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INTERNET-DRAFT                                                 N. Elkins
                                                         Inside Products
                                                            M. Ackermann
Intended Status: Informational                             BCBS Michigan
Expires: April 24, 2018                                 October 21, 2017




      Common Network Architecture for Brick and Mortar Enterprises
                draft-elkins-brickmortar-architecture-00

Abstract

   The network architecture and topology for "brick and mortar"
   enterprises differ in significant aspects from those of Internet-
   based companies.  This has implications for protocol implementations.
    By and large, the network connects to sites spread throughout a
   geographic region.  The architecture is not flat.  There may be
   multiple hops - routers, middle boxes and the like.   There may also
   be multiple carriers or ISPs involved (including internally built
   infrastructure).   The number, nature and amount of applications also
   dictate a complex topology which then dictates a complex protocol
   implementation.  Lastly, a number of these enterprises are in
   industries which are regulated.  Such regulations impact the nature
   of network design.  These considerations are discussed in this
   document.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
   other groups may also distribute working documents as
   Internet-Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
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   http://www.ietf.org/1id-abstracts.html

   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html



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Copyright and License Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors. All rights reserved.

   IETF Trust Legal Provisions of 28-dec-2009, Section 6.b(i), paragraph
   3: This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.




































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Table of Contents

   1  Background  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
     1.1 Middle Box Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
     1.2 Routing and Other Protocols Used . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     1.3 "Home-grown" Infrastructure  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     1.4 Connections to Business Partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   2 Regulatory Requirements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     2.1 End-to-End Encryption  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   3 Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   4 Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   5 IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   6 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     6.1 Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     6.2 Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   7 Acknowledgments  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6


1  Background


   The network architecture and topology for "brick and mortar"
   enterprises differ in significant aspects from those of Internet-
   based companies.   This has implications for protocol
   implementations. By and large, the network connects to sites spread
   throughout a geographic region.   The architecture is not flat.  For
   example, for an oil and gas company, the network may connect
   refineries, gas stations, storage depots, oil fields, and the like.
   The architecture is not flat.

   Within the data center as well as to the end location, there will be
   multiple hops - routers, firewall, load balancers and the like.
   Often multi-homing is done for fall back and disaster recovery.
   Hence, multiple carriers or ISPs will be involved.  Thus, the
   architecture is inherently complex -- some have routes with 10, 15 or
   even over 50 hops.

   The number, nature and amount of applications also dictate a complex
   topology which then dictates a complex protocol implementation.
   Lastly, a number of these enterprises are in industries which are
   regulated.  This means that some of the control over their
   architecture is not in their own hands.

1.1 Middle Box Usage

   Such large enterprises use Content Delivery Networks (CDNs) and NATs.
   One might wish that IPv6 was used to avoid NAT but this is not likely



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   to be the case inside the enterprise for many years.

   Other type of middle boxes are frequently used by the data center
   infrastructure.  This includes firewalls, load balancers, web
   servers, app servers,  and middleware servers.   A multi-tiered route
   is very common.

1.2 Routing and Other Protocols Used

   Within the data center, such enterprises often use OSPF, EIGRP, BGP,
   and even RIP and static routes.

1.3 "Home-grown" Infrastructure

   What is "home-grown"?  For the "brick and mortars", if they do
   anything on their own, it will be to put up hardware infrastructure.
   For example, the connectivity in the swamps (which may have oil) or
   mining locations may be quite bad.   Some companies put up, for
   example, their own microwave towers throughout the region.

   What such enterprises do NOT do was to rewrite the code for the
   routers, middle boxes, etc.

1.4 Connections to Business Partners

   Some of the most critical connections of large enterprises are to
   their business partners or regulatory bodies.  For example, many
   financial institutions in the United States connect to the Federal
   Reserve; many insurance companies connect to the Medicare or Social
   Security systems.

2 Regulatory Requirements

   Many of the "brick and mortar" enterprises are regulated by various
   legal structures such as HIPAA or PCI.  These have an impact on the
   type of architecture which can be supported.

2.1 End-to-End Encryption

   At times, there are regulatory requirements which enforce end-to-end
   encryption. For diagnostic and security purposes, it is important to
   be able to have visibility into the packets, routing and otherwise,
   so as to be able to manage the network.

   If there is a protocol which does not allow for visibility, this can
   be quite problematic.

3 Applications



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   One of the advantages that large brick and mortar enterprises had in
   the dawn of the computer age is that they began to computerize early.
   Forty or fifty years later, what was once a competitive advantage now
   carries with it some burdens.

   The number and nature of applications has multiplied greatly.
   Hundreds, if not thousands, of different applications are used.
   These range from the Stone Age (of computing) to the Space Age (of
   computing).  That is, applications from those written in the 1960's
   to those using the most current technology must be supported.

   Change can come at a glacial pace.

   Having said that, many brick and mortars still see technology as
   their competitive advantage and are trying to keep pace.

4 Security Considerations

   There are no security considerations.

5 IANA Considerations

   There are no IANA considerations.


6 References

6.1 Normative References


6.2 Informative References


7 Acknowledgments

   The authors would like to thank Steve Fenter for his comments.















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Authors' Addresses


   Nalini Elkins
   Inside Products, Inc.
   36A Upper Circle
   Carmel Valley, CA 93924
   United States
   Phone: +1 831 659 8360
   Email: nalini.elkins@insidethestack.com
   http://www.insidethestack.com




   Michael S. Ackermann
   Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan
   P.O. Box 2888
   Detroit, Michigan 48231
   United States
   Phone: +1 310 460 4080
   Email: mackermann@bcbsm.com
   http://www.bcbsm.com




























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