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INTERNET-DRAFT                                       Donald Eastlake 3rd
UPDATES BCP 37 / RFC 2780                                       Motorola
                                                           Scott Bradner
                                                      Harvard University
Expires: October 2001                                         April 2001



                          Extended IP Versions
                          -------- -- --------
                   <draft-eastlake-ext-ip-ver-01.txt>



Status of This Document

   Distribution of this draft, which is intended to become part of Best
   Current Practice 37, is unlimited. Comments should be sent to the
   authors.

   This document is an Internet-Draft and is in full conformance with
   all provisions of Section 10 of RFC 2026.  Internet-Drafts are
   working documents of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), its
   areas, and its working groups.  Note that other groups may also
   distribute working documents as Internet-Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet- Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt

   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.



Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2001).  All Rights Reserved.



Abstract

   The current four bit Internet Protocol (IP) Version field provides
   for such a limited number of versions that very tight control must be
   exercised on their allocation as documented in [RFC 2780].
   Provisions are specified whereby one value of that field is extended
   to provide more easily allocated values.



D. Eastlake 3rd, S. Bradner                                     [Page 1]


INTERNET-DRAFT            Extended IP Versions                April 2001


Table of Contents

      Status of This Document....................................1
      Copyright Notice...........................................1
      Abstract...................................................1

      Table of Contents..........................................2

      1. Introduction............................................3
      2. Extended IP Versions....................................3
      3. IANA Considerations.....................................4
      4. Security Considerations.................................4

      References.................................................5
      Authors Addresses..........................................5

      Full Copyright Statement...................................6
      Expiration and File Name...................................6


































D. Eastlake 3rd, S. Bradner                                     [Page 2]


INTERNET-DRAFT            Extended IP Versions                April 2001


1. Introduction

   Since the begining of the Internet Protocol (IP), it has had a four
   bit version field.  This was entirely adequate in the early days when
   the Internet engineering community was tiny and went fairly rapdily
   through version 1, 2, and 3, before stabilizing on version 4 (IPv4)
   under which the Internet has prospered [RFC 791].

   A few years ago, when a need was felt for specification of a new
   version, the remaining version number space was barely adequate to
   assign versions to the main contenders, leading to the selection of
   IPv6 as the main path [RFC 2460].  Furthermore, the Internet
   engineering community has grown by over two orders of magnitude since
   the specification of IP, with IETF attendence going from 15 to 3000
   potentially increasing demand for experimental parameter values.

   To continue the successful tradition of simple free availability of
   parameter values, IP version numbers should be extended.  How
   beneficial this will be in this particular case is unclear.  But if
   the prospering of Internet Technology has taught us anything, it is
   that simple free availability of parameter values can lead to
   surprising creativity and vigor.  Perhaps this mechanism will do that
   or perhaps it will turn out to be little, like the DNS Class
   mechanism.  But the cost is small and the potential benefit hard to
   bound.

   An equivalent 4 bit IP version number can be allocated for any
   extended IP version, when warranted, under the IP version allocation
   procedure specified in [RFC 2780].



2. Extended IP Versions

   The Internet Protocol packet format is defined to begin with a four
   bit Version as follows:

    0
    0 1 2 3 4 5
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |Version|  ...
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   To extend this versioning mechanism, this document specifies that the
   version number (TBD (suggest 1)) is followed by a twelve bit
   extention as shown below.






D. Eastlake 3rd, S. Bradner                                     [Page 3]


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    0                   1                   2                   3
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   | (TBD) |   x   |        y      | ...
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   The version number is considered an unsigned integer equal to x*256 +
   y.  This produces version numbers in the range 0 to 4095 but the
   first sixteen values, 0 through 15, are reserved for future
   definition and to avoid conflict with non-extended version numbers.
   This structure causes the remainder of the IP packet to be 16 bit
   aligned.



3. IANA Considerations

   IP Version number nibble value (TBD (suggest 1)) is allocated for
   extended IP Versions as documnted herein.

   Extended IP versions 0 through 15 are reserved and required a
   "Standards Action" as defined in RFC 2434 for allocation.

   Extended IP version 16 through 4095 are to be allocated in sequential
   order based on "Specification Required" as defined in RFC 2434.



4. Security Considerations

   Firwalls or other software which wishes to pass only packets they
   understand should block all packets with extended IP versions.




















D. Eastlake 3rd, S. Bradner                                     [Page 4]


INTERNET-DRAFT            Extended IP Versions                April 2001


References

   [RFC 791] - "Internet Protocol", J. Postel, September 1981.

   [RFC 2434] - "Guidelines for Writing an IANA Considerations Section
   in RFCs", T.  Narten, H. Alvestrand, October 1998.

   [RFC 2460] - "Internet Protocol, Version 6 (IPv6) Specification",
   Deering, S. and R. Hinden, December 1998.

   [RFC 2780] - "IANA Allocation Guidelines For Values In the Internet
   Protocol and Related Headers", S. Bradner, V. Paxon, March 2000.



Authors Addresses

   Scott Bradner
   Harvard University
   Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

   Telephone:   +1 617 495 3864
   EMail:       sob@harvard.edu


   Donald E. Eastlake 3rd
   Motorola
   155 Beaver Street
   Milford, MA 01757 USA

   Telephone:   +1-508-634-2066 (h)
                +1-508-261-5434 (w)
   FAX:         +1-508-261-4447 (w)
   EMail:       Donald.Eastlake@motorola.com


















D. Eastlake 3rd, S. Bradner                                     [Page 5]


INTERNET-DRAFT            Extended IP Versions                April 2001


Full Copyright Statement

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2001).  All Rights Reserved.

   This document and translations of it may be copied and furnished to
   others, and derivative works that comment on or otherwise explain it
   or assist in its implementation may be prepared, copied, published
   and distributed, in whole or in part, without restriction of any
   kind, provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph are
   included on all such copies and derivative works.  However, this
   document itself may not be modified in any way, such as by removing
   the copyright notice or references to the Internet Society or other
   Internet organizations, except as needed for the purpose of
   developing Internet standards in which case the procedures for
   copyrights defined in the Internet Standards process must be
   followed, or as required to translate it into languages other than
   English.

   The limited permissions granted above are perpetual and will not be
   revoked by the Internet Society or its successors or assigns.

   This document and the information contained herein is provided on an
   "AS IS" basis and THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND THE INTERNET ENGINEERING
   TASK FORCE DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING
   BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION
   HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
   MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.




Expiration and File Name

   This draft expires October 2001.

   Its file name is draft-eastlake-ext-ip-ver-02.txt.
















D. Eastlake 3rd, S. Bradner                                     [Page 6]


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