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In: Experimental
Intrusion Detection Exchange                                    D. Curry
Format                                                     Merrill Lynch
Internet-Draft                                                  H. Debar
Expires: July 8, 2004                                     France Telecom
                                                            B. Feinstein
                                                                     TNT
                                                         January 8, 2004


            The Intrusion Detection Message Exchange Format
                      draft-ietf-idwg-idmef-xml-11

Status of this Memo

   This document is an Internet-Draft and is in full conformance with
   all provisions of Section 10 of RFC2026.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that other
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   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at http://
   www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt.

   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.

   This Internet-Draft will expire on July 8, 2004.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2004). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   The purpose of the Intrusion Detection Message Exchange Format
   (IDMEF) is to define data formats and exchange procedures for sharing
   information of interest to intrusion detection and response systems,
   and to the management systems which may need to interact with them.

   This Internet-Draft describes a data model to represent information
   exported by intrusion detection systems, and explains the rationale
   for using this model.  An implementation of the data model in the
   Extensible Markup Language (XML) is presented, an XML Document Type



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   Definition is developed, and examples are provided.

Table of Contents

   1.     Conventions Used in This Document  . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   2.     Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   2.1    About the IDMEF Data Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   2.1.1  Problems Addressed by the Data Model . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   2.1.2  Data Model Design Goals  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   2.2    About the IDMEF XML Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   2.2.1  The Extensible Markup Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   2.2.2  Rationale for Implementing IDMEF in XML  . . . . . . . . .   9
   3.     Notational Conventions and Formatting Issues . . . . . . .  11
   3.1    IDMEF XML Documents  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   3.1.1  The Document Prolog  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   3.1.2  Character Data Processing in IDMEF . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   3.1.3  Languages in IDMEF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   3.2    IDMEF Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   3.2.1  Integers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   3.2.2  Real Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   3.2.3  Characters and Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   3.2.4  Bytes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   3.2.5  Enumerated Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   3.2.6  Date-Time Strings  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   3.2.7  NTP Timestamps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
   3.2.8  Port Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
   3.2.9  Unique Identifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
   4.     The IDMEF Data Model and XML DTD . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
   4.1    Data Model Overview  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
   4.2    The Message Classes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   4.2.1  The IDMEF-Message Class  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
   4.2.2  The Alert Class  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
   4.2.3  The Heartbeat Class  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  28
   4.2.4  The Core Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  30
   4.2.5  The Time Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  42
   4.2.6  The Assessment Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  44
   4.2.7  The Support Classes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  49
   5.     Extending the IDMEF  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  78
   5.1    Extending the Data Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  78
   5.2    Extending the XML DTD  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  78
   6.     Special Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  81
   6.1    XML Validity and Well-Formedness . . . . . . . . . . . . .  81
   6.2    Unrecognized XML Tags  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  81
   6.3    Analyzer-Manager Time Synchronization  . . . . . . . . . .  82
   6.4    NTP Timestamp Wrap-Around  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  83
   6.5    Digital Signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  84
   7.     Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  86
   7.1    Denial of Service Attacks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  86



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   7.1.1  The "teardrop" Attack  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  86
   7.1.2  The "ping of death" Attack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  87
   7.2    Port Scanning Attacks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  89
   7.2.1  Connection To a Disallowed Service . . . . . . . . . . . .  89
   7.2.2  Simple Port Scanning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  90
   7.3    Local Attacks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  91
   7.3.1  The "loadmodule" Attack  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  91
   7.3.2  The "phf" Attack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  93
   7.3.3  File Modification  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  95
   7.4    System Policy Violation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  97
   7.5    Correlated Alerts  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  98
   7.6    Analyzer Assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  99
   7.7    Heartbeat  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
   7.8    XML Extension  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
   8.     The IDMEF Document Type Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
   9.     Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
   10.    IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
   10.1   Adding Values to Existing Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . 118
   10.1.1 Attribute Registrations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
   10.1.2 Registration Template  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
   10.2   Adding New Attributes and Classes  . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
          Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
          Informational References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
          Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
   A.     History of Significant Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
   A.1    Significant Changes Since idmef-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
   B.     Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
   C.     An Overview of UML and XML as Used in This Document  . . . 139
   C.1    Unified Modeling Language  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
   C.1.1  Relationships  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
   C.1.2  Occurrence Indicators  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
   C.2    XML Document Type Definitions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
   C.2.1  Element Declarations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
   C.2.2  Attribute Declarations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
   C.2.3  Entity Declarations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
   C.3    XML Documents  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
   C.3.1  The Document Prolog  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
   C.3.2  Character Data Processing in XML . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
   C.3.3  Languages in XML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
   C.3.4  Inheritance and Aggregation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
          Intellectual Property and Copyright Statements . . . . . . 151










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1. Conventions Used in This Document

   The key words "MUST," "MUST NOT," "REQUIRED," "SHALL," "SHALL NOT,"
   "SHOULD," "SHOULD NOT," "RECOMMENDED," "MAY," and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [1].

   An "IDMEF-compliant application" is a program or program component,
   such as an analyzer or manager, that reads and/or writes messages in
   the format specified by this memo.

   An "IDMEF document" is a message that adheres to the requirements
   specified by this memo, and that is exchanged by two or more IDMEF
   applications.  "IDMEF message" is another term for an "IDMEF
   document."





































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2. Introduction

   The Intrusion Detection Message Exchange Format (IDMEF) [2] is
   intended to be a standard data format that automated intrusion
   detection systems can use to report alerts about events that
   they deem suspicious. The development of this standard format will
   enable interoperability among commercial, open source, and research
   systems, allowing users to mix-and-match the deployment of these
   systems according to their strong and weak points to obtain an
   optimal implementation.

   The most obvious place to implement the IDMEF is in the data channel
   between an intrusion detection analyzer (or "sensor") and the manager
   (or "console") to which it sends alarms.  But there are other places
   where the IDMEF can be useful:

   o  a single database system that could store the results from a
      variety of intrusion detection products would make it possible for
      data analysis and reporting activities to be performed on "the
      whole picture" instead of just a part of it;

   o  an event correlation system that could accept alerts from a
      variety of intrusion detection products would be capable of
      performing more sophisticated cross-correlation and cross-
      confirmation calculations than one that is limited to a single
      product;

   o  a graphical user interface that could display alerts from a
      variety of intrusion detection products would enable the user to
      monitor all of the products from a single screen, and require him
      or her to learn only one interface, instead of several; and

   o  a common data exchange format would make it easier for different
      organizations (users, vendors, response teams, law enforcement) to
      not only exchange data, but also communicate about it.

   The diversity of uses for the IDMEF needs to be considered when
   selecting its method of implementation.

2.1 About the IDMEF Data Model

   The IDMEF data model is an object-oriented representation of the
   alert data sent to intrusion detection managers by intrusion
   detection analyzers.

2.1.1 Problems Addressed by the Data Model

   The data model addresses several problems associated with



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   representing intrusion detection alert data:

   o  Alert information is inherently heterogeneous.  Some alerts are
      defined with very little information, such as origin, destination,
      name, and time of the event.  Other alerts provide much more
      information, such as ports or services, processes, user
      information, and so on.  The data model that represents this
      information must be flexible to accommodate different needs.

      An object-oriented model is naturally extensible via aggregation
      and subclassing.  If an implementation of the data model extends
      it with new classes, either by aggregation or subclassing, an
      implementation that does not understand these extensions will
      still be able to understand the subset of information that is
      defined by the data model.  Subclassing and aggregation provide
      extensibility while preserving the consistency of the model.

   o  Intrusion detection environments are different.  Some analyzers
      detect attacks by analyzing network traffic; others use operating
      system logs or application audit trail information.  Alerts for
      the same attack, sent by analyzers with different information
      sources, will not contain the same information.

      The data model defines support classes that accommodate the
      differences in data sources among analyzers.  In particular, the
      notion of source and target for the alert are represented by the
      combination of Node, Process, Service, and User classes.

   o  Analyzer capabilities are different.  Depending on the
      environment, one may install a lightweight analyzer that provides
      little information in its alerts, or a more complex analyzer that
      will have a greater impact on the running system but provide more
      detailed alert information.  The data model must allow for
      conversion to formats used by tools other than intrusion detection
      analyzers, for the purpose of further processing the alert
      information.

      The data model defines extensions to the basic schema that allow
      carrying both simple and complex alerts.  Extensions are
      accomplished through subclassing or association of new classes.

   o  Operating environments are different.  Depending on the kind of
      network or operating system used, attacks will be observed and
      reported with different characteristics.  The data model should
      accommodate these differences.

      Significant flexibility in reporting is provided by the Node and
      Service support classes.  If additional information must be



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      reported, subclasses may be defined that extend the data model
      with additional attributes.

   o  Commercial vendor objectives are different.  For various reasons,
      vendors may wish to deliver more or less information about certain
      types of attacks.

      The object-oriented approach allows this flexibility while the
      subclassing rules preserve the integrity of the model.


2.1.2 Data Model Design Goals

   The data model was designed to provide a standard representation of
   alerts in an unambiguous fashion, and to permit the relationship
   between simple and complex alerts to be described.

2.1.2.1 Representing Events

   The goal of the data model is to provide a standard representation of
   the information that an intrusion detection analyzer reports when it
   detects an occurrence of some unusual event(s).  These alerts may be
   simple or complex, depending on the capabilities of the analyzer that
   creates them.

2.1.2.2 Content-Driven

   The design of the data model is content-driven.  This means that new
   objects are introduced to accommodate additional content, not
   semantic differences between alerts.  This is an important goal, as
   the task of classifying and naming computer vulnerabilities is both
   extremely difficult and very subjective.

   The data model must be unambiguous.  This means that while we allow
   analyzers to be more or less precise than one another (i.e., one
   analyzer may report more information about an event than another), we
   do not allow them to produce contradictory information in two alerts
   describing the same event (i.e., the common subset of information
   reported by both analyzers must be identical and inserted in the same
   placeholders within the alert data structure).  Of course, it is
   always possible to insert all "interesting" information about an
   event in extension fields of the alert instead of in the fields where
   it belongs; however, such practice reduces interoperability and
   should be avoided whenever possible.

2.1.2.3 Relationship Between Alerts

   Intrusion detection alerts can be transmitted at several levels. This



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   Internet-Draft applies to the entire range, from very simple alerts
   (e.g., those alerts that are the result of a single action or
   operation in the system, such as a failed login report) to very
   complex ones (e.g., the aggregation of several events causing an
   alert to be generated).

   As such, the data model must provide a way for complex alerts that
   aggregate several simple alerts to identify those simple alerts in
   the complex alert's content.

2.2 About the IDMEF XML Implementation

   Two implementations of the IDMEF were originally proposed to the
   IDWG: one using the Structure of Management Information (SMI) to
   describe an SNMP MIB, and the other using a Document Type Definition
   (DTD) to describe XML documents.

   These proposed implementations were reviewed by the IDWG at its
   September 1999 and February 2000 meetings; it was decided at the
   February meeting that the XML solution was best at fulfilling the
   IDWG requirements.

2.2.1 The Extensible Markup Language

   The Extensible Markup Language (XML) [3] is a simplified version of
   the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML), a syntax for
   specifying text markup defined by the ISO 8879 standard.  XML is
   gaining widespread attention as a language for representing and
   exchanging documents and data on the Internet, and as the solution to
   most of the problems inherent in HyperText Markup Language (HTML).
   XML was published as a recommendation by the World Wide Web
   Consortium (W3C) on February 10, 1998.

   XML is a metalanguage -- a language for describing other languages --
   that enables an application to define its own markup.  XML allows the
   definition of customized markup languages for different types of
   documents and different applications.  This differs from HTML, in
   which there is a fixed set of identifiers with preset meanings that
   must be "adapted" for specialized uses.  Both XML and HTML use
   elements (tags) (identifiers delimited by '<' and >') and attributes
   (of the form "name='value'").  But where "<p>" always means
   "paragraph" in HTML, it may mean "paragraph," "person," "price," or
   "platypus" in XML, or it might have no meaning at all, depending on
   the particular application.







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   NOTE: XML provides both a syntax for declaring document markup and
      structure (i.e., defining elements and attributes, specifying the
      order in which they appear, and so on) and a syntax for using that
      markup in documents.  Because markup declarations look radically
      different from markup, many people are confused as to which syntax
      is called XML.  The answer is that they both are, because they are
      actually both part of the same language.

      For clarity in this document, we will use the terms "XML" and "XML
      documents" when speaking in the general case, and the term "IDMEF
      markup" when speaking specifically of the elements (tags) and
      attributes that describe IDMEF messages.

   The publication of XML was followed by the publication of a second
   recommendation [4] by the World Wide Web Consortium, defining the use
   of namespaces in XML documents.  An XML namespace is a collection of
   names, identified by a Universal Resource Identifier (URI) [5].  When
   using namespaces, each tag is identified with the namespace it comes
   from, allowing tags from different namespaces with the same names to
   occur in the same document. For example, a single document could
   contain both "usa:football" and "europe:football" tags, each with
   different meanings.

   In anticipation of the widespread use of XML namespaces, this memo
   includes the definition of the URI to be used to identify the IDMEF
   namespace.

2.2.2 Rationale for Implementing IDMEF in XML

   XML-based applications are being used or developed for a wide variety
   of purposes, including electronic data interchange in a variety of
   fields, financial data interchange, electronic business cards,
   calendar and scheduling, enterprise software distribution, web "push"
   technology, and markup languages for chemistry, mathematics, music,
   molecular dynamics, astronomy, book and periodical publishing, web
   publishing, weather observations, real estate transactions, and many
   others.

   XML's flexibility makes it a good choice for these applications; that
   same flexibility makes it a good choice for implementing the IDMEF as
   well.  Other, more specific reasons for choosing XML to implement the
   IDMEF are:

   o  XML allows a custom language to be developed specifically for the
      purpose of describing intrusion detection alerts.  It also defines
      a standard way to extend this language, either for later revisions
      of this document ("standard" extensions), or for vendor-specific
      use ("non-standard" extensions).



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   o  Software tools for processing XML documents are widely available,
      in both commercial and open source forms.  Numerous tools and APIs
      for parsing and/or validating XML are available in a variety of
      languages, including Java, C, C++, Tcl, Perl, Python, and GNU
      Emacs Lisp.  Widespread access to tools will make adoption of the
      IDMEF by product developers easier, and hopefully, faster.

   o  XML meets IDMEF Requirement 5.1 [2], that message formats support
      full internationalization and localization. The XML standard
      requires support for both the UTF-8 and UTF-16 encodings of ISO/
      IEC 10646 (Universal Multiple-Octet Coded Character Set, "UCS")
      and Unicode, making all XML applications (and therefore all
      IDMEF-compliant applications) compatible with these common
      character encodings.

      XML also provides support for specifying, on a per-element basis,
      the language in which the element's content is written, making
      IDMEF easy to adapt to "Natural Language Support" versions of a
      product.

   o  XML meets IDMEF Requirement 5.2 [2], that message formats must
      support filtering and aggregation.  XML's integration with XSL, a
      style language, allows messages to be combined, discarded, and
      rearranged.

   o  Ongoing XML development projects, in the W3C and elsewhere, will
      provide object-oriented extensions, database support, and other
      useful features.  If implemented in XML, the IDMEF immediately
      gains these features as well.

   o  XML is free, with no license, no license fees, and no royalties.




















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3. Notational Conventions and Formatting Issues

   This document uses three notations: Unified Modeling Language to
   describe the data model, XML to describe the markup used in IDMEF
   documents, and IDMEF markup to represent the documents themselves.

   Appendix A describes these notations in sufficient detail that
   readers unfamiliar with them can understand the document.  Note,
   however, that these descriptions are not comprehensive; they only
   cover the components of the notations used by the data model and
   document format.

   Appendix A also explains several document formatting issues that
   apply to XML documents, including formats for particular data types,
   special character and whitespace processing, character sets, and
   languages.

3.1 IDMEF XML Documents

   This section describes IDMEF XML document formatting rules.  Most of
   these rules are "inherited" from the rules for formatting XML
   documents; see Appendix A for more detail.

3.1.1 The Document Prolog

   The format of an IDMEF XML document prolog is described in the
   following sections.

3.1.1.1 XML Declaration

   IDMEF documents being exchanged between IDMEF-compliant applications
   MUST begin with an XML declaration, and MUST specify the XML version
   in use.  Specification of the encoding in use is RECOMMENDED.

   IDMEF-compliant applications MAY choose to omit the XML declaration
   internally to conserve space, adding it only when the message is sent
   to another destination (e.g., a web browser).  This practice is NOT
   RECOMMENDED unless it can be accomplished without loss of each
   message's version and encoding information.

3.1.1.2 IDMEF DTD Formal Public Identifier

   The formal public identifier (FPI) for the IDMEF Document Type
   Definition described in this memo is:

      "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"

   This FPI MUST be used in the document type declaration within an XML



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   document referencing the IDMEF DTD defined by this memo, as shown in
   the following section.

3.1.1.3 IDMEF DTD Document Type Declaration

   The document type declaration for an XML document referencing the
   IDMEF DTD defined by this memo will usually be specified in one of
   the following ways:

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC
      "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN">

   The last component of the document type declaration is the formal
   public identifier (FPI) specified in the previous section.

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message SYSTEM
      "/some/path/to/the/idmef-message.dtd">

   The last component of the document type declaration is a URI that
   points to a copy of the Document Type Definition.

   In order to be valid (see Section 6.1), an XML document must contain
   a document type declaration.  However, this represents significant
   overhead to an IDMEF-compliant application, both in the bandwidth it
   consumes as well as the requirements it places on the XML processor
   (not only to parse the declaration itself, but also to parse the DTD
   it references).

   Implementors MAY decide, therefore, to have analyzers and managers
   agree out-of-band on the particular document type definition they
   will be using to exchange messages (the standard one as defined here,
   or one with extensions), and then omit the document type declaration
   from IDMEF messages.  The method for negotiating this agreement is
   outside the scope of this document.  Note that great care must be
   taken in negotiating any such agreements, as the manager may have to
   accept messages from many different analyzers, each using a DTD with
   a different set of extensions.

3.1.2 Character Data Processing in IDMEF

   For portability reasons, IDMEF-compliant applications SHOULD NOT use,
   and IDMEF messages SHOULD NOT be encoded in, character encodings
   other than UTF-8 and UTF-16.  Consistent with the XML standard, if no
   encoding is specified for an IDMEF message, UTF-8 is assumed.







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   NOTE: The ASCII character set is a subset of the UTF-8 encoding, and
      therefore may be used to encode IDMEF messages.

   Per the XML standard, IDMEF documents encoded in UTF-16 MUST begin
   with the Byte Order Mark described by ISO/IEC 10646 Annex E and
   Unicode Appendix B (the "ZERO WIDTH NO-BREAK SPACE" character,
   #xFEFF).

3.1.2.1 Character Entity References

   It is RECOMMENDED that IDMEF-compliant applications use the entity
   reference form (see A.3.2.1) of the characters '&', ,'<', '>', '"',
   and ''' (single-quote) whenever writing these characters in data, to
   avoid any possibility of misinterpretation.

3.1.2.2 White Space Processing

   All IDMEF elements MUST support the "xml:space" attribute.

3.1.3 Languages in IDMEF

   IDMEF-compliant applications SHOULD specify the language in which
   their contents are encoded; in general this can be done by specifying
   the "xml:lang" attribute for the top-level element and letting all
   other elements "inherit" that definition.

   If no language is specified for an IDMEF message, English SHALL be
   assumed.

   All IDMEF tags MUST support the "xml:lang" attribute.

3.2 IDMEF Data Types

   Within an XML IDMEF message, all data will be expressed as "text" (as
   opposed to "binary"), since XML is a text formatting language.  We
   provide typing information for the attributes of the classes in the
   data model however, to convey to the reader the type of data the
   model expects for each attribute.

   Each data type in the model has specific formatting requirements in
   an XML IDMEF message; these requirements are set forth in this
   section.

3.2.1 Integers

   Integer attributes are represented by the INTEGER data type.  Integer
   data MUST be encoded in Base 10 or Base 16.




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   Base 10 integer encoding uses the digits '0' through '9' and an
   optional sign ('+' or '-').  For example, "123", "-456".

   Base 16 integer encoding uses the digits '0' through '9' and 'a'
   through 'f' (or their upper case equivalents), and is preceded by the
   characters "0x".  For example, "0x1a2b".

3.2.2 Real Numbers

   Real (floating-point) attributes are represented by the REAL data
   type.  Real data MUST be encoded in Base 10.

   Real encoding is that of the POSIX 1003.1 "strtod" library function:
   an optional sign ('+' or '-') followed by a non-empty string of
   decimal digits, optionally containing a radix character, then an
   optional exponent part.  An exponent part consists of an 'e' or 'E',
   followed by an optional sign, followed by one or more decimal digits.
   For example, "123.45e02", "-567,89e-03".

   IDMEF-compliant applications MUST support both the '.' and ',' radix
   characters.

3.2.3 Characters and Strings

   Single-character attributes are represented by the CHARACTER data
   type.  Multi-character attributes of known length are represented by
   the STRING data type.

   Character and string data have no special formatting requirements,
   other than the need to occasionally use character references (see
   Appendix C.3.2.1 and Appendix C.3.2.2) to represent special
   characters.

3.2.4 Bytes

   Binary data is represented by the BYTE (and BYTE[]) data type.

   Binary data MUST be encoded in its entirety using character code
   references (see Appendix C.3.2.2).

3.2.5 Enumerated Types

   Enumerated types are represented by the ENUM data type, and consist
   of an ordered list of acceptable values.  Each value has a rank
   (number) and a representing keyword.

   Within IDMEF XML messages, the enumerated type keywords are used as
   attribute values, and the ranks are ignored.  However, those IDMEF-



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   compliant applications that choose to represent these values
   internally in a numeric format MUST use the rank values identified in
   this memo.

3.2.6 Date-Time Strings

   Date-time strings are represented by the DATETIME data type.  Each
   date-time string identifies a particular instant in time; ranges are
   not supported.

   Date-time strings are formatted according to a subset of ISO
   8601:2000 [6], as show below. Section references in parentheses refer
   to sections of the ISO 8601:2000 standard.

   1.  Dates MUST be formatted as follows:

          YYYY-MM-DD

       where YYYY is the four- digit year, MM is the two-digit month
       (01-12), and DD is the two- digit day (01-31).  (Section 5.2.1.1,
       "Complete representation -- Extended format.")

   2.  Times MUST be formatted as follows:

          hh:mm:ss

       where hh is the two-digit hour (00-24), mm is the two-digit
       minute (00-59), and ss is the two-digit second (00-60).  (Section
       5.3.1.1, "Complete representation -- Extended format.")

       Note that midnight has two representations, 00:00:00 and
       24:00:00. Both representations MUST be supported by
       IDMEF-compliant applications, however, the 00:00:00
       representation SHOULD be used whenever possible.

       Note also that this format accounts for leap seconds.  Positive
       leap seconds are inserted between 23:59:59Z and 24:00:00Z and are
       represented as 23:59:60Z.  Negative leap seconds are achieved by
       the omission of 23:59:59Z.  IDMEF-compliant applications MUST
       support leap seconds.

   3.  Times MAY be formatted to include a decimal fraction of seconds,
       as follows:

          hh:mm:ss.ss     or
          hh:mm:ss,ss

       As many digits as necessary may follow the decimal sign (at least



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       one digit must follow the decimal sign).  Decimal fractions of
       hours and minutes are not supported.  (Section 5.3.1.3,
       "Representation of decimal fractions.")

       IDMEF-compliant applications MUST support the use of both decimal
       signs ('.'  and ',').

       Note that the number of digits in the fraction part does not
       imply anything about accuracy -- i.e., "00.100000", "00,1000" and
       "00.1" are all equivalent.

   4.  Times MUST be formatted to include (a) an indication that the
       time is in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), or (b) an indication
       of the difference between the specified time and Coordinated
       Universal Time.

       *  Times in UTC MUST be formatted by appending the letter 'Z' to
          the time string as follows:

             hh:mm:ssZ
             hh:mm:ss.ssZ
             hh:mm:ss,ssZ

          (Section 5.3.3, "Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) -- Extended
          format.")

       *  If the time is ahead of or equal to UTC, a '+' sign is
          appended to the time string; if the time is behind UTC, a '-'
          sign is appended. Following the sign, the number of hours and
          minutes representing the different from UTC is appended, as
          follows:

             hh:mm:ss+hh:mm
             hh:mm:ss-hh:mm
             hh:mm:ss.ss+hh:mm
             hh:mm:ss.ss-hh:mm
             hh:mm:ss,ss+hh:mm
             hh:mm:ss,ss-hh:mm

          The difference from UTC MUST be specified in both hours and
          minutes, even if the minutes component is 0.  A "difference"
          of "+00:00" is equivalent to UTC.  (Section 5.3.4.2, "Local
          time and the difference with Coordinated Universal Time --
          Extended Format.")

   5.  Date-time strings are created by joining the date and time
       strings with the letter 'T', as shown below:




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          YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ssZ
          YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.ssZ
          YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss,ssZ
          YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss+hh:mm
          YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss-hh:mm
          YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.ss+hh:mm
          YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.ss-hh:mm
          YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss,ss+hh:mm
          YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss,ss-hh:mm

       (Section 5.4.1, "Complete representation -- Extended format.")

   In summary, IDMEF date-time strings MUST adhere to one of the nine
   templates identified in Paragraph 5, above.

3.2.7 NTP Timestamps

   NTP timestamps are represented by the NTPSTAMP data type, and are
   described in detail in [7] and [8]. An NTP timestamp is a 64-bit
   unsigned fixed-point number. The integer part is in the first 32
   bits, and the fraction part is in the last 32 bits.

   Within IDMEF messages, NTP timestamps MUST be encoded as two 32-bit
   hexadecimal values, separated by a period ('.').  For example,
   "0x12345678.0x87654321".

   See also Section 6.4 for more information on NTP timestamps.

3.2.8 Port Lists

   Port lists are represented by the PORTLIST data type, and consist of
   a comma-separated list of numbers (individual integers) and ranges
   (N-M means ports N through M, inclusive).  Any combination of numbers
   and ranges may be used in a single list.  For example,
   "5-25,37,42,43,53,69-119,123-514".

3.2.9 Unique Identifiers

   There are two types of unique identifiers used in this specification.
   Both types are represented by STRING data types.

   These identifiers are implemented as attributes on the relevant XML
   elements, and must have unique values as follows:

   1.  The Analyzer class' (Section 4.2.4.1) "analyzerid" attribute, if
       specified, MUST have a value that is unique across all analyzers
       in the intrusion detection environment.




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       The "analyzerid" attribute is not required to be globally unique,
       only unique within the intrusion detection environment of which
       the analyzer is a member.  It is permissible for two analyzers,
       in different intrusion detection environments, to have the same
       value for "analyzerid".

       The default value is "0", which indicates that the analyzer
       cannot generate unique identifiers.

   2.  The Alert, Heartbeat, Source, Target, Node, User, Process,
       Service, File, Address, and UserId classes' (Section 4.2.2,
       Section 4.2.3, Section 4.2.4.3, Section 4.2.4.4, Section 4.2.7.1,
       Section 4.2.7.2, Section 4.2.7.3, Section 4.2.7.4, Section
       4.2.7.5, Section 4.2.7.1.1, and Section 4.2.7.2.1) "ident"
       attribute, if specified, MUST have a value that is unique across
       all messages sent by the individual analyzer.

       The "ident" attribute value MUST be unique for each particular
       combination of data identifying an object, not for each object.
       Objects may have more than one "ident" value associated with
       them. For example, an identification of a host by name would have
       one value, while an identification of that host by address would
       have another value, and an identification of that host by both
       name and address would have still another value.  Furthermore,
       different analyzers may produce different values for the same
       information.

       The "ident" attribute by itself provides a unique identifier only
       among all the "ident" values sent by a particular analyzer.  But
       when combined with the "analyzerid" value for the analyzer, a
       value that is unique across the intrusion detection environment
       is created.  Again, there is no requirement for global
       uniqueness.

       The default value is "0", which indicates that the analyzer
       cannot generate unique identifiers.

   The specification of methods for creating the unique values contained
   in these attributes is outside the scope of this document.












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4. The IDMEF Data Model and XML DTD

   In this section, the individual components of the IDMEF data model
   are explained in detail.  UML diagrams of the model are provided to
   show how the components are related to each other, and relevant
   sections of the XML DTD are presented to show how the model is
   translated into XML.

4.1 Data Model Overview

   The relationship between the principal components of the data model
   is shown in Figure 1 (occurrence indicators and attributes are
   omitted).

   The top-level class for all IDMEF messages is IDMEF-Message; each
   type of message is a subclass of this top-level class.  There are
   presently two types of messages defined; Alerts and Heartbeats.
   Within each message, subclasses of the message class are used to
   provide the detailed information carried in the message.

   It is important to note that the data model does not specify how an
   alert should be classified or identified.  For example, a port scan
   may be identified by one analyzer as a single attack against multiple
   targets, while another analyzer might identify it as multiple attacks
   from a single source.  However, once an analyzer has determined the
   type of alert it plans to send, the data model dictates how that
   alert should be formatted.

                               +---------------+
                               | IDMEF-Message |
                               +---------------+
                                      /_\
                                       |
          +----------------------------+-------+
          |                                    |
      +-------+   +----------------+     +-----------+   +----------------+
      | Alert |<>-|    Analyzer    |     | Heartbeat |<>-|    Analyzer    |
      +-------+   +----------------+     +-----------+   +----------------+
      |       |   +----------------+     |           |   +----------------+
      |       |<>-|   CreateTime   |     |           |<>-|   CreateTime   |
      |       |   +----------------+     |           |   +----------------+
      |       |   +----------------+     |           |   +----------------+
      |       |<>-|   DetectTime   |     |           |<>-| AdditionalData |
      |       |   +----------------+     +-----------+   +----------------+
      |       |   +----------------+
      |       |<>-|  AnalyzerTime  |
      |       |   +----------------+
      |       |   +--------+   +----------+



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      |       |<>-| Source |<>-|   Node   |
      |       |   +--------+   +----------+
      |       |   |        |   +----------+
      |       |   |        |<>-|   User   |
      |       |   |        |   +----------+
      |       |   |        |   +----------+
      |       |   |        |<>-| Process  |
      |       |   |        |   +----------+
      |       |   |        |   +----------+
      |       |   |        |<>-| Service  |
      |       |   +--------+   +----------+
      |       |   +--------+   +----------+
      |       |<>-| Target |<>-|   Node   |
      |       |   +--------+   +----------+
      |       |   |        |   +----------+
      |       |   |        |<>-|   User   |
      |       |   |        |   +----------+
      |       |   |        |   +----------+
      |       |   |        |<>-| Process  |
      |       |   |        |   +----------+
      |       |   |        |   +--------- +
      |       |   |        |<>-| Service  |       +----------------+
      |       |   |        |   +----------+  +----| Classification |
      |       |   |        |   +----------+  |    +----------------+
      |       |   |        |<>-| FileList |  |    +----------------+
      |       |   +--------+   +----------+  | +--|   Assessment   |
      |       |<>----------------------------+ |  +----------------+
      |       |<>------------------------------+  +----------------+
      |       |<>---------------------------------| AdditionalData |
      +-------+                                   +----------------+

                     Figure 1: Data model overview


4.2 The Message Classes

   The individual classes are described in the following sections.

4.2.1 The IDMEF-Message Class

   All IDMEF messages are instances of the IDMEF-Message class; it is
   the top-level class of the IDMEF data model, as well as the IDMEF
   DTD.  There are currently two types (subclasses) of IDMEF-Message:
   Alert and Heartbeat.







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   Because DTDs do not support subclassing (see Section Appendix C.3.4),
   the inheritance relationship between IDMEF-Message and the Alert and
   Heartbeat subclasses shown in Figure 1 has been replaced with an
   aggregate relationship.  This is declared in the IDMEF DTD as
   follows:

         <!ENTITY % attlist.idmef                "
             version             CDATA                   #FIXED    '1.0'
           ">
         <!ELEMENT IDMEF-Message                 (
             (Alert | Heartbeat)*
           )>
         <!ATTLIST IDMEF-Message
             %attlist.idmef;
           >

   The IDMEF-Message class has a single attribute:

   version

      The version of the IDMEF-Message specification (this document)
      this message conforms to.  Applications specifying a value for
      this attribute MUST specify the value "1.0".


4.2.2 The Alert Class

   Generally, every time an analyzer detects an event that it has been
   configured to look for, it sends an Alert message to its manager(s).
   Depending on the analyzer, an Alert message may correspond to a
   single detected event, or multiple detected events.  Alerts occur
   asynchronously in response to outside events.

   An Alert message is composed of several aggregate classes, as shown
   in Figure 3.  The aggregate classes themselves are described in
   Section 4.2.4, Section 4.2.5, and Section 4.2.6.

              +---------------+
              |    Alert      |
              +---------------+            +------------------+
              | STRING ident  |<>----------|     Analyzer     |
              |               |            +------------------+
              |               |            +------------------+
              |               |<>----------|    CreateTime    |
              |               |            +------------------+
              |               |       0..1 +------------------+
              |               |<>----------|    DetectTime    |
              |               |            +------------------+



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              |               |       0..1 +------------------+
              |               |<>----------|   AnalyzerTime   |
              |               |            +------------------+
              |               |       0..* +------------------+
              |               |<>----------|      Source      |
              |               |            +------------------+
              |               |       0..* +------------------+
              |               |<>----------|      Target      |
              |               |            +------------------+
              |               |       1..* +------------------+
              |               |<>----------|  Classification  |
              |               |            +------------------+
              |               |       0..1 +------------------+
              |               |<>----------|    Assessment    |
              |               |            +------------------+
              |               |       0..* +------------------+
              |               |<>----------|  AdditionalData  |
              |               |            +------------------+
              +---------------+
                     /_\
                      |
                      +----+------------+-------------+
                           |            |             |
                +-------------------+   |   +-------------------+
                |     ToolAlert     |   |   |  CorrelationAlert |
                +-------------------+   |   +-------------------+
                                        |
                              +-------------------+
                              |   OverflowAlert   |
                              +-------------------+

                       Figure 3: The Alert Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Alert are:

   Analyzer

      Exactly one.  Identification information for the analyzer that
      originated the alert.

   CreateTime

      Exactly one.  The time the alert was created.  Of the three times
      that may be provided with an Alert, this is the only one that is
      required.






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   DetectTime

      Zero or one.  The time the event(s) leading up to the alert was
      detected.  In the case of more than one event, the time the first
      event was detected.  In some circumstances, this may not be the
      same value as CreateTime.

   AnalyzerTime

      Zero or one.  The current time on the analyzer (see Section 6.3).

   Source

      Zero or more.  The source(s) of the event(s) leading up to the
      alert.

   Target

      Zero or more.  The target(s) of the event(s) leading up to the
      alert.

   Classification

      One or more.  The "name" of the alert, or other information
      allowing the manager to determine what it is.

   Assessment

      Zero or one.  Information about the impact of the event, actions
      taken by the analyzer in response to it, and the analyzer's
      confidence in its evaluation.

   AdditionalData

      Zero or more.  Information included by the analyzer that does not
      fit into the data model.  This may be an atomic piece of data, or
      a large amount of data provided through an extension to the IDMEF
      (see Section 5).

   Because DTDs do not support subclassing (see Appendix C.3.4), the
   inheritance relationship between Alert and the ToolAlert,
   CorrelationAlert, and OverflowAlert subclasses shown in Figure 3 has
   been replaced with an aggregate relationship.








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   Alert is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT Alert                         (
             Analyzer, CreateTime, DetectTime?, AnalyzerTime?, Source*,
             Target*, Classification+, Assessment?, (ToolAlert |
             OverflowAlert | CorrelationAlert)?, AdditionalData*
           )>
         <!ATTLIST Alert
             ident               CDATA                   '0'
           >

   The Alert class has one attribute:

   ident

      Optional.  A unique identifier for the alert, see Section 3.2.9.


4.2.2.1 The ToolAlert Class

   The ToolAlert class carries additional information related to the use
   of attack tools or malevolent programs such as Trojan horses, and can
   be used by the analyzer when it is able to identify these tools.  It
   is intended to group one or more previously-sent alerts together, to
   say "these alerts were all the result of someone using this tool."

   The ToolAlert class is composed of three aggregate classes, as shown
   in Figure 5.























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             +------------------+
             |      Alert       |
             +------------------+
                     /_\
                      |
             +------------------+
             |    ToolAlert     |
             +------------------+            +-------------------+
             |                  |<>----------|        name       |
             |                  |            +-------------------+
             |                  |       0..1 +-------------------+
             |                  |<>----------|      command      |
             |                  |            +-------------------+
             |                  |       1..* +-------------------+
             |                  |<>----------|    alertident     |
             |                  |            +-------------------+
             |                  |            | STRING analyzerid |
             |                  |            +-------------------+
             +------------------+

                     Figure 5: The ToolAlert Class

   The aggregate classes that make up ToolAlert are:

   name

      Exactly one.  STRING.  The reason for grouping the alerts
      together, for example, the name of a particular tool.

   command

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The command or operation that the tool was
      asked to perform, for example, a BackOrifice ping.

   alertident

      One or more.  STRING.  The list of alert identifiers that are
      related to this alert.  Because alert identifiers are only unique
      across the alerts sent by a single analyzer, the optional
      "analyzerid" attribute of "alertident" should be used to identify
      the analyzer that a particular alert came from.  If the
      "analyzerid" is not provided, the alert is assumed to have come
      from the same analyzer that is sending the ToolAlert.








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   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT ToolAlert                     (
             name, command?, alertident+
           )>
         <!ELEMENT alertident          (#PCDATA) >
         <!ATTLIST alertident
             analyzerid          CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           >


4.2.2.2 The CorrelationAlert Class

   The CorrelationAlert class carries additional information related to
   the correlation of alert information.  It is intended to group one or
   more previously-sent alerts together, to say "these alerts are all
   related."

   The CorrelationAlert class is composed of two aggregate classes, as
   shown in Figure 7.

             +------------------+
             |      Alert       |
             +------------------+
                     /_\
                      |
             +------------------+
             | CorrelationAlert |
             +------------------+            +-------------------+
             |                  |<>----------|        name       |
             |                  |            +-------------------+
             |                  |       1..* +-------------------+
             |                  |<>----------|    alertident     |
             |                  |            +-------------------+
             |                  |            | STRING analyzerid |
             |                  |            +-------------------+
             +------------------+

                  Figure 7: The CorrelationAlert Class

   The aggregate classes that make up CorrelationAlert are:

   name

      Exactly one.  STRING.  The reason for grouping the alerts
      together, for example, a particular correlation method.





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   alertident

      One or more.  STRING.  The list of alert identifiers that are
      related to this alert.  Because alert identifiers are only unique
      across the alerts sent by a single analyzer, the optional
      "analyzerid" attribute of "alertident" should be used to identify
      the analyzer that a particular alert came from.  If the
      "analyzerid" is not provided, the alert is assumed to have come
      from the same analyzer that is sending the CorrelationAlert.

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows.

         <!ELEMENT CorrelationAlert              (
             name, alertident+
           )>
         <!ELEMENT alertident          (#PCDATA) >
         <!ATTLIST alertident
             analyzerid          CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           >


4.2.2.3 The OverflowAlert Class

   The OverflowAlert carries additional information related to buffer
   overflow attacks.  It is intended to enable an analyzer to provide
   the details of the overflow attack itself.

   The OverflowAlert class is composed of three aggregate classes, as
   shown in Figure 9.






















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                  +------------------+
                  |      Alert       |
                  +------------------+
                          /_\
                           |
                  +------------------+
                  |  OverflowAlert   |
                  +------------------+            +---------+
                  |                  |<>----------| program |
                  |                  |            +---------+
                  |                  |       0..1 +---------+
                  |                  |<>----------| size    |
                  |                  |            +---------+
                  |                  |       0..1 +---------+
                  |                  |<>----------| buffer  |
                  |                  |            +---------+
                  +------------------+

                   Figure 9: The OverflowAlert Class

   The aggregate classes that make up OverflowAlert are:

   program

      Exactly one.  STRING.  The program that the overflow attack
      attempted to run (note: this is not the program that was
      attacked).

   size

      Zero or one.  INTEGER.  The size, in bytes, of the overflow (i.e.,
      the number of bytes the attacker sent).

   buffer

      Zero or one.  BYTE[].  Some or all of the overflow data itself
      (dependent on how much the analyzer can capture).

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT OverflowAlert                 (
             program, size?, buffer?
           )>


4.2.3 The Heartbeat Class

   Analyzers use Heartbeat messages to indicate their current status to



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   managers.  Heartbeats are intended to be sent in a regular period,
   say every ten minutes or every hour.  The receipt of a Heartbeat
   message from an analyzer indicates to the manager that the analyzer
   is up and running; lack of a Heartbeat message (or more likely, lack
   of some number of consecutive Heartbeat messages) indicates that the
   analyzer or its network connection has failed.

   All managers MUST support the receipt of Heartbeat messages; however,
   the use of these messages by analyzers is OPTIONAL.  Developers of
   manager software SHOULD permit the software to be configured on a
   per-analyzer basis to use/not use Heartbeat messages.

   A Heartbeat message is composed of several aggregate classes, as
   shown in Figure 11.  The aggregate classes themselves are described
   in Section 4.2.4 and Section 4.2.5.

            +--------------+
               |  Heartbeat   |
               +--------------+            +------------------+
               | STRING ident |<>----------|     Analyzer     |
               |              |            +------------------+
               |              |            +------------------+
               |              |<>----------|    CreateTime    |
               |              |            +------------------+
               |              |       0..1 +------------------+
               |              |<>----------|   AnalyzerTime   |
               |              |            +------------------+
               |              |       0..* +------------------+
               |              |<>----------|  AdditionalData  |
               |              |            +------------------+
               +--------------+

                     Figure 11: The Heartbeat Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Heartbeat are:

   Analyzer

      Exactly one.  Identification information for the analyzer that
      originated the heartbeat.

   CreateTime

      Exactly one.  The time the heartbeat was created.

   AnalyzerTime





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      Zero or one.  The current time on the analyzer (see Section 6.3).

   AdditionalData

      Zero or more.  Information included by the analyzer that does not
      fit into the data model.  This may be an atomic piece of data, or
      a large amount of data provided through an extension to the IDMEF
      (see Section 5).

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT Heartbeat                     (
             Analyzer, CreateTime, AnalyzerTime?, AdditionalData*
           )>
         <!ATTLIST Heartbeat
             ident               CDATA                   '0'
           >

   The Heartbeat class has one attribute:

   ident

      Optional.  A unique identifier for the heartbeat, see Section
      3.2.9.


4.2.4 The Core Classes

   The core classes -- Analyzer, Source, Target, Classification, and
   AdditionalData -- are the main parts of Alerts and Heartbeats, as
   shown in Figure 13.




















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                +-----------+                +----------------+
                | Heartbeat |        +-------|    Analyzer    |
                +-----------+        |       +----------------+
                |           |<>---+--+
                +-----------+     |  |  0..* +----------------+
                                  |  +-------| AdditionalData |
                                  |          +----------------+
                +-----------+     |
                |   Alert   |     |     0..* +----------------+
                +-----------+     |  +-------|     Source     |
                |           |<>---+  |       +----------------+
                |           |        |  0..* +----------------+
                |           |        +-------|     Target     |
                |           |        |       +----------------+
                |           |<>------+
                +-----------+        |  1..* +----------------+
                                     +-------| Classification |
                                             +----------------+

                      Figure 13: The Core Classes


4.2.4.1 The Analyzer Class

   The Analyzer class identifies the analyzer from which the alert or
   heartbeat message originates.  Only one analyzer may be encoded for
   each alert or heartbeat, and that MUST be the analyzer at which the
   alert or heartbeat originated.  Although the IDMEF data model does
   not prevent the use of hierarchical intrusion detection systems
   (where alerts get relayed up the tree), it does not provide any way
   to record the identity of the "relay" analyzers along the path from
   the originating analyzer to the manager that ultimately receives the
   alert.

   The Analyzer class is composed of two aggregate classes, as shown in
   Figure 14.















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                +---------------------+
                |      Analyzer       |
                +---------------------+       0..1 +---------+
                | STRING analyzerid   |<>----------|  Node   |
                | STRING manufacturer |            +---------+
                | STRING model        |       0..1 +---------+
                | STRING version      |<>----------| Process |
                | STRING class        |            +---------+
                | STRING ostype       |
                | STRING osversion    |
                +---------------------+

                     Figure 14: The Analyzer Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Analyzer are:

   Node

      Zero or one.  Information about the host or device on which the
      analyzer resides (network address, network name, etc.).

   Process

      Zero or one.  Information about the process in which the analyzer
      is executing.

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT Analyzer                      (
             Node?, Process?
           )>
         <!ATTLIST Analyzer
             analyzerid          CDATA                   '0'
             manufacturer        CDATA                   #IMPLIED
             model               CDATA                   #IMPLIED
             version             CDATA                   #IMPLIED
             class               CDATA                   #IMPLIED
             ostype              CDATA                   #IMPLIED
             osversion           CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           >

   The Analyzer class has seven attributes:

   analyzerid

      Optional (but see below).  A unique identifier for the analyzer,
      see Section 3.2.9.




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      This attribute is only "partially" optional.  If the analyzer
      makes use of the "ident" attributes on other classes to provide
      unique identifiers for those objects, then it MUST also provide a
      valid "analyzerid" attribute.  This requirement is dictated by the
      uniqueness requirements of the "ident" attribute (they are unique
      only within the context of a particular "analyzerid").  If the
      analyzer does not make use of the "ident" attributes however, it
      may also omit the "analyzerid" attribute.

   manufacturer

      Optional.  The manufacturer of the analyzer software and/or
      hardware.

   model

      Optional.  The model name/number of the analyzer software and/or
      hardware.

   version

      Optional.  The version number of the analyzer software and/or
      hardware.

   class

      Optional.  The class of analyzer software and/or hardware.

   ostype

      Optional.  Operating system name.  On POSIX 1003.1 compliant
      systems, this is the value returned in utsname.sysname by the
      uname() system call, or the output of the "uname -s" command.

   osversion

      Optional.  Operating system version.  On POSIX 1003.1 compliant
      systems, this is the value returned in utsname.release by the
      uname() system call, or the output of the "uname -r" command.

   The "manufacturer", "model", "version", and "class" attributes'
   contents are vendor-specific, but may be used together to identify
   different types of analyzers (and perhaps make determinations about
   the contents to expect in other vendor-specific fields of IDMEF
   messages).






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4.2.4.2 The Classification Class

   The Classification class provides the "name" of an alert, or other
   information allowing the manager to determine what it is.

   The Classification class is composed of two aggregate classes, as
   shown in Figure 16.

                    +----------------+
                    | Classification |
                    +----------------+            +------+
                    | STRING origin  |<>----------| name |
                    |                |            +------+
                    |                |            +------+
                    |                |<>----------| url  |
                    |                |            +------+
                    +----------------+

                  Figure 16: The Classification Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Classification are:

   name

      Exactly one.  STRING.  The name of the alert, from one of the
      origins listed below.

   url

      Exactly one.  STRING.  A URL at which the manager (or the human
      operator of the manager) can find additional information about the
      alert.  The document pointed to by the URL may include an in-depth
      description of the attack, appropriate countermeasures, or other
      information deemed relevant by the vendor.

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.origin               "
             ( unknown | bugtraqid | cve | vendor-specific )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT Classification                (
             name, url
           )>
         <!ATTLIST Classification
             origin              %attvals.origin;        'unknown'
           >

   The Classification class has one attribute:



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   origin

      Required.  The source from which the name of the alert originates.
      The permitted values for this attribute are shown below.  The
      default value is "unknown".  (See also Section 10.)

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | unknown              | Origin of the name  |
   |                      |                      | is not known        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | bugtraqid            | The SecurityFocus   |
   |                      |                      | ("Bugtraq")         |
   |                      |                      | vulnerability       |
   |                      |                      | database identifier |
   |                      |                      | (http://www.securit |
   |                      |                      | yfocus.com/vdb)     |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | cve                  | The Common          |
   |                      |                      | Vulnerabilities and |
   |                      |                      | Exposures (CVE)     |
   |                      |                      | name                |
   |                      |                      | (http://www.cve.mit |
   |                      |                      | re.org/)            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | vendor-specific      | A vendor-specific   |
   |                      |                      | name (and hence,    |
   |                      |                      | URL); this can be   |
   |                      |                      | used to provide     |
   |                      |                      | product-specific    |
   |                      |                      | information         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+


4.2.4.3 The Source Class

   The Source class contains information about the possible source(s) of
   the event(s) that generated an alert.  An event may have more than
   one source (e.g., in a distributed denial of service attack).

   The Source class is composed of four aggregate classes, as shown in
   Figure 18.








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                  +------------------+
                  |      Source      |
                  +------------------+       0..1 +---------+
                  | STRING ident     |<>----------|  Node   |
                  | ENUM spoofed     |            +---------+
                  | STRING interface |       0..1 +---------+
                  |                  |<>----------|  User   |
                  |                  |            +---------+
                  |                  |       0..1 +---------+
                  |                  |<>----------| Process |
                  |                  |            +---------+
                  |                  |       0..1 +---------+
                  |                  |<>----------| Service |
                  |                  |            +---------+
                  +------------------+

                      Figure 18: The Source Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Source are:

   Node

      Zero or one.  Information about the host or device that appears to
      be causing the events (network address, network name, etc.).

   User

      Zero or one.  Information about the user that appears to be
      causing the event(s).

   Process

      Zero or one.  Information about the process that appears to be
      causing the event(s).

   Service

      Zero or one.  Information about the network service involved in
      the event(s).












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   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.yesno                "
             ( unknown | yes | no )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT Source                        (
             Node?, User?, Process?, Service?
           )>
         <!ATTLIST Source
             ident               CDATA                   '0'
             spoofed             %attvals.yesno;         'unknown'
             interface           CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           >

   The Source class has three attributes:

   ident

      Optional.  A unique identifier for this source, see Section 3.2.9.

   spoofed

      Optional.  An indication of whether the source is, as far as the
      analyzer can determine, a decoy.  The permitted values for this
      attribute are shown below.  The default value is "unknown".  (See
      also Section 10.)

      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+
      | Rank | Keyword | Description                            |
      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+
      |    0 | unknown | Accuracy of source information unknown |
      |      |         |                                        |
      |    1 | yes     | Source is believed to be a decoy       |
      |      |         |                                        |
      |    2 | no      | Source is believed to be "real"        |
      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+

   interface

      Optional.  May be used by a network-based analyzer with multiple
      interfaces to indicate which interface this source was seen on.


4.2.4.4 The Target Class

   The Target class contains information about the possible target(s) of
   the event(s) that generated an alert.  An event may have more than
   one target (e.g., in the case of a port sweep).



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   The Target class is composed of four aggregate classes, as shown in
   Figure 20.

                  +------------------+
                  |      Target      |
                  +------------------+       0..1 +----------+
                  | STRING ident     |<>----------|   Node   |
                  | ENUM decoy       |            +----------+
                  | STRING interface |       0..1 +----------+
                  |                  |<>----------|   User   |
                  |                  |            +----------+
                  |                  |       0..1 +----------+
                  |                  |<>----------| Process  |
                  |                  |            +----------+
                  |                  |       0..1 +----------+
                  |                  |<>----------| Service  |
                  |                  |            +----------+
                  |                  |       0..1 +----------+
                  |                  |<>----------| FileList |
                  |                  |            +----------+
                  +------------------+

                      Figure 20: The Target Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Target are:

   Node

      Zero or one.  Information about the host or device at which the
      event(s) (network address, network name, etc.) is being directed.

   User

      Zero or one.  Information about the user at which the event(s) is
      being directed.

   Process

      Zero or one.  Information about the process at which the event(s)
      is being directed.

   Service

      Zero or one.  Information about the network service involved in
      the event(s).






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   FileList

      Zero or one.  Information about file(s) involved in the event(s).

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.yesno                "
             ( unknown | yes | no )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT Target                        (
             Node?, User?, Process?, Service?, FileList?
           )>
         <!ATTLIST Target
             ident               CDATA                   '0'
             decoy               %attvals.yesno;         'unknown'
             interface           CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           >

   The Target class has three attributes:

   ident

      Optional.  A unique identifier for this target, see Section 3.2.9.

   decoy

      Optional.  An indication of whether the target is, as far as the
      analyzer can determine, a decoy.  The permitted values for this
      attribute are shown below.  The default value is "unknown".  (See
      also Section 10.)

      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+
      | Rank | Keyword | Description                            |
      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+
      |    0 | unknown | Accuracy of target information unknown |
      |      |         |                                        |
      |    1 | yes     | Target is believed to be a decoy       |
      |      |         |                                        |
      |    2 | no      | Target is believed to be "real"        |
      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+

   interface

      Optional.  May be used by a network-based analyzer with multiple
      interfaces to indicate which interface this target was seen on.






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4.2.4.5 The Assessment Class

   The Assessment class is used to provide the analyzer's assessment of
   an event -- its impact, actions taken in response, and confidence.

   The Assessment class is composed of three aggregate classes, as shown
   in Figure 22.

                  +------------------+
                  |   Assessment     |
                  +------------------+       0..1 +------------+
                  |                  |<>----------|   Impact   |
                  |                  |            +------------+
                  |                  |       0..* +------------+
                  |                  |<>----------|   Action   |
                  |                  |            +------------+
                  |                  |       0..1 +------------+
                  |                  |<>----------| Confidence |
                  |                  |            +------------+
                  +------------------+

                    Figure 22: The Assessment Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Assessment are:

   Impact

      Zero or one.  The analyzer's assessment of the impact of the event
      on the target(s).

   Action

      Zero or more.  The action(s) taken by the analyzer in response to
      the event.

   Confidence

      A measurement of the confidence the analyzer has in its evaluation
      of the event.

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT Assessment                    (
             Impact?, Action*, Confidence?
           )>






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4.2.4.6 The AdditionalData Class

   The AdditionalData class is used to provide information that cannot
   be represented by the data model.  AdditionalData can be used to
   provide atomic data (integers, strings, etc.) in cases where only
   small amounts of additional information need to be sent; it can also
   be used to extend the data model and the DTD to support the
   transmission of complex data (such as packet headers).  Detailed
   instructions for extending the data model and the DTD are provided in
   Section 5.

   The AdditionalData element is declared in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.adtype               "
             ( boolean | byte | character | date-time | integer |
               ntpstamp | portlist | real | string | xml )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT AdditionalData            ANY >
         <!ATTLIST AdditionalData
             type                %attvals.adtype;        'string'
             meaning             CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           >

   The AdditionalData class has two attributes:

   type

      Required.  The type of data included in the element content. The
      permitted values for this attribute are shown below.  The default
      value is "string".  (See also Section 10.)

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | boolean              | The element         |
   |                      |                      | contains a boolean  |
   |                      |                      | value, i.e., the    |
   |                      |                      | strings "true" or   |
   |                      |                      | "false"             |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | byte                 | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a single 8-bit   |
   |                      |                      | byte (see Section   |
   |                      |                      | 3.2.4)              |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | character            | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a single         |
   |                      |                      | character (see      |



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   |                      |                      | Section 3.2.3)      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | date-time            | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a date-time      |
   |                      |                      | string (see Section |
   |                      |                      | 3.2.6)              |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | integer              | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is an integer (see  |
   |                      |                      | Section 3.2.1)      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | ntpstamp             | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is an NTP timestamp |
   |                      |                      | (see Section 3.2.7) |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    6 | portlist             | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a list of ports  |
   |                      |                      | (see Section 3.2.8) |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    7 | real                 | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a real number    |
   |                      |                      | (see Section 3.2.2) |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    8 | string               | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a string (see    |
   |                      |                      | Section 3.2.3)      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    9 | xml                  | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is XML-tagged data  |
   |                      |                      | (see Section 5.2)   |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   meaning

      Optional.  A string describing the meaning of the element content.
      These values will be vendor/implementation dependent; the method
      for ensuring that managers understand the strings sent by analyzer
      is outside the scope of this specification.


4.2.5 The Time Classes

   The data model provides three classes for representing time. These
   classes are aggregates of the Alert and Heartbeat classes.







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4.2.5.1 The CreateTime Class

   The CreateTime class is used to indicate the date and time the alert
   or heartbeat was created by the analyzer.  It is represented in the
   XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT CreateTime          (#PCDATA) >
         <!ATTLIST CreateTime
             ntpstamp            CDATA                   #REQUIRED
           >

   The DATETIME format of the <CreateTime> element content is described
   in Section 3.2.6.

   The CreateTime class has one attribute:

   ntpstamp

      Required.  The NTP timestamp representing the same date and time
      as the element content. The NTPSTAMP format of this attribute's
      value is described in Section 3.2.7.

   If the date and time represented by the element content and the NTP
   timestamp differ (should "never" happen), the value in the NTP
   timestamp MUST be used.

4.2.5.2 The DetectTime Class

   The DetectTime class is used to indicate the date and time the
   event(s) producing an alert was detected by the analyzer.  In the
   case of more than one event, the time the first event was detected.
   (This may or may not be the same time as CreateTime; analyzers are
   not required to send alerts immediately upon detection). It is
   represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT DetectTime          (#PCDATA) >
         <!ATTLIST DetectTime
             ntpstamp            CDATA                   #REQUIRED
           >

   The DATETIME format of the <DetectTime> element content is described
   in Section 3.2.6.

   The DetectTime class has one attribute:







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   ntpstamp

      Required.  The NTP timestamp representing the same date and time
      as the element content. The NTPSTAMP format of this attribute's
      value is described in Section 3.2.7.

   If the date and time represented by the element content and the NTP
   timestamp differ (should "never" happen), the value in the NTP
   timestamp MUST be used.

4.2.5.3 The AnalyzerTime Class

   The AnalyzerTime class is used to indicate the current date and time
   on the analyzer.  Its values should be filled in as late as possible
   in the message transmission process, ideally immediately before
   placing the message "on the wire."  It is represented in the XML DTD
   as follows:

         <!ELEMENT AnalyzerTime        (#PCDATA) >
         <!ATTLIST AnalyzerTime
             ntpstamp            CDATA                   #REQUIRED
           >

   The DATETIME format of the <AnalyzerTime> element content is
   described in Section 3.2.6.

   The AnalyzerTime class has one attribute:

   ntpstamp

      Required.  The NTP timestamp representing the same date and time
      as the element content. The NTPSTAMP format of this attribute's
      value is described in Section 3.2.7.

   If the date and time represented by the element content and the NTP
   timestamp differ (should "never" happen), the value in the NTP
   timestamp MUST be used.

   The use of <AnalyzerTime> to perform rudimentary time synchronization
   between analyzers and managers is discussed in Section 6.3.

4.2.6 The Assessment Classes

   The data model provides three types of "assessments" that an analyzer
   can make about an event.  These classes are aggregates of the
   Assessment class.





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4.2.6.1 The Impact Class

   The Impact class is used to provide the analyzer's assessment of the
   impact of the event on the target(s).  It is represented in the XML
   DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.severity             "
             ( low | medium | high )
           ">
         <!ENTITY % attvals.completion           "
             ( failed | succeeded )
           ">
         <!ENTITY % attvals.impacttype           "
             ( admin | dos | file | recon | user | other )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT Impact              (#PCDATA) >
         <!ATTLIST Impact
             severity            %attvals.severity;      #IMPLIED
             completion          %attvals.completion;    #IMPLIED
             type                %attvals.impacttype;    'other'
           >

   The Impact class has three attributes:

   severity

      An estimate of the relative severity of the event. The permitted
      values are shown below. There is no default value.  (See also
      Section 10.)

                  +------+---------+-----------------+
                  | Rank | Keyword | Description     |
                  +------+---------+-----------------+
                  |    0 | low     | Low severity    |
                  |      |         |                 |
                  |    1 | medium  | Medium severity |
                  |      |         |                 |
                  |    2 | high    | High severity   |
                  +------+---------+-----------------+

   completion

      An indication of whether the analyzer believes the attempt that
      the event describes was successful or not.  The permitted values
      are shown below.  There is no default value. (See also Section
      10.)





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         +------+-----------+--------------------------------+
         | Rank | Keyword   | Description                    |
         +------+-----------+--------------------------------+
         |    0 | failed    | The attempt was not successful |
         |      |           |                                |
         |    1 | succeeded | The attempt succeeded          |
         +------+-----------+--------------------------------+

   type

      The type of attempt represented by this event, in relatively broad
      categories.  The permitted values are shown below.  The default
      value is "other."  (See also Section 10.)

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | admin                | Administrative      |
   |                      |                      | privileges were     |
   |                      |                      | attempted or        |
   |                      |                      | obtained            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | dos                  | A denial of service |
   |                      |                      | was attempted or    |
   |                      |                      | completed           |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | file                 | An action on a file |
   |                      |                      | was attempted or    |
   |                      |                      | completed           |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | recon                | A reconnaissance    |
   |                      |                      | probe was attempted |
   |                      |                      | or completed        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | user                 | User privileges     |
   |                      |                      | were attempted or   |
   |                      |                      | obtained            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | other                | Anything not in one |
   |                      |                      | of the above        |
   |                      |                      | categories          |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   All three attributes are optional.  The element itself may be empty,
   or may contain a textual description of the impact, if the analyzer
   is able to provide additional details.





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4.2.6.2 The Action Class

   The Action class is used to describe any actions taken by the
   analyzer in response to the event.  Is is represented in the XML DTD
   as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.actioncat            "
             ( block-installed | notification-sent | taken-offline |
               other )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT Action              (#PCDATA) >
         <!ATTLIST Action
             category            %attvals.actioncat;     'other'
           >

   Action has one attribute:

   category

      The type of action taken. The permitted values are shown below.
      The default value is "other."  (See also Section 10.)

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | block-installed      | A block of some     |
   |                      |                      | sort was installed  |
   |                      |                      | to prevent an       |
   |                      |                      | attack from         |
   |                      |                      | reaching its        |
   |                      |                      | destination. The    |
   |                      |                      | block could be a    |
   |                      |                      | port block, address |
   |                      |                      | block, etc., or     |
   |                      |                      | disabling a user    |
   |                      |                      | account.            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | notification-sent    | A notification      |
   |                      |                      | message of some     |
   |                      |                      | sort was sent       |
   |                      |                      | out-of-band (via    |
   |                      |                      | pager, e-mail,      |
   |                      |                      | etc.). Does not     |
   |                      |                      | include the         |
   |                      |                      | transmission of     |
   |                      |                      | this alert.         |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | taken-offline        | A system, computer, |



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   |                      |                      | or user was taken   |
   |                      |                      | offline, as when    |
   |                      |                      | the computer is     |
   |                      |                      | shut down or a user |
   |                      |                      | is logged off.      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | other                | Anything not in one |
   |                      |                      | of the above        |
   |                      |                      | categories.         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

      The element itself may be empty, or may contain a textual
      description of the action, if the analyzer is able to provide
      additional details.


4.2.6.3 The Confidence Class

   The Confidence class is used to represent the analyzer's best
   estimate of the validity of its analysis.  It is represented in the
   XML DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.rating               "
             ( low | medium | high | numeric )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT Confidence          (#PCDATA) >
         <!ATTLIST Confidence
             rating              %attvals.rating;        'numeric'
           >

   The Confidence class has one attribute:

   rating

      The analyzer's rating of its analytical validity.  The permitted
      values are shown below.  The default value is "numeric."  (See
      also Section 10.)

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | low                  | The analyzer has    |
   |                      |                      | little confidence   |
   |                      |                      | in its validity     |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | medium               | The analyzer has    |
   |                      |                      | average confidence  |
   |                      |                      | in its validity     |



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   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | high                 | The analyzer has    |
   |                      |                      | high confidence in  |
   |                      |                      | its validity        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | numeric              | The analyzer has    |
   |                      |                      | provided a          |
   |                      |                      | posterior           |
   |                      |                      | probability value   |
   |                      |                      | indicating its      |
   |                      |                      | confidence in its   |
   |                      |                      | validity            |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   This element should be used only when the analyzer can produce
   meaningful information.  Systems that can output only a rough
   heuristic should use "low", "medium", or "high" as the rating value.
   In this case, the element content should be omitted.

   Systems capable of producing reasonable probability estimates should
   use "numeric" as the rating value and include a numeric confidence
   value in the element content. This numeric value should reflect a
   posterior probability (the probability that an attack has occurred
   given the data seen by the detection system and the model used by the
   system). It is a floating point number between 0.0 and 1.0,
   inclusive. The number of digits should be limited to those
   representable by a single precision floating point value, and may be
   represented as described in Section 3.2.2.

   NOTE: It should be noted that different types of analyzers may
      compute confidence values in different ways and that in many
      cases, confidence values from different analyzers should not be
      compared (for example, if the analyzers use different methods of
      computing or representing confidence, or are of different types or
      configurations).  Care should be taken when implementing systems
      that process confidence values (such as event correlators) not to
      make comparisons or assumptions that cannot be supported by the
      system's knowledge of the environment in which it is working.


4.2.7 The Support Classes

   The support classes make up the major parts of the core classes, and
   are shared between them.

4.2.7.1 The Node Class

   The Node class is used to identify hosts and other network devices



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   (routers, switches, etc.).

   The Node class is composed of three aggregate classes, as shown in
   Figure 31.

                   +---------------+
                   |     Node      |
                   +---------------+       0..1 +----------+
                   | STRING ident  |<>----------| location |
                   | ENUM category |            +----------+
                   |               |       0..1 +----------+
                   |               |<>----------|   name   |
                   |               |            +----------+
                   |               |       0..* +----------+
                   |               |<>----------|  Address |
                   |               |            +----------+
                   +---------------+

                       Figure 31: The Node Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Node are:

   location

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The location of the equipment.

   name

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The name of the equipment.  This
      information MUST be provided if no Address information is given.

   Address

      Zero or more.  The network or hardware address of the equipment.
      Unless a name (above) is provided, at least one address must be
      specified.















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   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.nodecat              "
             ( unknown | ads | afs | coda | dfs | dns | hosts | kerberos |
               nds | nis | nisplus | nt | wfw )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT Node                          (
             location?, (name | Address), Address*
           )>
         <!ATTLIST Node
             ident               CDATA                   '0'
             category            %attvals.nodecat;       'unknown'
           >

   The Node class has two attributes:

   ident

      Optional.  A unique identifier for the node, see Section 3.2.9.

   category

      Optional.  The "domain" from which the name information was
      obtained, if relevant.  The permitted values for this attribute
      are shown below.  The default value is "unknown".  (See also
      Section 10.)

     +------+----------+------------------------------------------+
     | Rank | Keyword  | Description                              |
     +------+----------+------------------------------------------+
     |    0 | unknown  | Domain unknown or not relevant           |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    1 | ads      | Windows 2000 Advanced Directory Services |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    2 | afs      | Andrew File System (Transarc)            |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    3 | coda     | Coda Distributed File System             |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    4 | dfs      | Distributed File System (IBM)            |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    5 | dns      | Domain Name System                       |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    6 | hosts    | Local hosts file                         |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    7 | kerberos | Kerberos realm                           |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    8 | nds      | Novell Directory Services                |
     |      |          |                                          |



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     |    9 | nis      | Network Information Services (Sun)       |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |   10 | nisplus  | Network Information Services Plus (Sun)  |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |   11 | nt       | Windows NT domain                        |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |   12 | wfw      | Windows for Workgroups                   |
     +------+----------+------------------------------------------+


4.2.7.1.1 The Address Class

   The Address class is used to represent network, hardware, and
   application addresses.

   The Address class is composed of two aggregate classes, as shown in
   Figure 33.

                  +------------------+
                  |     Address      |
                  +------------------+            +---------+
                  | STRING ident     |<>----------| address |
                  | ENUM category    |            +---------+
                  | STRING vlan-name |       0..1 +---------+
                  | INTEGER vlan-num |<>----------| netmask |
                  |                  |            +---------+
                  +------------------+

                      Figure 33: The Address Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Address are:

   address

      Exactly one.  STRING.  The address information.  The format of
      this data is governed by the category attribute.

   netmask

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The network mask for the address, if
      appropriate.










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   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.addrcat              "
             ( unknown | atm | e-mail | lotus-notes | mac | sna | vm |
               ipv4-addr | ipv4-addr-hex | ipv4-net | ipv4-net-mask |
               ipv6-addr | ipv6-addr-hex | ipv6-net | ipv6-net-mask )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT Address                       (
             address, netmask?
           )>
         <!ATTLIST Address
             ident               CDATA                   '0'
             category            %attvals.addrcat;       'unknown'
             vlan-name           CDATA                   #IMPLIED
             vlan-num            CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           >

   The Address class has four attributes:

   ident

      Optional.  A unique identifier for the address, see Section 3.2.9.

   category

      Optional.  The type of address represented.  The permitted values
      for this attribute are shown below.  The default value is
      "unknown".  (See also Section 10.)

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | unknown              | Address type        |
   |                      |                      | unknown             |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | atm                  | Asynchronous        |
   |                      |                      | Transfer Mode       |
   |                      |                      | network address     |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | e-mail               | Electronic mail     |
   |                      |                      | address (RFC 822)   |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | lotus-notes          | Lotus Notes e-mail  |
   |                      |                      | address             |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | mac                  | Media Access        |
   |                      |                      | Control (MAC)       |
   |                      |                      | address             |



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   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | sna                  | IBM Shared Network  |
   |                      |                      | Architecture (SNA)  |
   |                      |                      | address             |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    6 | vm                   | IBM VM ("PROFS")    |
   |                      |                      | e-mail address      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    7 | ipv4-addr            | IPv4 host address   |
   |                      |                      | in dotted-decimal   |
   |                      |                      | notation (a.b.c.d)  |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    8 | ipv4-addr-hex        | IPv4 host address   |
   |                      |                      | in hexadecimal      |
   |                      |                      | notation            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    9 | ipv4-net             | IPv4 network        |
   |                      |                      | address in          |
   |                      |                      | dotted-decimal      |
   |                      |                      | notation, slash,    |
   |                      |                      | significant bits    |
   |                      |                      | (a.b.c.d/nn)        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                   10 | ipv4-net-mask        | IPv4 network        |
   |                      |                      | address in          |
   |                      |                      | dotted-decimal      |
   |                      |                      | notation, slash,    |
   |                      |                      | network mask in     |
   |                      |                      | dotted-decimal      |
   |                      |                      | notation            |
   |                      |                      | (a.b.c.d/w.x.y.z)   |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                   11 | ipv6-addr            | IPv6 host address   |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                   12 | ipv6-addr-hex        | IPv6 host address   |
   |                      |                      | in hexadecimal      |
   |                      |                      | notation            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                   13 | ipv6-net             | IPv6 network        |
   |                      |                      | address, slash,     |
   |                      |                      | significant bits    |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                   14 | ipv6-net-mask        | IPv6 network        |
   |                      |                      | address, slash,     |
   |                      |                      | network mask        |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+





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   vlan-name

      Optional.  The name of the Virtual LAN to which the address
      belongs.

   vlan-num

      Optional.  The number of the Virtual LAN to which the address
      belongs.


4.2.7.2 The User Class

   The User class is used to describe users.  It is primarily used as a
   "container" class for the UserId aggregate class, as shown in Figure
   35.

                    +---------------+
                    |     User      |
                    +---------------+       1..* +--------+
                    | STRING ident  |<>----------| UserId |
                    | ENUM category |            +--------+
                    +---------------+

                       Figure 35: The User Class

   The aggregate class contained in User is:

   UserId

      One or more.  Identification of a user, as indicated by its type
      attribute (see Section 4.2.7.2.1).

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.usercat              "
             ( unknown | application | os-device )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT User                          (
             UserId+
           )>
         <!ATTLIST User
             ident               CDATA                   '0'
             category            %attvals.usercat;       'unknown'
           >

   The User class has two attributes:




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   ident

      Optional.  A unique identifier for the user, see Section 3.2.9.

   category

      Optional.  The type of user represented.  The permitted values for
      this attribute are shown below.  The default value is "unknown".
      (See also Section 10.)

      +------+-------------+------------------------------------+
      | Rank | Keyword     | Description                        |
      +------+-------------+------------------------------------+
      |    0 | unknown     | User type unknown                  |
      |      |             |                                    |
      |    1 | application | An application user                |
      |      |             |                                    |
      |    2 | os-device   | An operating system or device user |
      +------+-------------+------------------------------------+


4.2.7.2.1 The UserId Class

   The UserId class provides specific information about a user.  More
   than one UserId can be used within the User class to indicate
   attempts to transition from one user to another, or to provide
   complete information about a user's (or process') privileges.

   The UserId class is composed of two aggregate classes, as shown in
   Figure 37.

                      +--------------+
                      |    UserId    |
                      +--------------+       0..1 +--------+
                      | STRING ident |<>----------|  name  |
                      | ENUM type    |            +--------+
                      |              |       0..1 +--------+
                      |              |<>----------| number |
                      |              |            +--------+
                      +--------------+

                      Figure 37: The UserId Class

   The aggregate classes that make up UserId are:







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   name

      Zero or one.  STRING.  A user or group name.

   number

      Zero or one.  INTEGER.  A user or group number.

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.idtype               "
             ( current-user | original-user | target-user | user-privs |
               current-group | group-privs | other-privs )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT UserId                        (
             (name, number?) | (number, name?)
           )>
         <!ATTLIST UserId
             ident               CDATA                   '0'
             type                %attvals.idtype;        'original-user'
           >

   The UserId class has two attributes:

   ident

      Optional.  A unique identifier for the user id, see Section 3.2.9.

   type

      Optional.  The type of user information represented.  The
      permitted values for this attribute are shown below.  The default
      value is "original-user".  (See also Section 10.)

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | current-user         | The current user id |
   |                      |                      | being used by the   |
   |                      |                      | user or process. On |
   |                      |                      | Unix systems, this  |
   |                      |                      | would be the "real" |
   |                      |                      | user id, in         |
   |                      |                      | general.            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | original-user        | The actual identity |
   |                      |                      | of the user or      |
   |                      |                      | process being       |



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   |                      |                      | reported on. On     |
   |                      |                      | those systems that  |
   |                      |                      | (a) do some type of |
   |                      |                      | auditing and (b)    |
   |                      |                      | support extracting  |
   |                      |                      | a user id from the  |
   |                      |                      | "audit id" token,   |
   |                      |                      | that value should   |
   |                      |                      | be used. On those   |
   |                      |                      | systems that do not |
   |                      |                      | support this, and   |
   |                      |                      | where the user has  |
   |                      |                      | logged into the     |
   |                      |                      | system, the "login  |
   |                      |                      | id" should be used. |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | target-user          | The user id the     |
   |                      |                      | user or process is  |
   |                      |                      | attempting to       |
   |                      |                      | become. This would  |
   |                      |                      | apply, on Unix      |
   |                      |                      | systems for         |
   |                      |                      | example, when the   |
   |                      |                      | user attempts to    |
   |                      |                      | use "su," "rlogin," |
   |                      |                      | "telnet," etc.      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | user-privs           | Another user id the |
   |                      |                      | user or process has |
   |                      |                      | the ability to use, |
   |                      |                      | or a user id assoc- |
   |                      |                      | iated with a file   |
   |                      |                      | permission. On Unix |
   |                      |                      | systems, this would |
   |                      |                      | be the "effective"  |
   |                      |                      | user id in a user   |
   |                      |                      | or process context, |
   |                      |                      | and the owner       |
   |                      |                      | permissions in a    |
   |                      |                      | file context.       |
   |                      |                      | Multiple UserId     |
   |                      |                      | elements of this    |
   |                      |                      | type may be used to |
   |                      |                      | specify a list of   |
   |                      |                      | privileges.         |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | current-group        | The current group   |
   |                      |                      | id (if applicable)  |



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   |                      |                      | being used by the   |
   |                      |                      | user or process. On |
   |                      |                      | Unix systems, this  |
   |                      |                      | would be the "real" |
   |                      |                      | group id, in        |
   |                      |                      | general.            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | group-privs          | Another group id    |
   |                      |                      | the group or        |
   |                      |                      | process has the     |
   |                      |                      | ability to use, or  |
   |                      |                      | a group id          |
   |                      |                      | associated with a   |
   |                      |                      | file permission. On |
   |                      |                      | Unix systems, this  |
   |                      |                      | would be the        |
   |                      |                      | "effect- ive" group |
   |                      |                      | id in a group or    |
   |                      |                      | process context,    |
   |                      |                      | and the group       |
   |                      |                      | permissions in a    |
   |                      |                      | file context. On    |
   |                      |                      | BSD-derived Unix    |
   |                      |                      | systems, multiple   |
   |                      |                      | UserId elements of  |
   |                      |                      | this type would be  |
   |                      |                      | used to include all |
   |                      |                      | the group ids on    |
   |                      |                      | the "group list."   |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    6 | other-privs          | Not used in a user, |
   |                      |                      | group, or process   |
   |                      |                      | context, only used  |
   |                      |                      | in the file         |
   |                      |                      | context. The file   |
   |                      |                      | permissions         |
   |                      |                      | assigned to users   |
   |                      |                      | who do not match    |
   |                      |                      | either the user or  |
   |                      |                      | group permissions   |
   |                      |                      | on the file. On     |
   |                      |                      | Unix systems, this  |
   |                      |                      | would be the        |
   |                      |                      | "world"             |
   |                      |                      | permissions.        |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+





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4.2.7.3 The Process Class

   The Process class is used to describe processes being executed on
   sources, targets, and analyzers.

   The Process class is composed of five aggregate classes, as shown in
   Figure 39.

                     +--------------+
                     |    Process   |
                     +--------------+            +------+
                     | STRING ident |<>----------| name |
                     |              |            +------+
                     |              |       0..1 +------+
                     |              |<>----------| pid  |
                     |              |            +------+
                     |              |       0..1 +------+
                     |              |<>----------| path |
                     |              |            +------+
                     |              |       0..* +------+
                     |              |<>----------| arg  |
                     |              |            +------+
                     |              |       0..* +------+
                     |              |<>----------| env  |
                     |              |            +------+
                     +--------------+

                      Figure 39: The Process Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Process are:

   name

      Exactly one.  STRING.  The name of the program being executed.
      This is a short name; path and argument information are provided
      elsewhere.

   pid

      Zero or one.  INTEGER.  The process identifier of the process.

   path

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The full path of the program being
      executed.






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   arg

      Zero or more.  STRING.  A command-line argument to the program.
      Multiple arguments may be specified (they are assumed to have
      occurred in the same order they are provided) with multiple uses
      of arg.

   env

      Zero or more.  STRING.  An environment string associated with the
      process; generally of the format "VARIABLE=value".  Multiple
      environment strings may be specified with multiple uses of env.

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT Process                       (
             name, pid?, path?, arg*, env*
           )>
         <!ATTLIST Process
             ident               CDATA                   '0'
           >

   The Process class has one attribute:

   ident

      Optional.  A unique identifier for the process, see Section 3.2.9.


4.2.7.4 The Service Class

   The Service class describes network services on sources and targets.
   It can identify services by name, port, and protocol.  When Service
   occurs as an aggregate class of Source, it is understood that the
   service is one from which activity of interest is originating; and
   that the service is "attached" to the Node, Process, and User
   information also contained in Source.  Likewise, when Service occurs
   as an aggregate class of Target, it is understood that the service is
   one to which activity of interest is being directed; and that the
   service is "attached" to the Node, Process, and User information also
   contained in Target.

   The Service class is composed of four aggregate classes, as shown in
   Figure 41.







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                   +--------------+
                   |   Service    |
                   +--------------+       0..1 +----------+
                   | STRING ident |<>----------|   name   |
                   |              |            +----------+
                   |              |       0..1 +----------+
                   |              |<>----------|   port   |
                   |              |            +----------+
                   |              |       0..1 +----------+
                   |              |<>----------| portlist |
                   |              |            +----------+
                   |              |       0..1 +----------+
                   |              |<>----------| protocol |
                   |              |            +----------+
                   +--------------+
                          /_\
                           |
                           +------------+
                                        |
                       +-------------+  |  +-------------+
                       | SNMPService |--+--| WebService  |
                       +-------------+     +-------------+

                      Figure 41: The Service Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Service are:

   name

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The name of the service.  Whenever
      possible, the name from the IANA list of well-known ports SHOULD
      be used.

   port

      Zero or one.  INTEGER.  The port number being used.

   portlist

      Zero or one.  PORTLIST.  A list of port numbers being used; see
      Section 3.2.8 for formatting rules.

   protocol

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The protocol being used.

   A Service MUST be specified as either (a) a name, (b) a port, (c) a
   name and a port, or (d) a portlist.  The protocol is optional in all



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   cases, but no other combinations are permitted.

   Because DTDs do not support subclassing (see Appendix C.3.4), the
   inheritance relationship between Service and the SNMPService and
   WebService subclasses shown in Figure 41 has been replaced with an
   aggregate relationship.

   Service is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT Service                       (
             (((name, port?) | (port, name?)) | portlist), protocol?,
             SNMPService?, WebService?
           )>
         <!ATTLIST Service
             ident               CDATA                   '0'
           >

   The Service class has one attribute:

   ident

      Optional.  A unique identifier for the service, see Section 3.2.9.


4.2.7.4.1 The WebService Class

   The WebService class carries additional information related to web
   traffic.

   The WebService class is composed of four aggregate classes, as shown
   in Figure 43.




















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                   +-------------+
                   |   Service   |
                   +-------------+
                         /_\
                          |
                   +-------------+
                   | WebService  |
                   +-------------+            +-------------+
                   |             |<>----------|     url     |
                   |             |            +-------------+
                   |             |       0..1 +-------------+
                   |             |<>----------|     cgi     |
                   |             |            +-------------+
                   |             |       0..1 +-------------+
                   |             |<>----------| http-method |
                   |             |            +-------------+
                   |             |       0..* +-------------+
                   |             |<>----------|     arg     |
                   |             |            +-------------+
                   +-------------+

                    Figure 43: The WebService Class

   The aggregate classes that make up WebService are:

   url

      Exactly one.  STRING.  The URL in the request.

   cgi

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The CGI script in the request, without
      arguments.

   http-method

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The HTTP method (PUT, GET) used in the
      request.

   arg

      Zero or more.  STRING.  The arguments to the CGI script.

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT WebService                    (
             url, cgi?, http-method?, arg*
           )>



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4.2.7.4.2 The SNMPService Class

   The SNMPService class carries additional information related to SNMP
   traffic.

   The SNMPService class is composed of three aggregate classes, as
   shown in Figure 45.

                +-------------+
                |   Service   |
                +-------------+
                      /_\
                       |
                +-------------+
                | SNMPService |
                +-------------+       0..1 +-----------------+
                |             |<>----------|       oid       |
                |             |            +-----------------+
                |             |       0..1 +-----------------+
                |             |<>----------|    community    |
                |             |            +-----------------+
                |             |       0..1 +-----------------+
                |             |<>----------|   securityName  |
                |             |            +-----------------+
                |             |       0..1 +-----------------+
                |             |<>----------|   contextName   |
                |             |            +-----------------+
                |             |       0..1 +-----------------+
                |             |<>----------| contextEngineID |
                |             |            +-----------------+
                |             |       0..1 +-----------------+
                |             |<>----------|     command     |
                |             |            +-----------------+
                +-------------+

                    Figure 45: The SNMPService Class

   The aggregate classes that make up SNMPService are:

   oid

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The object identifier in the request.

   community

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The object's community string, if the
      traffic uses the SNMPv1 or SNMPv2c protocol.




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   securityName

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The object's security name, if the traffic
      uses the SNMPv3 protocol.

   contextName

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The object's context name, if the traffic
      uses the SNMPv3 protocol.

   contextEngineID

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The object's context engine identifier, if
      the traffic uses the SNMPv3 protocol.

   command

      Zero or one.  STRING.  The command sent to the SNMP server (GET,
      SET.  etc.).

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT SNMPService                   (
             oid?, community?, command?
           )>


4.2.7.5 The FileList Class

   The FileList class describes files and other file-like objects on
   targets.  It is primarily used as a "container" class for the File
   aggregate class, as shown in Figure 47.

                     +--------------+
                     |   FileList   |
                     +--------------+       1..* +------+
                     |              |<>----------| File |
                     |              |            +------+
                     +--------------+

                     Figure 47: The FileList Class

   The aggregate class contained in FileList is:

   File






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      One or more.  Information about an individual file, as indicated
      by its "category" and "fstype" attributes (see Section 4.2.7.5.1).

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT FileList                      (
             File+
           )>


4.2.7.5.1 The File Class

   The File class provides specific information about a file or other
   file-like object that has been created, deleted, or modified on the
   target.  More than one File can be used within the FileList class to
   provide information about more than one file.  The description can
   provide either the file settings prior to the event or the file
   settings at the time of the event, as specified using the "category"
   attribute.

   The File class is composed of ten aggregate classes, as shown in
   Figure 49.

                  +--------------+
                  |     File     |
                  +--------------+            +-------------+
                  |              |<>----------|    name     |
                  |              |            +-------------+
                  |              |            +-------------+
                  |              |<>----------|    path     |
                  |              |            +-------------+
                  |              |       0..1 +-------------+
                  |              |<>----------| create-time |
                  |              |            +-------------+
                  |              |       0..1 +-------------+
                  |              |<>----------| modify-time |
                  |              |            +-------------+
                  |              |       0..1 +-------------+
                  |              |<>----------| access-time |
                  |              |            +-------------+
                  |              |       0..1 +-------------+
                  |              |<>----------|  data-size  |
                  |              |            +-------------+
                  |              |       0..1 +-------------+
                  |              |<>----------|  disk-size  |
                  |              |            +-------------+
                  |              |       0..* +-------------+
                  |              |<>----------| FileAccess  |



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                  |              |            +-------------+
                  |              |       0..* +-------------+
                  |              |<>----------|   Linkage   |
                  |              |            +-------------+
                  |              |       0..1 +-------------+
                  |              |<>----------|    Inode    |
                  |              |            +-------------+
                  +--------------+

                       Figure 49: The File Class

   The aggregate classes that make up File are:

   name

      Exactly one.  STRING.  The name of the file to which the alert
      applies, not including the path to the file.

   path

      Exactly one.  STRING.  The full path to the file, including the
      name.  The path name should be represented in as "universal" a
      manner as possible, to facilitate processing of the alert.

      For Windows systems, the path should be specified using the
      Universal Naming Convention (UNC) for remote files, and using a
      drive letter for local files (e.g., "C:\boot.ini").  For Unix
      systems, paths on network file systems should use the name of the
      mounted resource instead of the local mount point (e.g.,
      "fileserver:/usr/local/bin/foo").  The mount point can be provided
      using the <Linkage> element.

   create-time

      Zero or one.  DATETIME.  Time the file was created.  Note that
      this is *not* the Unix "st_ctime" file attribute (which is not
      file creation time).  The Unix "st_ctime" attribute is contained
      in the "Inode" class.

   modify-time

      Zero or one.  DATETIME.  Time the file was last modified.

   access-time

      Zero or one.  DATETIME.  Time the file was last accessed.





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   data-size

      Zero or one.  INTEGER.  The size of the data, in bytes.  Typically
      what is meant when referring to file size.  On Unix UFS file
      systems, this value corresponds to stat.st_size.  On Windows NTFS,
      this value corres- ponds to VDL.

   disk-size

      Zero or one.  INTEGER.  The physical space on disk consumed by the
      file, in bytes.  On Unix UFS file systems, this value corresponds
      to 512 * stat.st_blocks.  On Windows NTFS, this value corresponds
      to EOF.

   FileAccess

      Zero or more.  Access permissions on the file.

   Linkage

      Zero or more.  File system objects to which this file is linked
      (other references for the file).

   Inode

      Zero or one.  Inode information for this file (relevant to Unix).

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.filecat              "
             ( current | original )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT File                          (
             name, path, create-time?, modify-time?, access-time?,
             data-size?, disk-size?, FileAccess*, Linkage*, Inode?
           )>
         <!ATTLIST File
             ident               CDATA                   '0'
             category            %attvals.filecat;       #REQUIRED
             fstype              CDATA                   #REQUIRED
           >

   The File class has three attributes:

   ident






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      Optional.  A unique identifier for this file, see Section 3.2.9.

   category

      Required.  The context for the information being provided.  The
      permitted values are shown below.  There is no default value. (See
      also Section 10.)

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | current              | The file            |
   |                      |                      | information is from |
   |                      |                      | after the reported  |
   |                      |                      | change              |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | original             | The file            |
   |                      |                      | information is from |
   |                      |                      | before the reported |
   |                      |                      | change              |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   fstype

      Required.  The type of file system the file resides on.  This
      attribute governs how path names and other attributes are
      interpreted.  The permitted values are shown below.  There is no
      default value.  (See also Section 10.)

        +------+---------+-------------------------------------+
        | Rank | Keyword | Description                         |
        +------+---------+-------------------------------------+
        |    0 | ufs     | Berkeley UNIX Fast File System      |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    1 | efs     | Linux "efs" file system             |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    2 | nfs     | Network File System                 |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    3 | afs     | Andrew File System                  |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    4 | ntfs    | Windows NT File System              |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    5 | fat16   | 16-bit Windows FAT File System      |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    6 | fat32   | 32-bit Windows FAT File System      |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    7 | pcfs    | "PC" (MS-DOS) file system on CD-ROM |
        |      |         |                                     |



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        |    8 | joliet  | Joliet CD-ROM file system           |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    9 | iso9660 | ISO 9660 CD-ROM file system         |
        +------+---------+-------------------------------------+


4.2.7.5.1.1 The FileAccess Class

   The FileAccess class represents the access permissions on a file. The
   representation is intended to be usefule across operating systems.

   The FileAccess class is composed of two aggregate classes, as shown
   in Figure 51.

                  +--------------+
                  |  FileAccess  |
                  +--------------+            +------------+
                  |              |<>----------|   UserId   |
                  |              |            +------------+
                  |              |       1..* +------------+
                  |              |<>----------| permission |
                  |              |            +------------+
                  +--------------+

                    Figure 51: The FileAccess Class

   The aggregate classes that make up FileAccess are:

   UserId

      Exactly one.  The user (or group) to which these permissions
      apply.  The value of the "type" attribute must be "user-privs",
      "group-privs", or "other-privs" as appropriate.  Other values for
      "type" MUST NOT be used in this context.

   permission

      One or more.  STRING.  Level of access allowed.  The permitted
      values are shown below.  There is no default value.  (See also
      Section 10.)











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   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | noAccess             | No access at all is |
   |                      |                      | allowed for this    |
   |                      |                      | user                |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | read                 | This user has read  |
   |                      |                      | access to the file  |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | write                | This user has write |
   |                      |                      | access to the file  |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | execute              | This user has the   |
   |                      |                      | ability to execute  |
   |                      |                      | the file            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | search               | This user has the   |
   |                      |                      | ability to search   |
   |                      |                      | this file (applies  |
   |                      |                      | to "execute"        |
   |                      |                      | permission on       |
   |                      |                      | directories in      |
   |                      |                      | UNIX)               |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | delete               | This user has the   |
   |                      |                      | ability to delete   |
   |                      |                      | this file           |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    6 | executeAs            | This user has the   |
   |                      |                      | ability to execute  |
   |                      |                      | this file as        |
   |                      |                      | another user        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    7 | changePermissions    | This user has the   |
   |                      |                      | ability to change   |
   |                      |                      | the access          |
   |                      |                      | permissions on this |
   |                      |                      | file                |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    8 | takeOwnership        | This user has the   |
   |                      |                      | ability to take     |
   |                      |                      | ownership of this   |
   |                      |                      | file                |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   The "changePermissions" and "takeOwnership" strings represent those
   concepts in Windows.  On Unix, the owner of the file always has



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   "changePermissions" access, even if no other access is allowed for
   that user.  "Full Control" in Windows is represented by enumerating
   the permissions it contains.  The "executeAs" string represents the
   set-user-id and set-group-id features in Unix.

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT FileAccess                    (
             UserId, permission+
           )>


4.2.7.5.1.2 The Linkage Class

   The Linkage class represents file system connections between the file
   described in the <File> element and other objects in the file system.
   For example, if the <File> element is a symbolic link or shortcut,
   then the <Linkage> element should contain the name of the object the
   link points to.  Further information can be provided about the object
   in the <Linkage> element with another <File> element, if appropriate.

   The Linkage class is composed of three aggregate classes, as shown in
   Figure 53.

                  +--------------+
                  |   Linkage    |
                  +--------------+            +------+
                  |              |<>----------| name |
                  |              |            +------+
                  |              |            +------+
                  |              |<>----------| path |
                  |              |            +------+
                  |              |            +------+
                  |              |<>----------| File |
                  |              |            +------+
                  +--------------+

                      Figure 53: The Linkage Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Linkage are:

   name

      Exactly one.  STRING.  The name of the file system object.  not
      including the path.






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   path

      Exactly one.  STRING.  The full path to the file system object,
      including the name.  The path name should be represented in as
      "universal" a manner as possible, to facilitate processing of the
      alert.

   File

      Exactly one.  A <File> element may be used in place of the <name>
      and <path> elements if additional information about the file is to
      be included.

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ENTITY % attvals.linkcat              "
             ( hard-link | mount-point | reparse-point | shortcut |
               stream | symbolic-link )
           ">
         <!ELEMENT Linkage                       (
             (name, path) | File
           )>
         <!ATTLIST Linkage
             category            %attvals.linkcat;       #REQUIRED
           >

   The Linkage class has one attribute:

   category

      The type of object that the link describes.  The permitted values
      are shown below.  There is no default value.  (See also Section
      10.)

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | hard-link            | The <name> element  |
   |                      |                      | represents another  |
   |                      |                      | name for this file. |
   |                      |                      | This information    |
   |                      |                      | may be more easily  |
   |                      |                      | obtainable on NTFS  |
   |                      |                      | file systems than   |
   |                      |                      | others.             |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | mount-point          | An alias for the    |
   |                      |                      | directory specified |



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   |                      |                      | by the parent's     |
   |                      |                      | <name> and <path>   |
   |                      |                      | elements.           |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | reparse-point        | Applies only to     |
   |                      |                      | Windows; excludes   |
   |                      |                      | symbolic links and  |
   |                      |                      | mount points, which |
   |                      |                      | are specific types  |
   |                      |                      | of reparse points.  |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | shortcut             | The file            |
   |                      |                      | represented by a    |
   |                      |                      | Windows "shortcut." |
   |                      |                      | A shortcut is       |
   |                      |                      | distinguished from  |
   |                      |                      | a symbolic link     |
   |                      |                      | because of the      |
   |                      |                      | difference in their |
   |                      |                      | contents, which may |
   |                      |                      | be of importance to |
   |                      |                      | the manager.        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | stream               | An Alternate Data   |
   |                      |                      | Stream (ADS) in     |
   |                      |                      | Windows; a fork on  |
   |                      |                      | MacOS. Separate     |
   |                      |                      | file system entity  |
   |                      |                      | that is considered  |
   |                      |                      | an extension of the |
   |                      |                      | main <File>.        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | symbolic-link        | The <name> element  |
   |                      |                      | represents the file |
   |                      |                      | to which the link   |
   |                      |                      | points.             |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+


4.2.7.5.1.3 The Inode Class

   The Inode class is used to represent the additional information
   contained in a Unix file system i-node.

   The Inode class is composed of six aggregate classes, as shown in
   Figure 55.





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                  +--------------+
                  |    Inode     |
                  +--------------+            +----------------+
                  |              |<>----------|   change-time  |
                  |              |            +----------------+
                  |              |            +----------------+
                  |              |<>----------|     number     |
                  |              |            +----------------+
                  |              |            +----------------+
                  |              |<>----------|  major-device  |
                  |              |            +----------------+
                  |              |            +----------------+
                  |              |<>----------|  minor-device  |
                  |              |            +----------------+
                  |              |            +----------------+
                  |              |<>----------| c-major-device |
                  |              |            +----------------+
                  |              |            +----------------+
                  |              |<>----------| c-minor-device |
                  |              |            +----------------+
                  +--------------+

                       Figure 55: The Inode Class

   The aggregate classes that make up Inode are:

   change-time

      Zero or one.  DATETIME.  The time of the last inode change, given
      by the st_ctime element of "struct stat".

   number

      Zero or one.  INTEGER.  The inode number.

   major-device

      Zero or one.  INTEGER.  The major device number of the device the
      file resides on.

   minor-device

      Zero or one.  INTEGER.  The minor device number of the device the
      file resides on.

   c-major-device





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      Zero or one.  INTEGER.  The major device of the file itself, if it
      is a character special device.

   c-minor-device

      Zero or one.  INTEGER.  The minor device of the file itself, if it
      is a character special device.

   Note that <number>, <major-device>, and <minor-device> must be given
   together, and the <c-major-device> and <c-minor-device> must be given
   together.

   This is represented in the XML DTD as follows:

         <!ELEMENT Inode                         (
             change-time?, (number, major-device, minor-device)?,
             (c-major-device, c-minor-device)?
           )>

































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5. Extending the IDMEF

   As intrusion detection systems evolve, the IDMEF data model and DTD
   will have to evolve along with them.  To allow new features to be
   added as they are developed, both the data model and the DTD can be
   extended as described in this section.  As these extensions mature,
   they can then be incorporated into future versions of the
   specification.

5.1 Extending the Data Model

   There are two mechanisms for extending the IDMEF data model,
   inheritance and aggregation:

   o  Inheritance denotes a superclass/subclass type of relationship
      where the subclass inherits all the attributes, operations, and
      relationships of the superclass.  This type of relationship is
      also called a "is-a" or "kind-of" relationship.  Subclasses may
      have additional attributes or operations that apply only to the
      subclass, and not to the superclass.

   o  Aggregation is a form of association in which the whole is related
      to its parts.  This type of relationship is also referred to as a
      "part-of" relationship.  In this case, the aggregate class
      contains all of its own attributes and as many of the attributes
      associated with its parts as required and specified by occurrence
      indicators.

   Of the two mechanisms, inheritance is preferred, because it preserves
   the existing data model structure and also preserves the operations
   (methods) executed on the classes of the structure.

   Note that the rules for extending the XML DTD (see below) set limits
   on the places where extensions to the data model may be made.

5.2 Extending the XML DTD

   There are two ways to extend the IDMEF XML DTD:

   1.  The AdditionalData class (see Section 4.2.4.6) allows
       implementors to include arbitrary "atomic" data items (integers,
       strings, etc.) in an Alert or Heartbeat message.  This approach
       SHOULD be used whenever possible.  See Section 7.4 and Section
       7.5.

   2.  The AdditionalData class allows implementors to extend the XML
       DTD with additional DTD "modules" that describe arbitrarily
       complex data types and relationships.  The remainder of this



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       section describes this extension method.

   To extend the IDMEF DTD with a new DTD "module," the following steps
   MUST be followed:

   1.  The IDMEF message MUST include a document type declaration (see
       Section 3.1.1.3).

   2.  The document type declaration MUST define a parameter entity (see
       Appendix C.2.3) that contains the location of the extension DTD,
       and then reference that entity:

            <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message SYSTEM "/path/to/idmef-message.dtd" [
               <!ENTITY % x-extension SYSTEM "/path/to/extension.dtd">
               %x-extension;
              ]>

        In this example, the "x-extension" parameter entity is defined
       and then referenced, causing the DTD for the extension to be read
       by the XML parser.

       The name of the parameter entity defined for this purpose MUST be
       a string beginning with "x-"; there are no other restrictions on
       the name (other than those imposed on all entity names by XML).

       Multiple extensions may be included by defining multiple entities
       and referencing them.  For example:

            <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message SYSTEM "/path/to/idmef-message.dtd" [
               <!ENTITY % x-extension SYSTEM "/path/to/extension.dtd">
               <!ENTITY % x-another SYSTEM "/path/to/another.dtd">
               %x-extension;
               %x-another;
              ]>

   3.  Extension DTDs MUST declare all of their elements and attributes
       in a separate XML namespace.  Extension DTDs MUST NOT declare any
       elements or attributes in the "idmef" or default namespaces.













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       For example, the "test" extension might be declared as follows:

            <!ELEMENT test:test (
                test:a, test:b, test:c
              )>
            <!ATTLIST test:test
                xmlns      CDATA   #IMPLIED
                xmlns:test CDATA   #IMPLIED
              >

            <!ELEMENT test:a (#PCDATA)>
            <!ATTLIST test:a
                test:attr   CDATA   #IMPLIED
              >

            <!ELEMENT test:b (#PCDATA)>
            <!ELEMENT test:c (#PCDATA)>

   4.  Extensions MUST only be included in IDMEF alert and heartbeat
       messages under an <AdditionalData> element whose "type" attribute
       contains the value "xml".  For example:

            <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
              <Alert ident="...">
                ...
                <AdditionalData type="xml">
                  <test:test xmlns:test="http://www.ietf.org/test.html"
                             xmlns="http://www.ietf.org/test.html">
                    <test:a test:attr="...">...</test:a>
                    <test:b>...</test:b>
                    <test:c>...</test:c>
                  </test:test>
                </AdditionalData>
              </Alert>
            </IDMEF-Message>

   See Section 7.8 for another example of extending the IDMEF DTD with
   XML.













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6. Special Considerations

   This section discusses some of the special considerations that must
   be taken into account by implementors of the IDMEF.

6.1 XML Validity and Well-Formedness

   It is expected that IDMEF-compliant applications will not normally
   include the IDMEF DTD itself in their communications.  Instead, the
   DTD will be referenced in the document type declaration in the IDMEF
   message (see Section 3.1.1.3).  Such IDMEF documents will be
   well-formed and valid as defined in [3].

   Other IDMEF documents will be specified that do not include the
   document prolog (e.g., entries in an IDMEF-format database).  Such
   IDMEF documents will be well-formed but not valid.

   Generally, well-formedness implies that a document has a single
   element that contains everything else (e.g., "<Book>"), and that all
   the other elements nest nicely within each other without any
   overlapping (e.g., a "chapter" does not start in the middle of
   another "chapter").

   Validity further implies that not only is the document well-formed,
   but it also follows specific rules (contained in the Document Type
   Definition) about which elements are "legal" in the document, how
   those elements nest within other elements, and so on (e.g., a
   "chapter" does not begin in the middle of a "title").  A document
   cannot be valid unless it references a DTD.

   XML processors are required to be able to parse any well-formed
   document, valid or not.  The purpose of validation is to make the
   processing of that document (what's done with the data after it's
   parsed) easier.  Without validation, a document may contain elements
   in nonsense order, elements "invented" by the author that the
   processing application doesn't understand, and so forth.

   IDMEF documents MUST be well-formed.  IDMEF documents SHOULD be valid
   whenever both possible and practical.

6.2 Unrecognized XML Tags

   On occasion, an IDMEF-compliant application may receive a
   well-formed, or even well-formed and valid, IDMEF message containing
   tags that it does not understand.  The tags may be either:

   o  Recognized as "legitimate" (a valid document), but the application
      does not know the semantic meaning of the element's content; or



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   o  Not recognized at all.

   IDMEF-compliant applications MUST continue to process IDMEF messages
   that contain unknown tags, provided that such messages meet the
   well-formedness requirement of Section 6.1.  It is up to the
   individual application to decide how to process (or ignore) any
   content from the unknown elements(s).

6.3 Analyzer-Manager Time Synchronization

   Synchronization of time-of-day clocks between analyzers and managers
   is outside the scope of this document.  However, the following
   comments and suggestions are offered:

   1.  Whenever possible, all analyzers and managers should have their
       time-of-day clocks synchronized to an external source such as NTP
       or SNTP [13, 14], GPS/GOES/WWV clocks, or some other reliable
       time standard.

   2.  When external time synchronization is not possible, the IDMEF
       provides the <AnalyzerTime> element, which may be used to perform
       rudimentary time synchronization (see below).

   3.  IDMEF-compliant applications SHOULD permit the user to enable/
       disable the <AnalyzerTime> method of time synchronization as a
       configuration option.

   A number of caveats apply to the use of <AnalyzerTime> for time
   synchronization:

   1.  <AnalyzerTime> works best in a "flat" environment where analyzers
       report up to a single level of managers.  When a tree topology of
       high-level managers, intermediate relays, and analyzers is used,
       the problem becomes more complex.

   2.  When intermediate message relays (managers or otherwise) are
       involved, two scenarios are possible:

       *  The intermediaries may forward entire IDMEF messages, or may
          perform aggregation or correlation, but MUST NOT inject delay.
          In this case, time synchronization is end-to-end between the
          analyzer and the highest-level manager.

       *  The intermediaries may inject delay, due to storage or
          additional processing.  In this case, time synchronization
          MUST be performed at each hop.  This means each intermediary
          must decompose the IDMEF message, adjust all time values, and
          then reconstruct the message before sending it on.



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   3.  When the environment is mixed, with some analyzers and managers
       using external time synchronization and some not, all managers
       and intermediaries must perform <AnalyzerTime> synchronization.
       This is because determining whether or not compensation is
       actually needed between two parties rapidly becomes very complex,
       and requires knowledge of other parts of the topology.

   4.  If an alert can take alternate paths, or be stored in multiple
       locations, the recorded times may be different depending on the
       path taken.

   The above being said, <AnalyzerTime> synchronization is probably
   still better than nothing in many environments.  To implement this
   type of synchronization, the following procedure is suggested:

   1.  When an analyzer or manager sends an IDMEF message, it should
       place the current value of its time-of-day clock in an
       <AnalyzerTime> element.  This should occur as late as possible in
       the message transmission process, ideally right before the
       message is "put on the wire."

   2.  When a manager receives an IDMEF message, it should compute the
       difference between its own time-of-day clock and the time in the
       <AnalyzerTime> element of the message.  This difference should
       then be used to adjust the times in the <CreateTime> and
       <DetectTime> elements (NTP timestamps should also be adjusted).

   3.  If the manager is an intermediary and sends the IDMEF message on
       to a higher-level manager, and hop-by-hop synchronization is in
       effect, it should regenerate the <AnalyzerTime> value to contain
       the value of its own time-of-day clock.


6.4 NTP Timestamp Wrap-Around

   From [8]:

      Note that, since some time in 1968 (second 2,147,483,648) the most
      significant bit (bit 0 of the integer part) has been set and that
      the 64-bit field will overflow some time in 2036 (second
      4,294,967,296).  Should NTP or SNTP be in use in 2036, some
      external means will be necessary to qualify time relative to 1900
      and time relative to 2036 (and other multiples of 136 years).
      There will exist a 200-picosecond interval, henceforth ignored,
      every 136 years when the 64-bit field will be 0, which by
      convention is interpreted as an invalid or unavailable timestamp.

   IDMEF-compliant applications MUST NOT send a zero-valued NTP



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   timestamp unless they mean to indicate that it is invalid or
   unavailable.  If an IDMEF-compliant application must send an IDMEF
   message at the time of rollover, the application should wait for 200
   picoseconds until the timestamp will have a non-zero value.

   Also from [8]:

      As the NTP timestamp format has been in use for the last 17 years,
      it remains a possibility that it will be in use 40 years from now
      when the seconds field overflows.  As it is probably inappropriate
      to archive NTP timestamps before bit 0 was set in 1968, a
      convenient way to extend the useful life of NTP timestamps is the
      following convention:



         If bit 0 is set, the UTC time is in the range 1968-2036 and UTC
         time is reckoned from 0h 0m 0s UTC on 1 January 1900.

         If bit 0 is not set, the time is in the range 2036-2104 and UTC
         time is reckoned from 6h 28m 16s UTC on 7 February 2036.

      Note that when calculating the correspondence, 2000 is not a leap
      year.  Note also that leap seconds are not counted in the
      reckoning.

   IDMEF-compliant applications in use after 2036-02-07T06:28:16Z MUST
   adhere to the above convention.

6.5 Digital Signatures

   Standard XML digital signature processing rules and syntax are
   specified in [11].  XML Signatures provide integrity, message
   authentication, and/or signer authentication services for data of any
   type, whether located within the XML that includes the signature or
   elsewhere.

   The IDMEF requirements document [2] assigns responsibility for
   message integrity and authentication to the communications protocol,
   not the message format.  However, in situations where IDMEF messages
   are exchanged over other, less secure protocols, or in cases where
   the digital signatures must be archived for later use, the inclusion
   of digital signatures within an IDMEF message itself may be
   desirable.

   Specifications for the use of digital signatures within IDMEF
   messages are outside the scope of this document.  However, if such
   functionality is needed, use of the XML Signature standard is



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   RECOMMENDED.


















































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7. Examples

   The examples shown in this section demonstrate how the IDMEF is used
   to encode alert data.  These examples are for illustrative purposes
   only, and do not necessarily represent the only (or even the "best"
   way to encode these particular alerts).  These examples should not be
   taken as guidelines on how alerts should be classified.

7.1 Denial of Service Attacks

   The following examples show how some common denial of service attacks
   could be represented in the IDMEF.

7.1.1 The "teardrop" Attack

   Network-based detection of the "teardrop" attack.  This shows the
   basic format of an alert.


































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      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
        "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert ident="abc123456789">
          <Analyzer analyzerid="hq-dmz-analyzer01">
            <Node category="dns">
              <location>Headquarters DMZ Network</location>
              <name>analyzer01.example.com</name>
            </Node>
          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc723b45.0xef449129">
            2000-03-09T10:01:25.93464-05:00
          </CreateTime>
          <Source ident="a1b2c3d4">
            <Node ident="a1b2c3d4-001" category="dns">
              <name>badguy.example.net</name>
              <Address ident="a1b2c3d4-002" category="ipv4-net-mask">
                <address>192.0.2.50</address>
                <netmask>255.255.255.255</netmask>
              </Address>
            </Node>
          </Source>
          <Target ident="d1c2b3a4">
            <Node ident="d1c2b3a4-001" category="dns">
              <Address category="ipv4-addr-hex">
                <address>0xde796f70</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="bugtraqid">
            <name>124</name>
            <url>http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/124</url>
          </Classification>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>


7.1.2 The "ping of death" Attack

   Network-based detection of the "ping of death" attack.  Note the
   identification of multiple targets, and the identification of the
   source as a spoofed address.

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>




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      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
        "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert ident="abc123456789">
          <Analyzer analyzerid="bc-sensor01">
            <Node category="dns">
              <name>sensor.example.com</name>
            </Node>
          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc71f4f5.0xef449129">
            2000-03-09T10:01:25.93464Z
          </CreateTime>
          <Source ident="a1a2" spoofed="yes">
            <Node ident="a1a2-1">
              <Address ident="a1a2-2" category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.200</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
          </Source>
          <Target ident="b3b4">
            <Node>
              <Address ident="b3b4-1" category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.50</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
          </Target>
          <Target ident="c5c6">
            <Node ident="c5c6-1" category="nisplus">
              <name>lollipop</name>
            </Node>
          </Target>
          <Target ident="d7d8">
            <Node ident="d7d8-1">
              <location>Cabinet B10</location>
              <name>Cisco.router.b10</name>
            </Node>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="cve">
            <name>CVE-1999-128</name>
            <url>http://www.cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-1999-128</url>
          </Classification>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>







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7.2 Port Scanning Attacks

   The following examples show how some common port scanning attacks
   could be represented in the IDMEF.

7.2.1 Connection To a Disallowed Service

   Host-based detection of a policy violation (attempt to obtain
   information via "finger").  Note the identification of the target
   service, as well as the originating user (obtained, e.g., through
   RFC1413).

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
        "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert ident="abc123456789">
          <Analyzer analyzerid="bc-sensor01">
            <Node category="dns">
              <name>sensor.example.com</name>
            </Node>
          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc72541d.0x00000000">
            2000-03-09T18:47:25+02:00
          </CreateTime>
          <Source ident="a123">
            <Node ident="a123-01">
              <Address ident="a123-02" category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.200</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
            <User ident="q987-03" category="os-device">
              <UserId ident="q987-04" type="target-user">
                <name>badguy</name>
              </UserId>
            </User>
            <Service ident="a123-03">
              <port>31532</port>
            </Service>
          </Source>
          <Target ident="z456">
            <Node ident="z456-01" category="nis">
              <name>myhost</name>
              <Address ident="z456-02" category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.50</address>
              </Address>



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            </Node>
            <Service ident="z456-03">
              <name>finger</name>
              <port>79</port>
            </Service>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="vendor-specific">
            <name>finger</name>
            <url>http://www.vendor.com/finger</url>
          </Classification>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>


7.2.2 Simple Port Scanning

   Network-based detection of a port scan.  This shows detection by a
   single analyzer; see Example 8.5 for the same attack as detected by a
   correlation engine.  Note the use of <portlist> to show the ports
   that were scanned.

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
        "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert ident="abc123456789">
          <Analyzer analyzerid="hq-dmz-analyzer62">
            <Node category="dns">
              <location>Headquarters Web Server</location>
              <name>analyzer62.example.com</name>
            </Node>
          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc72b2b4.0x00000000">
            2000-03-09T15:31:00-08:00
          </CreateTime>
          <Source ident="abc01">
            <Node ident="abc01-01">
              <Address ident="abc01-02" category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.200</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
          </Source>
          <Target ident="def01">
            <Node ident="def01-01" category="dns">
              <name>www.example.com</name>
              <Address ident="def01-02" category="ipv4-addr">



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                <address>192.0.2.50</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
            <Service ident="def01-03">
              <portlist>5-25,37,42,43,53,69-119,123-514</portlist>
            </Service>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="vendor-specific">
            <name>portscan</name>
            <url>http://www.vendor.com/portscan</url>
          </Classification>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>


7.3 Local Attacks

   The following examples show how some common local host attacks could
   be represented in the IDMEF.

7.3.1 The "loadmodule" Attack

   Host-based detection of the "loadmodule" exploit.  This attack
   involves tricking the "loadmodule" program into running another
   program; since "loadmodule" is set-user-id "root," the executed
   program runs with super-user privileges.  Note the use of <User> and
   <Process> to identify the user attempting the exploit and how he's
   doing it.

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
        "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert ident="abc123456789">
          <Analyzer analyzerid="bc-fs-sensor13">
            <Node category="dns">
              <name>fileserver.example.com</name>
            </Node>
            <Process>
              <name>monitor</name>
              <pid>8956</pid>
              <arg>monitor</arg><arg>-d</arg>
              <arg>-m</arg><arg>idmanager.example.com</arg>
              <arg>-l</arg><arg>/var/logs/idlog</arg>
            </Process>
          </Analyzer>



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          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc7221c0.0x4ccccccc">
            2000-03-09T08:12:32.3-05:00
          </CreateTime>
          <Source ident="a1a2">
            <User ident="a1a2-01" category="os-device">
              <UserId ident="a1a2-02" type="original-user">
                <name>joe</name>
                <number>13243</number>
              </UserId>
            </User>
            <Process ident="a1a2-03">
              <name>loadmodule</name>
              <path>/usr/openwin/bin</path>
            </Process>
          </Source>
          <Target ident="z3z4">
            <Node ident="z3z4-01" category="dns">
              <name>fileserver.example.com</name>
            </Node>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="bugtraqid">
            <name>33</name>
            <url>http://www.securityfocus.com</url>
          </Classification>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>

   The IDS could also indicate that the target user is the "root" user,
   and show the attempted command; the alert might then look like:

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
        "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert ident="abc123456789">
          <Analyzer analyzerid="bc-fs-sensor13">
            <Node category="dns">
              <name>fileserver.example.com</name>
            </Node>
            <Process>
              <name>monitor</name>
              <pid>8956</pid>
              <arg>monitor</arg><arg>-d</arg>
              <arg>-m</arg><arg>idmanager.example.com</arg>
              <arg>-l</arg><arg>/var/logs/idlog</arg>
            </Process>



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          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc7221c0.0x4ccccccc">
            2000-03-09T08:12:32.3-05:00
          </CreateTime>
          <Source ident="a1a2">
            <User ident="a1a2-01" category="os-device">
              <UserId ident="a1a2-02" type="original-user">
                <name>joe</name>
                <number>13243</number>
              </UserId>
            </User>
            <Process ident="a1a2-03">
              <name>loadmodule</name>
              <path>/usr/openwin/bin</path>
            </Process>
          </Source>
          <Target ident="z3z4">
            <Node ident="z3z4-01" category="dns">
              <name>fileserver.example.com</name>
            </Node>
            <User ident="z3z4-02" category="os-device">
              <UserId ident="z3z4-03" type="target-user">
                <name>root</name>
                <number>0</number>
              </UserId>
            </User>
            <Process ident="z3z4-04">
              <name>sh</name>
              <pid>25134</pid>
              <path>/bin/sh</path>
            </Process>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="bugtraqid">
            <name>33</name>
            <url>http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/33</url>
          </Classification>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>


7.3.2 The "phf" Attack

   Network-based detection of the "phf" attack.  Note the use of the
   <WebService> element to provide more details about this particular
   attack.

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>




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      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
        "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert ident="abc123456789">
          <Analyzer analyzerid="bc-sensor01">
            <Node category="dns">
              <name>sensor.example.com</name>
            </Node>
          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc71e980.0x00000000">
            2000-03-09T08:12:32-01:00
          </CreateTime>
          <Source ident="abc123">
            <Node ident="abc123-001">
              <Address ident="abc123-002" category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.200</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
            <Service ident="abc123-003">
              <port>21534</port>
            </Service>
          </Source>
          <Target ident="xyz789">
            <Node ident="xyz789-001" category="dns">
              <name>www.example.com</name>
              <Address ident="xyz789-002" category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.100</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
            <Service>
              <port>8080</port>
              <WebService>
                <url>
                  http://www.example.com/cgi-bin/phf?/etc/group
                </url>
                <cgi>/cgi-bin/phf</cgi>
                <http-method>GET</http-method>
              </WebService>
            </Service>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="bugtraqid">
            <name>629</name>
            <url>http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/629/discussion/</url>
          </Classification>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>




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7.3.3 File Modification

   Host-based detection of a race condition attack. Note the use of the
   <FileList> to provide information about the files that are used to
   perform the attack.

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
       "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert>
          <Analyzer analyzerid="bids-192.0.2.1" ostype="Linux"
           osversion="2.2.16-3">
            <Node category="hosts">
              <name>etude</name>
              <Address category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.1</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc71e980.0x00000000">
            2000-03-09T08:12:32-01:00
          </CreateTime>
          <Source spoofed="no">
            <Node>
              <location>console</location>
              <Address category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.1</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
          </Source>
          <Target decoy="no">
            <Node>
              <location>local</location>
              <Address category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.1</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
            <User category="os-device">
              <UserId type="original-user">
                <number>456</number>
              </UserId>
              <UserId type="current-user">
                <name>fred</name>
                <number>456</number>
              </UserId>



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              <UserId type="user-privs">
                <number>456</number>
              </UserId>
            </User>
            <FileList>
              <File category="current" fstype="tmpfs">
                <name>xxx000238483</name>
                <path>/tmp/xxx000238483</path>
                <FileAccess>
                  <UserId type="user-privs">
                    <name>alice</name><number>777</number>
                  </UserId>
                  <permission>read</permission>
                  <permission>write</permission>
                  <permission>delete</permission>
                  <permission>changePermissions</permission>
                </FileAccess>
                <FileAccess>
                  <UserId type="group-privs">
                    <name>user</name><number>42</number>
                  </UserId>
                  <permission>read</permission>
                  <permission>write</permission>
                  <permission>delete</permission>
                </FileAccess>
                <FileAccess>
                  <UserId type="other-privs">
                    <name>world</name>
                  </UserId>
                  <permission>noAccess</permission>
                </FileAccess>
                <Linkage category="symbolic-link">
                  <name>passwd</name>
                  <path>/etc/passwd</path>
                </Linkage>
              </File>
            </FileList>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="vendor-specific">
            <name>DOM race condition</name>
            <url>file://attack-info/race.html</url>
          </Classification>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>







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7.4 System Policy Violation

   In this example, logins are restricted to daytime hours.  The alert
   reports a violation of this policy that occurs when a user logs in a
   little after 10:00pm.  Note the use of <AdditionalData> to provide
   information about the policy being violated.

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
        "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert ident="abc123456789">
          <Analyzer analyzerid="bc-ds-01">
            <Node category="dns">
              <name>dialserver.example.com</name>
            </Node>
          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc72e7ef.0x00000000">
            2000-03-09T22:18:07-05:00
          </CreateTime>
          <Source ident="s01">
            <Node ident="s01-1">
              <Address category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>127.0.0.1</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
            <Service ident="s01-2">
              <port>4325</port>
            </Service>
          </Source>
          <Target ident="t01">
            <Node ident="t01-1" category="dns">
              <name>mainframe.example.com</name>
            </Node>
            <User ident="t01-2" category="os-device">
              <UserId ident="t01-3" type="current-user">
                <name>louis</name>
                <number>501</number>
              </UserId>
            </User>
            <Service ident="t01-4">
              <name>login</name>
              <port>23</port>
            </Service>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="vendor-specific">



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            <name>out-of-hours activity</name>
            <url>http://my.company.com/policies</url>
          </Classification>
          <AdditionalData type="date-time" meaning="start-time">
            2000-03-09T07:00:00-05:00
          </AdditionalData>
          <AdditionalData type="date-time" meaning="stop-time">
            2000-03-09T19:30:00-05:00
          </AdditionalData>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>


7.5 Correlated Alerts

   The following example shows how the port scan alert from Section
   7.2.2 could be represented if it had been detected and sent from a
   correlation engine, instead of a single analyzer.

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
        "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert ident="abc123456789">
          <Analyzer analyzerid="bc-corr-01">
            <Node category="dns">
              <name>correlator01.example.com</name>
            </Node>
          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc72423b.0x00000000">
            2000-03-09T15:31:07Z
          </CreateTime>
          <Source ident="a1">
            <Node ident="a1-1">
              <Address ident="a1-2" category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.200</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
          </Source>
          <Target ident="a2">
            <Node ident="a2-1" category="dns">
              <name>www.example.com</name>
              <Address ident="a2-2" category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.50</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>



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            <Service ident="a2-3">
              <portlist>5-25,37,42,43,53,69-119,123-514</portlist>
            </Service>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="vendor-specific">
            <name>portscan</name>
            <url>http://www.vendor.com/portscan</url>
          </Classification>
          <CorrelationAlert>
            <name>multiple ports in short time</name>
            <alertident>123456781</alertident>
            <alertident>123456782</alertident>
            <alertident>123456783</alertident>
            <alertident>123456784</alertident>
            <alertident>123456785</alertident>
            <alertident>123456786</alertident>
            <alertident analyzerid="a1b2c3d4">987654321</alertident>
            <alertident analyzerid="a1b2c3d4">987654322</alertident>
          </CorrelationAlert>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>


7.6 Analyzer Assessments

   Host-based detection of a successful unauthorized acquisition of root
   access through the eject buffer overflow. Note the use of
   <Assessment> to provide information about the analyzer's evaluation
   of and reaction to the attack.

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
       "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert>
          <Analyzer analyzerid="bids-192.0.2.1">
          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc71e980.0x00000000">
            2000-03-09T08:12:32-01:00
          </CreateTime>
          <Source spoofed="no">
            <Node>
              <location>console</location>
              <Address category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.1</address>
              </Address>



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            </Node>
          </Source>
          <Target decoy="no">
            <Node>
              <location>local</location>
              <Address category="ipv4-addr">
                <address>192.0.2.1</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
            <User category="os-device">
              <UserId type="original-user">
                <number>456</number>
              </UserId>
              <UserId type="current-user">
                <name>root</name>
                <number>0</number>
              </UserId>
              <UserId type="user-privs">
                <number>0</number>
              </UserId>
            </User>
            <Process>
              <name>eject</name>
              <pid>32451</pid>
              <path>/usr/bin/eject</path>
              <arg>\x90\x80\x3f\xff...\x08/bin/sh</arg>
            </Process>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="vendor-specific">
            <name>Unauthorized user to superuser</name>
            <url>file://attack-info/u2s.html</url>
          </Classification>
          <Assessment>
            <Impact severity="high" completion="succeeded" type="admin"/>
            <Action category="notification-sent">
              page
            </Action>
            <Action category="block-installed">
              disabled user (fred)
            </Action>
            <Action category="taken-offline">
              logout user (fred)
            </Action>
            <Confidence rating="high"/>
          </Assessment>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>




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7.7 Heartbeat

   This example shows a heartbeat message that provides "I'm alive and
   working" information to the manager.  Note the use of
   <AdditionalData> elements, with "meaning" attributes, to provide some
   additional information.

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
        "idmef-message.dtd">

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Heartbeat ident="abc123456789">
          <Analyzer analyzerid="hq-dmz-analyzer01">
            <Node category="dns">
              <location>Headquarters DMZ Network</location>
              <name>analyzer01.example.com</name>
            </Node>
          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc722ebe.0x00000000">
            2000-03-09T14:07:58Z
          </CreateTime>
          <AdditionalData type="real" meaning="%memused">
            62.5
          </AdditionalData>
          <AdditionalData type="real" meaning="%diskused">
            87.1
          </AdditionalData>
        </Heartbeat>
      </IDMEF-Message>




















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7.8 XML Extension

   The following example shows how to extend the IDMEF DTD with XML. In
   the example, the VendorCo company has decided it wants to add
   geographic information to the Node class.  To do this, VendorCo
   creates a Document Type Definition that defines how their class will
   be formatted:

         <!ELEMENT VendorCo:NodeGeography (
             VendorCo:latitude, VendorCo:longitude, VendorCo:elevation?
           )>
         <!ATTLIST VendorCo:NodeGeography
             xmlns               CDATA                   #FIXED
                 'idmef+vendorco'
             xmlns:VendorCo      CDATA                   #FIXED
                 'idmef+vendorco'
             VendorCo:node-ident CDATA                   #REQUIRED
           >

         <!ELEMENT VendorCo:latitude     (#PCDATA) >
         <!ELEMENT VendorCo:longitude    (#PCDATA) >
         <!ELEMENT VendorCo:elevation    (#PCDATA) >

   The VendorCo:NodeGeography class will contain the geographic data in
   three aggregate classes, VendorCo:latitude, VendorCo:longitude, and
   VendorCo:elevation.  To associate the information in this class with
   a particular node, the "VendorCo:node-ident" attribute is provided;
   it must contain the same value as the "ident" attribute on the
   relevant Node element.

   To make use of this DTD now, VendorCo follows the rules in Section
   5.2 and defines a parameter entity called "x-vendorco" within the
   Document Type Declaration, and then references this entity.  In the
   alert, the DTD's elements are included under the AdditionalData
   element, with a "type" attribute of "xml", as shown below.

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

      <!DOCTYPE IDMEF-Message PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD RFC XXXX IDMEF v1.0//EN"
        "idmef-message.dtd" [
          <!ENTITY % x-vendorco SYSTEM "vendorco.dtd">
          %x-vendorco;
        ]>

      <IDMEF-Message version="1.0">
        <Alert ident="abc123456789">
          <Analyzer analyzerid="hq-dmz-analyzer01">
            <Node category="dns">



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              <location>Headquarters DMZ Network</location>
              <name>analyzer01.example.com</name>
            </Node>
          </Analyzer>
          <CreateTime ntpstamp="0xbc723b45.0xef449129">
            2000-03-09T10:01:25.93464-05:00
          </CreateTime>
          <Source ident="a1b2c3d4">
            <Node ident="a1b2c3d4-001" category="dns">
              <name>badguy.example.net</name>
              <Address ident="a1b2c3d4-002" category="ipv4-net-mask">
                <address>192.0.2.50</address>
                <netmask>255.255.255.255</netmask>
              </Address>
            </Node>
          </Source>
          <Target ident="d1c2b3a4">
            <Node ident="d1c2b3a4-001" category="dns">
              <Address category="ipv4-addr-hex">
                <address>0xde796f70</address>
              </Address>
            </Node>
          </Target>
          <Classification origin="bugtraqid">
            <name>124</name>
            <url>http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/124</url>
          </Classification>
          <AdditionalData type="xml">
            <VendorCo:NodeGeography VendorCo:node-ident="a1b2c3d4-001">
              <VendorCo:latitude>38.89</VendorCo:latitude>
              <VendorCo:longitude>-77.02</VendorCo:longitude>
            </VendorCo:NodeGeography>
          </AdditionalData>
        </Alert>
      </IDMEF-Message>
















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8. The IDMEF Document Type Definition

       <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

       <!-- ***************************************************************
        *******************************************************************
        *** Intrusion Detection Message Exchange Format (IDMEF) XML DTD ***
        ***                Version 1.0, 08 January 2004                 ***
        ***                                                             ***
        *** The use and extension of the IDMEF XML DTD are described in ***
        *** RFC XXXX, "Intrusion Detection Message Exchange Format Data ***
        *** Model and Extensible Markup Language (XML) Document Type    ***
        *** Definition," D. Curry, H. Debar, B. Feinstein.              ***
        *******************************************************************
        *************************************************************** -->

       <!-- ===============================================================
        ===================================================================
        === SECTION 1. Attribute list declarations.
        ===================================================================
        =============================================================== -->

       <!--
        | Attributes of the IDMEF element.  In general, the fixed values of
        | these attributes will change each time a new version of the DTD
        | is released.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attlist.idmef                "
           version             CDATA                   #FIXED    '1.0'
         ">

       <!--
        | Attributes of all elements.  These are the "XML" attributes that
        | every element should have.  Space handling, language, and name
        | space.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attlist.global               "
           xmlns:idmef         CDATA                   #FIXED
               'urn:iana:xml:ns:idmef'
           xmlns               CDATA                   #FIXED
               'urn:iana:xml:ns:idmef'
           xml:space           (default | preserve)    'default'
           xml:lang            NMTOKEN                 #IMPLIED
         ">

       <!-- ===============================================================
        ===================================================================
        === SECTION 2. Attribute value declarations.  Enumerated values for



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        ===            many of the element-specific attribute lists.
        ===================================================================
        =============================================================== -->

       <!--
        | Values for the Action.category attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.actioncat            "
           ( block-installed | notification-sent | taken-offline | other )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the Address.category attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.addrcat              "
           ( unknown | atm | e-mail | lotus-notes | mac | sna | vm |
             ipv4-addr | ipv4-addr-hex | ipv4-net | ipv4-net-mask |
             ipv6-addr | ipv6-addr-hex | ipv6-net | ipv6-net-mask )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the AdditionalData.type attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.adtype               "
           ( boolean | byte | character | date-time | integer | ntpstamp |
             portlist | real | string | xml )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the Impact.completion attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.completion           "
           ( failed | succeeded )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the File.category attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.filecat              "
           ( current | original )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the Id.type attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.idtype               "
           ( current-user | original-user | target-user | user-privs |
             current-group | group-privs | other-privs )



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         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the Impact.type attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.impacttype           "
           ( admin | dos | file | recon | user | other )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the Linkage.category attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.linkcat              "
           ( hard-link | mount-point | reparse-point | shortcut | stream |
             symbolic-link )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the Node.category attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.nodecat              "
           ( unknown | ads | afs | coda | dfs | dns | hosts | kerberos |
             nds | nis | nisplus | nt | wfw )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the Classification.origin attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.origin               "
           ( unknown | bugtraqid | cve | vendor-specific )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the Confidence.rating attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.rating               "
           ( low | medium | high | numeric )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the Impact.severity attribute.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.severity             "
           ( low | medium | high )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for the User.category attribute.



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        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.usercat              "
           ( unknown | application | os-device )
         ">

       <!--
        | Values for yes/no attributes such as Source.spoofed and
        | Target.decoy.
        -->
       <!ENTITY % attvals.yesno                "
           ( unknown | yes | no )
         ">

       <!-- ===============================================================
        ===================================================================
        === SECTION 3. Top-level element declarations.  The IDMEF-Message
        ===            element and the types of messages it can include.
        ===================================================================
        =============================================================== -->

       <!ELEMENT IDMEF-Message                 (
           (Alert | Heartbeat)*
         )>
       <!ATTLIST IDMEF-Message
           %attlist.global;
           %attlist.idmef;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Alert                         (
           Analyzer, CreateTime, DetectTime?, AnalyzerTime?, Source*,
           Target*, Classification+, Assessment?, (ToolAlert |
           OverflowAlert | CorrelationAlert)?, AdditionalData*
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Alert
           ident               CDATA                   '0'
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Heartbeat                     (
           Analyzer, CreateTime, AnalyzerTime?, AdditionalData*
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Heartbeat
           ident               CDATA                   '0'
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!-- ===============================================================
        ===================================================================



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        === SECTION 4. Subclasses of the Alert element that provide more
        ===            data for specific types of alerts.
        ===================================================================
        =============================================================== -->

       <!ELEMENT CorrelationAlert              (
           name, alertident+
         )>
       <!ATTLIST CorrelationAlert
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT OverflowAlert                 (
           program, size?, buffer?
         )>
       <!ATTLIST OverflowAlert
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT ToolAlert                     (
           name, command?, alertident+
         )>
       <!ATTLIST ToolAlert
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!-- ===============================================================
        ===================================================================
        === SECTION 5.  The AdditionalData element.  This element allows an
        ===             alert to include additional information that cannot
        ===             be encoded elsewhere in the data model.
        ===================================================================
        =============================================================== -->

       <!ELEMENT AdditionalData            ANY >
       <!ATTLIST AdditionalData
           type                %attvals.adtype;        'string'
           meaning             CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!-- ===============================================================
        ===================================================================
        === SECTION 6. Elements related to identifying entities - analyzers
        ===            (the senders of these messages), sources (of
        ===            attacks), and targets (of attacks).
        ===================================================================
        =============================================================== -->



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       <!ELEMENT Analyzer                      (
           Node?, Process?
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Analyzer
           analyzerid          CDATA                   '0'
           manufacturer        CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           model               CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           version             CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           class               CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           ostype              CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           osversion           CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Source                        (
           Node?, User?, Process?, Service?
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Source
           ident               CDATA                   '0'
           spoofed             %attvals.yesno;         'unknown'
           interface           CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Target                        (
           Node?, User?, Process?, Service?, FileList?
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Target
           ident               CDATA                   '0'
           decoy               %attvals.yesno;         'unknown'
           interface           CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!-- ===============================================================
        ===================================================================
        === SECTION 7. Support elements used for providing detailed info
        ===            about entities - addresses, names, etc.
        ===================================================================
        =============================================================== -->

       <!ELEMENT Address                       (
           address, netmask?
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Address
           ident               CDATA                   '0'
           category            %attvals.addrcat;       'unknown'
           vlan-name           CDATA                   #IMPLIED



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           vlan-num            CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Assessment                    (
           Impact?, Action*, Confidence?
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Assessment
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Classification                (
           name, url
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Classification
           origin              %attvals.origin;        'unknown'
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT File                          (
           name, path, create-time?, modify-time?, access-time?,
           data-size?, disk-size?, FileAccess*, Linkage*, Inode?
         )>
       <!ATTLIST File
           ident               CDATA                   '0'
           category            %attvals.filecat;       #REQUIRED
           fstype              CDATA                   #REQUIRED
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT FileAccess                    (
           UserId, permission+
         )>
       <!ATTLIST FileAccess
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT FileList                      (
           File+
         )>
       <!ATTLIST FileList
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Inode                         (
           change-time?, (number, major-device, minor-device)?,
           (c-major-device, c-minor-device)?
         )>



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       <!ATTLIST Inode
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Linkage                       (
           (name, path) | File
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Linkage
           category            %attvals.linkcat;       #REQUIRED
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Node                          (
           location?, (name | Address), Address*
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Node
           ident               CDATA                   '0'
           category            %attvals.nodecat;       'unknown'
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Process                       (
           name, pid?, path?, arg*, env*
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Process
           ident               CDATA                   '0'
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Service                       (
           (((name, port?) | (port, name?)) | portlist), protocol?,
           SNMPService?, WebService?
         )>
       <!ATTLIST Service
           ident               CDATA                   '0'
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT SNMPService                   (
           oid?, (community | (securityName, contextName,
           contextEngineID))?, command?
         )>
       <!ATTLIST SNMPService
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT User                          (
           UserId+



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         )>
       <!ATTLIST User
           ident               CDATA                   '0'
           category            %attvals.usercat;       'unknown'
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT UserId                        (
           (name, number?) | (number, name?)
         )>
       <!ATTLIST UserId
           ident               CDATA                   '0'
           type                %attvals.idtype;        'original-user'
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT WebService                    (
           url, cgi?, http-method?, arg*
         )>
       <!ATTLIST WebService
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!-- ===============================================================
        ===================================================================
        === SECTION 8. Simple elements with sub-elements or attributes of a
        ===            special nature.
        ===================================================================
        =============================================================== -->

       <!ELEMENT Action              (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST Action
           category            %attvals.actioncat;     'other'
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT AnalyzerTime        (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST AnalyzerTime
           ntpstamp            CDATA                   #REQUIRED
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT Confidence          (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST Confidence
           rating              %attvals.rating;        'numeric'
           %attlist.global;
         >




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       <!ELEMENT CreateTime          (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST CreateTime
           ntpstamp            CDATA                   #REQUIRED
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT DetectTime          (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST DetectTime
           ntpstamp            CDATA                   #REQUIRED
           %attlist.global;

         >

       <!ELEMENT Impact              (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST Impact
           severity            %attvals.severity;      #IMPLIED
           completion          %attvals.completion;    #IMPLIED
           type                %attvals.impacttype;    'other'
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT alertident          (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST alertident
           analyzerid          CDATA                   #IMPLIED
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!-- ===============================================================
        ===================================================================
        === SECTION 9. Simple elements with no sub-elements and no special
        ===            attributes.
        ===================================================================
        =============================================================== -->

       <!ELEMENT access-time         (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST access-time
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT address             (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST address
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT arg                 (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST arg
           %attlist.global;
         >



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       <!ELEMENT buffer              (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST buffer
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT c-major-device      (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST c-major-device
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT c-minor-device      (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST c-minor-device
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT cgi                 (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST cgi
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT change-time         (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST change-time
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT command             (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST command
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT community           (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST community
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT create-time         (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST create-time
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT data-size           (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST data-size
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT disk-size           (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST disk-size
           %attlist.global;



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         >

       <!ELEMENT env                 (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST env
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT http-method         (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST http-method
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT location            (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST location
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT major-device        (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST major-device
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT minor-device        (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST minor-device
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT modify-time         (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST modify-time
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT name                (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST name
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT netmask             (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST netmask
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT number              (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST number
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT oid                 (#PCDATA) >



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       <!ATTLIST oid
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT path                (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST path
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT permission          (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST permission
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT pid                 (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST pid
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT port                (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST port
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT portlist            (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST portlist
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT program             (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST program
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT protocol            (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST protocol
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT size                (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST size
           %attlist.global;
         >

       <!ELEMENT url                 (#PCDATA) >
       <!ATTLIST url
           %attlist.global;
         >



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9. Security Considerations

   This Internet-Draft describes a data representation for exchanging
   security-related information between intrusion detection system
   implementations.  Although there are no security concerns directly
   applicable to the format of this data, the data itself may contain
   security-sensitive information whose confidentiality, integrity, and/
   or availability may need to be protected.

   This suggests that the systems used to collect, transmit, process,
   and store this data should be protected against unauthorized use, and
   that the data itself should be protected against unauthorized access.
   The means for achieving this protection are outside the scope of this
   document.

   Section 5 of [2] describes the required and recommended security
   characteristics of the transmission protocol that will be used to
   deliver IDMEF data from analyzers to managers.  These requirements
   include message confidentiality, message integrity, non-repudiation,
   and avoidance of duplicate messages.  Both standard and proposed
   protocols exist that provide these features.

   Where a protocol that does not meet the requirements of Section 5 of
   [2] is used to exchange IDMEF messages, it may be desirable to use
   digital signatures to certify the integrity of these messages; this
   is discussed in Section 6.5 of this document.

























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10. IANA Considerations

   Section 5 describes how to use the AdditionalData class to include
   arbitrary "atomic" data items in an IDMEF message, as well as how
   AdditionalData may be used to extended the DTD itself by adding new
   classes and attributes.

   From time to time, it may be desirable to move an extension from its
   private or local use status (as all extensions made via the above
   mechanism are) to "standard" status that should be supported by all
   implementations.

   This may be accomplished as described in this section.

10.1 Adding Values to Existing Attributes

   Several of the attributes specified in this document have lists of
   permissible values that they may contain.  To allow the addition of
   new values to these lists, the IANA will create a repository for
   attribute values called "IDMEF Attribute Values."

   Following the policies outlined in [9], this repository is
   "Specification Required" by RFC.  Section 10.1.1 describes the
   initial values for this repository.

   To create a new attribute, you MUST publish an RFC to document the
   type.  In the RFC, include a copy of the registration template found
   in Section 10.1.2 of this document.  Put the template in your IANA
   Considerations section, filling in the appropriate fields.  You MUST
   describe any interoperability and security issues in your document.

   When adding a new attribute value to the repository, the IANA shall
   assign the next rank number in numerical sequence for the value.

10.1.1 Attribute Registrations

   IDMEF Class Name: Classification

   IDMEF Attribute Name: origin

   Registered Values:

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | unknown              | Origin of the name  |
   |                      |                      | is not known        |
   |                      |                      |                     |



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   |                    1 | bugtraqid            | The SecurityFocus   |
   |                      |                      | ("Bugtraq")         |
   |                      |                      | vulnerability       |
   |                      |                      | database identifier |
   |                      |                      | (http://www.securit |
   |                      |                      | yfocus.com/vdb)     |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | cve                  | The Common          |
   |                      |                      | Vulnerabilities and |
   |                      |                      | Exposures (CVE)     |
   |                      |                      | name                |
   |                      |                      | (http://www.cve.mit |
   |                      |                      | re.org/)            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | vendor-specific      | A vendor-specific   |
   |                      |                      | name (and hence,    |
   |                      |                      | URL); this can be   |
   |                      |                      | used to provide     |
   |                      |                      | product-specific    |
   |                      |                      | information         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: Source

   IDMEF Attribute Name: spoofed

   Registered Values:

      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+
      | Rank | Keyword | Description                            |
      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+
      |    0 | unknown | Accuracy of source information unknown |
      |      |         |                                        |
      |    1 | yes     | Source is believed to be a decoy       |
      |      |         |                                        |
      |    2 | no      | Source is believed to be "real"        |
      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: Target

   IDMEF Attribute Name: decoy

   Registered Values:

      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+
      | Rank | Keyword | Description                            |
      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+
      |    0 | unknown | Accuracy of target information unknown |



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      |      |         |                                        |
      |    1 | yes     | Target is believed to be a decoy       |
      |      |         |                                        |
      |    2 | no      | Target is believed to be "real"        |
      +------+---------+----------------------------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: AdditionalData

   IDMEF Attribute Name: type

   Registered Values:

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | boolean              | The element         |
   |                      |                      | contains a boolean  |
   |                      |                      | value, i.e., the    |
   |                      |                      | strings "true" or   |
   |                      |                      | "false"             |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | byte                 | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a single 8-bit   |
   |                      |                      | byte (see Section   |
   |                      |                      | 3.2.4)              |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | character            | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a single         |
   |                      |                      | character (see      |
   |                      |                      | Section 3.2.3)      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | date-time            | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a date-time      |
   |                      |                      | string (see Section |
   |                      |                      | 3.2.6)              |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | integer              | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is an integer (see  |
   |                      |                      | Section 3.2.1)      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | ntpstamp             | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is an NTP timestamp |
   |                      |                      | (see Section 3.2.7) |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    6 | portlist             | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a list of ports  |
   |                      |                      | (see Section 3.2.8) |
   |                      |                      |                     |



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   |                    7 | real                 | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a real number    |
   |                      |                      | (see Section 3.2.2) |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    8 | string               | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is a string (see    |
   |                      |                      | Section 3.2.3)      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    9 | xml                  | The element content |
   |                      |                      | is XML-tagged data  |
   |                      |                      | (see Section 5.2)   |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: Impact

   IDMEF Attribute Name: severity

   Registered Values:

                  +------+---------+-----------------+
                  | Rank | Keyword | Description     |
                  +------+---------+-----------------+
                  |    0 | low     | Low severity    |
                  |      |         |                 |
                  |    1 | medium  | Medium severity |
                  |      |         |                 |
                  |    2 | high    | High severity   |
                  +------+---------+-----------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: Impact

   IDMEF Attribute Name: completion

   Registered Values:

         +------+-----------+--------------------------------+
         | Rank | Keyword   | Description                    |
         +------+-----------+--------------------------------+
         |    0 | failed    | The attempt was not successful |
         |      |           |                                |
         |    1 | succeeded | The attempt succeeded          |
         +------+-----------+--------------------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: Impact

   IDMEF Attribute Name: type





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   Registered Values:

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | admin                | Administrative      |
   |                      |                      | privileges were     |
   |                      |                      | attempted or        |
   |                      |                      | obtained            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | dos                  | A denial of service |
   |                      |                      | was attempted or    |
   |                      |                      | completed           |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | file                 | An action on a file |
   |                      |                      | was attempted or    |
   |                      |                      | completed           |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | recon                | A reconnaissance    |
   |                      |                      | probe was attempted |
   |                      |                      | or completed        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | user                 | User privileges     |
   |                      |                      | were attempted or   |
   |                      |                      | obtained            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | other                | Anything not in one |
   |                      |                      | of the above        |
   |                      |                      | categories          |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: Action

   IDMEF Attribute Name: category

   Registered Values:

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | block-installed      | A block of some     |
   |                      |                      | sort was installed  |
   |                      |                      | to prevent an       |
   |                      |                      | attack from         |
   |                      |                      | reaching its        |
   |                      |                      | destination. The    |
   |                      |                      | block could be a    |
   |                      |                      | port block, address |



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   |                      |                      | block, etc., or     |
   |                      |                      | disabling a user    |
   |                      |                      | account.            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | notification-sent    | A notification      |
   |                      |                      | message of some     |
   |                      |                      | sort was sent       |
   |                      |                      | out-of-band (via    |
   |                      |                      | pager, e-mail,      |
   |                      |                      | etc.). Does not     |
   |                      |                      | include the         |
   |                      |                      | transmission of     |
   |                      |                      | this alert.         |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | taken-offline        | A system, computer, |
   |                      |                      | or user was taken   |
   |                      |                      | offline, as when    |
   |                      |                      | the computer is     |
   |                      |                      | shut down or a user |
   |                      |                      | is logged off.      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | other                | Anything not in one |
   |                      |                      | of the above        |
   |                      |                      | categories.         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: Confidence

   IDMEF Attribute Name: rating

   Registered Values:

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | low                  | The analyzer has    |
   |                      |                      | little confidence   |
   |                      |                      | in its validity     |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | medium               | The analyzer has    |
   |                      |                      | average confidence  |
   |                      |                      | in its validity     |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | high                 | The analyzer has    |
   |                      |                      | high confidence in  |
   |                      |                      | its validity        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | numeric              | The analyzer has    |



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   |                      |                      | provided a          |
   |                      |                      | posterior           |
   |                      |                      | probability value   |
   |                      |                      | indicating its      |
   |                      |                      | confidence in its   |
   |                      |                      | validity            |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: Node

   IDMEF Attribute Name: category

   Registered Values:

     +------+----------+------------------------------------------+
     | Rank | Keyword  | Description                              |
     +------+----------+------------------------------------------+
     |    0 | unknown  | Domain unknown or not relevant           |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    1 | ads      | Windows 2000 Advanced Directory Services |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    2 | afs      | Andrew File System (Transarc)            |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    3 | coda     | Coda Distributed File System             |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    4 | dfs      | Distributed File System (IBM)            |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    5 | dns      | Domain Name System                       |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    6 | hosts    | Local hosts file                         |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    7 | kerberos | Kerberos realm                           |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    8 | nds      | Novell Directory Services                |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |    9 | nis      | Network Information Services (Sun)       |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |   10 | nisplus  | Network Information Services Plus (Sun)  |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |   11 | nt       | Windows NT domain                        |
     |      |          |                                          |
     |   12 | wfw      | Windows for Workgroups                   |
     +------+----------+------------------------------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: Address






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   IDMEF Attribute Name: category

   Registered Values:

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | unknown              | Address type        |
   |                      |                      | unknown             |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | atm                  | Asynchronous        |
   |                      |                      | Transfer Mode       |
   |                      |                      | network address     |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | e-mail               | Electronic mail     |
   |                      |                      | address (RFC 822)   |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | lotus-notes          | Lotus Notes e-mail  |
   |                      |                      | address             |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | mac                  | Media Access        |
   |                      |                      | Control (MAC)       |
   |                      |                      | address             |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | sna                  | IBM Shared Network  |
   |                      |                      | Architecture (SNA)  |
   |                      |                      | address             |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    6 | vm                   | IBM VM ("PROFS")    |
   |                      |                      | e-mail address      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    7 | ipv4-addr            | IPv4 host address   |
   |                      |                      | in dotted-decimal   |
   |                      |                      | notation (a.b.c.d)  |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    8 | ipv4-addr-hex        | IPv4 host address   |
   |                      |                      | in hexadecimal      |
   |                      |                      | notation            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    9 | ipv4-net             | IPv4 network        |
   |                      |                      | address in          |
   |                      |                      | dotted-decimal      |
   |                      |                      | notation, slash,    |
   |                      |                      | significant bits    |
   |                      |                      | (a.b.c.d/nn)        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                   10 | ipv4-net-mask        | IPv4 network        |
   |                      |                      | address in          |



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   |                      |                      | dotted-decimal      |
   |                      |                      | notation, slash,    |
   |                      |                      | network mask in     |
   |                      |                      | dotted-decimal      |
   |                      |                      | notation            |
   |                      |                      | (a.b.c.d/w.x.y.z)   |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                   11 | ipv6-addr            | IPv6 host address   |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                   12 | ipv6-addr-hex        | IPv6 host address   |
   |                      |                      | in hexadecimal      |
   |                      |                      | notation            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                   13 | ipv6-net             | IPv6 network        |
   |                      |                      | address, slash,     |
   |                      |                      | significant bits    |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                   14 | ipv6-net-mask        | IPv6 network        |
   |                      |                      | address, slash,     |
   |                      |                      | network mask        |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: User

   IDMEF Attribute Name: category

   Registered Values:

      +------+-------------+------------------------------------+
      | Rank | Keyword     | Description                        |
      +------+-------------+------------------------------------+
      |    0 | unknown     | User type unknown                  |
      |      |             |                                    |
      |    1 | application | An application user                |
      |      |             |                                    |
      |    2 | os-device   | An operating system or device user |
      +------+-------------+------------------------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: UserId

   IDMEF Attribute Name: category

   Registered Values:








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   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | current-user         | The current user id |
   |                      |                      | being used by the   |
   |                      |                      | user or process. On |
   |                      |                      | Unix systems, this  |
   |                      |                      | would be the "real" |
   |                      |                      | user id, in         |
   |                      |                      | general.            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | original-user        | The actual identity |
   |                      |                      | of the user or      |
   |                      |                      | process being       |
   |                      |                      | reported on. On     |
   |                      |                      | those systems that  |
   |                      |                      | (a) do some type of |
   |                      |                      | auditing and (b)    |
   |                      |                      | support extracting  |
   |                      |                      | a user id from the  |
   |                      |                      | "audit id" token,   |
   |                      |                      | that value should   |
   |                      |                      | be used. On those   |
   |                      |                      | systems that do not |
   |                      |                      | support this, and   |
   |                      |                      | where the user has  |
   |                      |                      | logged into the     |
   |                      |                      | system, the "login  |
   |                      |                      | id" should be used. |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | target-user          | The user id the     |
   |                      |                      | user or process is  |
   |                      |                      | attempting to       |
   |                      |                      | become. This would  |
   |                      |                      | apply, on Unix      |
   |                      |                      | systems for         |
   |                      |                      | example, when the   |
   |                      |                      | user attempts to    |
   |                      |                      | use "su," "rlogin," |
   |                      |                      | "telnet," etc.      |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | user-privs           | Another user id the |
   |                      |                      | user or process has |
   |                      |                      | the ability to use, |
   |                      |                      | or a user id assoc- |
   |                      |                      | iated with a file   |
   |                      |                      | permission. On Unix |
   |                      |                      | systems, this would |



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   |                      |                      | be the "effective"  |
   |                      |                      | user id in a user   |
   |                      |                      | or process context, |
   |                      |                      | and the owner       |
   |                      |                      | permissions in a    |
   |                      |                      | file context.       |
   |                      |                      | Multiple UserId     |
   |                      |                      | elements of this    |
   |                      |                      | type may be used to |
   |                      |                      | specify a list of   |
   |                      |                      | privileges.         |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | current-group        | The current group   |
   |                      |                      | id (if applicable)  |
   |                      |                      | being used by the   |
   |                      |                      | user or process. On |
   |                      |                      | Unix systems, this  |
   |                      |                      | would be the "real" |
   |                      |                      | group id, in        |
   |                      |                      | general.            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | group-privs          | Another group id    |
   |                      |                      | the group or        |
   |                      |                      | process has the     |
   |                      |                      | ability to use, or  |
   |                      |                      | a group id          |
   |                      |                      | associated with a   |
   |                      |                      | file permission. On |
   |                      |                      | Unix systems, this  |
   |                      |                      | would be the        |
   |                      |                      | "effect- ive" group |
   |                      |                      | id in a group or    |
   |                      |                      | process context,    |
   |                      |                      | and the group       |
   |                      |                      | permissions in a    |
   |                      |                      | file context. On    |
   |                      |                      | BSD-derived Unix    |
   |                      |                      | systems, multiple   |
   |                      |                      | UserId elements of  |
   |                      |                      | this type would be  |
   |                      |                      | used to include all |
   |                      |                      | the group ids on    |
   |                      |                      | the "group list."   |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    6 | other-privs          | Not used in a user, |
   |                      |                      | group, or process   |
   |                      |                      | context, only used  |
   |                      |                      | in the file         |



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   |                      |                      | context. The file   |
   |                      |                      | permissions         |
   |                      |                      | assigned to users   |
   |                      |                      | who do not match    |
   |                      |                      | either the user or  |
   |                      |                      | group permissions   |
   |                      |                      | on the file. On     |
   |                      |                      | Unix systems, this  |
   |                      |                      | would be the        |
   |                      |                      | "world"             |
   |                      |                      | permissions.        |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: File

   IDMEF Attribute Name: category

   Registered Values:

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | current              | The file            |
   |                      |                      | information is from |
   |                      |                      | after the reported  |
   |                      |                      | change              |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | original             | The file            |
   |                      |                      | information is from |
   |                      |                      | before the reported |
   |                      |                      | change              |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: File

   IDMEF Attribute Name: fstype

   Registered Values:













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        +------+---------+-------------------------------------+
        | Rank | Keyword | Description                         |
        +------+---------+-------------------------------------+
        |    0 | ufs     | Berkeley UNIX Fast File System      |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    1 | efs     | Linux "efs" file system             |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    2 | nfs     | Network File System                 |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    3 | afs     | Andrew File System                  |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    4 | ntfs    | Windows NT File System              |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    5 | fat16   | 16-bit Windows FAT File System      |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    6 | fat32   | 32-bit Windows FAT File System      |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    7 | pcfs    | "PC" (MS-DOS) file system on CD-ROM |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    8 | joliet  | Joliet CD-ROM file system           |
        |      |         |                                     |
        |    9 | iso9660 | ISO 9660 CD-ROM file system         |
        +------+---------+-------------------------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: FileAccess

   IDMEF Attribute Name: permission

   Registered Values:

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | noAccess             | No access at all is |
   |                      |                      | allowed for this    |
   |                      |                      | user                |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | read                 | This user has read  |
   |                      |                      | access to the file  |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | write                | This user has write |
   |                      |                      | access to the file  |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | execute              | This user has the   |
   |                      |                      | ability to execute  |
   |                      |                      | the file            |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | search               | This user has the   |



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   |                      |                      | ability to search   |
   |                      |                      | this file (applies  |
   |                      |                      | to "execute"        |
   |                      |                      | permission on       |
   |                      |                      | directories in      |
   |                      |                      | UNIX)               |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | delete               | This user has the   |
   |                      |                      | ability to delete   |
   |                      |                      | this file           |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    6 | executeAs            | This user has the   |
   |                      |                      | ability to execute  |
   |                      |                      | this file as        |
   |                      |                      | another user        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    7 | changePermissions    | This user has the   |
   |                      |                      | ability to change   |
   |                      |                      | the access          |
   |                      |                      | permissions on this |
   |                      |                      | file                |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    8 | takeOwnership        | This user has the   |
   |                      |                      | ability to take     |
   |                      |                      | ownership of this   |
   |                      |                      | file                |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+

   IDMEF Class Name: Linkage

   IDMEF Attribute Name: category

   Registered Values:

   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                 Rank | Keyword              | Description         |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+
   |                    0 | hard-link            | The <name> element  |
   |                      |                      | represents another  |
   |                      |                      | name for this file. |
   |                      |                      | This information    |
   |                      |                      | may be more easily  |
   |                      |                      | obtainable on NTFS  |
   |                      |                      | file systems than   |
   |                      |                      | others.             |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    1 | mount-point          | An alias for the    |
   |                      |                      | directory specified |



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   |                      |                      | by the parent's     |
   |                      |                      | <name> and <path>   |
   |                      |                      | elements.           |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    2 | reparse-point        | Applies only to     |
   |                      |                      | Windows; excludes   |
   |                      |                      | symbolic links and  |
   |                      |                      | mount points, which |
   |                      |                      | are specific types  |
   |                      |                      | of reparse points.  |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    3 | shortcut             | The file            |
   |                      |                      | represented by a    |
   |                      |                      | Windows "shortcut." |
   |                      |                      | A shortcut is       |
   |                      |                      | distinguished from  |
   |                      |                      | a symbolic link     |
   |                      |                      | because of the      |
   |                      |                      | difference in their |
   |                      |                      | contents, which may |
   |                      |                      | be of importance to |
   |                      |                      | the manager.        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    4 | stream               | An Alternate Data   |
   |                      |                      | Stream (ADS) in     |
   |                      |                      | Windows; a fork on  |
   |                      |                      | MacOS. Separate     |
   |                      |                      | file system entity  |
   |                      |                      | that is considered  |
   |                      |                      | an extension of the |
   |                      |                      | main <File>.        |
   |                      |                      |                     |
   |                    5 | symbolic-link        | The <name> element  |
   |                      |                      | represents the file |
   |                      |                      | to which the link   |
   |                      |                      | points.             |
   +----------------------+----------------------+---------------------+


10.1.2 Registration Template

   IDMEF Class Name:

      <provide the name of the class that contains the attribute to
      which you want to add a new value, e.g., "Address">






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   IDMEF Attribute Name:

      <provide the name of the attribute to which you want to add a new
      value, e.g., "category">

   New Attribute Value to be Defined:

      <provide the name of the new attribute value that you want to add,
      e.g., "sneaker-net">

   Meaning of New Attribute Value:

      <describe in detail what the attribute value means - i.e., if an
      analyzer sends this value, what is it telling the receiver of the
      information?>

   Contact Person and E-Mail Address:

      <your name and e-mail address>


10.2 Adding New Attributes and Classes

   To the extent possible, the IDMEF classes and attributes specified in
   this document have been designed to accomodate all current and
   near-future needs.  Although it is recognized that the addition of
   new classes, as well as the addition of new attributes to existing
   classes, will be necessary in the future, these actions should not be
   taken lightly.

   Any addition of new attributes or classes should only be undertaken
   when the current classes and attributes simply cannot be used to
   represent the information in a "clean" way -- and such additions
   should only be made to represent generally-useful types of data.
   Vendor-specific information, obscure information provided by only a
   particular type of analyzer or used only by a particular type of
   manager, "pet" attributes, and the like are not good reasons to make
   class and attribute additions.

   At the time this RFC was written, the first anticipated case for
   which new classes and attributes will need to be added is to handle
   host-based intrusion detection systems.  However, such additions
   should not be made until some level of consensus has been reached
   about the set of data that will be provided by these systems.

   Following the policies outlined in [9], the addition of new classes
   and attributes to the IDMEF requires "IETF Consensus."




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   To add new attributes or classes, you MUST publish an RFC to document
   them, and get that RFC approved by the IESG.  Typically, the IESG
   will seek input on prospective additions from appropriate persons
   (e.g., a relevant Working Group if one exists).  You MUST describe
   any interoperability and security issues in your document.














































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Normative References

   [1]   Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement
         Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [2]   Wood, M. and M. Erlinger, "Intrusion Detection Mesage Exchange
         Requirements", draft-ietf-idwg-requirements-10 (work in
         progress), October 2002.

   [3]   Bray, T., Paoli, J., Sperberg-McQueen, C. and E. Maler,
         "Extensible Markup Language (XML) 1.0 (Second Edition)", W3C
         FirstEdition REC-xml-20001006, October 2000.

   [4]   Bray, T., Hollander, D. and A. Layman, "Namespaces in XML", W3C
         REC REC-xml-names-19990114, January 1999.

   [5]   Berners-Lee, T., Fielding, R. and L. Masinter, "Uniform
         Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax", RFC 2396, August
         1998.

   [6]   International Organization for Standardization, "Data elements
         and interchange formats - Information interchange -
         Representation of dates and times", ISO Standard 8601, Second
         Edition, December 2000.

   [7]   Mills, D., "Network Time Protocol (Version 3) Specification,
         Implementation", RFC 1305, March 1992.

   [8]   Mills, D., "Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) Version 4 for
         IPv4, IPv6 and OSI", RFC 2030, October 1996.

   [9]   Narten, T. and H. Alvestrand, "Guidelines for Writing an IANA
         Considerations Section in RFCs", BCP 26, RFC 2434, October
         1998.

   [10]  Alvestrand, H., "Tags for the Identification of Languages", BCP
         47, RFC 3066, January 2001.














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Informational References

   [11]  Eastlake, D., Reagle, J. and D. Solo, "XML-Signature Syntax and
         Processing", RFC 3075, March 2001.

   [12]  Rumbaugh, J., Jacobson, I. and G. Booch, "The Unified Modeling
         Language Reference Model", ISBN 020130998X, 1998.

   [13]  Freed, N. and J. Postel, "IANA Charset Registration
         Procedures", BCP 19, RFC 2278, January 1998.


Authors' Addresses

   David A. Curry
   Merrill Lynch & Co.
   Corporate Technology Group
   95 Greene Street, 2nd Floor
   Jersey City, NJ  07302
   US

   Phone: +1 201 671-1670
   EMail: david_a_curry@ml.com
   URI:   http://www.ml.com/


   Herve Debar
   France Telecom R & D
   42 Rue des Coutures
   Caen  14000
   FR

   Phone: +33 2 31 75 92 61
   EMail: herve.debar@francetelecom.fr
   URI:   http://www.francetelecom.fr/


   Benjamin S. Feinstein
   Trusted Network Technologies, Inc.
   3600 Mansell Road
   Suite 200
   Alpharetta, GA  30022
   US

   Phone: +1 678 990-5345
   EMail: bfeinstein@acm.org
   URI:   http://www.trustednetworktech.com/




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Appendix A. History of Significant Changes

   The RFC Editor should remove this section and its corresponding TOC
   references prior to publication.

A.1 Significant Changes Since idmef-10

   [BF] Converted memo to RFC2629-compliant XML.

   [BF] Added Appendix A.

   [HD] Changed examples to have diverse urls.







































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Appendix B. Acknowledgements

   The following individuals contributed substantially to this document
   and should be recognized for their efforts.  This document would not
   exist without their help:

   Dominique Alessandri, IBM Corporation
   Spencer Allain, Teknowledge Corporation
   James L. Burden, California Independent Systems Operator
   Marc Dacier, IBM Corporation
   Oliver Dain, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
   David J. Donahoo, AFIWC
   Michael Erlinger, Harvey Mudd College
   Reinhard Handwerker, Internet Security Systems, Inc.
   Ming-Yuh Huang, The Boeing Company
   Joe McAlerney, Silicon Defense
   Cynthia McLain, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
   Glenn Mansfield, Cyber Solutions, Inc.
   Paul Osterwald, Intrusion.com
   James Riordan, IBM Corporation
   Stephane Schitter, IBM Corporation
   Michael J. Slifcak, Trusted Network Technologies, Inc.
   Paul Sangree, Cisco Systems
   Michael Steiner, University of Saarland
   Steven R. Snapp, CyberSafe Corporation
   Stuart Staniford-Chen, Silicon Defense
   Maureen Stillman, Nokia IP Telephony
   Vimal Vaidya, AXENT
   Andy Walther, Harvey Mudd College
   Andreas Wespi, IBM Corporation
   John C. C. White, MITRE
   Eric D. Williams, Information Brokers, Inc.
   S. Felix Wu, North Carolina State University


















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Appendix C. An Overview of UML and XML as Used in This Document

   This appendix provides an overview of features of the Unified
   Modeling Language and the Extensible Markup Language as they are used
   in this specification.

C.1 Unified Modeling Language

   The IDMEF data model is described using the Unified Modeling Language
   (UML) [12].  UML provides a simple framework to represent entities
   and their relationships.  UML defines entities as classes.  In this
   document, we have identified several classes and their associated
   attributes.  The symbols used in this document to represent classes
   and attributes are shown in Figure 76.

              +-------------+
              | Class Name  |     <----- Name of class
              +-------------+
              | Attribute 1 |     <----- Name of first attribute
              | ...         |
              | Attribute N |     <----- Name of nth attribute
              +-------------+

         Figure 76: Symbols representing classes and attributes

   Note that attributes for a class may not appear in all diagrams in
   which the class is used.

C.1.1 Relationships

   The IDMEF model currently uses only two of the relationship types
   defined by UML: inheritance and aggregation.

C.1.1.1 Inheritance Relationship

   Inheritance denotes a superclass/subclass type of relationship where
   the subclass inherits all the attributes, operations, and
   relationships of the superclass.  This type of relationship is also
   called a "is-a" or "kind-of" relationship.  Subclasses may have
   additional attributes or operations that apply only to the subclass,
   and not to the superclass.










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                                +-------------+
                                | Publication |
                                +-------------+
                                | publisher   |
                                | pubDate     |
                                +-------------+
                                      /_\
                                       |
                              +--------+--------+
                              |                 |
                         +----------+     +----------+
                         | Magazine |     |   Book   |
                         +----------+     +----------+
                         | name     |     | title    |
                         |          |     | author   |
                         +----------+     +----------+

                  Figure 77: Inheritance relationships

   In this document, inheritance is denoted by the /_\ symbol.  In
   Figure 77 above, we are showing that Book and Magazine are two types
   of Publication.  Book inherits all the attributes of Publication,
   plus all of its own attributes (thus, it has four attributes in
   total); as does Magazine (giving it three attributes in total).

C.1.1.2 Aggregation Relationship

   Aggregation is a form of association in which the whole is related to
   its parts.  This type of relationship is also referred to as a
   "part-of" relationship.  In this case, the aggregate class contains
   all of its own attributes and as many of the attributes associated
   with its parts as required and specified by the occurrence indicators
   (see Appendix C.1.2).


















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                   +----------+
                   |   Book   |
                   +----------+       0..1 +--------------+
                   | title    |<>----------| Preface      |
                   | author   |            +--------------+
                   |          |       1..* +--------------+
                   |          |<>----------| Chapter      |
                   |          |            +--------------+
                   |          |       0..* +--------------+
                   |          |<>----------| Appendix     |
                   |          |            +--------------+
                   |          |       0..1 +--------------+
                   |          |<>----------| Bibliography |
                   |          |            +--------------+
                   |          |            +--------------+
                   |          |<>----------| Index        |
                   |          |            +--------------+
                   +----------+

                  Figure 78: Aggregation relationships

   In this document, the symbol <> is used to indicate aggregation. It
   is placed at the end of the association line closest to the aggregate
   (whole) class.  In Figure 78 above, we are showing that a Book is
   made up of pieces called Preface, Chapter, Appendix, Bibliography,
   and Index.

C.1.2 Occurrence Indicators

   Occurrence indicators show the number of objects within a class that
   are linked to one another by an aggregation relationship.  They are
   placed at the end of the association line closest to the part they
   refer to.  Occurrence indicators, as used in this document, are:

            +-----------+---------------------------------+
            | Indicator | Description                     |
            +-----------+---------------------------------+
            |         n | exactly "n" (left blank if n=1) |
            |           |                                 |
            |      0..* | zero or more                    |
            |           |                                 |
            |      1..* | one or more                     |
            |           |                                 |
            |      0..1 | zero or one (i.e., "optional")  |
            |           |                                 |
            |      n..m | between "n" and "m" (inclusive) |
            +-----------+---------------------------------+




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                                Table 35

   In Table 35 above, the Book:

   o  may have no Preface or one Preface;

   o  must have at least one Chapter, but may have more;

   o  may have any number of Appendixes; and

   o  must have exactly one Index.


C.2 XML Document Type Definitions

   XML Document Type Definitions (DTDs) are used to declare the markup
   for a document.  This includes the different pieces of information
   the document will contain (the elements), characteristics of that
   information (the attributes), and the relationship between the pieces
   (the content model).

   Section 8 of this document contains the complete IDMEF DTD.

C.2.1 Element Declarations

   Elements are the main part of a document's markup; they define the
   names of the pieces of the document, and the content model for those
   pieces.

         <!ELEMENT Book (
             Preface, Chapter, Appendix, Bibliography, Index
           )>

   In this example, the "Book" element is defined to consist of exactly
   one Preface, one Chapter, one Appendix, one Bibliography, and one
   Index.  Furthermore, these parts must appear in this order (e.g., the
   Index cannot come before the Bibliography).














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   The XML document associated with this DTD might look like this:

         <Book>
           <Preface>
             ...
           </Preface>
           <Chapter>
             ...
           </Chapter>
           <Appendix>
             ...
           </Appendix>
           <Index>
             ...
           </Index>
         </Book>

   NOTE: XML is for the most part a free-format language; the line
      breaks and indentation used in the examples are for the purpose of
      improving readability only.


C.2.1.1 Occurrence Indicators

   In the example above, Book must contain exactly one of each part --
   it cannot have more than one Chapter, the Preface is not optional,
   and so on.  This is not a very good representation of real-life
   books.

   XML provides occurrence indicators to make it possible to represent
   more complex content models.  The occurrence indicators are:

   +---------------------------------+---------------------------------+
   |                       Indicator | Description                     |
   +---------------------------------+---------------------------------+
   |                               ? | the content may appear either   |
   |                                 | once or not at all              |
   |                                 |                                 |
   |                               * | the content may appear one or   |
   |                                 | more times or not at all        |
   |                                 |                                 |
   |                               + | the content must appear at      |
   |                                 | least once, and may appear more |
   |                                 | than once                       |
   |                                 |                                 |
   |                          [none] | the content must appear exactly |
   |                                 | once                            |
   +---------------------------------+---------------------------------+



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   Occurrence indicators allow us to revise our Book content model.

         <!ELEMENT Book (
             Preface?, Chapter+, Appendix*, Bibliography?, Index
           )>

   Now a Book may contain an optional Preface, one or more Chapters, any
   number of Appendixes, an optional Bibliography, and an Index.  The
   parts must still occur in this order.

C.2.1.2 Alternative Content and Grouping

   To allow the creation of arbitrarily complex content models, XML also
   provides:

   o  alternatives, specified with the '|' character

   o  parentheses, to permit grouping of elements

   o  occurrence indicators may also be used on parenthesized groups

   For example:

         <!ELEMENT x (a, (b | c | d), e)* >

   would allow all of the following:

           <x>          <x>          <x>          <x>          <x>
             <a/>         <a/>         <a/>         <a/>       </x>
             <b/>         <d/>         <c/>         <b/>
             <e/>         <e/>         <e/>         <e/>
           </x>         </x>           <a/>         <a/>
                                       <c/>         <c/>
                                       <e/>         <e/>
                                     </x>           <a/>
                                                    <d/>
                                                    <e/>
                                                  </x>

   The example above also introduces the "<tag/>" notation; this is used
   in XML to denote empty content.  It is more or less equivalent to
   "<tag></tag>" (the differences are beyond the scope of this
   document).

C.2.1.3 Element Content

   An XML document has a tree structure.  One element at the top is the
   parent of all other elements (e.g., Book), there are some number of



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   other elements all with parents and children, and then at the bottom
   of the tree, there are some number of elements that have no children.
   These are the elements that contain the document content.

   XML DTDs do not support data types such as integer, real, string, and
   so on (more on this later).  However, they do require some indication
   of the type(s) of content that an element will contain.  There are
   several types available, but only three are used in the IDMEF:

   PCDATA

      An XML processor will find only text (parsed character data) in
      this element, no tags or entity references (see Appendix C.2.3).
      This is the content type for all but one of the elements at the
      bottom of the IDMEF document tree.

   ANY

      The element may contain anything -- text, other tags, entity
      references, etc.  This is the content type for the AdditionalData
      element (see Section 4.2.4.6).

   EMPTY

      The element may be empty, in which case it is represented with a
      single tag, "<element/>" instead of "<element></element>".


C.2.2 Attribute Declarations

   Attributes allow data to be associated with an element.  The decision
   to put data in an attribute or a child element is mostly one of
   style, although consideration should be given to the type and
   quantity of data as well.  Attributes are, generally, used for small,
   atomic data and elements are used for large or composite data.

   Attributes are declared with their name, their content type, and
   their attribute type, as shown below:

         <!ATTLIST Book
             title          CDATA                  #REQUIRED
             author         CDATA                  #REQUIRED
         >

   The declaration above defines two attributes of the Book element,
   title and author. Both may contain character data, and both are
   required.  These might be given as follows in an XML document:




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         <Book title="The Cat in the Hat" author="Dr. Seuss">


C.2.2.1 Attribute Types

   There are four attribute types:

   #REQUIRED

      The attribute is required, and has no default value.  The XML
      document must specify a value for it.

   #IMPLIED

      The attribute is optional, and has no default value.

   #FIXED [value]

      The attribute must always have the default value "[value]."  It is
      an error to specify the attribute with any other value.  When an
      XML processor encounters an omitted attribute, it will behave as
      though it were present with the declared default value.

   [value]

      The attribute is optional, and has a default value of "[value]."
      When an XML processor encounters an omitted attribute, it will
      behave as though it were present with the default value.


C.2.2.2 Attribute Content

   There are a variety of attribute content types defined, but only two
   are used in the IDMEF:

   CDATA

      An attribute of this type contains character data (text); tags and
      entity references (see Appendix C.2.3) are not processed.

   [values]

      An attribute may also be declared with a list of acceptable
      values; this functions somewhat like an enumerated type.  For
      example:

            <!ATTLIST Person
                gender     "unknown|male|female"   "unknown"



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              >

       The gender attribute may have one of three values; if a Person
      tag appears without a gender attribute, the XML processor will
      behave as though it did have one, with value "unknown."


C.2.3 Entity Declarations

   Entities allow symbols to be defined that will be replaced with other
   text when processed.  There are two types of entities, "general" and
   "parameter."  General entities are for use within XML document
   content; for example:

         <!ENTITY idmef "Intrusion Detection Message Exchange Format">

   Entities are referenced by bracketing them with the characters '&'
   and ';' -- whenever "&idmef;" appears in the XML document from the
   example above, it will be replaced with the text "Intrusion Detection
   Message Exchange Format".  General entities (and a special case of
   them called character references) are used extensively in handling
   special characters (see Appendix C.3.2.1 and Appendix C.3.2.2).

   Parameter entities are for use within DTDs (they are not recognized
   in document content), and are declared and referenced in a slightly
   different way.  The declaration includes a '%' symbol before the
   entity name, and they are referenced by bracketing them with the
   characters '%' (instead of '&') and ';'.  For example, attributes
   that must appear on every element are declared in a parameter entity:

         <!ENTITY % attlist.global               "
             xmlns:idmef         CDATA                   #FIXED
                 'urn:iana:xml:ns:idmef'
             xmlns               CDATA                   #FIXED
                 'urn:iana:xml:ns:idmef'
             xml:space           (default | preserve)    'default'
             xml:lang            NMTOKEN                 #IMPLIED
           ">

   and then referenced in each attribute list declaration:

          <!ATTLIST IDMEF-Message
              %attlist.global;
            >
          <!ATTLIST Alert
              %attlist.global;
            >




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C.3 XML Documents

   This section describes a number of XML document formatting rules.

C.3.1 The Document Prolog

   The "prolog" of an XML document, that part that precedes anything
   else, consists of the XML declaration and the document type
   declaration.

C.3.1.1 XML Declaration

   Every XML document starts with an XML declaration.  The XML
   declaration specifies the version of XML being used; it may also
   specify the character encoding being used.

   The XML declaration looks like:

        <?xml version="1.0" ?>

   If a character encoding is specified, the declaration looks like:

        <?xml version="1.0" encoding="charset" ?>

   where "charset" is the name of the character encoding in use (see
   Section 3.2).  If no encoding is specified, UTF-8 is assumed.

C.3.2 Character Data Processing in XML

   A document's XML declaration (see Section 3.1.1) specifies the
   character encoding to be used in the document, as follows:

         <?xml version="1.0" encoding="charset" ?>

   where "charset" is the name of the character encoding, as registered
   with the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA), see [13].

   The XML standard requires that XML processors support the UTF-8 and
   UTF-16 encodings of ISO/IEC 10646 (UCS) and Unicode, making all XML
   applications compatible with these common character encodings.  The
   XML standard also permits other character encodings to be used (e.g.,
   UTF-7, UTF-8, UTF-32).  However, support for these encodings is not
   guaranteed to be present in all XML applications.

C.3.2.1 Character Entity References

   Within XML documents, certain characters have special meanings in
   some contexts.  To include the actual character itself in one of



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   these contexts, a special escape sequence, called an entity
   reference, must be used.

   The characters that sometimes need to be escaped, and their entity
   references, are:

                    +-----------+------------------+
                    | Character | Entity Reference |
                    +-----------+------------------+
                    |         & | &amp;            |
                    |           |                  |
                    |         < | &lt;             |
                    |           |                  |
                    |         > | &gt;             |
                    |           |                  |
                    |         " | &quot;           |
                    |           |                  |
                    |         ' | &apos;           |
                    +-----------+------------------+


C.3.2.2 Character Code References

   Any character defined by the ISO/IEC 10646 and Unicode standards may
   be included in an XML document by the use of a character reference. A
   character reference is started with the characters '&' and '#', and
   ended with the character ';'.  Between these characters, the
   character code for the character inserted.

   If the character code is preceded by an 'x' it is interpreted in
   hexadecimal (base 16), otherwise, it is interpreted in decimal (base
   10).  For instance, the ampersand (&) is encoded as &#38; or &#x0026;
   and the less-than sign (<) is encoded as &#60; or &#x003C;.

   Any one-, two-, or four-byte character specified in the ISO/IEC 10646
   and Unicode standards can be included in a document using this
   technique.

C.3.2.3 White Space Processing

   XML preserves white space by default.  The XML processor passes all
   white space characters to the application unchanged.  This is much
   different from HTML (and SGML), in which, although the space/no space
   distinction is meaningful, the one space/many spaces distinction is
   not.

   XML allows elements to identify the importance of white space in
   their content by using the "xml:space" attribute:



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         <tag xml:space="action">

   where "action" is either "default" or "preserve."

   If "action" is "preserve," the application MUST treat all white space
   in the element's content as significant.  If "action" is "default,"
   the application is free to do whatever it normally would with white
   space in the element's content.

   The intent declared with the "xml:space" attribute is considered to
   apply to all attributes and content of the element where it is
   specified (including sub-elements), unless overridden with an
   instance of "xml:space" on another element within that content.

C.3.3 Languages in XML

   XML allows elements to identify the language their content is written
   in by using the "xml:lang" attribute:

         <tag xml:lang="langcode">

   where "langcode" is a language tag as described in RFC 3066 [10]

   The intent declared with the "xml:lang" attribute is considered to
   apply to all attributes and content of the element where it is
   specified (including sub-elements), unless overridden with an
   instance of "xml:lang" on another element within that content.

C.3.4 Inheritance and Aggregation

   XML DTDs do not support inheritance as used by the IDMEF data model
   (i.e., there is no support for "kind-of" relationships).  This does
   not present a major problem in practice; aggregation relationships
   have been used instead to implement these relationships with little
   loss of functionality.

   As a note of interest, XML Schemas, currently being developed by the
   W3C, will provide support for inheritance, as well as stronger data
   typing and other useful features.  Future versions of the IDMEF will
   probably use XML Schemas instead of DTDs; this is not currently
   possible because the XML Schema Recommendation has not been
   finalized.









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   HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
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