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  HIP Research Group                                       Pascal Urien
  Internet Draft                                      Telecom ParisTech
  Intended status: Experimental                          Gyu Myoung Lee
                                                       Telecom SudParis
  Expires: December, 2010                                   Guy Pujolle
                                                                   LIP6
                                                              June 2010



                             HIP support for RFIDs
                           draft-irtf-hiprg-rfid-00



Abstract

   This document describes an architecture based on the Host Identity
   Protocol (HIP), for active tags, i.e. RFIDs (Radio Frequency
   Identifiers) that include tamper resistant computing resources, as
   specified for example in the ISO 14443 or 15693 standards. HIP-Tags
   never expose their identity in clear text, but hide this value
   (typically an EPC-Code) by a particular equation (f) that can be only
   solved by a dedicated entity, referred as the portal. HIP exchanges
   occurred between HIP-Tags and portals; they are shuttled by IP
   packets, through the Internet cloud.


Requirements Language

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].


Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute working
   documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-Drafts is
   at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 2010.


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Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document. Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.

   All IETF Documents and the information contained therein are provided
   on an "AS IS" basis and THE CONTRIBUTOR, THE ORGANIZATION HE/SHE
   REPRESENTS OR IS SPONSORED BY (IF ANY), THE INTERNET SOCIETY, THE
   IETF TRUST AND THE INTERNET ENGINEERING TASK FORCE DISCLAIM ALL
   WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY
   WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION THEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE
   ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS
   FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.



Table of Contents

   Abstract........................................................... 1
   Requirements Language.............................................. 1
   Status of this Memo................................................ 1
   Copyright Notice................................................... 2
   Table of Contents.................................................. 2
   1 Overview......................................................... 4
      1.1 Motivation.................................................. 4
      1.2 Passive and active tags..................................... 4
      1.3 About the Internet of Things (IoT).......................... 5
      1.4 HIP-Tags.................................................... 5
      1.5 Main differences between HIP-TAGS and HIP................... 6
   2. Basic Exchange.................................................. 7
      2.1 I1-T........................................................ 7
      2.2 R1-T........................................................ 8
      2.3 I2-T........................................................ 8
      2.4 R2-T........................................................ 9
   3. Formats........................................................ 10
      3.1 Payload.................................................... 10
      3.2 Packets types.............................................. 11
      3.3 Summary of HIP parameters.................................. 12
      3.4 R-T........................................................ 12
      3.5 HIP-T-Transform............................................ 13
      3.6 F-T........................................................ 13
      3.7 Signature-T................................................ 14
      3.8 ESP-Transform.............................................. 14
      3.9 ESP-Info................................................... 14

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   4. BEX Example.................................................... 15
      4.1 Generic example............................................ 15
          4.1.1 I1-T ................................................ 15
          4.1.2 R1-T ................................................ 15
          4.1.3 I2-T ................................................ 16
          4.1.4 R2-T ................................................ 17
      4.2 HIP-T Transform 0x0001, HMAC............................... 17
          4.2.1 I1-T ................................................ 17
          4.2.2 R1-T ................................................ 17
          4.2.3 I2-T ................................................ 18
   5. HIP-T-Transforms Definition.................................... 18
      5.1 Type 0x0001, HMAC.......................................... 18
          5.1.1 F-T computing (f function) .......................... 18
          5.1.2 K-Auth-Key computing (g function) ................... 18
          5.1.3 Signature-T computing ............................... 19
      5.2 Type 0x0002, Keys-Tree..................................... 19
          5.2.1 F-T computing (f function) .......................... 19
          5.2.2 K-Auth-Key computing (g function) ................... 20
          5.2.3 Signature-T computing ............................... 20
   6. Security Considerations........................................ 21
   7. IANA Considerations............................................ 21
   8 References...................................................... 21
      8.1 Normative references....................................... 21
      8.2 Informative references..................................... 21
   Author's Addresses................................................ 22



























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1 Overview

1.1 Motivation

   RFIDs are electronic devices, associated to things or computers, who
   transmit their identity (usually a serial number) via radio links.

   The first motivation for designing HIP support for RFIDs is to
   enforce a strong privacy for the Internet of Things, e.g. identity is
   protected by cryptographic procedures compatible with RFID computing
   resources. As an illustration EPC codes or IP addresses are today
   transmitted in clear form.

   The second motivation is to define an identity layer for RFIDs
   logically independent from the transport facilities, which may
   optionally support IP stacks.

   In other words we believe that the Internet of Things will be
   Identity oriented; RFIDs will act as electronic ID for objects to
   which they are linked. In this context privacy is a major challenge.

1.2 Passive and active tags

   An RFID is a slice of silicon whose area is about 1 mm2 for
   components used as cheap electronic tags, and around 25 mm2 for chips
   like contact-less smart cards inserted in passports and mobile
   phones.

   RFIDs are divided into two classes, the first includes devices that
   embed CPU and memories (RAM, ROM, E2PROM) such as contact-less smart
   cards, the second comprises electronic chips based on cabled logic
   circuits.

   There are multiple standards relative to RFIDs.

   The ISO 14443 standard introduces components dealing with the
   13,56Mhz frequency that embed a CPU and consume about 10mW; data
   throughput is about 100 Kbits/s and the maximum working distance
   (from the reader) is around 10cm.

   The ISO 15693 standard also uses the same 13,56 MHz frequency, but
   enables working distances as high as one meter, with a data
   throughput of a few Kbits/s.

   The ISO 18000 standard defines parameters for air interface
   communications associated with frequency such as 135 KHz, 13,56 MHz,
   2.45 GHz, 5.8 GHz, 860 to 960 MHz and 433 MHz. The ISO 18000-6
   standard uses the 860-960 MHz range and is the basis for the Class-1
   Generation-2 UHF RFID, introduced by the EPCglobal [EPCGLOBAL]
   consortium.


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1.3 About the Internet of Things (IoT)

   The term "Internet of Thing (IoT)" was invented by the MIT Auto-ID
   Center, in 2001, and refers to an architecture that comprises four
   levels,

   - Passive tags, such as Class-1 Generation-2 UHF RFIDs, introduced by
   the EPC Global consortium and operating in the 860-960 MHz range.

   - Readers plugged to a local (computing) system, which read the
   Electronic Product Code [EPC].

   - A local system, offering IP connectivity, which collects
   information pointed by the EPC thanks to a protocol called Object
   Naming Service (ONS)

   - EPCIS (EPC Information Services) servers, which process incoming
   ONS requests and returns PML (Physical Markup Language) files [PML],
   e.g. XML documents that carry meaningful information linked to tags.

1.4 HIP-Tags

   This document suggests embedding a modified version of HIP stack in
   active tags, named HIP-Tags. It assumes that such devices would not
   support an IP stack, but should be rather identity oriented, i.e.
   will use readers IP resources in order to unveil their EPC-Code only
   to trusted entities (called portals in the architecture in Figure 1).
   Privacy, e.g. identity protection seems a key prerequisite [SEC]
   before the effective massive deployment of these devices.

           PORTAL                     READER               TAG

   +-----------------------+
   !                       !                          +-----------+
   !               +-----+ !                          ! +-------+ !
   !  +---------+  + HIP + !<========================>! +  HIP  + !
   !  + IDENTITY+  +-----+ !   +-------------------+  ! +-------+ !
   !  + SOLVER  +    [HAT] !<=>! [HAT]             !  !     |     !
   !  +---------+  +-----+ !   ! +------+-------+  !  ! +-------+ !
   !               +     + !   ! +      + RFID  +  !  ! + RFID  + !
   !    EPC-Code   + IP  + !<=>! +  IP  + Radio +  !<>! + Radio + !
   !               +     + !   ! +      + Ptcol +  !  ! + Ptcol + !
   !               +-----+ !   ! +------+-------+  !  ! +-------+ !
   !                       !   !                   !  !           !
   +----------+------------+   +-------------------+  +-----------+
              !
              V
        TO EPC GLOBAL
           SERVICES

   Figure 1. HIP-Tag Architecture

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   The functional HIP-TAG architecture includes three logical entities,

   - HIP tags. HIP is transported by IP packets. HIP tags support a
   modified version of this protocol but don't require end-to-end IP
   transport.

   - RFID readers. They provide IP connectivity and communicate with
   tags through radio link either defined by EPC Global or ISO
   standards. The IP layer transports HIP messages between tags and
   other HIP entities. According to HIP, an SPI (Security Parameter
   Index) associated to an IPSEC tunnel MAY be used by the IP host (e.g.
   a reader) in order to route HIP packets to/from the right software
   identity.

   - HAT, HIP Address Translator. HIP messages MAY be encapsulated by
   protocols such as UDP in order to facilitate HIP transport in
   existing software and networking architectures. The HAT does not
   modify the content of an HIP packet.

   - PORTAL entity. This device manages a set of readers; it is an HIP
   entity that includes a full IP stack. Communications between portal
   and tags logically work as peer to peer HIP exchanges. RFID identity
   (HIT) is hidden and appears as a pseudo random value; within the
   portal a software block called the IDENTITY SOLVER resolves an
   equation f, whose solution is an EPC Code. The portal accesses to
   EPCIS services; when required privacy may be enforced by legacy
   protocol such as SSL or IPSEC.

   - The portal maintains a table linking HIT and EPC-Code. It acts as a
   router for that purpose it MUST provide an identity resolution
   mechanism, i.e. a relation between HIT and EPC-Code.

1.5 Main differences between HIP-TAGS and HIP

   In HIP [HIP], the HIT (Host Identifier Tag) is a fix value obtained
   from the hash of an RSA public key. This parameter is therefore
   linked to a unique identity, and can be used for traceability
   purposes; in other words HIP does not natively include privacy
   features.

   In [BLIND], it is proposed to hide the HIT with by random number
   thanks to a hash function, i.e.
   B-HIT = sha1(HIT || N), with N a random value and || the
   concatenation operation.
   The case in which only one HIT (either imitator or responder) is
   blinded looks similar to the HIP-TAGS protocol described in this
   draft working with a particular transform (HMAC Transform, 0x001)




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2. Basic Exchange

   The HIP-Tags basic exchange (T-BEX) is derived from the "classical"
   BEX exchange, introduced in [HIP]. It is a four ways handshake
   illustrated by Figure 2.

       TAG             READER                                PORTAL
      --+--            --+--                                 ---+---
        !     START      !                                      !
        !<---------------!                                      !
        !                !                                      !
        !  I1-T                                                 !
        !  HIT-I  HIT-R                                         !
        ! ----------------------------------------------------> !
        !                                                       !
        !                                                       !
        !  R1-T                                                 !
        !  HIT-I  HIT-R  R-T(r1) HIP-T-Transforms               !
        !  [ESP-Transforms]                                     !
        ! <---------------------------------------------------- !
        !                                                       !
        !                                                       !
        !  I2-T                                                 !
        !  HIT-I HIT-R HIP-T-Transform [ESP-Transform] R-T(r2)  !
        !  F-T=f(r1, r2, EPC-Code) [ESP-Info] Signature-T       !
        ! ----------------------------------------------------> !
        !                                                       !
        !                                                       !
        !  R2-T                                                 !
        !  HIT-I HIT-R  [ESP-Info]  Signature-T                 !
        ! <---------------------------------------------------- !
        !                                                       !
        !                                                       !
        !                 Optional ESP Dialog                   !
        ! <---------------------------------------------------> !
        !                                                       !
        !                                                       !

   Figure 2. HIP-Tags Basic Exchange (T-BEX)

   A HAT layer MAY be used to transport HIP messages in non IP context,
   but this optional facility is out of scope from this document.

2.1 I1-T

   When a reader detects a tag, it realizes all low level operations in
   order to set up a radio communication link. Finally the reader
   delivers a START message that trigs the tag.




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   The HIP tag sends the I1-T packet (I suffix meaning initiator), in
   which HIT-I is a true random value internally generated by the HIP-
   Tag.

   If the tag doesn't known the portal HIT it sets the HIT-R value to
   zero; in that case the reader MAY modify this field in order to
   identify the appropriate entity.

   The I1-T message is not signed.

2.2 R1-T

   The portal produces the R1-T (R suffix meaning responder) packet,
   which includes a nonce r1 and optional parameters. These fields
   indicate a list of supported authentication schemes (HIP-T-
   TRANSFORMs) and a list of ESP-TRANSFORMs, i.e. secure channels that
   could be opened between portal and tags.

   This message includes the following fields:
   - HIT-I, a random number which identified a TAG
   - HIT-R, the portal HIP either a null or fix value.
   - HIT-T-TRANSFORMs, a list of authentication schemes
   - ESP-T-TRANSFORM, an optional list of ESP secure channels

   The R1-T message is not signed.

2.3 I2-T

   The HIP-Tag builds the I2-T message, which contains

   - The selected HIP-T-TRANSFORM (the current authentication scheme).
   - An optional ESP-TRANSFORM (a class of secure channel between tag
   and portal).
   - A nonce r2, included in the R-T attribute.
   - An equation f(r1, r2, EPC-Code), whose solution, according to the
   selected HIP-T-TRANSFORM, unveils the EPC-Code value.
   - An optional ESP-Info attribute that gives information about the
   secure (ESP) channel, and which includes the SPI-I value.
   - A signature (Signature-T), which works with a KI-Auth-key deduced
   from r1, r2 and the hidden EPC-CODE value.

   KI-Auth-key = g(r1, r2, EPC-Code)

   The signature is computed over the complete I2-T message, the content
   of Signature-T resulting from this calculation is initially set to a
   nul value

   The portal and the tag shares secret keys. The meaning of these keys
   are dependent upon the f equation.



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   In some cases the EPC-Code is the only shared key. The portal knows a
   list of EPC-Code and tries all solutions for solving f, according to
   brute force techniques. As an illustration a hash function may be
   used for f:
   f= sha1(r1 || r2 || EPC-Code), where || is the concatenation
   operation.

   In other cases a set of keys is shared between portal and tags. For
   example a binary tree of HMAC procedure may be used, each Hmac beeing
   assocaited to a particular key. A binary tree of order p may identify
   2**p tags, each of them stores p keys. The f function is a list of p
   values such as

                           HMAC(r1 || r2, ki || cti)

   Where ki is a secret ki and cti the bit value (either 0 or 1) at the
   rang i for the EPC-Code (or tag index)

2.4 R2-T

   The fourth and last R2-T packet is optional. It includes

   - A signature (Signature-T) computed with the KI-Auth-key deduced
   from r1, r2 and the hidden EPC-CODE value.

   KI-Auth-key = g(r1, r2, EPC-Code)

   - An optional ESP-Info attribute that gives information about the
   secure (ESP) channel, and which includes the SPI-R value.

   The R2-T packet is mandatory when an ESP channel has been previously
   negotiated. ESP channel is required if the portal intends to perform
   read or write operations with the tags.



















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3. Formats

3.1 Payload

   The payload format is imported from the [HIP] specification.

       0                   1                   2                   3
       0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      | Next Header   | Header Length |0| Packet Type |  VER. | RES.|1|
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |          Checksum             |           Controls            |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                Sender's Host Identity Tag (HIT)               |
      |                                                               |
      |                                                               |
      |                                                               |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |               Receiver's Host Identity Tag (HIT)              |
      |                                                               |
      |                                                               |
      |                                                               |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                                                               |
      /                        HIP Parameters                         /
      /                                                               /
      |                                                               |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   Next Header : normal value is decimal 59, IPPROTO_NONE.

   Header Length: the length of the HIP Header and HIP parameters in 8
   bytes units, excluding the first 8 bytes

   Packet Type: Detailed in section 4.2

   VER: 0001

   RES: 000

   Checksum: This checksum covers the source and destination addresses
   in the IP header.

   HIP-Tags always deliver HIP packets with the null value for the
   checksum field. The reader MUST compute the checksum.

   HIP tags do not check the checksum of received packets.

   Controls: this field is reserved for future use (RFU)

   Sender's Host Identity Tag: 16 bytes HIT

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   Receiver's Host Identity Tag: 16 bytes HIT

   HIP Parameters: a list of attributes encoded in the TLV format

3.2 Packets types

    +-----------------+-------------------------------------------+
    |   Packet type   | Packet name                               |
    +-----------------+-------------------------------------------+
    |      0x40       | I1-T - The HIP-Tag Initiator Packet       |
    |                 |                                           |
    |      0x41       | R1-T - The HIP-Tag Responder Packet       |
    |                 |                                           |
    |      0x42       | I2-T - The Second HIP-Tag Initiator Packet|
    |                 |                                           |
    |      0x43       | R2-T - The Second HIP-Tag Responder Packet|
    |                 |                                           |
    +-----------------+-------------------------------------------+

































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3.3 Summary of HIP parameters

    +----------------------+-------+----------+-----------------------+
    | TLV                  | Type  | Length   | Data                  |
    +----------------------+-------+----------+-----------------------+
    | R-T                  | 0x400 | variable | Random value r1 or r2 |
    |                      |       |          |                       |
    | HIP-T-TRANSFORM      | 0x402 | variable | HIP-Tag transform     |
    |                      |       |          |                       |
    | F-T                  | 0x404 | variable | f function value      |
    |                      |       |          |                       |
    | Signature-T          | 0x406 | variable | Signature             |
    |                      |       |          |                       |
    | ESP-Transform        | 0x408 | variable | ESP transforms        |
    |                      |       |          |                       |
    | ESP-Info             | 0x40A | variable | ESP parameters        |
    |                      |       |          |                       |
    +----------------------+-------+----------+-----------------------+

3.4 R-T

     0                   1                   2                   3
     0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |             Type              |             Length            |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |       Padding-Length          |              value            /
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    /         value                 |             Padding           |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

         Type            0x400
         Length          total length in bytes
         Value           random value
         Padding-Length  padding length in bytes
         Padding         padding bytes
















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3.5 HIP-T-Transform

     0                   1                   2                   3
     0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |             Type              |             Length            |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |       Padding-Length          |            Suite-ID#1         |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    +     Length-of-Suite-ID#1      |              value            +
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    /           value               |             Suite-ID#2        |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |                               |             Padding           |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

         Type                 0x402
         Length               Total length
         Padding-Length       Number of padding bytes
         Suite-ID             Defines the HIP Cipher Suite to be used
         Length-of-Suite-ID   Defines the length of optional data
         Padding              Padding bytes

3.6 F-T

     0                   1                   2                   3
     0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |             Type              |             Length            |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |         Padding-Length        |             value             |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |                               |            Padding            |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

         Type            0x404
         Length          total length, in bytes
         Padding-Length  padding length in bytes
         Value           f value
         Padding         padding bytes












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3.7 Signature-T

     0                   1                   2                   3
     0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |             Type              |             Length            |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |          Padding-Length       |           Signature           /
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    /                               |             Padding           |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

         Type            0x406
         Length          total length, in bytes
         Padding-Length  padding length, in bytes
         Value           Signature value
         Padding         padding bytes

   A signature procedure works with the K-Auth-Key and is computed over
   the whole HIP message according to the following rules

   - The checksum field of the HIP header is set to a null value.

   - The signature field of the Signature-T attribute is set to a null
   value

3.8 ESP-Transform

   To be defined

3.9 ESP-Info

   To be defined



















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4. BEX Example

4.1 Generic example

  4.1.1 I1-T

         Next Header:                    0x3B
         Header Length:                  0x4
         Packet Type:                    0x40
         Version:                        0x1
         Reserved:                       0x1
         Control:                        0x0
         Checksum:                       0x0000
         Sender's HIT (Tag) :            0x0123456789ABCDEF
                                           0123456789ABCDEF
         Receiver's HIT (Portal) :       0x0000000000000000
                                           0000000000000000

   The checksum is computed by portal and reader according to rules
   specified in [HIP]; it covers the source and destination IP
   addresses.

  4.1.2 R1-T

         Next Header:                    0x3B
         Header Length:                  0xB
         Packet Type:                    0x41
         Version:                        0x1
         Reserved:                       0x1
         Control:                        0x0
         Checksum:                       0xabcd
         Sender's HIT (Portal)           0xA5A5A5A5A5A5A5A5
                                           5A5A5A5A5A5A5A5A
         Receiver's HIT (Tag)            0x0123456789ABCDEF
                                           0123456789ABCDEF
         R-T                             0x040000280002rrrr
                                           rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
                                           rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
                                           rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
                                           rrrrrrrrrrrrpppp
         HIP-T-Transforms                0x0402001000020001
                                           000000020000pppp

   r1 is a 128 bits value
   Transforms 1, 2 are supported by the reader.






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  4.1.3 I2-T

         Next Header:                    0x3B
         Header Length:                  0x14
         Packet Type:                    0x42
         Version:                        0x1
         Reserved:                       0x1
         Control:                        0x0
         Checksum:                       0x0000
         Sender's HIT (Tag) :            0x0123456789ABCDEF
                                           0123456789ABCDEF
         Sender's HIT (Portal) :         0xA5A5A5A5A5A5A5A5
                                           5A5A5A5A5A5A5A5A
         HIP-T-Transform                 0x0402001000060001
                                           0000pppppppppppp
         R-T                             0x040000280002rrrr
                                           rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
                                           rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
                                           rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
                                           rrrrrrrrrrrrpppp
         F-T                             0x040400280002ffff
                                           ffffffffffffffff
                                           ffffffffffffffff
                                           ffffffffffffffff
                                           ffffffffffffpppp
         Signature-T                     0x040600040006ssss
                                           ssssssssssssssss
                                           ssssssssssssssss
                                           sssspppppppppppp

   The tag selects the HIP-Transform number one. It produces an r2 nonce
   and computes a f value. It appends a 20 bytes signature.




















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  4.1.4 R2-T

         Next Header:                    0x3B
         Header Length:                  0x08
         Packet Type:                    0x40
         Version:                        0x1
         Reserved:                       0x1
         Control:                        0x0
         Checksum:                       0xabcd
         Sender's HIT (Tag) :            0x0123456789ABCDEF
                                           0123456789ABCDEF
         Sender's HIT (Portal) :         0xA5A5A5A5A5A5A5A5
                                           5A5A5A5A5A5A5A5A
         Signature-T                     0x040600040006ssss
                                           ssssssssssssssss
                                           ssssssssssssssss
                                           sssspppppppppppp

   Reader ends the BEX-T.

4.2 HIP-T Transform 0x0001, HMAC

   EPC = 0123456789abcdefcdab

  4.2.1 I1-T

   << 3B 04 40 11 00 00 00 00 6A 68 2E 53 51 6B 51 6F
      2F 58 CE 60 25 42 1A E6 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
      00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

   HEAD 3b04401100000000
   sHIT 6a682e53516b516f2f58ce6025421ae6
   dHIT 00000000000000000000000000000000

  4.2.2 R1-T

   >> 3B 0A 41 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
      00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 6A 68 2E 53 51 6B 51 6F
      2F 58 CE 60 25 42 1A E6 04 00 00 20 00 06 27 6D
      03 4D DD 2D 52 79 3B 17 2C B9 5B CD 02 97 E2 DF
      61 15 00 00 00 00 00 00 04 02 00 10 00 06 00 02
      00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

   HEAD 3b0a411100000000
   sHIT 00000000000000000000000000000000
   dHIT 6a682e53516b516f2f58ce6025421ae6

   ATT 0400 20 bytes  276d034ddd2d52793b172cb95bcd0297e2df6115
   ATT 0402 04 bytes  00020000


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  4.2.3 I2-T

   << 3B 13 40 11 00 00 00 00 6A 68 2E 53 51 6B 51 6F
      2F 58 CE 60 25 42 1A E6 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
      00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04 02 00 10 00 06 00 01
      00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 04 00 00 20 00 06 C5 95
      8B 23 6B 9B 0E AA 7A BB 25 F2 7D 24 C5 04 6E 89
      19 9E 00 00 00 00 00 00 04 04 00 20 00 06 80 1D
      BC 55 C5 F3 97 89 F8 3C 6C BA 14 50 18 7D 83 83
      3C AF 00 00 00 00 00 00 04 06 00 20 00 06 2A 23
      68 93 2B F7 3A BE C4 6B DD B8 3F 1B 3F 7F 9D ED
      8B 83 00 00 00 00 00 00

   HEAD 3b13401100000000
   sHIT 6a682e53516b516f2f58ce6025421ae6
   dHIT 00000000000000000000000000000000

   ATT 0402 04 bytes  00010000
   ATT 0400 20 bytes  c5958b236b9b0eaa7abb25f27d24c5046e89199e
   ATT 0404 20 bytes  801dbc55c5f39789f83c6cba1450187d83833caf
   ATT 0406 20 bytes  2a2368932bf73abec46bddb83f1b3f7f9ded8b83

5. HIP-T-Transforms Definition

5.1 Type 0x0001, HMAC

  5.1.1 F-T computing (f function)

   The F-T function produces a 20 bytes result, according to the
   relation:

   K = HMAC-SHA1(r1 | r2, EPC-Code)

   Y = f(r1, r2, EPC-Code) = HMAC-SHA1(K, CT1 | "Type 0001 key")

   Where:

   - SHA1 is the SHA1 digest function

   - EPC-Code is the tag identity

   - HMAC-SHA1 is the keyed MAC algorithm based on the SHA1 digest
   procedure.

   - CT1 is a 32 bits string, whose value is equal to 0x00000001

   - r1 and r2 are the two random values exchanged by the BEX

  5.1.2 K-Auth-Key computing (g function)

   The K-Auth-Key is computing according to the relation:

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   K = HMAC-SHA1(r1 | r2, EPC-Code)

   Y = HMAC-SHA1(K, CT2 | "Type 0001 key")

   Where:

   - SHA1 is the SHA1 digest function

   - EPC-Code is the tag identity

   - HMAC-SHA1 is the keyed MAC algorithm based on the SHA1 digest
   procedure.

   - CT2 is a 32 bits string, whose value is equal to 0x00000002

   - r1 and r2 are the two random values exchanged by the BEX

  5.1.3 Signature-T computing

   The HMAC-SHA1 function is used with the K-Auth-Key secret value:

   Signature-T(HIT-T packet) = HMAC-SHA1(K-Auth-Key, HIP-T packet)

5.2 Type 0x0002, Keys-Tree

  5.2.1 F-T computing (f function)

   The F-T function produces a list of Hi, 1<= i <= n, of nx20 bytes
   results, according to the relation:


   Y = f(r1, r2, EPC-Code) = H1 | H2 | Hi | Hn

   With
   Hi = HMAC-SHA1(r1 | r2, Ki | CT1 )
   Or
   Hi = HMAC-SHA1(r1 | r2, Ki | CT2 )


   Where:

   - SHA1 is the SHA1 digest function

   - Ki is a set of n secret keys. Each EPC-Code is associated with an
   index of n bits, whose value b1b2...bn is secretly notified by the
   list H1 H2...Hn

   - HMAC-SHA1 is the keyed MAC algorithm based on the SHA1 digest
   procedure.

   - CT1 is a 32 bits string, whose value is equal to 0x00000001

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   - CT2 is a 32 bits string, whose value is equal to 0x00000002

   - r1 and r2 are the two random values exchanged by the BEX

  5.2.2 K-Auth-Key computing (g function)

   The K-Auth-Key is computing according to the relation:

   K = HMAC-SHA1(r1 | r2, EPC-Code)

   Y = HMAC-SHA1(K, CT1 | "Type 0002 key")

   Where:

   - SHA1 is the SHA1 digest function

   - EPC-Code is the tag identity

   - HMAC-SHA1 is the keyed MAC algorithm based on the SHA1 digest
   procedure.

   - CT1 is a 32 bits string, whose value is equal to 0x00000001

   - r1 and r2 are the two random values exchanged by the BEX

  5.2.3 Signature-T computing

   The HMAC-SHA1 function is used with the K-Auth-Key secret value:

   Signature-T(HIT-T packet) = HMAC-SHA1(K-Auth-Key, HIP-T packet)





















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6. Security Considerations

   To be done.

7. IANA Considerations

   None

8 References

8.1 Normative references

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
   Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [HIP] R. Moskowitz, P. Nikander, P. Jokela, T. Henderson, Host
   Identity Protocol, RFC 5201, April 2008.

8.2 Informative references

   [EPC] Brock, D.L, The Electronic Product Code (EPC), A Naming Scheme
   for Physical Objects, MIT AUTO-ID CENTER, 2001.

   [PML] Brock, D.L - The Physical Markup Language, MIT AUTO-ID CENTER,
   2001.

   [EPCGLOBAL] EPCglobal, EPC Radio Frequency Identity Protocols Class 1
   1516 Generation 2 UHF RFID Protocol for Communications at 860 MHz-960
   MHz Version 1517 1.0.9, EPCglobal Standard, January 2005.

   [NIST-800-108] NIST Special Publication 800-108, Recommendation for
   Key Derivation Using Pseudorandom Functions.

   [SEC] S. Weis, S. Sarma, R. Rivest and D. Engels. "Security and
   privacy aspects of low-cost radio frequency identification systems"
   In D. Hutter, G. Muller, W. Stephan and M. Ullman, editors,
   International Conference on Security in Pervasive Computing - SPC
   2003, volume 2802 of Lecture Notes in computer Science, pages 454-
   469. Springer-Verlag, 2003.

   [HIP-TAG-EXP] Pascal Urien, Simon Elrharbi, Dorice Nyamy, Herve
   Chabanne, Thomas Icart, Francois Lecocq, Cyrille Pepin, Khalifa
   Toumi, Mathieu Bouet, Guy Pujolle, Patrice Krzanik, Jean-Ferdinand
   Susini, "HIP-Tags architecture implementation for the Internet of
   Things", AH-ICI 2009. First Asian Himalayas International Conference
   on Internet, 3-5 Nov. 2009.

   [BLIND] Dacheng Zhang, Miika Komu, "An Extension of HIP Base Exchange
   to Support Identity Privacy", draft-zhang-hip-privacy-protection-00,
   work in progress, Mar. 2010.


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Author's Addresses

   Pascal Urien
   Telecom ParisTech
   37/39 rue Dareau, 75014 Paris, France

   Email: Pascal.Urien@telecom-paristech.fr

   Gyu Myoung Lee
   Telecom SudParis
   9 rue Charles Fourier, 91011 Evry, France

   Email: gm.lee@it-sudparis.eu

   Guy Pujolle
   Laboratoire d'informatique de Paris 6 (LIP6)
   4 place Jussieu
   75005 Paris France

   Email: Guy.Pujolle@lip6.fr
































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