-BIT],
   [ANRW19-PM-QUIC], [EXPLICIT-FLOW-MEASUREMENTS]) or not should be made
   by the device owner by properly configuring the applications (e.g.




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   browsers) based on connection-oriented protocols that support
   explicit measurements (e.g.  QUIC).

   All applications should provide the activation or deactivation of
   packet marking, for example by providing a user interface or exposing
   API.

   So, during the client-server handshake, the client will decide
   whether the marking is active or not within a session and notify its
   decision to the server.

6.  Who Will Handle the Performance Data?

   Performance data are stored only on the user device or also sent to
   "external bodies" according to the will of the device owner.

   The main recipient would be the Internet Service Provider.  Indeed,
   as explained in the previous section, this enables user device and
   network probes coordination that permits an improved performance
   measurement approach.

   Moreover these data could also be of interest for the national
   regulatory authorities or others authorized subjects.

7.  The Explicit Performance App

   This methodology could be implemented with an "Explicit Performance
   App" installed on the user device.

   The App should perform the following tasks:

   -  collect user preferences;

   -  activate/deactivate marking on device Apps (e.g. browsers);

   -  implement the observer;

   -  show performances to the user;

   -  send data to the "Explicit Performance Management Center";

   -  set performance thresholds.

8.  Security Considerations

   TBD





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9.  Privacy Considerations

   TBD

10.  IANA Considerations

   This document makes no request of IANA.

11.  Change Log

   TBD

12.  Contributors

   TBD

13.  Acknowledgements

   TBD

14.  References

14.1.  Normative References

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC2119, March 1997,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2119>.

   [TCP]      Postel, J., "Transmission Control Protocol", STD 7,
              RFC 793, DOI 10.17487/RFC0793, September 1981,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc793>.

14.2.  Informative References

   [ANRW19-PM-QUIC]
              Bulgarella, F., Cociglio, M., Fioccola, G., Marchetto, G.,
              and R. Sisto, "Performance measurements of QUIC
              communications", Proceedings of the Applied Networking
              Research Workshop, DOI 10.1145/3340301.3341127, July 2019.

   [EXPLICIT-FLOW-MEASUREMENTS]
              Cociglio, M., Fioccola, G., Nilo, M., Bulgarella, F., and
              R. Sisto, "Client-Server Explicit Performance
              Measurements", draft-cfb-ippm-spinbit-measurements-02
              (work in progress), July 2020.





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   [QUIC-TRANSPORT]
              Iyengar, J. and M. Thomson, "QUIC: A UDP-Based Multiplexed
              and Secure Transport", draft-ietf-quic-transport-32 (work
              in progress), October 2020.

   [SPIN-BIT]
              Trammell, B., Vaere, P., Even, R., Fioccola, G., Fossati,
              T., Ihlar, M., Morton, A., and S. Emile, "Adding Explicit
              Passive Measurability of Two-Way Latency to the QUIC
              Transport Protocol", draft-trammell-quic-spin-03 (work in
              progress), May 2018.

Authors' Addresses

   Mauro Cociglio
   Telecom Italia (TIM)
   Via Reiss Romoli, 274
   Torino  10148
   Italy

   EMail: mauro.cociglio@telecomitalia.it


   Massimo Nilo
   Telecom Italia (TIM)
   Via Reiss Romoli, 274
   Torino  10148
   Italy

   EMail: massimo.nilo@telecomitalia.it


   Fabio Bulgarella
   Telecom Italia (TIM)
   Via Reiss Romoli, 274
   Torino  10148
   Italy

   EMail: fabio.bulgarella@guest.telecomitalia.it


   Giuseppe Fioccola
   Huawei Technologies
   Riesstrasse, 25
   Munich  80992
   Germany

   EMail: giuseppe.fioccola@huawei.com



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