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Versions: 00 01

DNA Working Group                                               J. Kempf
Internet-Draft                            DoCoMo Communications Labs USA
Expires: January 19, 2006                                   S. Narayanan
                                                               Panasonic
                                                             E. Nordmark
                                                        Sun Microsystems
                                                        B. Pentland, Ed.
                                                  Monash University CTIE
                                                           July 18, 2005


         Detecting Network Attachment in IPv6 Networks (DNAv6)
                   draft-pentland-dna-protocol-01.txt

Status of this Memo

   By submitting this Internet-Draft, each author represents that any
   applicable patent or other IPR claims of which he or she is aware
   have been or will be disclosed, and any of which he or she becomes
   aware will be disclosed, in accordance with Section 6 of BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 19, 2006.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2005).

Abstract

   Efficient detection of network attachment in IPv6 needs the following
   two components: a method for the host to query routers on the link to
   identify the link (Link Identification) and a method for the routers



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   on the link to consistently respond to such a query with minimal
   delay (Fast RA).  Solving the link identification based strictly on
   RFC 2461 is difficult because of the flexibilities offered to routers
   in terms of prefixes advertised in a router advertisement (RA)
   message.  Similarly, the random delay in responding to router
   solicitation messages imposed by RFC 2461 makes to it difficult to
   achieve fast RA.  A known set of solutions to these two problems was
   identified and catalogued by the DNA design team.  In this memo, an
   integrated solution is presented, based on a sub-set of the
   catalogued solutions.  This integrated solution consolidates most of
   the advantages of all known solutions while addressing most of the
   disadvantages.







































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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5

   2.  Terms and Abbreviations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5

   3.  Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     3.1   What Identifies a Link?  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     3.2   Link Identification  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     3.3   Fast Router Advertisement  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7

   4.  Message Formats  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     4.1   Router Advertisement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     4.2   Landmark Option  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
     4.3   DNA Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

   5.  DNA Operation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
     5.1   DNA Router Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
       5.1.1   Data Structures  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
       5.1.2   Router Configuration Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
       5.1.3   Bootstrapping DNA Data Structures  . . . . . . . . . . 14
       5.1.4   Processing Router Advertisements . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       5.1.5   Processing Router Solicitations  . . . . . . . . . . . 15
       5.1.6   Complete Router Advertisements . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
       5.1.7   Scheduling Fast Router Advertisements  . . . . . . . . 16
       5.1.8   Scheduling Unsolicited Router Advertisements . . . . . 17
     5.2   DNA Host Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
       5.2.1   Data Structures  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
       5.2.2   Host Configuration Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
       5.2.3   Selection of a Landmark Prefix . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
       5.2.4   Sending Router Solicitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
       5.2.5   Processing Router Advertisements . . . . . . . . . . . 19
       5.2.6   DNA and Address Configuration  . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

   6.  Backward Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
     6.1   Non DNA Host with DNA Routers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
     6.2   DNA Host with Non-DNA Routers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

   7.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
     7.1   Amplification Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
     7.2   Attacks on the Token Bucket  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
     7.3   Attacks on DNA Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

   8.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

   9.  Open Issues  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

   10.   Acknowledgments  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26



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   11.   References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
     11.1  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
     11.2  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

       Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

   A.  How the Goals are Met? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

       Intellectual Property and Copyright Statements . . . . . . . . 30










































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1.  Introduction

   The proposed scheme in this memo is built upon the following
   solutions catalogued in [15]: Complete RA and Requested Landmark are
   used for the link identification, and Hash-based Fast RA is used to
   achieve fast response to RS messages.  The reasoning behind these
   choices will become evident as the whole scheme and its advantages
   are understood.

2.  Terms and Abbreviations

   There is an existing DNA terminology draft [12].  This draft does not
   introduce any new terminology not already used by existing drafts.

   The term "link" is used as defined in RFC 2460 [2].  NOTE: this is
   completely different from the term "link" as used by IEEE 802, etc.

3.  Overview

   The DNA protocol presented in this document tries to achieve the
   following objectives:

   o  Eliminate the delays introduced by RFC 2461 in discovering the
      configuration.

   o  Make it possible for the hosts to accurately detect the identity
      of their current link from a single RA.

   o  Keep the packets relatively small in size.

   The approach described in this memo is based on the combination of
   Requested Landmark and CompleteRA for link identification and the
   Hash-based Fast RA mechanism.  The rest of the document refers to
   this approach by the term "DNAv6".

   DNAv6 assumes that the host's wireless link interface software and
   hardware is capable of delivering a 'link up' event notification when
   layer 2 on the host is configured and sufficiently stable for IP
   traffic.  This event notification acts as a hint to the layer 3 DNA
   procedures to check whether or not the host is attached to the same
   link as before.  DNAv6 also assumes that an interface on the host is
   never connected to two links at the same time.  In the case that the
   layer 2 technology is capable of having multiple attachments (for
   instance, multiple layer 2 associations or connections) at the same
   time, DNAv6 requires the individual layer-2 associations to be
   represented as separate (virtual interfaces) to layer 3 and DNAv6 in
   particular.




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3.1  What Identifies a Link?

   DNAv6 identifies a link by the set of prefixes that are assigned to
   the link, which is quite natural and doesn't require introducing any
   new form of identifier.  However, this choice implies that the
   protocol needs to be robust against changes in the set of prefixes
   assigned to a link, including the case when a link is renumbered and
   the prefix is later reassigned to a different link.  The protocol
   handles this quite well during graceful renumbering (when the valid
   lifetime of the prefix is allowed to decrease to zero before it is
   removed and perhaps reassigned to a different link), however, it can
   also cope with "flash" renumbering and reassignment but not in an
   optimized fashion.

3.2  Link Identification

   DNAv6 is based on using a Router Solicitation/Router Advertisement
   exchange to both verify whether the host has changed link, and if it
   has, provide the host with the configuration information for the new
   link.  This uses a technique called a "landmark", where the host
   chooses one of the prefixes as a landmark prefix, and then includes
   this in the Router Solicitation message in the form of a question "am
   I still connected to the link which has this prefix?".  The landmark
   is carried in a new option, called the Landmark Option.

   In the case when the host is still attached to the same link, which
   might occur when the host has changed from using one layer 2 access
   point to another, but the access points are on the same link, the
   Router Advertisement(s) it receives will contain a "yes, that prefix
   is on this link" answer, and no other information.  Thus, such RA
   messages are quite small.

   In the case when the landmark prefix is unknown to the responding
   router, the host will receive a "No" answer to its landmark question,
   and also the information it needs to configure itself for the new
   link.  The routers try to include as much information as possible in
   such messages, so that the host can be informed of all the prefixes
   assigned to the new link as soon as possible.

   The router advertisement messages are larger than the solicitations,
   and with multiple routers on the link there will be multiple
   advertisements sent for each solicitation.  This amplification can be
   used by an attacker to cause a Denial of Service attack.  Such
   attacks are limited by applying a rate limit on the unicast Router
   Advertisements sent directly in response to each solicitation, and
   using multicast RAs when the rate limit is exceeded.

   When the multicast method is used, there are no explicit answers to



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   the landmark questions, instead the router(s) include information so
   that the hosts themselves can answer their landmark questions.  This
   information consists of the prefixes a router would advertise itself
   as per RFC 2461, and also, the prefixes learned from other routers on
   the link that are not being advertised by itself.  These learned
   prefixes are included in a new DNA Option in the Router
   Advertisement.

   When the resulting multicast RA carries all the prefixes known to the
   router, the RA is marked as "complete" using a new bit in the
   message.  When a host receives a complete multicast RA, the host can
   easily decide whether it is attached to the same link or not from the
   single RA.  Thus, unlike CPL [14], the host does not have to wait for
   multiple advertisements before making a decision.

   In order for the routers be able to both respond to the landmark
   questions and send the complete RAs, the routers need to track the
   prefixes that other routers advertise on the link.  This process is
   initialized when a router is enabled, by sending a Router
   Solicitation and collecting the resulting RAs, and then multicasting
   a few RAs more rapidly as already suggested in RFC 2461.  This
   process ensures with high probability that all the routers have the
   same notion of the set of prefixes assigned to the link.

3.3  Fast Router Advertisement

   According to RFC 2461 a solicited Router Advertisement should have a
   random delay between 0 and 500 milliseconds, to avoid the
   advertisements from all the routers colliding on the link causing
   congestion and higher probability of packet loss.  In addition, RFC
   2461 suggests that the RAs be multicast, and multicast RAs are rate
   limited to one message every 3 seconds.  This implies that the
   response to a RS might be delayed up to 3.5 seconds.

   DNAv6 avoids this delay by using a different mechanism to ensure that
   two routers will not respond at exactly the same time while allowing
   one of the routers on the link to respond immediately.  Since the
   hosts might be likely to use the first responding router as the first
   choice from their default router list, the mechanism also ensures
   that the same router doesn't respond first to the RSs from different
   hosts.

   The mechanism is based on the routers on the link determining (from
   the same RAs that are used in section Section 3.1 to determine all
   the prefixes assigned to the link), the link-local addresses of all
   the other routers on the link.  With this loosely consistent list,
   each router can independently compute some function of the (link-
   local) source address of the RS and each of the routers' link-local



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   addresses.  The results of that function are then compared to create
   a ranking, and the ranking determines the delay each router will use
   when responding to the RS.  The router which is ranked as #0 will
   respond with a zero delay.

   If the routers become out-of-sync with respect to their learned
   router lists, two or more routers may respond with the same delay,
   but over time the routers will converge on their lists of learned
   routers on the link.

4.  Message Formats

   This memo defines two new flags for inclusion in the router
   advertisement message and two new options.


4.1  Router Advertisement

   DNAv6 modifies the format of the Router Advertisement message by
   adding a flag bit to indicate that the router sending the message is
   participating in the DNAv6 protocol as well as a flag to indicate the
   completeness of the set of prefixes included in the Router
   Advertisement.  The new message format is as follows:


     0                   1                   2                   3
     0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |     Type      |     Code      |          Checksum             |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    | Cur Hop Limit |M|O|H|Pr |D|C|R|       Router Lifetime         |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |                         Reachable Time                        |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |                          Retrans Timer                        |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    +   Options ...
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-

   DNA (D)

      The DNA (D) bit indicates that the router sending the RA is
      participating in the DNAv6 protocol.  Other routers should include
      this router in calculating response delay tokens.







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   Complete (C)

      The Complete (C) bit indicates that the Router Advertisement
      contains PIOs for all prefixes explicitly configured on the
      sending router, and, if other routers on the link are advertising
      additional prefixes, a DNA Option containing all additional
      prefixes that the router has heard from other routers on the link.

   Reserved (R)

      The reserved field is reduced from 3 bits to 1 bit.


4.2  Landmark Option

   The Landmark Option is used by hosts in a Router Solicitation message
   to ask the routers on a link if the specified prefix is being
   advertised by some router on the link.  It is used by routers in a
   Router Advertisement to reply to a corresponding question in a Router
   Solicitation, indicating whether the prefix referred to is being
   advertised by any router on the link.


     0                   1                   2                   3
     0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |     Type      |    Length     | Pref Length   |Y|N|           |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+           +
    |                           Reserved                            |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |                                                               |
    ~                          Landmark Prefix                      ~
    |                                                               |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   Type

      TBA

   Length

      8 bit unsigned integer indicating the length of the option in
      units of 8 octets.  Set to 2 or 3.

   Pref Length






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      An 8 bit unsigned integer representing the number of bits in the
      prefix to be used for matching.

   Yes (Y)

      The Yes (Y) bit, when included in a Landmark Option in a Router
      Advertisement, indicates that the prefix referred to in the Prefix
      field of this option is being advertised by one or more routers on
      the current link.  In a Landmark Option in a Router Solicitation,
      this bit MUST be set to zero and ignored by receivers.

   No (N)

      The No (N) bit, when included in a Landmark Option in a Router
      Advertisement, indicates that the prefix referred to in the Prefix
      field of this option is not being advertised by any router on the
      current link.  In a Landmark Option in a Router Solicitation, this
      bit MUST be set to zero and ignored by receivers.

   Reserved

      A 38 bit unused field.  It MUST be initialised to zero by the
      sender, and ignored by the receiver.

   Prefix

      A prefix being used by the host currently for a global IPv6
      address, padded at the right with zeros.  If the prefix length is
      less than 65 bits, only 64 bits need be included, otherwise 128
      bits are included.


4.3  DNA Option

   The DNA Option (DNAO) is used by a router to indicate prefixes that
   are being advertised in PIOs by other routers on the link, but not by
   itself.














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     0                   1                   2                   3
     0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |     Type      |    Length     | Prefix Len 1  | Prefix Len 2  |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |      ...      | Prefix Len N  |            Padding            |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |                                                               |
    +                                                               +
    |                                                               |
    +                          Prefix 1                             +
    |                                                               |
    +                                                               +
    |                                                               |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |                                                               |
    +                                                               +
    |                                                               |
    +                          Prefix 2                             +
    |                                                               |
    +                                                               +
    |                                                               |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    ~ ...
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    |                                                               |
    +                                                               +
    |                                                               |
    +                          Prefix N                             +
    |                                                               |
    +                                                               +
    |                                                               |
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   Type

      TBA

   Length

      8 bit unsigned integer indicating the length of the option in
      units of 8 octets.

   Prefix Len







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      One or more fields (N) each consisting of an 8-bit unsigned
      integer representing the prefix lengths of the following prefixes.
      The Prefix Len fields are ordered the same as the Prefix fields so
      that the first Prefix Len field represents the prefix length of
      the prefix contained in the first prefix field, and so on.

   Padding

      Zero padding sufficient to align the following prefix field on an
      8-octet boundary.

   Prefix

      One or more fields (N) each containing a 128-bit address
      representing a prefix that has been heard on the link but is not
      explicitly configured on this router.

   Description

      This option MUST only be included in a Router Advertisement.  This
      option contains prefixes that are being advertised on the link but
      are not explicitly configured on the sending router.  The router
      MUST NOT include any prefixes with a zero valid lifetime in the
      DNAO.


5.  DNA Operation

5.1  DNA Router Operation

   Routers MUST collect information about the other routers that are
   advertising on the link.

5.1.1  Data Structures

   The routers maintain a set of conceptual data structures for each
   interface to track the prefixes advertised by other routers on the
   link, and also the set of DNA routers (the routers that will quickly
   respond to RSs) on the link.

   For each interface, routers maintain a list of all prefixes
   advertised on the link.  The list will be referred to in this
   document as "DNAPrefixList".  For each prefix the router MUST store
   sufficient information to identify the prefix and to know when to
   remove the prefix entry from the list.  This may be achieved by
   storing the following information:





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   1.  Prefix

   2.  Prefix length

   3.  Valid lifetime

   4.  Time last refreshed

   For each interface, routers also maintain a list of the other routers
   advertising on the link.  The list will be referred to in this memo
   as "DNARouterList".  For each router from which a Router
   Advertisement is received with the DNA flag set, the following
   information MUST be stored:

   1.  Source address of advertising router

   2.  Token equal to the first 64 bits of an SHA-1 hash of the above
       address

   3.  Time last refreshed

   Each router MUST include itself in the DNARouterList and generate a
   token for itself as describe above based on the link-local address
   used in its RA messages.

5.1.2  Router Configuration Variables

   A DNAv6 router MUST allow for the following conceptual variables to
   be configured by the system management.  Default values are set to
   ease configuration load.

   UnicastRAInterval

      The interval corresponding to the maximum average rate of Router
      Solicitations that the router is prepared to service with unicast
      responses.  This is the interval at which the token bucket
      controlling the unicast responses is replenished.

      Default: 50 milliseconds

   MaxUnicastRABurst

      The maximum size burst of Router Solicitations that the router is
      prepared to service with unicast responses.  This is the maximum
      number of tokens allowed in the token bucket controlling the
      unicast responses.





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      Default: 20

   RASeparation

      The separation between responses from different routers on the
      same link to a single Router Solicitation.

      Default: 20 milliseconds

   MulticastRADelay

      The delay to be introduced when scheduling a multicast RA in
      response to a RS message when the token bucket is empty.

      Default: 3000 milliseconds

   FastRAThreshold

      The maximum number of fast responses that a host should receive
      when soliciting for Router Advertisements.

      Default: 3


5.1.3  Bootstrapping DNA Data Structures

   When an interface on a router first starts up, it SHOULD transmit up
   to MAX_RTR_SOLICITATIONS Router Solicitations separated by
   RTR_SOLICITATION_INTERVAL [3] in order to quickly learn of the other
   routers and prefixes active on the link.

   Upon startup, a router interface SHOULD also send a few unsolicited
   Router Advertisements as recommended in Section 6.2.4 of RFC 2461
   [3], in order to inform others routers on the link of its presence.

   During the bootstrap period ( (MAX_RTR_SOLICITATIONS - 1) *
   RTR_SOLICITATION_INTERVAL + RetransTimer [3]), a router interface
   both sends unsolicited Router Advertisements and responds to Router
   Solicitations, but with a few restrictions on the message content.
   Router Advertisements MUST NOT include any DNA specific options
   except that the DNA flag MUST be set.  The DNA flag is set so that
   other routers will know to include this router in their timing
   calculations for fast RA transmission.  Other DNA options are omitted
   because the router may have incomplete information during bootstrap.

   During the bootstrap period, the timing of Router Advertisement
   transmission is as specified in RFC 2461.




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5.1.4  Processing Router Advertisements

   When a router receives a Router Advertisement, it first validates the
   RA as per the rules in RFC 2461, and then performs the actions
   specified in RFC 2461.  In addition, each valid Router Advertisement
   is processed as follows:

   If the DNA flag is set in the RA, the router checks if there is an
   entry in its DNARouterList.  Thus it looks up the source address of
   the RA in that list and, if not found, a new entry is added to
   DNARouterList, including the source address and a token equal to the
   first 64 bits of an SHA-1 hash of the source address.  The entry's
   'Time last refreshed' is updated.

   Regardless of the state of the DNA flag, each PIO in the RA is
   examined.  If the prefix is not in the router's DNAPrefixList, it is
   added, along with the lifetime and refresh information.

5.1.5  Processing Router Solicitations

   The usual response to an RS SHOULD be a unicast RA.  However, to keep
   control of the rate of unicast RAs sent, a token bucket is used.  The
   token bucket is filled at one token every UnicastRAInterval.  A
   maximum of MaxUnicastRABurst tokens are stored.

   When a Router Solicitation is received, if a unicast send token is
   available then:

      If the source address of the Router Solicitation is the
      Unspecified Address, then the router builds a Complete RA as
      specified in Section 5.1.6 and schedules it for multicast
      transmission as per RFC 2461.

      If the source address of the RS is NOT the unspecified address,
      the router consumes one unicast send token and then builds a
      Router Advertisement as follows:

         The DNA flag is set.

         If the RS contains a Landmark Option whose prefix matches one
         of those in the interface's DNAPrefixList, then the Landmark
         option with the Landmark prefix is included in the RA but with
         the Yes flag set.  All configuration related options (MTU,
         Advertisement Interval, etc., including PIOs) SHOULD NOT be
         included as this information is already known to the host.
         SEND options, if any, MUST NOT be omitted.  At this point the
         RA is ready for transmission, and is scheduled as specified in
         Section 5.1.7.



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         If the RS contains a Landmark Option whose prefix does not
         match any of those in the interface's stored prefix list, then
         the Landmark option with the Landmark prefix is included in the
         RA but with the No flag set.  All fixed options (MTU,
         Advertisement Interval, flags, etc.) are added to the Router
         Advertisement.  Prefix Information Options for any explicitly
         configured prefixes SHOULD be added to the Router
         Advertisement, while the DNAO for learned prefixes SHOULD NOT
         be added.  If there is insufficient room to fit all of the
         PIOs, an additional Router Advertisement is built after
         consuming another token, if available.  At this point the
         Router Advertisement is ready for transmission, and is
         scheduled as specified in Section 5.1.7.

         If the RS does not contain a Landmark Option, then the router
         builds a complete RA as specified in Section 5.1.6 and
         schedules it for unicast transmission as specified in
         Section 5.1.7.

   If no unicast send token is available in the token bucket, AND there
   are no existing scheduled multicast RAs, the router MUST construct a
   Complete RA as specified in Section 5.1.6 and schedule it for
   transmission after MulticastRADelay.

   Otherwise it is not possible to send a fast unicast response and a
   multicast Complete RA is already scheduled so therefore the Router
   Solicitation MUST be dropped.

5.1.6  Complete Router Advertisements

   A CompleteRA is formed as follows:

   Starting with a Router Advertisement with all fixed options (MTU,
   Advertisement Interval, flags, etc.), the DNA flag is set.  As many
   Prefix Information Options for explicitly configured prefixes as will
   fit are added to the Router Advertisement.  If there is sufficient
   room, a DNA option as defined in Section 4.3 containing as many of
   the learned prefixes as will fit is added.

   It may not be possible to include all of the prefixes in use on the
   link due to MTU or administrative limitations.  If all Prefix
   Information Options and a DNA Option containing all of the learned
   prefixes were included in the RA, then the Complete flag in the
   Router Advertisement header is set.

5.1.7  Scheduling Fast Router Advertisements

   RAs may need to be delayed to avoid collisions in the case that there



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   is more than one router on a link.  The delay is calculated by
   determining a ranking for the router for the received RS, and
   multiplying that by RASeparation.

   A token is needed from the RS to calculate the router's ranking.  The
   low order 64 bits of the RS source address MUST be used as the RS
   token.

   A router's ranking is determined by taking the XOR of the RS token
   and each of the stored router tokens.  The results of these XOR
   operations are sorted lowest to highest, doing comparisons byte-by-
   byte starting with the least significant byte.  The router
   corresponding to the first entry in the sorted list is ranked zero,
   the second, one, and so on.

      Note: it is not necessary for a router to actually sort the whole
      list.  Each router just needs to determine its own position in the
      sorted list.

   If Rank < FastRAThreshold, then the RA MUST be scheduled for
   transmission in Rank * RASeparation milliseconds.  When the router is
   ranked as zero, the resulting delay is zero, thus the RA SHOULD be
   sent immediately.

   If Rank >= FastRAThreshold, then the RA MUST be replaced with a
   Complete RA, if it is not one already, and scheduled for multicast
   transmission as in RFC 2461.

5.1.8  Scheduling Unsolicited Router Advertisements

   Unsolicited router advertisements MUST be scheduled as per RFC 2461
   SHOULD be Complete RAs.  This recommendation is made to keep the
   multicast RA messages transmitted on the link looking the same,
   whether they are responses to solicitation that are unable to be
   unicast or the unsolicited RA messages transmitted based on RFC 2461.

5.2  DNA Host Operation

   Hosts collect information about the prefixes available on the link to
   which they are connected to facilitate change detection.

5.2.1  Data Structures

   Hosts MUST maintain a list of prefixes advertised on the link.  This
   is separate from the RFC 2461 "Prefix List" and will be referred to
   here as the "DNAPrefixList".  All prefixes SHOULD be stored, however
   an upper bound MUST be placed on the number stored to prevent
   overflow.  For each prefix stored the host MUST store the following



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   information:

   1.  Prefix

   2.  Prefix length

   3.  Valid lifetime

   4.  Time last refreshed

   If a host is not able to store this information for every prefix,
   there is a risk that the host will incorrectly decide that it has
   moved to a new link, when it receives advertisements from a non-DNA
   router.

   Prefix information entry MUST be removed from the DNAPrefixList when
   its valid lifetime expires or if the entry has not been refreshed in
   the last 1.5 hours.

   Hosts MUST also maintain a "Landmark Prefix" as described in
   Section 5.2.3.

5.2.2  Host Configuration Variables

   Hosts MUST make use of the following conceptual variables and they
   SHOULD be configurable:

   DNASameLinkDADFlag

      Boolean value indicating whether or not a host should re-run DAD
      when DNA indicates that link change has not occurred.

      Default: False


5.2.3  Selection of a Landmark Prefix

   For each interface, hosts MUST choose a prefix to use as a Landmark
   Prefix in Router Solicitations.  The following rules are used in
   selecting the landmark prefix:

      The prefix MUST have a non-zero valid lifetime.

      The prefix MUST be one the host is using for one of its non-link-
      local IPv6 addresses.

      The prefix SHOULD be chosen as the one with the longest preferred
      lifetime, but it is not necessary to switch to different prefix if



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      the preferred lifetime of the current landmark prefix changes.


5.2.4  Sending Router Solicitations

   Upon the occurrence of a Layer 2 link-up event notification, hosts
   SHOULD send a Router Solicitation.  Hosts SHOULD apply rate limiting
   and/or hysteresis to this behaviour as appropriate to the link
   technology subject to the reliability of the hints.

   Hosts SHOULD include a Landmark Option (LO) in the RS message with
   the landmark prefix chosen based on the rules in section
   Section 5.2.3.

   Hosts MUST include a tentative source link layer address option
   (TSLLAO) in the RS message [16].  The router solicitation message is
   sent to the All_Routers_Multicast address and the source address MUST
   be the link local address of the host.

   The host MUST consider its link local address to be in the
   "Optimistic" state for duplicate address detection [6] until either
   the returned RA confirms that the host has not switched to a new link
   or, if an link change has occurred, the host has performed optimistic
   duplicate address detection for the address.

5.2.5  Processing Router Advertisements

   When the host receives a Router Advertisement, the host checks for
   the conditions and derives the associated conclusions given below:

   If the received Router Advertisement message was sent unicast to the
   host:

      If the unicast Router Advertisement contains a Landmark Option
      that matches the Landmark Option in the last transmitted Router
      Solicitation, and the 'Y' bit is set in the received Landmark
      option, then that indicates that no link change has occurred and
      current configuration can be assumed to be still current.

      Instead if the 'N' bit is set in the received Landmark Option, a
      change of link is indicated and the host SHOULD initiate
      reconfiguration using the information in the Router Advertisement.

      Since the host received a unicast RA from the router, the host
      knows the router heard its RS, hence it SHOULD mark that router as
      REACHABLE from a Neighbor Unreachability Perspective.

   If a Router Advertisement is received with a multicast destination



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   address and the DNA flag is set, check if the received RA is a
   Complete RA by checking the Complete (C) bit in the RA message.

      If the RA is a Complete RA and the landmark prefix is not included
      in either a PIO or DNAO, then the host can conclude that it has
      changed link and SHOULD initiate re-configuration using the
      information in the received router advertisement.

      If the RA is a Complete RA and the the landmark prefix is included
      in either a PIO or DNAO, then the host can conclude that it has
      not changed link.

      If the received RA is not complete then the host SHOULD use CPL
      logic to decide whether or not to reconfigure as described in
      [14].

   If the DNA flag is not set then the host SHOULD use CPL logic to
   decide whether or not to reconfigure as described in [14].

   When initiating reconfiguration due to link change, the host MUST
   remove all prefixes in the DNAPrefixList and repopulate it with the
   prefixes in the Prefix Information Options in the RA.

5.2.6  DNA and Address Configuration

   When a host moves to a new point of attachment, a potential exists
   for a change in the validity of its unicast and multicast addresses
   on that network interface.  In this section, host processing for
   address configuration is specified.  The section considers both
   statelessly and statefully configured addresses.

5.2.6.1  Duplicate Address Detection

   A DNA host MUST support optimistic Duplicate Address Detection [6]
   for autoconfiguring unicast link local addresses.  If a DNA host uses
   address autoconfiguration [7] for global unicast addresses, the DNA
   host MUST support optimistic Duplicate Address Detection for
   autoconfiguring global unicast addresses.

5.2.6.2  DNA and the Address Autoconfiguration State Machine

   When a link level event occurs on a network interface indicating that
   the host has moved from one point of attachment to another, it is
   possible that a change in the reachability of the addresses
   associated with that interface may occur.  Upon detection of such a
   link event and prior to sending the RS initiating a DNA exchange, a
   DNA host MUST change the state of addresses associated with the
   interface in the following way (address state designations follow RFC



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   2461):

   o  Addresses in the "Preferred" state are moved to the "Optimistic"
      state, but the host defers sending out an NS to initiate Duplicate
      Address Detection.

   o  Addresses in the "Optimistic" state remain in the "Optimistic"
      state, but the host defers sending out an NS to initiate Duplicate
      Address Detection.

   o  Addresses in the "Deprecated" state remain in the "Deprecated"
      state.

   o  No addresses should be in the "Tentative" state, since this state
      is unnecessary for nodes that support optimistic Duplicate Address
      Detection.

   A host MUST keep track of which "Preferred" addresses are moved to
   the "Optimistic" state, so it is possible to know which addresses
   were in the "Preferred" state and which were in the "Optimistic"
   state prior to the change in point of attachment.

   In order to perform the DNA transaction, the DNA host SHOULD select
   one of the unicast link local addresses that was in the "Preferred"
   state prior to switching to "Optimistic" and utilize that as the
   source address on the DNA RS.  If the host had no "Preferred" unicast
   link local address but did have an address in the "Optimistic" state,
   it MUST utilize such an address as the source address.  If the host
   currently has no unicast link local addresses, it MUST construct one
   and put it into the "Optimistic" state and note this address as
   having been in the "Optimistic" state previously, but defer sending
   the NS to confirm.  Note that the presence of a duplicate unicast
   link local address on the link will not interfere with the ability of
   the link to route a unicast DNA RA from the router back to the host
   nor will it result in corruption of the router's neighbor cache,
   because the TSLLA option is included in the RS and is utilized by the
   router on the RA frame without changing the neighbor cache.

   When the host receives unicast or multicast RAs from the router, if
   the host determines from the received RAs that it has moved to a new
   link, the host MUST immediately move all unicast global addresses to
   the "Deprecated" state and configure new addresses using the subnet
   prefixes obtained from the RA.  For all unicast link local addresses,
   the host MUST initiate NS signaling for optimistic Duplicate Address
   Detection to confirm the uniqueness of the unicast link local
   addresses on the new link.

   If the host determines from the received RAs that it has not moved to



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   a new link (i.e. the link has not changed) and the previous state of
   an address was "Optimistic", then the host MUST send an NS to confirm
   that the address is unique on the link.  This is required because
   optimistic Duplicate Address Detection may not have completed on the
   previous point of attachment, so the host may not have confirmed
   address uniqueness.  If the previous state of an address was
   "Preferred", whether or not the host initiates optimistic Duplicate
   Address Detection depends on the configurable DNASameLinkDADFlag
   flag.  A host MUST forgo sending an NS to confirm uniqueness if the
   value of the DNASameLinkDAD flag is False.  If, however, the
   DNASameLinkDAD flag is True, the host MUST perform optimistic
   duplicate address detection on its unicast link local and unicast
   global addresses to determine address uniqueness.

5.2.6.3  DNA and Statefully Configured Addresses

   The DHCPv6 specification [8] requires hosts to send a DHCPv6 CONFIRM
   message when a change in point of attachment is detected.  Since the
   DNA protocol provides the same level of movement detection as the
   DHCPv6 CONFIRM, it is RECOMMENDED that DNA hosts not utilize the
   DHCPv6 CONFIRM message when a DNA RA is received, to avoid excessive
   signaling.  If, however, a non-DNA RA is received, the host SHOULD
   use the DHCPv6 CONFIRM message as described in RFC 3315 [8] rather
   than wait for additional RAs to perform CPL, since this will reduce
   the amount of time required for the host to confirm whether or not it
   has moved to a new link.  If the CONFIRM message validates the
   addresses, the host can continue to use them.

   When a DNA RA is received and the received RA indicates that the host
   has not moved to a new link, the host SHOULD apply the same rules to
   interpreting the 'M' flag in the received RA and any subsequently
   received RAs as in Section 5.5.3 of RFC 2461 [3].  That is, if an RA
   is received with the 'M' flag set, then the 'M' flag value is copied
   into the ManagedFlag, and if the ManagedFlag changes from False to
   True the host should run DHCPv6, but if the ManagedFlag changes from
   True to False, the host should continue to run DHCPv6.  If, however,
   the value of the ManagedFlag remains the same both before and after
   the change in point of attachment on the same link has been
   confirmed, it is NOT RECOMMENDED that the host run DHCPv6 to obtain
   new addresses, since the old addresses will continue to be valid.

   If the DNA RA indicates that the host has moved to a new link or the
   DHCPv6 CONFIRM indicates that the addresses are invalid, the host
   MUST move its old addresses to the "Deprecated" state and MUST run
   DHCPv6 to obtain new addresses.  Normally, the DHCPv6 operation is
   4-message exchange, however, this exchange allows for redundancy
   (multiple DHCPv6 servers) without wasting addresses, as addresses are
   only provisionally assigned to a host until the host chooses and



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   requests one of the provisionally assigned addresses.  If the DNA
   host supports the Rapid Commit Option [8], the host SHOULD use the
   Rapid Commit Option in order to shorten the exchange from 4 messages
   to 2 messages.

5.2.6.4  Packet Delivery During DNA

   The specification of packet delivery before, during, and immediately
   after DNA when a change in point of attachment occurs is out of scope
   for this document.  The details of how packets are delivered depends
   on the mobility management protocols (if any) available to the host's
   stack.

5.2.6.5  Multicast Address Configuration

   If the returning RAs indicate that the host has not moved to a new
   link, no further action is required for multicast addresses to which
   the host has subscribed using MLD Report [9].  In particular, the
   host MUST NOT perform MLD signaling for any multicast addresses
   unless such signaling was not performed prior to movement to the new
   point of attachment.  For example, if an address is put into the
   "Optimistic" state prior to movement but the MLD Report for the
   Solicited_Node_Multicast_Address is not sent prior to movement to a
   new point of attachment, the host MUST send the MLD Report on the new
   point of attachment prior to performing optimistic Duplicate Address
   Detection.  The host SHOULD use the procedure described below for
   sending an MLD Report.

   If, on the other hand, the DNA RA indicates that the host has moved
   to a new link, the host MUST issue a new MLD Report to the router for
   subscribed multicast addresses.  MLD signaling for the
   Solicited_Node_Multicast_Addresses [7] MUST be sent prior to
   performing signaling for optimistic DAD.

   To avoid lengthy delays in address reconfiguration, it is RECOMMENDED
   that the host send the MLD Report for newly configured addresses
   immediately, as soon as the addresses have been constructed, rather
   than waiting for a random backoff.

   Hosts MUST defer MLD signaling until after the results of DNA have
   confirmed whether or not a link change has occurred.

6.  Backward Compatibility

6.1  Non DNA Host with DNA Routers

   The RS message sent by non-DNA hosts will not contain any of the new
   options defined by this document.  The host will receive a Complete



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   RA in response to the solicitation message and process it as per RFC
   2461.  This means that it will drop the unrecognised DNA option, but
   process the included PIOs and non-DNA flags normally.

6.2  DNA Host with Non-DNA Routers

   The routers will behave based in the recommendations of RFC 2461 [3]
   and ignore the new options defined in this memo.  Hosts will receive
   RA message without the DNA bit in the RA header set and will fallback
   on CPL for link identification.  Obviously, the objective of
   receiving fast response for RS message can not be achieved.

7.  Security Considerations

   The two security threats discussed in Section 7.1 and Section 7.2 are
   part of the discussion catalogued as Issue 14 in Section 9.

7.1  Amplification Effect

   With N routers on a link, each RS message sent on the link will have
   N RA responses sent on the link within (N-1) * RASeparation time.
   The rate control mechanism specified by this memo only controls the
   rate of RA messages generated by each of the routers.  But, since
   there is no theoretical restriction on the number of routers on the
   link, this amplification can deteriorate the performance of the nodes
   on the link.  The routers could mitigate this effect by aggregating
   multiple RA messages into a single multicast RA message.  When a RS
   message is received, except for the router chosen to respond first,
   all the other routers have a delay introduced before they respond to
   the RS message.  Also, when the token bucket is empty (see
   Section 7.2), the routers will have to wait for a token to be
   generated before responding.  If multiple RS messages are received
   during this wait time, the routers MAY choose to aggregate the
   responses to a single multicast RA message.  Aggregation can be done
   by creating a Complete RA message as specified by Section 5.1.6.
   But, since MIN_DELAY_BETWEEN_RAS restriction for multicast RA
   messages is inherited by this document, such aggregations are only
   possible every MIN_DELAY_BETWEEN_RAS (3 seconds).

7.2  Attacks on the Token Bucket

   A host on the link could easily drain the token bucket(s) of the
   router(s) on the link by continuously sending RS messages on the
   link.  For example, if a host sends one RS message every
   UnicastRAInterval, and send a additional RS every third
   UnicastRAInterval, the token bucket in the router(s) on the link will
   drain within MaxUnicastRABurst * UnicastRAInterval * 3 time-units.
   For the recommended values of UnicastRAInterval and



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   MaxUnicastRABurst, this value is 3000 milliseconds.  It is not clear
   whether arrival of such RS messages can be recognized by the router
   as a DoS attack.  This attack can also be mitigated by aggregating
   responses.  Since only one aggregation is possible in this interval
   due to MIN_DELAY_BETWEEN_RAS restriction, the routers may not be able
   protect the tokens in the bucket.

7.3  Attacks on DNA Hosts

   RFC 3756 outlines a collection of threats involving rouge routers.
   Since DNAv6 requires a host to obtain trustworthy responses from
   routers, such threats are relevant to DNAv6.  In order to counter
   such threats, DNAv6 hosts SHOULD deploy RFC 3971 (SEND) secure router
   discovery.

8.  IANA Considerations

   This memo defines two new Neighbor Discovery [3] options, which must
   be assigned Option Type values within the option numbering space for
   Neighbor Discovery messages:

   1.  The Landmark option, described in Section 4.2; and

   2.  The DNA option, described in Section 4.3.


9.  Open Issues

   A list of open issues in the proposed design has been identified and
   catalogued at:
   http://ctieware.eng.monash.edu.au/twiki/bin/view/DNA/DNASolution1.
   The following is a sample of the open issues, please refer to the
   above link for details.

   Issue 006: Congestion control in hosts

      The draft currently does not discuss congestion control in hosts
      and thus if there is no response to an RS, a host will follow RFC
      2461 and send MAX_RTR_SOLICITATIONS separated by
      RTR_SOLICITATION_INTERVAL (default 3 RSs at 4 sec. intervals).
      Should we specify some kind of exponential backoff to improve
      response performance for DNAv6 routers or should we try to
      maintain compatibility with RFC 2461?

   Issue 009: LNOLO vs matched prefix






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      If there is a landmark option with 'N' bit set in an RA, and *in
      the same RA* there is PIO that matches another prefix that the
      host believes is on the current link, what should the host
      conclude?

   Issue 010: Host response to inconsistent information

      What does the host do if it receives multiple RAs that have
      conflicting information?

   Issue 012: Network renumbering - guidelines for deployment

      What does the draft need to say about network renumbering?
      Recommendations about not flash renumbering?  Explanation of
      effects of flash renumbering?

   Issue 013:  Lifetime of learned prefixes and routers

      Since the maximum possible values for lifetimes of routers and
      prefixes could be very high, should we put an upper limit on how
      long learned prefixes and routers information can be stored by
      routers?


10.  Acknowledgments

   The design presented in this document was generated by discussions
   among the members of the DNA design team (JinHyeock Choi, Tero
   Kauppinen, James Kempf, Sathya Narayanan, Erik Nordmark and Brett
   Pentland).  The spirited debates on the design, advantages and dis-
   advantages of various DNA solutions helped creation of this document.
   Thanks to Greg Daley and Subba Reddy for their review of this
   document, and thanks also to other members of the DNA working group
   for their helpful comments.

11.  References

11.1  Normative References

   [1]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement
        Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [2]  Deering, S. and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol, Version 6 (IPv6)
        Specification", RFC 2460, December 1998.

   [3]  Narten, T., Nordmark, E., and W. Simpson, "Neighbor Discovery
        for IP Version 6 (IPv6)", RFC 2461, December 1998.




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   [4]  Johnson, D., Perkins, C., and J. Arkko, "Mobility Support in
        IPv6", RFC 3775, June 2004.

   [5]  Arkko, J., Kempf, J., Sommerfeld, B., Zill, B., and P. Nikander,
        "SEcure Neighbor Discovery (SEND)", draft-ietf-send-ndopt-06
        (work in progress), July 2004.

   [6]  Moore, N., "Optimistic Duplicate Address Detection for IPv6",
        draft-ietf-ipv6-optimistic-dad-05 (work in progress),
        February 2005.

11.2  Informative References

   [7]   Thomson, S. and T. Narten, "IPv6 Stateless Address
         Autoconfiguration", RFC2462 2462, December 1998.

   [8]   Droms, R., Bound, J., Volz, B., Lemon, T., Perkins, C., and M.
         Carney, "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv6
         (DHCPv6)", RFC 3315, July 2003.

   [9]   Vida, R. and L. Costa, "Multicast Listener Discovery Version 2
         (MLDv2) for IPv6", RFC 3810, June 2004.

   [10]  Choi, J., "Detecting Network Attachment in IPv6 Goals",
         draft-ietf-dna-goals-04 (work in progress), December 2004.

   [11]  Narayanan, S., Daley, G., and N. Montavont, "Detecting Network
         Attachment in IPv6 - Best Current Practices",
         draft-narayanan-dna-bcp-00 (work in progress), June 2004.

   [12]  Yamamoto, S., "Detecting Network Attachment Terminology",
         draft-yamamoto-dna-term-00 (work in progress), February 2004.

   [13]  Manner, J. and M. Kojo, "Mobility Related Terminology",
         draft-ietf-seamoby-mobility-terminology-06 (work in progress),
         February 2004.

   [14]  Choi, J. and E. Nordmark, "DNA with unmodified routers: Prefix
         list based approach", draft-ietf-dna-cpl-00 (work in progress),
         April 2005.

   [15]  Pentland, B., "An Overview of Approaches to Detecting Network
         Attachment in IPv6", draft-dnadt-dna-discussion-00 (work in
         progress), February 2005.

   [16]  Daley, G., "Tentative Source Link-Layer Address Options for
         IPv6 Neighbour Discovery", draft-daley-ipv6-tsllao-00 (work in
         progress), June 2004.



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Authors' Addresses

   James Kempf
   DoCoMo Communications Labs USA
   USA

   Phone:
   Email: kempf@docomolabs-usa.com


   Sathya Narayanan
   Panasonic Digital Networking Lab
   Two Research Way, 3rd Floor
   Princeton, NJ  08536
   USA

   Phone: 609 734 7599
   Email: sathya@Research.Panasonic.COM
   URI:


   Erik Nordmark
   Sun Microsystems, Inc.
   17 Network Circle
   Mountain View, CA
   USA

   Phone: +1 650 786 2921
   Email: erik.nordmark@sun.com


   Brett Pentland (editor)
   Centre for Telecommunications and Information Engineering
   Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering
   Monash University
   Clayton, Victoria  3800
   Australia

   Phone: +61 3 9905 5245
   Email: brett.pentland@eng.monash.edu.au

Appendix A.  How the Goals are Met?

   The DNA goals document [10] contains a list of goals identified by G1
   to G10.  This is also enumerated in the solutions discussion document
   [15] generated by the DNA design team.  This section discusses how
   the proposed scheme addresses each of these goals.




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   G1 The answer to the landmark question confirms whether link change
      has occurred and if it has the RA contains sufficient information
      for the host to commence re-configuration.  If a multicast RA is
      used it contains a complete list of prefixes advertised on the
      link allowing the host to determine whether link change has
      occurred and to re-configure if necessary.

   G2 Under normal circumstances the host will receive a RA response
      within round-trip time and some processing time on the router.  If
      the first RA message is lost, if another router is on the link, a
      second RA should arrive within a slot time and so on.

   G3 Non movement scenarios will be correctly identified because the
      landmark will be confirmed by the router(s) on the link.

   G4 A single RS/RA message exchange is initiated in response to a hint
      that link change may have occurred.

   G5 The existing RS/RA signalling is used along with unsolicited RA
      messages.  Some new options and flags are proposed.

   G6 Only link scope signaling is used.

   G7 SEND can be used to protect the RS and RA messages exchanged.

   G8 If SEND is not deployed, then a rogue device could cause a host to
      think its configuration is invalid by sending an RA that answers
      the RS question incorrectly.  A similar effect is already
      possible, however, by a rogue device sending an RA with valid
      prefixes with zero lifetimes.

   G9 The CPL logic allows a graceful fallback position for dealing with
      non-DNA routers and non DNA hosts will still receive the benefit
      of receiving an RA response from its current router faster than
      RFC 2461.

   G10 This technique is carried out on an interface by interface basis.
      A host with multiple interfaces can get information about changes
      to configuration on each interface, but would need a higher level
      process to decide how the information from the various interfaces
      relates to each other.










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Internet-Draft                    DNAv6                        July 2005


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