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Versions: 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 RFC 3368

Network Working Group                                        M. Mealling
Internet-Draft                                                       NSI
Expires: July 24, 2001                                  January 23, 2001


      The 'go' URI Scheme for the Common Name Resolution Protocol
                         draft-ietf-cnrp-uri-06

Status of this Memo

   This document is an Internet-Draft and is in full conformance with
   all provisions of Section 10 of RFC2026.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that
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   Internet-Drafts.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on July 24, 2001.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2001). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   This document defines a URI scheme, 'go:' to be used with the Common
   Name Resolution Protocol. Specifically it lays out the syntactic
   components and how those components are used by URI Resolution to
   find the available transports for a CNRP service. Care should be
   taken with several of the URI components because, while they may
   look like components found in other URI schemes, they often do not
   act like them. The "go" scheme has more in common with the location
   independent "news" scheme than any other URI scheme.







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Table of Contents

   1.    Goals  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.    Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   3.    Syntax Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   3.1   General Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   3.2   ABNF Grammar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   3.3   Special Cases and Default Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   3.3.1 If there is only a server  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
   3.3.2 If server is empty then server=localhost . . . . . . . . . .  6
   3.3.3 Default Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
   3.4   Encoding Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
   4.    Transport Independence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
   5.    Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
   6.    Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
         References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
         Author's Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   A.    Registration Template  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
         Full Copyright Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
































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1. Goals

   The two goals of the CNRP[3]URI[1] are to identify both a specific
   common-name record at a specific server and to identify a possibly
   dynamic query or entry point into the query process. Since CNRP
   requires that the ID be a core query term, these two cases can be
   generalized down to simply specifying a query that contains only the
   ID of the item.

   On first glance it would seem a simple enough exercise to
   canonicalize the XML encoded query and then insert it into the query
   portion of the URL. The problem here is that, due to the encoding
   rules, any remotely complex query will quickly blow out the URI
   length limitations. The suggested solution is to provide a
   simplified query syntax that is a subset of what is available via
   the XML.



































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2. Terminology

      The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL
      NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED",  "MAY", and
      "OPTIONAL" in this document are to be interpreted as described in
      RFC 2119[4].













































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3. Syntax Rules

3.1 General Syntax

   The CNRP URI comes in two forms. The first form is for talking to a
   specific server. The second form is for expressing a query that is
   meant to be sent to several different CNRP services. The following
   two examples are for pedagogical purposes only. The complete ABNF
   grammar in Section 3.2 is the only authoritative syntax definition.

   go://[<host>]?[<common-name>]*[;<attribute>=[<type>,]<value>]

   and

   go:<common-name>*[;<attribute>=[<type>,]<value>]

3.2 ABNF Grammar

   The full ABNF[2] (certain values are included by reference from
   RFC2396[1]):


   cnrp-uri      = "go:" (form1 / form2)
   form1         = "//" [server] ["?" ((common-name *avpair) / id-req) ]
   form2         = common-name *avpair

   id-req        = "id=" value
   avpair        = ";" attribute "=" [ type "," ] value

   server        = // as specified in RFC2396

   common-name     = *(unreserved | escaped)
   attribute       = *(unreserved | escaped)
   value           = *(unreserved | escaped)
   type            = *(unreserved | escaped)

   unreserved      = // as specified in RFC2396

   escaped       = "%" hex hex
   hex           = "0" | "1" | "2" | "3" | "4" | "5" | "6" | "7" |
                   "8" | "9" | "A" | "B" | "C" | "D" | "E" | "F" |
                   "a" | "b" | "c" | "d" | "e" | "f"


3.3 Special Cases and Default Values






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3.3.1 If there is only a server

   In the case where the CNRP URI contains only the server production
   then the URI identifies a given CNRP server, not any particular
   query that is to be done. A client can assume that this server will
   at least answer the 'servicequery' request.

3.3.2 If server is empty then server=localhost

   If the 'server' element has no value then its value MUST be assumed
   to be "localhost".

3.3.3 Default Port

   CNRP's well known HTTP transport port is 1096. If the port value
   portion of the server production is not specified then port 1096
   SHOULD be used if the client has no prior knowledge about other
   ports or transports that the service may support.

3.4 Encoding Rules

   The common-name, query parameters, and parameter values must be
   encoded using the UTF-8 encoding scheme[5], and any octet that is
   not one of the permitted characters per the above grammar MUST
   instead be represented by a "%" followed by two characters from the
   <hex> character set above.  The two characters give the hexadecimal
   representation of that octet.
























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4. Transport Independence

   As stated in the CNRP protocol specification[3], CNRP is allowed to
   be expressed over multiple transport protocols with HTTP being
   mandatory to implement. In the case where a client attempts to
   resolve a CNRP URI and it knows nothing about the service being
   referenced in that URI, then it SHOULD use HTTP on the CNRP default
   port (1096).











































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5. Examples

   go:Mercedes%20Benz
      This example shows a general query for the common-name "Mercedes
      Benz". The intent is that the query should be packaged with any
      client provided defaults and sent to the one or more services
      that the client has configured to ask.

   go://?Mercedes%20Benz
      This example shows a general query for the common-name "Mercedes
      Benz" that is sent to the server running on the 'localhost'.

   go://cnrp.foo.com?Mercedes%20Benz;geography=US-ga
      This example shows a query for the common-name "Mercedes Benz" in
      the geographic area "US-ga" which should be sent to the server
      found at cnrp.foo.com.

   go://cnrp.foo.org?Martin%20J.%20D%C3%BCrst
      This example includes a UTF-8 character encoded using hex
      escaping. The value encoded is a u-umlaut (a 'u' with two dots
      over it). This simple query is sent to a server found at
      cnrp.foo.org with no parameters

   go://cnrp.foo.com?id=5432345
      Here only an id is given which means that his example points
      directly at a particular common-name record on a particular
      server. This example would probably be found in a link on a web
      page of some type.























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6. Security Considerations

   In addition to the security considerations inherent in CNRP itself
   (see the Security Considerations section of RFC  XXXX[3]), the URI
   mechanism can also be used to retrieve a URI identifying some other
   site by including just the ID and not the common-name being linked
   to. I.e.  the user may think he/she is being shown the URI currently
   mapped to the "BMW" common-name but in the case where only the ID is
   used the actual common-name is not part of the URI, thus making it
   possible to use a CNRP URI without knowing which common-name it is
   referring to.








































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References

   [1]  Berners-Lee, T., Fielding, R.T. and L. Masinter, "Uniform
        Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax", RFC 2396, August
        1998.

   [2]  Crocker, D., "Augmented BNF for Syntax Specifications: ABNF",
        RFC 2234, November 1997.

   [3]  Moseley, M., Mealling, M. and N. Popp, "Common Name Resolution
        Protocol (CNRP)", RFC XXXX, draft-ietf-cnrp-protocol-02 (work
        in progress), February 2000.

   [4]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement
        Levels", RFC 2119, BCP 14, March 1997.

   [5]  The Unicode Consortium, "The Unicode Standard, Version 2.0:
        Appendix A.2", ISBN 0-201-48345-9, January 1988.


Author's Address

   Michael Mealling
   Network Solutions, Inc.
   505 Huntmar Park Drive
   Herndon, VA  22070
   US

   Phone: (703) 742-0400
   EMail: michaelm@netsol.com





















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Appendix A. Registration Template

      URL scheme name: go

      URL scheme syntax: Section 3.2

      Character encoding considerations: Section 3.4

      Intended usage: Section 1

      Applications and/or protocols which use this scheme: [3]

      Interoperability considerations: None not specified in [3]

      Security considerations: Section 6

      Relevant publications: [3]

      Contact: CNRP Working Group

      Author/Change Controller: IESG






























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Full Copyright Statement

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2001). All Rights Reserved.

   This document and translations of it may be copied and furnished to
   others, and derivative works that comment on or otherwise explain it
   or assist in its implementation may be prepared, copied, published
   and distributed, in whole or in part, without restriction of any
   kind, provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph
   are included on all such copies and derivative works. However, this
   document itself may not be modified in any way, such as by removing
   the copyright notice or references to the Internet Society or other
   Internet organizations, except as needed for the purpose of
   developing Internet standards in which case the procedures for
   copyrights defined in the Internet Standards process must be
   followed, or as required to translate it into languages other than
   English.

   The limited permissions granted above are perpetual and will not be
   revoked by the Internet Society or its successors or assigns.

   This document and the information contained herein is provided on an
   "AS IS" basis and THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND THE INTERNET ENGINEERING
   TASK FORCE DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING
   BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION
   HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
   MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

Acknowledgement

   Funding for the RFC editor function is currently provided by the
   Internet Society.



















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