[Docs] [txt|pdf] [Tracker] [WG] [Email] [Nits]

Versions: 00

Network Working Group                                        D. Auerbach
INTERNET-DRAFT                                                   D. Berg
                                                            K. Morneault
                                                           Cisco Systems

Expires in six months                                   25 Feburary 1999



                         SESSION MANAGER
                 <draft-ietf-sigtran-session-mgr-00.txt>


Status of This Memo

This document is an Internet-Draft and is in full conformance with all
provisions of Section 10 of RFC 2026. Internet-Drafts are working
documents of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), its areas,
and its working groups.  Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts.

Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

To learn the current status of any Internet-Draft, please check the
"1id-abstracts.txt" listing contained in the Internet- Drafts Shadow
Directories on ftp.is.co.za (Africa), nic.nordu.net (Europe),
munnari.oz.au (Pacific Rim), ftp.ietf.org (US East Coast), or
ftp.isi.edu (US West Coast).




Abstract

This Internet Draft discusses a protocol layer, Session Manager,
that provides network redundancy and redundant Media Gateway
Controller configurations for signaling protocol applications.
Session Manager provides this support transparently.  Network
and Media Gateway Controller redundancy are important for providing
highly reliable commercial applications that provide transportation of
signaling protocols over packet networks.












Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                     [Page  1]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


                        TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.  Introduction..............................................3
     1.1 Background...........................................3
     1.2 Terminology..........................................3
2.  Problem Definition........................................4
3.  Functionality.............................................4
     3.1 Messages.............................................5
     3.2 Message Header.......................................5
     3.3 Session States.......................................5
     3.4 Redundant Network....................................6
     3.4.1 Server Side........................................6
     3.4.2 Client Side........................................8
     3.5 Redundant MGC Configuration.........................10
     3.5.1 Server Side.......................................10
     3.5.2 Client Side.......................................11
     3.6 Session Manager Timers..............................13
     3.7 Session Manager Counters............................13
     3.8 Session Manager Statistics..........................14
4.  Author's Addresses.......................................14


































Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                     [Page  2]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


1.  Introduction

Session Manager provides support for network and Media Gateway
Controller redundancy.  Session Manager is intended to be used between
a Media Gateway (MG) or Signaling Gateway (SG), which interfaces
between the circuit world (PSTN) and the packet world (IP/ATM), and a
Media Gateway Controller (MGC), which provides call processing.  For the
rest of this document, Media Gateways and Signaling Gateways will be
more generically refered to as gateways.

1.0  Background

Before discussing the functions of Session Manager, it is important to
define a session and the other terms associated with a session.

1.1  Terminology

Session - A session is defined by a local IP address and port and a
remote IP address and port.  It is a “physical” connection between a
MGC and a gateway.

Session Group - One or more sessions make up a session group. A session
group is used when network redundancy is required.  Session Manager
manages session group(s) for a signaling application.

Session Set - A collection of session-group(s) each providing connectivity
to a different MGC.  A session set is used in a redundant MGC architecture.

Channel - A channel is a physical termination of a signaling line (T1/E1
timeslot, V.35, etc.).  It is defined by the protocol family, protocol
variant and layer terminated (i.e. Q.921).  Each channel is associated
with a path.

Path - A path consists of one or more channels.  A path is defined by
protocol family, variant and other relevant characteristics specific to
the protocol supported by that path.  A path will use a session, session
group or a session set.  Multiple paths between the same MGC and gateway
can share the same sessions.  For example, a SS7 path would be equivalent
to a linkset and a SS7 channel would be equivalent to a link.  An ISDN
(FAS) path would be equivalent to a single ISDN D-channel.

In the following diagram, there is an ISDN and DPNSS path.  Both paths
are associated with the same session group.  The session group (SG1)
consists of Session 1 and Session 2.  For network redundancy, Session 1
would be on one IP network and Session 2 would be on a separate IP
network.

                                       +----------+
       +---------+      SG1/Session 1  |          | -- DPNSS channel
       |         | ------------------- | gateway  |
       |   MGC   |      SG1/Session 2  |          | -- ISDN channel
       |         | ------------------- |          |
       +---------+                     |          |
                                       +----------+

Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                     [Page  3]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


The following diagram is the same except that the ISDN and DPNSS
paths are carried over separate session group(s).  Most likely, this
configuration would be used when there was a desire to separate the
DPNSS and ISDN signaling traffic.  More sessions could be added
to each session group for network redundancy.


                                       +----------+
       +---------+      SG1/Session 1  |          |--- DPNSS channel
       |         |---------------------| gateway  |
       |   MGC   |      SG2/Session 1  |          |--- ISDN channel
       |         |---------------------|          |
       +---------+                     |          |
                                       +----------+


The following diagram shows an example of the redundant MGC configuration.
In this case, Session Manager provides the ability to manage ACTIVE/-
STANDBY orientation on the client (gateway) side.  In this configuration,
Session Group 1 and Session Group 2 make up a Session Set.


                                       +----------+
       +---------+      SG1/Session 1  |          |--- DPNSS channel
       | ACTIVE  |---------------------| gateway  |
       |   MGC   |      SG1/Session 2  |          |--- ISDN channel
       |         |---------------------|          |
       +---------+                     |          |
                                       |          |
                                       |          |
       +---------+      SG2/Session 1  |          |
       | STANDBY |---------------------|          |
       |   MGC   |      SG2/Session 2  |          |
       |         |---------------------|          |
       +---------+                     |          |
                                       +----------+



2.0  Problem Definition

There is a need for a lightweight protocol layer below the signaling
protocol application to manage sessions used by signaling paths and
channels.  The use of a session group or session set is desirable to
maintain multiple connections between a given gateway (client) and MGC
(server).  This increases the availability of the gateway.  In addition,
there is a need for managing redundant MGC hardware configurations
transparently to signaling protocol application(s).

The intent is to have Session Manager provide these services to signaling
application(s).  As shown in the figure below, it sits below the
application and above a reliable communication mechanism.  Session
Manager requires a reliable, connection-oriented transport mechanism


Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                     [Page  3]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


as its lower layer.  In the figure below, Session Manager sits on top
of Reliable UDP.

           +------------------------------+
           |    Signaling Application     |
           |         (backhaul)           |
           +------------------------------+
           |       Session Manager        |
           +------------------------------+
           |            RUDP              |
           +------------------------------+

The signaling session management layer provides the following functions:

1.  Manage sessions in a session group based on priority and
    availability. Only the client side needs to know priority.
2.  Provide a mechanism to support session failure / switchover
    scenario.
3.  Provide a mechanism to support redundant MGC configurations.
    a.  notification of ACTIVE / STANDBY state of server (MGC)
        to client (gateway).
    b.  Manage ACTIVE / STANDBY orientation on the client side
4.  Allow the application to control the state of the session group,
    session set or sessions. If multiple applications are using the
    same session group or session set, it is up to the applications
    to coordinate this type of management function. In effect, this
    could provide an operator the ability to adminstratively cause a
    session switchover.
5.  Provide a mechanism for querying the state of the session set,
    session group or sessions.
6.  Provide a mechanism for autonomous notification of session set,
    session group or session change of service state.
7.  Provide a mechanism for querying statistics of session set,
    session group or sessions.
8.  If available, work with reliable transport to circumvent the
    duplication of packets on switchovers.
9.  Monitor the frequency of how often the session is switched and
    recovered.  If the frequency is larger than the threshold trigger
    sm_unstable_session, an alarm and appropriate operation is taken
    to report this faulty situation.
10. Avoid the ping-pong effects of failing over sessions in a short
    period of time.

3.0  Functionality

Session Manager provides two basic functions: the ability to manage
sessions in a redundant network configuration and the ability to manage
a session set in a redundant MGC configuration.  Session Manager can
provide this function for one or more applications.





Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                     [Page  4]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


3.1  Messages

In order to fulfill its functions, the client and server implementations
of Session Manager need to pass messages.  The four primary messages
are the Start, Stop, Active, and Standby message.  The Start message
is sent by the client to activate a session to make it available
for transmission and receiption of PDUs.  The Stop message is sent
by the client to deactivate a session for transmission and receiption
of PDUs.  The Active and Standby messages are used by the server to
indicate ACTIVE/STANDBY state.

3.2  Message Header

In order to support the above mentioned messages, a header is required.
This header will contain a 16-bit message type, 8-bit version number
and an 8-bit spare field.  The valid messages types are:

  *  Start Message (0x0)
  *  Stop Message (0x1)
  *  Active Message (0x2) - used with redundant MGC configuration
  *  Standby Message (0x3) - used with redundant MGC configuration
  *  Q_HOLD Invoke Message (0x4) - used with redundant MGC
     configuration
  *  Q_HOLD Response Message (0x5) - used with redundant MGC
     configuration
  *  Q_RESUME Invoke Message (0x6) - used with redundant MGC
     configuration
  *  Q_RESUME Response Message (0x7) - used with redundant MGC
     configuration
  *  Q_RESET Invoke Message (0x8) - used with redundant MGC
     configuration
  *  Q_RESET Response Message (0x9) - used with redundant MGC
     configuration
  *  PDU (0x8000) - Non Session Manager message from application

Note that messages used by Session Manager (i.e. not passed to the
application) are in the 0-0x7fff range.

          0     7 8      15 16             31
         +-------+---------+-----------------+
         | Spare | Version |     Msg Type    |
         +-----------------+-----------------+

The initial version number is 1.

3.3  Session States

A session can be in one of three states:

  1.  Out-of-Service: session has been created, but is not connected at
      transport layer.
  2.  In-Service: session has been created and is connected at network
      layer

Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                     [Page  5]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


  3.  Primary In-Service: session is In-Service and START message has
      been transferred from client to server

The figure below shows the state transitions.

                     +---------+
                     |         |
                     |   OOS   |
                     |         |
                     +---------+
                          |
                          |  (connection established)
                          V
                     +---------+
                     |         |
                     |    IS   |
                     |         |
                     +---------+
                          |
                          |  (START message sent/received)
                          V
                     +---------+
                     | Primary |
                     |    IS   |
                     |         |
                     +---------+

3.4  Redundant Network

Session Manager should be used when redundant networks are required
between a MGC (server) and a gateway (client). Each session is given a
priority.  The highest priority session will have a value of 1, lower
priorities increase in value.

Session Manager will keep all sessions In-Service. If an In-Service
session fails (goes Out-of-Service), Session Manager should periodically
retry to bring that session back In-Serivce.

Session Manager only transmits and receives PDUs over the Primary
In-Service session in order to avoid sequencing problems. Thus, only
one session can be Primary In-Service at a given time. The client side
implementation of Session Manager coordinates which In-Service
session is primary. The algorithm the client uses to handle session
failovers is described in Section 3.4.2.

3.4.1   Server Side

The server side implementation of Session Manager in a redundant network
configuration is fairly straightforward.  A server can be in one of
four states:

  1.  Idle: a session group has been created


Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                     [Page  6]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999

  2.  Out-of-Service: a session or sessions have been added to the
      session group, no Primary In-Service session (there may be one or
      more In-Service sessions though).
  3.  In-Service: one of the sessions is in the Primary In-Service state
      Note: The server side must have received the START message from
      the client before it will transition to In-Service.
  4.  Switchover: the Primary In-Service session has failed,
      sm_switchover_timer set

Initially, the server side is in the Idle state after the session group
has been created.  It transitions to the Out-of-Service state when a
session(s) is added.

As sessions come In-Service, the server remains Out-of-Service until
a session is selected to be primary.  This occurs when the client side
sends a START message over an In-Service session.  At this point, the
server side transitions to the In-Service state.  It will remain In-
Service unless the Primary In-Service session fails.  In this case, it
transitions to the Switchover state.

In the Switchover state, the server side sets the sm_switchover_timer
and waits for the client to make another session primary.  If the
timer expires, the server side transitions to Out-of-Service.

Note that if the currently active session is a secondary session, the
server may want to indicate a degradation in service (i.e. In-Service-
Degraded).

The figure below shows an example of the state diagram for a server side
implementation.

                        +---------+
                        |         |
                        |  Idle   |
                        |         |
                        +---------+
                             |
                             |
                             V
                        +---------+
                        |         |
                    ----|   OOS   |<---
                   /    |         |    \
                  /     +---------+     \
       session   /                       \ Switchover Timer
     Primary IS /                         \  Triggered
               /                           \
              /                             \
             V                              |
        +---------+  Primary IS -> OOS  +---------+
        |         |-------------------->|         |
        |    IS   |                     | Recover |
        |         |<--------------------|         |
        +---------+ Session Primary IS  +---------+


Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                     [Page  7]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


3.4.2   Client Side

The client side supports five states:

  1.  Idle: a session group has been created
  2.  Out-of-Service: a session or sessions have been added to the
      session group, no active session (meaning session is connected but
      Start message has not been sent).
  3.  In-Service: one of the highest priority sessions is Primary
      In-Service
  4.  Switchover: the active session has failed, try to bring next
      highest priority session In-Service.
  5.  IS-Degraded: one of the lower priority sessions is Primary In-
      Service

The client side begins in the Idle state when the session group has been
created.  It transitions to the Out-of-Service state as soon as a
session is added.  The client side periodically (sm_retry_timer) tries
to bring all the sessions to the In-Service state.  Once a session is In-
Service, the client determines if it should be transitioned to
Primary-In-Service based on priority.  The session is made Primary-
In-Service by passing a START message to the server side on that session.
The client can remove the primary designation of a session by passing a
STOP message to the server side on that session.

If one of the highest priority sessions is designated as primary,
the client transitions to the In-Service.  If a lower priority session
is designated as primary, the client transitions to the In-Service-
Degraded state.

If the primary session fails while In-Service, the client side
transitions to the Switchover state.  In this switchover state, the
client does the following:

  a.  Find the highest priority session that is In-Service.  If there
      are multiple high priority sessions, it picks the first.
  b.  If there are no sessions In-Service, it sets the
      sm_switchover_timer and it tries to bring all sessions
      In-Service in order of priority.  If the switchover timer
      (sm_switchover_timer) expires, the client transitions to
      Out-of-Service.
  c.  Once the client has picked the session, it sends a START on
      that session to transition it to the Primary-In-Service state.
      The client then transitions its own state to In-Service or
      In-Service-Degraded based on whether the session is of the
      highest priority.

The figure below shows an example of the state diagram for a client side
implementation.






Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                     [Page  8]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


                             +---------+
                             |         |
                             |  Idle   |
                             |         |
                             +---------+
                                  |
                                  |
                                  V
                             +---------+
                             |         |
                -------------|   OOS   |-------------
               /             |         |             \
              /              +---------+              \
     HPS     /                    ^                    \  LPS
 Primary IS /                     |                     \  Primary IS
           /                      | Switchover           \
          /                       | Timer                 \
         /                        | Triggered              \
        V                         |                         V
  +---------+   HPS -> OOS   +---------+   LPS -> IS   +----------+
  |         |--------------->|         |-------------->|          |
  |    IS   |                | Switch  |               |    IS    |
  |         |<---------------|  Over   |<--------------| Degraded |
  +---------+   HPS -> IS    +---------+   LPS -> OOS  +----------+


* HPS = Highest Priority Session
  LPS = Lower Priority Session


3.4.2.1  Client Side with RUDP

When the client side Session Manager is using RUDP as its transport
mechanism, it has the opportunity to initiate a session switchover
to another session in a session group.  In this configuration, the
client does the following:

  a.  Receive the CONN_FAIL signal from RUDP which indicates the session
      has failed (disconnected)
  b.  Find the highest priority session that is In-Service.  If there
      are multiple high priority sessions, it picks the first.
  c.  If there are no sessions In-Service, it sets the
      sm_switchover_timer and it tries to bring all sessions In-Service
      in order of priority.  If the switchover timer (sm_switchover_timer)
      expires, the client transitions to Out-of-Service.
  d.  Once the client has picked the session, it sends a START on
      that session to transition it to the Primary-In-Service state.
      The client then transitions its own state to In-Service or
      In-Service-Degraded based on whether the session is of the highest
      priority.
  e.  If the AUTO_RESET signal has not yet been received from RUDP,
      Session Manager initiates a state transfer from the failed
      session to the Primary-In-Service session.  RUDP is responsible


Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                     [Page  9]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


      for ensuring the messages are retransmitted and avoiding the
      transmission/reception of duplicate messages.

3.5     Redundant MGC Configuration

In a redundant MGC configuration, a gateway is connected to an
ACTIVE MGC and one or more STANDBY MGC(s).  On the gateway side (client
side), Session Manager is used to manage ACTIVE/STANDBY state for the
signaling application.  On the MGC side (server side), the signaling
application informs Session Manager of its ACTIVE/STANDBY state.

The Primary In-Service state is separated into two states for this mode
of operation:

  1.  Primary In-Service-ACTIVE: session is In-Service and START
      message has been transferred from client to server, server has
      transferred ACTIVE notification to client
  2.  Primary In-Service-STANDBY: session is In-Service and START
      message has been transferred from client to server, server has
      transferred STANDBY notification to client

3.5.1   Server Side

The server side implementation of this functionality is very straight-
forward. The figure below shows the state diagram.  The server side
supports three states:

  1.  Idle: a session set has been created
  2.  Out-of-Service: session group(s) have been added to the session
      set, a session In-Service.
  3.  In-Service: a session is Primary In-Service and ACTIVE/STANDBY
      state has been sent

The server initializes to the Idle state when the session set is
created.  When the session set is created, the initial ACTIVE/STANDBY
state is passed as an argument.  After the session set has been created,
the signaling application can change the ACTIVE/STANDBY state at any
time.

The server transitions to the Out-of-Service state when a session is
created.  When a session transitions to the Primary In-Service state,
it passes an ACTIVE or STANDBY message to the client.  The server then
transitions to the In-Service state.

Note: The server periodically sends its state (ACTIVE/STANDBY) based
on sm_state_timer.

The figure below shows an example of the state diagram for a server side
implementation.





Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                    [Page  10]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


                        +---------+
                        |         |
                        |  Idle   |
                        |         |
                        +---------+
                             |
                             |
                             V
                        +---------+
                        |         |
                        |   OOS   |
                        |         |
                        +---------+
                             |
                             |     Session transitions to Primary IS
                             |     ACTIVE/STANDBY notification sent
                             V
                        +---------+
                        |         |
                        |    IS   |
                        |         |
                        +---------+

3.5.2   Client Side

The client side implementation is a bit more complex since it needs to
act on ACTIVE/STANDBY indications from each server.  The figure below
shows the state diagram.  The client side supports five states:

  1.  SESS_IDLE State: a Session has been created.
  2.  SESS_OOS State: a session or sessions have been added to session
      group, no ACTIVE notification has been received from MGC.
  3.  SESS_ACTIVE_IS State: a ACTIVE notification has been received
      over one In-Service session, STANDBY notification has not been
      received on any available In-Service session(s).
  4.  SESS_STANDBY_IS State: a STANDBY notification is received, but
      there is no In-Service Active session available.
  5.  SESS_FULL_IS State: a session In-Service that has ACTIVE
      notification and at least one session In-Service that has STANDBY
      notification.

The client side only accepts PDU messages received from the ACTIVE
MGC.  The client can be configured to send to just the ACTIVE MGC or
both the ACTIVE and STANDBY MGCs.

The client side session initializes to SESS_IDLE state when the
session is created.  It transitions to the SESS_OOS state when a
session is added, and then waits for an ACTIVE or STANDBY notification.
If the notification is ACTIVE, it transitions to SESS_ACTIVE_IS state
and informs all the applications using this Session Set that the
Session Set is operational.  If the notification is STANDBY, it
transitions to SESS_STANDBY_IS state.  The session that the ACTIVE


Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                    [Page  11]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


notification is received on will be called the Active session.  The
session that the STANDBY notifcation is received on will be called the
Standby session.

If in the SESS_ACTIVE_IS state, it transitions to the SESS_FULL_IS state
if the STANDBY notification is received on any session other than the
Active session.  If on the other hand, it receives a STANDBY
notification on the Active session, it transitions to the SESS_STANDBY_IS
state.

If in the SESS_STANDBY_IS state, the client transitions to the
SESS_FULL_IS state if the ACTIVE notification is received on a session
other than the Standby session.  If on the other hand, the client
receives an ACTIVE notification on the Standby session, it transitions
to the SESS_ACTIVE_IS state.

If in the SESS_FULL_IS state, the client transitions to the
SESS_ACTIVE_IS state if an ACTIVE notification is received on the
Standby session and no other Standby session(s) is/are available.
Likewise, if in the SESS_FULL_IS state, the client transitions to
the SESS_STANDBY_IS state if a STANDBY notification is received on
the Active session.

The figure below shows an example of the state diagram for a client side
implementation.

                             +---------+
                             |         |
                             |  Idle   |
                             |         |
                             +---------+
                                  |
                                  |
                                  V
                             +---------+
                             |         |
                -------------|   OOS   |-----------------
               /   --------->|         |<----------      \
              /   /          +---------+           \      \
             /   /                                  \      \
     Active /   / Active                     Standby \      \ Standby
       IS  /   /   OOS                         OOS    \      \  IS
          /   /                                        \      \
         /   /                                          \      \
        V   /                                            \      V
  +---------+   Standby IS   +---------+   Standby IS  +----------+
  |  ACTIVE |--------------->|   FULL  |-------------->| STANDBY  |
  |    IS   |                |    IS   |               |    IS    |
  |         |<---------------|         |<--------------|          |
  +---------+    Active IS   +---------+  Standby OOS  +----------+



Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                    [Page  12]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


3.5.2.1  Session Queueing

In the redundant MGC configuration, there is a requirement to be able
to queue messages on the client side while the MGC is in the process of
failover/switchover.  The ACTIVE MGC requests that messages be queued
using the Q_HOLD Invoke message.  The Q_HOLD Response message
indicates to the ACTIVE MGC that messages are being queued.  At this point,
the MGC can freeze its state, transfer that state to the STANDBY MGC, then
the MGCs will transition states with the STANDBY MGC becoming ACTIVE.

The Q_RESUME Invoke message is used to request that the client begin
sending the queued messages to the ACTIVE MGC.  The Q_RESET Invoke
message is used to request that the client clear (delete) all queued
messages.

In this SESS_ACTIVE_IS state, if Q_RESET Invoke notification is received
the Q_HOLD condition of all the queues associated with the session are
cleared and any queued messages are deleted. On the other hand, if
Q_RESUME Invoke notification is received, the Q_HOLD condition of all the
queues associated with the session are cleared and any queued messages
are transferred. If Q_HOLD condition is not set, a Q_RESET Invoke or
Q_RESUME Invoke notification are ignored. The same action is taken
when Q_RESET Invoke or Q_RESUME Invoke notifications are received in any
other state except SESS_IDLE and SESS_OOS states.

In this SESS_FULL_IS state, if the client receives a Q_HOLD Invoke
notification it will not change state, but the status of all the queues
associated with the session is set to Q_HOLD.  The Q_HOLD Invoke
notification is only acted on in the SESS_FULL_IS state.  Once Q_HOLD
condition is set for queues, it remains until cleared by Q_RESUME Invoke
or Q_RESET Invoke messages.  No state transition clears the Q_HOLD
condition.

3.6  Session Manager Timers

Session Manager uses the following timers:

  *  sm_retry_timer - used to retry connection of Out-of-Service
     sessions (default is 5 seconds)
  *  sm_switchover_timer - amount of time allowed for a switchover to
     another session before transitioning to Out-of-Service state
     (default is 3 seconds)
  *  sm_state_timer (redundant MGC configuration) - the server will send
     state (ACTIVE/STANDBY) periodically based on this timer (default is
     60 seconds)

3.7  Session Manager Counters

  *  sm_unstable_session - alarm trigger - if 20 session recoveries in
     60 minutes or less




Auerbach, Berg & Morneault                                    [Page  13]


Internet Draft             Session Manager Protocol             Feb 1999


3.8  Session Manager Statistics

Statistics should be maintained on a session, session group and session
set basis.  The application should be able to query and clear the
statistics.

  *  number of bytes transmitted
  *  number of PDUs transmitted
  *  number of bytes received
  *  number of PDUs received
  *  number of session switchovers (kept at a session group level)
  *  number of MGC switchovers/failovers - redundant MGC configuration
    (kept at a session set level)

4.0  Author's Addresses

David Auerbach                          Tel:  +1-703-484-3464
Cisco Systems                           Email:  dea@cisco.com
13615 Dulles Technology Drive
Herndon, VA  20171
USA

Diane Berg                              Tel:  +1-703-484-3461
Cisco Systems                         Email:  dberg@cisco.com
13615 Dulles Technology Drive
Herndon, VA  20171
USA

Ken Morneault                           Tel:  +1-703-484-3323
Cisco Systems                      Email:  kmorneau@cisco.com
13615 Dulles Technology Drive
Herndon, VA  20171
USA


Html markup produced by rfcmarkup 1.129c, available from https://tools.ietf.org/tools/rfcmarkup/