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ECRIT                                                           B. Rosen
Internet-Draft                                             NeuStar, Inc.
Intended status: Standards Track                          H. Schulzrinne
Expires: January 14, 2010                                    Columbia U.
                                                           H. Tschofenig
                                                  Nokia Siemens Networks
                                                           July 13, 2009


 A Uniform Resource Name (URN) for Early Warning Emergency Services and
         Location-to-Service Translation (LoST) Protocol Usage
              draft-rosen-ecrit-lost-early-warning-01.txt

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 14, 2010.

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   Copyright (c) 2009 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
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Abstract

   The Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) is an XML document format for
   exchanging emergency alerts and public warnings.  Different
   organizations issue alerts for specific geographic regions.  The
   Location-to-Service Translation (LoST) protocol provides a way to
   discover servers that distribute these alerts for a geographical
   region.  This document defines the Service Uniform Resource Names
   (URN)s for warnings in the same way as they have been defined with
   RFC 5031 for citizen-to-authority emergency services.  Additionally,
   this document suggests to use LoST for the discovery of servers
   distributing alerts.


Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   3.  Protocol Semantics  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   4.  Examples  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
     6.1.  Sub-Services for the 'warning' Service  . . . . . . . . . . 7
     6.2.  Initial IANA Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
   7.  Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
   8.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
     8.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
     8.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9






















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1.  Introduction

   The Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) is an XML document format for
   exchanging emergency alerts and public warnings.  Different
   organizations issue alerts for specific geographical regions.  The
   Location-to-Service Translation (LoST) protocol provides a way to
   discover servers that distribute these alerts for a geographical
   region.  This document defines the Service Uniform Resource Names
   (URN)s for warnings in the same way as they have been defined with
   RFC 5031 for citizen-to-authority emergency services.  Additionally,
   this document suggests to use LoST for the discovery of servers
   distributing alerts.


2.  Terminology

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].


3.  Protocol Semantics

   This document makes use of LoST, RFC 5222 [RFC5222].  However,
   instead of performing a translation from location information and a
   Service URN to a PSAP URI (plus supplementary information), as used
   with [I-D.ietf-ecrit-phonebcp] for the citizen-to-authority emergency
   services use case, the LoST client asks the LoST server for a URI to
   receive further information on how to obtain warning alerts.  In a
   response the URIs in the <uri> element MUST be from the following
   format: sip, xmpp or http.  The SIP URI MUST subsequently be used
   with [I-D.rosen-sipping-cap].  An XMPP URI MUST be used as described
   in [XEP-0127].  An HTTP URI MUST be used with GeoRSS ([Reference to
   be added.]).

   In a LoST response the optional <serviceNumber> element is not used
   by this specification.  In mapping citizen-to-authority services,
   receiving multiple mappings is an exception.  However, since many
   organizations may provide warnings for the same area, this is likely
   to be more common for alerts.  As such, the extensions defined in
   [I-D.forte-ecrit-lost-extensions] (e.g., the ability to limit the
   number of returned mappings) are useful in this context.


4.  Examples

   Figure 1 shows a regular LoST query including geodetic location
   information with the Service URN pointing to 'urn:service:warning'.



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   The semantic of the query is: "I am at location (point,"37.775
   -122.422").  Please give me a URI where I can obtain information for
   warnings under the category 'urn:service:warning'.


      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
      <findService
        xmlns="urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:lost1"
        xmlns:p2="http://www.opengis.net/gml"
        serviceBoundary="value"
        recursive="true">

        <location id="6020688f1ce1896d" profile="geodetic-2d">
          <p2:Point id="point1" srsName="urn:ogc:def:crs:EPSG::4326">
             <p2:pos>37.775 -122.422</p2:pos>
          </p2:Point>
        </location>
        <service>urn:service:warning</service>

      </findService>

                 Figure 1: A <findService> geodetic query

   In response to the query in Figure 1 the LoST server returns a
   regular LoST response, as shown in Figure 2.  The returned mapping
   information indicates that the URIs (sip:alerts@example.com and
   xmpp:alerts@example.com) can be contacted to subscribe to warning
   events.  The service boundary indicates that subsequent requests to
   the same service will lead to the same response for the geodetic
   region indicated by the polygon in the <serviceBoundary> element.





















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      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
      <findServiceResponse xmlns="urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:lost1"
        xmlns:p2="http://www.opengis.net/gml">
        <mapping
          expires="2007-01-01T01:44:33Z"
          lastUpdated="2006-11-01T01:00:00Z"
          source="authoritative.example"
          sourceId="7e3f40b098c711dbb6060800200c9a66">
          <displayName xml:lang="en">
            Austrian Early Warning Center
          </displayName>
          <service>urn:service:warning</service>
          <serviceBoundary profile="geodetic-2d">
            <p2:Polygon srsName="urn:ogc:def::crs:EPSG::4326">
              <p2:exterior>
                <p2:LinearRing>
                  <p2:pos>37.775 -122.4194</p2:pos>
                  <p2:pos>37.555 -122.4194</p2:pos>
                  <p2:pos>37.555 -122.4264</p2:pos>
                  <p2:pos>37.775 -122.4264</p2:pos>
                  <p2:pos>37.775 -122.4194</p2:pos>
                </p2:LinearRing>
              </p2:exterior>
            </p2:Polygon>
          </serviceBoundary>
          <uri>sip:alerts@example.com</uri>
          <uri>xmpp:alerts@example.com</uri>
        </mapping>
        <path>
          <via source="resolver.example"/>
          <via source="authoritative.example"/>
        </path>
        <locationUsed id="6020688f1ce1896d"/>
      </findServiceResponse>

             Figure 2: A <findServiceResponse> geodetic answer

   Figure 3 shows a <ListServicesByLocation> query asking for the
   services that are available at a given location; in this example at a
   point (-34.407 150.883).











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      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
      <listServicesByLocation
        xmlns="urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:lost1"
        xmlns:p2="http://www.opengis.net/gml"
        recursive="true">
        <location id="3e19dfb3b9828c3" profile="geodetic-2d">
          <p2:Point srsName="urn:ogc:def:crs:EPSG::4326">
            <p2:pos>-34.407 150.883</p2:pos>
          </p2:Point>
        </location>
        <service>urn:service:warning</service>
      </listServicesByLocation>

            Figure 3: Example of <ListServicesByLocation> query

   Figure 4 lists a possible response to the <ListServicesByLocation>
   query with 6 subservices being offered for the indicated geographical
   region.


      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
      <listServicesByLocationResponse
       xmlns="urn:ietf:params:xml:ns:lost1">
       <serviceList>
        urn:service:warning.geo
        urn:service:warning.met
        urn:service:warning.safety
        urn:service:warning.security
        urn:service:warning.rescue
        urn:service:warning.fire
       </serviceList>
       <path>
        <via source="resolver.example"/>
        <via source="authoritative.example"/>
       </path>
       <locationUsed id="3e19dfb3b9828c3"/>
      </listServicesByLocationResponse>

           Figure 4: Example of <listServicesByLocationResponse>


5.  Security Considerations

   The security considerations of RFC 5031 [RFC5031], RFC 5222 [RFC5222]
   and [I-D.rosen-sipping-cap] are relevant to this document.  This
   document does not introduce new security vulnerabilities.





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6.  IANA Considerations

6.1.  Sub-Services for the 'warning' Service

   This section defines the service registration within the IANA
   registry defined in Section 4.1 of [RFC5031], using the top-level
   service label 'warning'.

   The 'warning' service type describes services providing public safety
   alerts, i.e., alerts that can warn members of the public about
   dangers to life, health and property.  Additional sub-services can be
   added after expert review and must be of general public interest and
   have a similar emergency nature.  The expert is designated by the
   ECRIT working group, its successor, or, in their absence, the IESG.
   The expert review should only approve early warning based emergency
   services that are offered widely and in different countries, with
   approximately the same caller expectation in terms of services
   rendered.  The 'warning' service is not meant to be used by non-
   emergency services related information.

   The warning classification (including description) in the list below
   is taken from the CAP specification [cap]:

   'urn:service:warning':  The generic 'warning' service denotes a
      generic early warning message of any type encompassing all of the
      services listed below.

   'urn:service:warning:geo':  Geophysical (inc. landslide)

   'urn:service:warning:met':  Meteorological (inc. flood)

   'urn:service:warning:safety':  General emergency and public safety

   'urn:service:warning:security':  Law enforcement, military, homeland
      and local/private security

   'urn:service:warning:rescue':  Rescue and recovery

   'urn:service:warning:fire':  Fire suppression and rescue

   'urn:service:warning:health':  Medical and public health

   'urn:service:warning:env':  Pollution and other environmental








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   'urn:service:warning:transport':  Public and private transportation

   'urn:service:warning:infra':  Utility, telecommunication, other non-
      transport infrastructure

   'urn:service:warning:cbrne':  Chemical, Biological, Radiological,
      Nuclear or High-Yield Explosive threat or attack

6.2.  Initial IANA Registration

   The following table contains the initial IANA registration for early
   warning services.



Service                   Reference  Description
------------------------------------------------------------------------
warning                   RFC TBD    Early Warning Services
warning.geo               RFC TBD    Geophysical (inc. landslide)
warning.met               RFC TBD    Meteorological (inc. flood)
warning.safety            RFC TBD    General emergency and public safety
warning.security          RFC TBD    Law enforcement, military,
                                     homeland and local/private security
warning.rescue            RFC TBD    Rescue and recovery
warning.fire              RFC TBD    Fire suppression and rescue
warning.health            RFC TBD    Medical and public health
warning.env               RFC TBD    Pollution and other environmental
warning.transport         RFC TBD    Public and private transportation
warning.infra             RFC TBD    Utility, telecommunication, other
                                     non-transport infrastructure
warning.cbrne             RFC TBD    Chemical, Biological,
                                     Radiological, Nuclear or High-Yield
                                     Explosive threat or attack


7.  Acknowledgments

   We would also like to thank the participants of the Early Warning
   Adhoc meeting at IETF#69.


8.  References

8.1.  Normative References

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", March 1997.




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   [cap]      Jones, E. and A. Botterell, "Common Alerting Protocol v.
              1.1", October 2005.

   [RFC5222]  Hardie, T., Newton, A., Schulzrinne, H., and H.
              Tschofenig, "LoST: A Location-to-Service Translation
              Protocol", RFC 5222, August 2008.

   [I-D.rosen-sipping-cap]
              Rosen, B., Schulzrinne, H., and H. Tschofenig, "Session
              Initiation Protocol (SIP) Event Package for the Common
              Alerting  Protocol (CAP)", draft-rosen-sipping-cap-03
              (work in progress), March 2009.

   [RFC5031]  Schulzrinne, H., "A Uniform Resource Name (URN) for
              Emergency and Other Well-Known Services", RFC 5031,
              January 2008.

8.2.  Informative References

   [XEP-0127]
              Saint-Andre, P. and B. Fletcher, "Common Alerting Protocol
              (CAP) Over XMPP", XSF XEP 0127, December 2004.

   [I-D.forte-ecrit-lost-extensions]
              Forte, A. and H. Schulzrinne, "Location-to-Service
              Translation Protocol (LoST) Extensions",
              draft-forte-ecrit-lost-extensions-02 (work in progress),
              March 2009.

   [I-D.ietf-ecrit-phonebcp]
              Rosen, B. and J. Polk, "Best Current Practice for
              Communications Services in support of Emergency  Calling",
              draft-ietf-ecrit-phonebcp-12 (work in progress),
              July 2009.


Authors' Addresses

   Brian Rosen
   NeuStar, Inc.
   470 Conrad Dr
   Mars, PA  16046
   US

   Phone:
   Email: br@brianrosen.net





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   Henning Schulzrinne
   Columbia University
   Department of Computer Science
   450 Computer Science Building
   New York, NY  10027
   US

   Phone: +1 212 939 7004
   Email: hgs+ecrit@cs.columbia.edu
   URI:   http://www.cs.columbia.edu


   Hannes Tschofenig
   Nokia Siemens Networks
   Linnoitustie 6
   Espoo  02600
   Finland

   Phone: +358 (50) 4871445
   Email: Hannes.Tschofenig@gmx.net
   URI:   http://www.tschofenig.priv.at






























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