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Network Working Group            Kireeti Kompella, Juniper Networks
Internet Draft                      Yakov Rekhter, Juniper Networks
Expiration Date: December 2002 Jean Philippe Vasseur, Cisco Systems
                                         Ting Wo Chung, Bell Canada




                  Multi-area MPLS Traffic Engineering

                draft-kompella-mpls-multiarea-te-03.txt


1. Status of this Memo

   This document is an Internet-Draft and is in full conformance with
   all provisions of Section 10 of RFC2026 except that the right to
   produce derivative works is not granted.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
   other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
   Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as ``work in progress.''

   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt

   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.


2. Abstract

   An ISIS/OSPF routing domain may consists of multiple areas. This
   document postulates a set of mechanisms, and then outlines how these
   mechanisms could be used to establish/maintain Traffic Engineering
   LSPs that span multiple areas.









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3. Set of mechanisms

   In this section we postulate a set of mechanisms that could be used
   to construct LSPs that span multiple ISIS/OSPF areas. The actual
   application of these mechanisms to construct such LSPs is covered in
   the next section. We assume that the mechanisms listed below are
   either already available, or could be realized via extensions to the
   existing signaling (RSVP/CR-LDP) and/or routing (ISIS/OSPF) protocols
   used for MPLS Traffic Engineering.

   In this document we use the OSPF term "backbone area". In the context
   of ISIS this term means the set of L2 routers. We also use the OSPF
   term "ABR". In the context of ISIS this terms means a router that is
   both L2 and L1.


3.1. Passing constraints

   An LSR that acts as a head-end of an LSP should be able to pass the
   constraints associated with this LSP to some other node. The other
   node may, or may not be along the path taken by the LSP. Note that
   the existing signalling (RSVP/CR-LDP) already provides a way to pass
   some of the constraints, like resource affinity. [Vasseur] proposes
   additional extensions to RSVP to pass additional constraints. A more
   general way to provide this functionality is described in [Kompella].


3.2. Loose hops

   An LSR should be able to specify loose ERO hops, and let some
   intermediate LSR(s) along the path to expand it to strict hops. Note
   that the ability to specify loose hops is already available.


3.3. Path computation server

   An LSR that originates an LSP should be able to "ask" some other node
   to compute the path for the LSP. The node that computes the path may,
   or may not be along the path taken by the LSP. Depending on the
   amount of the topology and TE information available to the node, the
   node may compute either the whole path, or a segment of the path. In
   the latter case the computed path would include loose hops.

   This mechanism requires the ability of the LSR that originates the
   LSP to pass the constraints associated with that LSP to the node that
   is going to compute the path for the LSP. It also requires the
   ability of the LSR that originates the LSP to pass the address of LSR
   at the tail-end of the LSP to the node that is going to compute the



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   path for the LSP, and for the node that is going to compute the path
   for the LSP the ability to pass back to the node that originates the
   LSP the ERO that contains the results of the path computation.

   Once the path computation server computes the path, if the server is
   not along the path, the server is no longer responsible for
   maintaining the feasibility of the path (for one thing, the server
   may not even know whether the LSR established the path in the first
   place).

   A path computation server usually has the topology and TE information
   of more than one area, including the backbone area. An example of a
   node that could act as as a path computation server and meet this
   requirement would be an OSPF Area Border Router (ABR), as an ABR has
   the topology and TE information of the backbone area, plus all the
   other areas connected to that ABR. An extreme case of a path
   computation server is a node that has the topology and TE information
   of the whole ISIS/OSPF routing domain.


3.4. Acquiring topology/TE information for multiple areas

   It could be possible for a node that originates an LSP to obtain the
   topology and TE information of not just its own area, but other areas
   as well. This information may be subject to filtering (e.g., the node
   could obtain only the information about FAs in other areas). The node
   should be able to perform Constrained SPF (CSPF) based on this
   information.

   One possible scenario is when the node, in addition to the topology
   and TE information of its own area, also obtains the topology and TE
   information of the backbone area.

   An extreme case is when a node obtains the topology and TE
   information of the whole OSPF/ISIS domain.
















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4. Constructing multi-area TE LSPs

   Consider the situation where the head-end of a TE LSP is in a
   different ISIS/OSPF area than the tail-end of a TE LSP. We'll refer
   to the area that the head-end is in as the head-end area.  We'll
   refer to the area that the tail-end is in as the tail-end area.

   Given the set of the mechanisms outlined in the previous section, the
   following sub-sections outline some of the possible scenarios that
   use these mechanisms in order to construct TE LSPs that span multiple
   OSPF/ISIS areas.

   In the context of this document we define an optimal route as a route
   that would be computed in the absence of areas.  In other words, an
   optimal route in a given network that is composed of a single
   OSPF/ISIS routing domain is a route that is computed if the network
   isn't partitioned into areas.

   It is easy to construct examples that show that partitioning a
   network into areas, and the resulting  loss of routing information
   may lead to sub-optimal routing, in a sense that the computed routes
   would be different than optimal routes. That is true irrespective of
   a particular scheme to aggregate/abstract/summarize routing
   information. One corollary of this is that it is impossible to
   guarantee optimal routing in the presence of routing information
   aggregation/abstraction/summarization.


4.1. Scenario 1

   Path computation is done on a per area basis. The head-end LSR
   computes strict hops within its own area. The head-end LSR then
   initiates LSP path setup. The setup includes the information about
   the constraints associated with the LSP.

   The ABR in the head-end area uses the topology and TE information of
   the backbone area, as well as the information about the constraints
   associated with the LSP (the ABR receives this information as part of
   the LSP setup) to compute strict hops within the backbone area to the
   ABR in the tail-end area.

   The ABR in the tail-end area uses the topology and TE information of
   the tail-end area, as well as the information about the constraints
   associated with the LSP (the ABR receives this information as part of
   the LSP setup) to compute strict hops within the tail-end area from
   itself to the tail-end LSR.

   Note that since the choice of ABR in the head-end area is determined



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   by only the information in the head-end area, the inability to find a
   route across multiple areas doesn't mean that the route doesn't exist
   - it may mean that another ABR in the head-end area should be chosen,
   and/or it may mean than another ABR in the tail-end area should be
   chosen.  Thus the failure to find a route may require to try another
   ABRs. The total number of such attempts could be as large as H*T
   (where H is the number of ABRs in the head-end area, and T is the
   number of ABRs in the tail-end area).

   To exert control over which ABRs a particular LSP can traverse, the
   LSR that originates this LSP could be preconfigured with the
   addresses of these ABRs.

   In this scenario the only information that has to be distributed
   across area boundaries are the reachability information associated
   with routers' interface addresses (including loopback addresses, if
   an LSP is to be terminated on a router loopback address). Both OSPF
   and ISIS already provide mechanisms to accomplish this.

   Handling link/node failures could be done as a two-phase approach,
   where in the first phase a failure is handled within an area where
   the failure occurs, and only if that fails, the head-end LSR is
   notified of the failure and is expected to handle it. To direct
   failure notifications to the ABR of the area where the failure occurs
   (rather than to the head-end LSR), the ABR should use the Notify
   Request Object.

   Alternatively, link/node failures could always be handled by the
   head-end LSR.


4.2. Scenario 2

   The head-end LSR requests an ABR in its (head-end) area to compute
   the path all the way from the LSR to the ABR in the tail-end area.
   This is possible because the ABR in the head-end area maintains the
   topology and TE information both for the head-end area and for the
   backbone area. The head-end LSR then initiates the LSP setup using
   the computed path. As part of the LSP setup, the ABR in the tail-end
   area then computes the rest of the path.

   Alternatively, the head-end LSR, after requesting and obtaining the
   path from the ABR in the head-end area, may request the ABR in the
   tail-end area (which is known from the path computed by the ABR in
   the head-end area) to compute the path to the destination. Once this
   is done, the head-end LSR would have a complete path to the tail-end
   LSR and could use it for the LSP setup.




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   Note that the ABR in the head-end area that computes the path all the
   way to the ABR in the tail-end area may, or may not be on the path
   taken by the LSP.

   In this scenario the only information that has to be distributed
   across area boundaries are the reachability information associated
   with routers' interface addresses (including loopback addresses, if
   an LSP is to be terminated on a router loopback address). Both OSPF
   and ISIS already provide mechanisms to accomplish this.

   In this scenario the head-end LSR may end up in a situation, where
   the head-end LSR, after requesting and obtaining the path than spans
   both the head-end area and the backbone area from the ABR in the
   head-end area, may find out that there is no feasible path from the
   ABR in the tail-end area to the destination. A way to handle this is
   for the head-end LSR to issue another request to the ABR in the head-
   end area, but indicate in the request that the ABR in the tail-end
   area (the one that was selected by the previous request) should be
   excluded from the path (this could be done by adding an additional
   constraint to the request).

   This scenario is likely to reduce the number of LSP setup failures,
   relative to the scenario 1. This is because in contrast with the
   first scenario, there is no need to try multiple ABRs in the head-end
   area.

   Handling link/node failures could be done as a two-phase approach,
   where in the first phase a failure is handled within an area where
   the failure occurs, and only if that fails, the head-end LSR is
   notified of the failure and is expected to handle it. To direct
   failure notifications to the ABR of the area where the failure occurs
   (rather than to the head-end LSR), the ABR should use the Notify
   Request Object. Note also, that the ABR will be informed of the
   failure by the routing protocol (ISIS/OSPF).

   Alternatively, link/node failures could always be handled by the
   head-end LSR.


4.3. Scenario 3

   The head-end LSR obtains the TE information from the backbone area,
   and uses it to compute the path all the way to the ABR in the tail-
   end area. The head-end LSR then initiates the LSP setup using the
   computed path. As part of the LSP setup, the ABR in the tail-end area
   then computes the rest of the path.

   Alternatively, the head-end LSR, after computing the path to the ABR



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   in the tail-end area, may request the ABR in the tail-end area the
   head-end area) to compute the path to the destination. Once this is
   done, the head-end LSR would have a complete path to the tail-end LSR
   and could use it for the LSR setup.

   A variation on the above alternative is for the head-end LSR to
   request the ABR in the tail-end area to compute paths to the
   destination from all/some of the ABRs in the tail-end area.  Once
   this is done, the head-end LSR could use this information to compute
   a path through the head-end and the backbone areas.  This variation
   could improve path optimality and reduce the probability of the LSP
   setup failure, relative to the other alternatives described in this
   section. On the other hand, it deterministically (not
   probabalistically) increases the computational overhead on the ABRs,
   relative to the other alternatives described in this section.

   If the head-end area contains LSRs that don't originate LSPs, then
   these LSRs need not maintain the TE information from the backbone
   area.

   This scenario is similar to scenario 2, except for the entity that
   computes path through the head-end and the backbone areas, and the
   amount of information that the originating LSR has to maintain.  With
   respect to the amount of information, the originating LSR maintains
   the same information as the ABR in the head-end area.

   Handling link/node failures could be done as a two-phase approach,
   where in the first phase a failure is handled within an area where
   the failure occurs, and only if that fails, the head-end LSR is
   notified of the failure and is expected to handle it. To direct
   failure notifications to the ABR of the area where the failure occurs
   (rather than to the head-end LSR), the ABR should use the Notify
   Request Object.

   If the head-end LSR is notified of a failure, and the failure is
   neither at the ABR in the tail-end area, not in the tail-end area
   itself, the head-end LSR should compute a (feasible) path to the same
   ABR in the tail-end area, as the one that was used prior to the
   failure. If the head-end LSR is notified of the failure, and the
   failure is either at the ABR in the tail-end area, or at the tail-end
   area, the head-end LSR should compute a (feasible) path to some other
   ABR in the tail-end area.

   Alternatively, link/node failures could always be handled by the
   head-end LSR.






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4.4. Scenario 4

   The head-end LSR requests one of the ABRs in the head-end area to
   compute a path to the destination. When the ABR in the head-end area
   receives the request, the ABR requests one of the ABRs in the tail-
   end area to compute paths to the destination from all/some of the
   ABRs in the tail-end area. Once the ABR in the head-end area obtains
   this information from the ABR in the tail-end area, the ABR in the
   head-end area could compute the path through the head-end and the
   backbone areas, concatenates the results of this computation with the
   appropriate path through the tail-end area, and then return the
   result to the head-end LSR.

   Note that the ABR in the head-end area that computes the path all the
   way to the ABR in the tail-end area may, or may not be on the path
   taken by the LSP.

   Likewise, the ABR in the tail-end area that computes the path(s) in
   the tail-end area may, or may not be on the path taken by the LSP.

   In this scenario, just like in the Scenario 2, the only information
   that has to be distributed across area boundaries are the
   reachability information associated with routers' interface addresses
   (including loopback addresses, if an LSP is to be terminated on a
   router loopback address). Both OSPF and ISIS already provide
   mechanisms to accomplish this.

   While this scenario is likely to reduce the probability of the LSP
   setup failure relative to the Scenario 2, it does this at the expense
   of deterministically (and not probabalistically) higher computational
   overhead placed on ABRs.

   Note that the approach outlined in this scenario results in computing
   optimal routes.

   The approach described in this section could reduce the probability
   of the LSP setup failure, relative to the approach outlined in
   Scenario 2.  On the other hand, it deterministically (not
   probabalistically) increases the computational overhead on the ABRs,
   relative to the approach outlined in Scenario 2.

   The approach described in this section could also facilitate
   computation of node/link disjoint paths.








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4.5. Scenario 5

   The head-end LSR requests an entity that has the entire network (all
   areas) topology to compute the whole path.

   Except for the entity that has the entire network topology, in this
   scenario the only information that has to be distributed across area
   boundaries are the reachability information associated with routers'
   interface addresses (including loopback addresses, if an LSP is to be
   terminated on a router loopback address). Both OSPF and ISIS already
   provide mechanisms to accomplish this.

   Note that the approach outlined in this scenario results in computing
   optimal routes.

   Handling link/node failures could be done as a two-phase approach,
   where in the first phase a failure is handled within an area where
   the failure occurs, and only if that fails, the head-end LSR is
   notified of the failure and is expected to handle it. To direct
   failure notifications to the ABR of the area where the failure occurs
   (rather than to the head-end LSR), the ABR should use the Notify
   Request Object.

   If the head-end LSR is notified of a failure, the head-end LSR should
   request the entity that computed the whole path to compute another
   path. When issuing such a request, the LSR should specify that the
   path should exclude the element that caused the failure.

   The approach described in this section could also facilitate
   computation of node/link disjoint paths.


5. Pre-engineered backbone area

   In certain cases it may be desirable to "pre-engineer" the backbone
   area by constructing a set of TE LSPs that would be used as FAs by
   the traffic that has to traverse the backbone area. The scenarios
   outline above do not preclude this as an option.

   With a pre-engineered backbone area, a variation of Scenario 3 would
   be to restrict the backbone information leaked to the non-backbone
   areas to only the information associated with the FAs in the backbone
   area.

   Note that an LSP that starts/ends in a non-backbone area, but
   traverses the backbone area may use more than one FA. That means, for
   example, that even if there is no FA between any of the ABRs in the
   head-end area and any of the ABRs in the tail-end area, an LSP could



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   still be established, as long as there are some other FAs that
   combined together provide a path from the head-end to the tail-end
   area.

   Stability of the LSPs that are used as FAs in the backbone area is
   unaffected by the establishment/tear down of the LSPs that start/end
   in other areas, but traverse the backbone area.

   Pre-engineering the backbone area enables aggregation of the Label
   Forwarding State in the backbone area, as a TE LSP that is used as an
   FA could carry/nest multiple LSPs. One possible application of this
   feature would be in conjunction with GMPLS controlling OXCs, where
   OXCs would be placed in the backbone area.


6. TE information summary

   One possible application of summarization of TE information would be
   to prune off unfeasible ABRs, as follows.  An ABR in the tail-end
   area would compute two paths: (a) a min hop path to the destination
   ignoring all other constraints (such as b/w or resource affinity),
   and (b) a max unreserved b/w path to the destination, again ignoring
   all other constraints (such as resource affinity or unreserved b/w).
   The ABR will then advertise the hop count from the first path and the
   max unreserved b/w from the second path into the backbone area. The
   ABR in the head-end area will do exactly the same, and then advertise
   this information into the head-end area. An LSR in the head-end area
   that needs to originate an LSP could use this information to prune
   off unfeasible ABRs. For example, if the LSP requires X amount of
   bandwidth, the LSR should rule out any of the ABRs in its area that
   advertise less than X amount of unreserved b/w to the LSP's
   destination.

   While pruning off unfeasible ABRs, as outlined in the previous
   paragraph, could reduce the number of LSP setup failures, it is not
   without drawbacks. For one thing, it increases the amount of control
   (routing) information that an LSR has to maintain, as well as the
   volume of the control information that an LSR receives from other
   LSRs, and has to process. In addition, it adds computational overhead
   to ABRs, as they need to perform additional computation. Moreover,
   establishment/tear down of inter-area LSPs increases the frequency
   with which this computation would need to be performed.  Finally, it
   is important to realize that this approach doesn't eliminate LSP
   setup failures, as for one thing, the information computed and
   advertised by ABRs may be "out-of-date". Yet another reason for LSP
   setup failures is that the unreserved b/w information computed by
   ABRs doesn't take into account any other constraints, while a
   particular LSP may be subject not just to unreserved b/w, but to



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   other constraints (e.g., resource affinity) as well. So, even if from
   the unreserved b/w constraint point of view a particular ABR is
   feasible for a particular LSP, when taking into account all the
   constraints associated with that LSP, the ABR may no longer be
   feasible.

   And to reiterate the point made earlier, since route computation with
   this approach uses summarized/aggreated/abstracted information, this
   approach doesn't guarantee optimal routing.


7. Protection in the multi-area environment

   An LSP that spans multiple area could be protected in a variety of
   ways. One alternative is to establish a backup (secondary) LSP, and
   make sure that this LSP is node/link disjoined from the (primary) LSP
   that it protects.

   Another alternative is to provide protection on a per-area basis,
   where LSP's segment that is within a given area is protected by
   another LSP (this other LSP protects just that segment). Note that by
   using the label stacking construct a single LSP could be used for
   protecting segments of multiple other LSPs.

   Finally, within each area one could employ the same protection
   mechanisms as are currently used for LSPs that are confined to a
   single area.


8. Reoptimization

   Reoptimization is the set of mechanisms by which an existing (already
   established) LSP is rerouted over a more optimal path. In general
   reoptimization could be either periodic (timer-driven), or triggered
   (event-driven). An example of an event that could trigger
   reoptimization is coming up of a link that was previously down.

   Periodic (time-driven) reoptimization is performed by the head-end
   LSR.

   Handling event-driven reoptimization could be done on a per area
   basis. That is, if the event that triggers reoptimization happens in
   the head-end area, it is the responsibility of the head-end LSR.  If
   the event happens in the backbone area, then it is the responsibility
   of the ABR in the head-end area. Finally, if the event happens in the
   tail-end area, then it is the responsibility of the ABR in the tail-
   end area.




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   Just like with a sigle area reoptimization, the multi-area
   reoptimization should be done without traffic disruption (by using
   the approach known as "make before break").


9. Security Considerations

   Security issues are not discussed in this document.


10. Acknowledgements

   We would like to thank Noel Chiappa, Tony Li, Robert Raszuk, and Alex
   Zinin for helping us with the ideas presented in this document.


11. References

   [Kompella] Kompella, K., "Carrying Constraints in RSVP"

   [Vasseur] JP Vasseur et al, "RSVP Path computation request and reply
   messages", draft-vasseur-mpls-path-computation-rsvp-te-00.txt ", July
   01.


12. Author Information

























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Kireeti Kompella
Juniper Networks, Inc.
1194 N. Mathilda Ave.
Sunnyvale, CA 94089
Email: kireeti@juniper.net

Yakov Rekhter
Juniper Networks, Inc.
1194 N. Mathilda Ave.
Sunnyvale, CA 94089
Email: yakov@juniper.net

Jean Philippe Vasseur
Cisco Systems, Inc.
11, rue Camille Desmoulins
92782  Issy les Moulineaux Cedex 9
France
Email: jpv@cisco.com

Ting Wo Chung
Bell Canada
181 Bay Street, Suite 350, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5J 2T3
Email: ting_wo.chung@bell.ca



























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