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Versions: (draft-lennox-avtext-lrr) 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07

Payload Working Group                                          J. Lennox
Internet-Draft                                                   D. Hong
Intended status: Standards Track                                   Vidyo
Expires: December 17, 2017                                     J. Uberti
                                                               S. Holmer
                                                              M. Flodman
                                                                  Google
                                                           June 15, 2017


         The Layer Refresh Request (LRR) RTCP Feedback Message
                        draft-ietf-avtext-lrr-06

Abstract

   This memo describes the RTCP Payload-Specific Feedback Message "Layer
   Refresh Request" (LRR), which can be used to request a state refresh
   of one or more substreams of a layered media stream.  It also defines
   its use with several RTP payloads for scalable media formats.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 17, 2017.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must



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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Conventions, Definitions and Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     2.1.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Layer Refresh Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     3.1.  Message Format  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     3.2.  Semantics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   4.  Usage with specific codecs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     4.1.  H264 SVC  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     4.2.  VP8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     4.3.  H265  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   5.  Usage with different scalability transmission mechanisms  . .  10
   6.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   7.  SDP Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   8.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13

1.  Introduction

   This memo describes an RTCP [RFC3550] Payload-Specific Feedback
   Message [RFC4585] "Layer Refresh Request" (LRR).  It is designed to
   allow a receiver of a layered media stream to request that one or
   more of its substreams be refreshed, such that it can then be decoded
   by an endpoint which previously was not receiving those layers,
   without requiring that the entire stream be refreshed (as it would be
   if the receiver sent a Full Intra Request (FIR); [RFC5104] see also
   [RFC8082]).

   The feedback message is applicable both to temporally and spatially
   scaled streams, and to both single-stream and multi-stream
   scalability modes.

2.  Conventions, Definitions and Acronyms

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].






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2.1.  Terminology

   A "Layer Refresh Point" is a point in a scalable stream after which a
   decoder, which previously had been able to decode only some (possibly
   none) of the available layers of stream, is able to decode a greater
   number of the layers.

   For spatial (or quality) layers, layer refresh typically requires
   that a spatial layer be encoded in a way that references only lower-
   layer subpictures of the current picture, not any earlier pictures of
   that spatial layer.  Additionally, the encoder must promise that no
   earlier pictures of that spatial layer will be used as reference in
   the future.

   In a layer refresh, however, other layers than the ones requested for
   refresh may still maintain dependency on earlier content of the
   stream.  This is the difference between a layer refresh and a Full
   Intra Request [RFC5104].  This minimizes the coding overhead of
   refresh to only those parts of the stream that actually need to be
   refreshed at any given time.

   An illustration of spatial layer refresh of an enhancement layer is
   shown below.

        ... <--  S1  <--  S1       S1  <--  S1  <-- ...
                  |        |        |        |
                 \/       \/       \/       \/
        ... <--  S0  <--  S0  <--  S0  <--  S0  <-- ...

                  1        2        3        4

                                 Figure 1

   In Figure 1, frame 3 is a layer refresh point for spatial layer S1; a
   decoder which had previously only been decoding spatial layer S0
   would be able to decode layer S1 starting at frame 3.

   An illustration of spatial layer refresh of a base layer is shown
   below.

        ... <--  S1  <--  S1  <--  S1  <--  S1  <-- ...
                  |        |        |        |
                 \/       \/       \/       \/
        ... <--  S0  <--  S0       S0  <--  S0  <-- ...

                  1        2        3        4

                                 Figure 2



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   In Figure 2, frame 3 is a layer refresh point for spatial layer S0; a
   decoder which had previously not been decoding the stream at all
   could decode layer S0 starting at frame 3.

   For temporal layers, layer refresh requires that the layer be
   "temporally nested", i.e. use as reference only earlier frames of a
   lower temporal layer, not any earlier frames of this temporal layer,
   and also promise that no future frames of this temporal layer will
   reference frames of this temporal layer before the refresh point.  In
   many cases, the temporal structure of the stream will mean that all
   frames are temporally nested, in which case decoders will have no
   need to send LRR messages for the stream.

   An illustration of temporal layer refresh is shown below.

           ...  <----- T1  <------ T1          T1  <------ ...
                      /           /           /
                    |_          |_          |_
        ... <--  T0  <------ T0  <------ T0  <------ T0  <--- ...

                  1     2     3     4     5     6     7

                                 Figure 3

   In Figure 3, frame 6 is a layer refresh point for temporal layer T1;
   a decoder which had previously only been decoding temporal layer T0
   would be able to decode layer T1 starting at frame 6.

   An illustration of an inherently temporally nested stream is shown
   below.

                       T1          T1          T1
                      /           /           /
                    |_          |_          |_
        ... <--  T0  <------ T0  <------ T0  <------ T0  <--- ...

                  1     2     3     4     5     6     7

                                 Figure 4

   In Figure 4, the stream is temporally nested in its ordinary
   structure; a decoder receiving layer T0 can begin decoding layer T1
   at any point.

   A "Layer Index" is a numeric label for a specific spatial and
   temporal layer of a scalable stream.  It consists of the pair of a
   "temporal ID" identifying the temporal layer, and a "layer ID"
   identifying the spatial or quality layer.  The details of how layers



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   of a scalable stream are labeled are codec-specific.  Details for
   several codecs are defined in Section 4.

3.  Layer Refresh Request

   A layer refresh frame can be requested by sending a Layer Refresh
   Request (LRR), which is an RTP Control Protocol (RTCP) [RFC3550]
   payload-specific feedback message [RFC4585] asking the encoder to
   encode a frame which makes it possible to upgrade to a higher layer.
   The LRR contains one or two tuples, indicating the temporal and
   spatial layer the decoder wants to upgrade to, and (optionally) the
   currently highest temporal and spatial layer the decoder can decode.

   The specific format of the tuples, and the mechanism by which a
   receiver recognizes a refresh frame, is codec-dependent.  Usage for
   several codecs is discussed in Section 4.

   LRR follows the model of the Full Intra Request (FIR) [RFC5104]
   (Section 3.5.1) for its retransmission, reliability, and use in
   multipoint conferences.

   The LRR message is identified by RTCP packet type value PT=PSFB and
   FMT=TBD.  The FCI field MUST contain one or more LRR entries.  Each
   entry applies to a different media sender, identified by its SSRC.

   [NOTE TO RFC Editor: Please replace "TBD" with the IANA-assigned
   payload-specific feedback number.]

3.1.  Message Format

   The Feedback Control Information (FCI) for the Layer Refresh Request
   consists of one or more FCI entries, the content of which is depicted
   in Figure 5.  The length of the LRR feedback message MUST be set to
   2+3*N, where N is the number of FCI entries.

       0                   1                   2                   3
       0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                              SSRC                             |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      | Seq nr.       |C| Payload Type| Reserved                      |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      | RES     | TTID| TLID          | RES     | CTID| CLID (opt)    |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

                                 Figure 5





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   SSRC (32 bits)  The SSRC value of the media sender that is requested
      to send a layer refresh point.

   Seq nr. (8 bits)  Command sequence number.  The sequence number space
      is unique for each pairing of the SSRC of command source and the
      SSRC of the command target.  The sequence number SHALL be
      increased by 1 modulo 256 for each new command.  A repetition
      SHALL NOT increase the sequence number.  The initial value is
      arbitrary.

   C (1 bit)  A flag bit indicating whether the "Current Temporal Layer
      ID (CTID)" and "Current Layer ID (CLID)" fields are present in the
      FCI.  If this bit is 0, the sender of the LRR message is
      requesting refresh of all layers up to and including the target
      layer.

   Payload Type (7 bits)  The RTP payload type for which the LRR is
      being requested.  This gives the context in which the target layer
      index is to be interpreted.

   Reserved (RES) (16 bits / 5 bits / 5 bits)  All bits SHALL be set to
      0 by the sender and SHALL be ignored on reception.

   Target Temporal Layer ID (TTID) (3 bits)  The temporal ID of the
      target layer for which the receiver wishes a refresh point.

   Target Layer ID (TLID) (8 bits)  The layer ID of the target spatial
      or quality layer for which the receiver wishes a refresh point.
      Its format is dependent on the payload type field.

   Current Temporal Layer ID (CTID) (3 bits)  If C is 1, the ID of the
      current temporal layer being decoded by the receiver.  This
      message is not requesting refresh of layers at or below this
      layer.  If C is 0, this field SHALL be set to 0 by the sender and
      SHALL be ignored on reception.

   Current Layer ID (CLID) (8 bits)  If C is 1, the layer ID of the
      current spatial or quality layer being decoded by the receiver.
      This message is not requesting refresh of layers at or below this
      layer.  If C is 0, this field SHALL be set to 0 by the sender and
      SHALL be ignored on reception.

   When C is 1, TTID MUST NOT be less than CTID, and TLID MUST NOT be
   less than CLID; at least one of TTID or TLID MUST be greater than
   CTID or CLID respectively.  That is to say, the target layer index
   <TTID, TLID> MUST be a layer upgrade from the current layer index
   <CTID, CLID>.  A sender MAY request an upgrade in both temporal and
   spatial/quality layers simultaneously.



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   Note: the syntax of the TTID, TLID, CTID, and CLID fields match, by
   design, the TID and LID fields in [I-D.ietf-avtext-framemarking].

3.2.  Semantics

   Within the common packet header for feedback messages (as defined in
   section 6.1 of [RFC4585]), the "SSRC of packet sender" field
   indicates the source of the request, and the "SSRC of media source"
   is not used and SHALL be set to 0.  The SSRCs of the media senders to
   which the LRR command applies are in the corresponding FCI entries.
   A LRR message MAY contain requests to multiple media senders, using
   one FCI entry per target media sender.

   Upon reception of LRR, the encoder MUST send a decoder refresh point
   (see Section 2.1) as soon as possible.

   The sender MUST respect bandwidth limits provided by the application
   of congestion control, as described in Section 5 of [RFC5104].  As
   layer refresh points will often be larger than non-refreshing frames,
   this may restrict a sender's ability to send a layer refresh point
   quickly.

   LRR MUST NOT be sent as a reaction to picture losses -- it is
   RECOMMENDED to use PLI [RFC4585] instead.  LRR SHOULD be used only in
   situations where not sending a layer refresh point would render the
   video unusable for the users.

4.  Usage with specific codecs

   In order for LRR to be used with a scalable codec, the format of the
   temporal and layer ID fields (for both the target and current layer
   indices) needs to be specified for that codec's RTP packetization.
   New RTP packetization specifications for scalable codecs SHOULD
   define how this is done.  (The VP9 payload [I-D.ietf-payload-vp9],
   for instance, has done so.)  If the payload also specifies how it is
   used with the Frame Marking RTP Header Extension
   [I-D.ietf-avtext-framemarking], the syntax MUST be defined in the
   same manner as the TID and LID fields in that header.

4.1.  H264 SVC

   H.264 SVC [RFC6190] defines temporal, dependency (spatial), and
   quality scalability modes.








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               +---------------+---------------+
               |0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|
               +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
               | RES     | TID |R|  DID  | QID |
               +---------------+---------------+

                                 Figure 6

   Figure 6 shows the format of the layer index fields for H.264 SVC
   streams.  The "R" and "RES" fields MUST be set to 0 on transmission
   and ignored on reception.  See [RFC6190] Section 1.1.3 for details on
   the DID, QID, and TID fields.

   A dependency or quality layer refresh of a given layer in H.264 SVC
   can be identified by the "I" bit (idr_flag) in the extended NAL unit
   header, present in NAL unit types 14 (prefix NAL unit) and 20 (coded
   scalable slice).  Layer refresh of the base layer can also be
   identified by its NAL unit type of its coded slices, which is "5"
   rather than "1".  A dependency or quality layer refresh is complete
   once this bit has been seen on all the appropriate layers (in
   decoding order) above the current layer index (if any, or beginning
   from the base layer if not) through the target layer index.

   Note that as the "I" bit in a PACSI header is set if the
   corresponding bit is set in any of the aggregated NAL units it
   describes; thus, it is not sufficient to identify layer refresh when
   NAL units of multiple dependency or quality layers are aggregated.

   In H.264 SVC, temporal layer refresh information can be determined
   from various Supplemental Encoding Information (SEI) messages in the
   bitstream.

   Whether an H.264 SVC stream is scalably nested can be determined from
   the Scalability Information SEI message's temporal_id_nesting flag.
   If this flag is set in a stream's currently applicable Scalability
   Information SEI, receivers SHOULD NOT send temporal LRR messages for
   that stream, as every frame is implicitly a temporal layer refresh
   point.  (The Scalability Information SEI message may also be
   available in the signaling negotiation of H.264 SVC, as the sprop-
   scalability-info parameter.)

   If a stream's temporal_id_nesting flag is not set, the Temporal Level
   Switching Point SEI message identifies temporal layer switching
   points.  A temporal layer refresh is satisfied when this SEI message
   is present in a frame with the target layer index, if the message's
   delta_frame_num refers to a frame with the requested current layer
   index.  (Alternately, temporal layer refresh can also be satisfied by
   a complete state refresh, such as an IDR.)  Senders which support



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   receiving LRR for non-temporally-nested streams MUST insert Temporal
   Level Switching Point SEI messages as appropriate.

4.2.  VP8

   The VP8 RTP payload format [RFC7741] defines temporal scalability
   modes.  It does not support spatial scalability.

               +---------------+---------------+
               |0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|
               +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
               | RES     | TID | RES           |
               +---------------+---------------+

                                 Figure 7

   Figure 7 shows the format of the layer index field for VP8 streams.
   The "RES" fields MUST be set to 0 on transmission and be ignored on
   reception.  See [RFC7741] Section 4.2 for details on the TID field.

   A VP8 layer refresh point can be identified by the presence of the
   "Y" bit in the VP8 payload header.  When this bit is set, this and
   all subsequent frames depend only on the current base temporal layer.
   On receipt of an LRR for a VP8 stream, A sender which supports LRR
   MUST encode the stream so it can set the Y bit in a packet whose
   temporal layer is at or below the target layer index.

   Note that in VP8, not every layer switch point can be identified by
   the Y bit, since the Y bit implies layer switch of all layers, not
   just the layer in which it is sent.  Thus the use of LRR with VP8 can
   result in some inefficiency in transmision.  However, this is not
   expected to be a major issue for temporal structures in normal use.

4.3.  H265

   The initial version of the H.265 payload format [RFC7798] defines
   temporal scalability, with protocol elements reserved for spatial or
   other scalability modes (which are expected to be defined in a future
   version of the specification).

               +---------------+---------------+
               |0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|
               +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
               | RES     | TID |RES|  LayerId  |
               +---------------+---------------+

                                 Figure 8




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   Figure 8 shows the format of the layer index field for H.265 streams.
   The "RES" fields MUST be set to 0 on transmission and ignored on
   reception.  See [RFC7798] Section 1.1.4 for details on the LayerId
   and TID fields.

   H.265 streams signal whether they are temporally nested, using the
   vps_temporal_id_nesting_flag in the Video Parameter Set (VPS), and
   the sps_temporal_id_nesting_flag in the Sequence Parameter Set (SPS).
   If this flag is set in a stream's currently applicable VPS or SPS,
   receivers SHOULD NOT send temporal LRR messages for that stream, as
   every frame is implicitly a temporal layer refresh point.

   If a stream's sps_temporal_id_nesting_flag is not set, the NAL unit
   types 2 to 5 inclusively identify temporal layer switching points.  A
   layer refresh to any higher target temporal layer is satisfied when a
   NAL unit type of 4 or 5 with TID equal to 1 more than current TID is
   seen.  Alternatively, layer refresh to a target temporal layer can be
   incrementally satisfied with NAL unit type of 2 or 3.  In this case,
   given current TID = TO and target TID = TN, layer refresh to TN is
   satisfied when NAL unit type of 2 or 3 is seen for TID = T1, then TID
   = T2, all the way up to TID = TN.  During this incremental process,
   layer refresh to TN can be completely satisfied as soon as a NAL unit
   type of 2 or 3 is seen.

   Of course, temporal layer refresh can also be satisfied whenever any
   Intra Random Access Point (IRAP) NAL unit type (with values 16-23,
   inclusively) is seen.  An IRAP picture is similar to an IDR picture
   in H.264 (NAL unit type of 5 in H.264) where decoding of the picture
   can start without any older pictures.

   In the (future) H.265 payloads that support spatial scalability, a
   spatial layer refresh of a specific layer can be identified by NAL
   units with the requested layer ID and NAL unit types between 16 and
   21 inclusive.  A dependency or quality layer refresh is complete once
   NAL units of this type have been seen on all the appropriate layers
   (in decoding order) above the current layer index (if any, or
   beginning from the base layer if not) through the target layer index.

5.  Usage with different scalability transmission mechanisms

   Several different mechanisms are defined for how scalable streams can
   be transmitted in RTP.  The RTP Taxonomy [RFC7656] Section 3.7
   defines three mechanisms: Single RTP Stream on a Single Media
   Transport (SRST), Multiple RTP Streams on a Single Media Transport
   (MRST), and Multiple RTP Streams on Multiple Media Transports (MRMT).

   The LRR message is applicable to all these mechanisms.  For MRST and
   MRMT mechanisms, the "media source" field of the LRR FCI is set to



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   the SSRC of the RTP stream containing the layer indicated by the
   Current Layer Index (if "C" is 1), or the stream containing the base
   encoded stream (if "C" is 0).  For MRMT, it is sent on the RTP
   session on which this stream is sent.  On receipt, the sender MUST
   refresh all the layers requested in the stream, simultaneously in
   decode order.

6.  Security Considerations

   All the security considerations of FIR feedback packets [RFC5104]
   apply to LRR feedback packets as well.  Additionally, media senders
   receiving LRR feedback packets MUST validate that the payload types
   and layer indices they are receiving are valid for the stream they
   are currently sending, and discard the requests if not.

7.  SDP Definitions

   Section 7 of [RFC5104] defines SDP procedures for indicating and
   negotiating support for codec control messages (CCM) in SDP.  This
   document extends this with a new codec control command, "lrr", which
   indicates support of the Layer Refresh Request (LRR).

   Figure 9 gives a formal Augmented Backus-Naur Form (ABNF) [RFC5234]
   showing this grammar extension, extending the grammar defined in
   [RFC5104].

   rtcp-fb-ccm-param =/ SP "lrr"    ; Layer Refresh Request

                     Figure 9: Syntax of the "lrr" ccm

   The Offer-Answer considerations defined in [RFC5104] Section 7.2
   apply.

8.  IANA Considerations

   This document defines a new entry to the "Codec Control Messages"
   subregistry of the "Session Description Protocol (SDP) Parameters"
   registry, according to the following data:

   Value name:  lrr

   Long name:  Layer Refresh Request Command

   Usable with:  ccm

   Reference:  RFC XXXX





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   This document also defines a new entry to the "FMT Values for PSFB
   Payload Types" subregistry of the "Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP)
   Parameters" registry, according to the following data:

   Name:  LRR

   Long Name:  Layer Refresh Request Command

   Value:  TBD

   Reference:  RFC XXXX

9.  References

9.1.  Normative References

   [I-D.ietf-avtext-framemarking]
              Berger, E., Nandakumar, S., and M. Zanaty, "Frame Marking
              RTP Header Extension", draft-ietf-avtext-framemarking-04
              (work in progress), March 2017.

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, DOI 10.17487/
              RFC2119, March 1997,
              <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2119>.

   [RFC3550]  Schulzrinne, H., Casner, S., Frederick, R., and V.
              Jacobson, "RTP: A Transport Protocol for Real-Time
              Applications", STD 64, RFC 3550, DOI 10.17487/RFC3550,
              July 2003, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3550>.

   [RFC4585]  Ott, J., Wenger, S., Sato, N., Burmeister, C., and J. Rey,
              "Extended RTP Profile for Real-time Transport Control
              Protocol (RTCP)-Based Feedback (RTP/AVPF)", RFC 4585, DOI
              10.17487/RFC4585, July 2006,
              <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4585>.

   [RFC5104]  Wenger, S., Chandra, U., Westerlund, M., and B. Burman,
              "Codec Control Messages in the RTP Audio-Visual Profile
              with Feedback (AVPF)", RFC 5104, DOI 10.17487/RFC5104,
              February 2008, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc5104>.

   [RFC5234]  Crocker, D., Ed. and P. Overell, "Augmented BNF for Syntax
              Specifications: ABNF", STD 68, RFC 5234, DOI 10.17487/
              RFC5234, January 2008,
              <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc5234>.





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   [RFC6190]  Wenger, S., Wang, Y., Schierl, T., and A. Eleftheriadis,
              "RTP Payload Format for Scalable Video Coding", RFC 6190,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC6190, May 2011,
              <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6190>.

   [RFC7741]  Westin, P., Lundin, H., Glover, M., Uberti, J., and F.
              Galligan, "RTP Payload Format for VP8 Video", RFC 7741,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC7741, March 2016,
              <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7741>.

   [RFC7798]  Wang, Y., Sanchez, Y., Schierl, T., Wenger, S., and M.
              Hannuksela, "RTP Payload Format for High Efficiency Video
              Coding (HEVC)", RFC 7798, DOI 10.17487/RFC7798, March
              2016, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7798>.

9.2.  Informative References

   [I-D.ietf-payload-vp9]
              Uberti, J., Holmer, S., Flodman, M., Lennox, J., and D.
              Hong, "RTP Payload Format for VP9 Video", draft-ietf-
              payload-vp9-03 (work in progress), March 2017.

   [RFC7656]  Lennox, J., Gross, K., Nandakumar, S., Salgueiro, G., and
              B. Burman, Ed., "A Taxonomy of Semantics and Mechanisms
              for Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) Sources", RFC 7656,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC7656, November 2015,
              <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7656>.

   [RFC8082]  Wenger, S., Lennox, J., Burman, B., and M. Westerlund,
              "Using Codec Control Messages in the RTP Audio-Visual
              Profile with Feedback with Layered Codecs", RFC 8082, DOI
              10.17487/RFC8082, March 2017,
              <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8082>.

Authors' Addresses

   Jonathan Lennox
   Vidyo, Inc.
   433 Hackensack Avenue
   Seventh Floor
   Hackensack, NJ  07601
   US

   Email: jonathan@vidyo.com







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   Danny Hong
   Vidyo, Inc.
   433 Hackensack Avenue
   Seventh Floor
   Hackensack, NJ  07601
   US

   Email: danny@vidyo.com


   Justin Uberti
   Google, Inc.
   747 6th Street South
   Kirkland, WA  98033
   USA

   Email: justin@uberti.name


   Stefan Holmer
   Google, Inc.
   Kungsbron 2
   Stockholm  111 22
   Sweden

   Email: holmer@google.com


   Magnus Flodman
   Google, Inc.
   Kungsbron 2
   Stockholm  111 22
   Sweden

   Email: mflodman@google.com
















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