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Versions: 00 01

6Lo Working Group                                              MS. Akbar
Internet-Draft                                    Bournemouth University
Intended status: Informational                                 AR. Sangi
Expires: May 3, 2018                     Huaiyin Institute of Technology
                                                                M. Zhang
                                                                  J. Hou
                                                     Huawei Technologies
                                                              C. Perkins
                                                               Futurewei
                                                             A. Petrescu
                                                               CEA, LIST
                                                              R.N.B.Rais
                                                        Ajman University
                                                        October 30, 2017


 Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs)
                        draft-sajjad-6lo-wban-01

Abstract

   Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs) intend to facilitate use cases
   related to medical field.  IEEE 802.15.6 defines PHY and MAC layer
   and is designed to deal with better penetration through the human
   tissue without creating any damage to human tissues with the approved
   MICS (Medical Implant Communication Service) band by USA Federal
   Communications Commission (FCC).  Devices of WBANs conform to this
   IEEE standard.

   This specification defines details to enable transmission of IPv6
   packets, method of forming link-local and statelessly autoconfigured
   IPv6 addresses on WBANs.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."




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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 3, 2018.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Frame Format and Addressing Modes . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.2.  Why 6lo is required for IEEE 802.15.6 . . . . . . . . . .   4
   2.  Conventions and Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   3.  Topology and Scope of Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   4.  Protocol Stack  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   6.  Specification of IPv6 over WBAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     6.1.  Stateless Address Autoconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     6.2.  IPv6 Link-Local Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     6.3.  Unicast and Multicast Address Mapping . . . . . . . . . .   8
     6.4.  Header Compression  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     6.5.  Fragmentation and Reassembly  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   8.  Security and Privacy Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   Appendix A.  Patient monitoring use case - Spoke Hub  . . . . . .  10
   Appendix B.  Patient monitoring use case - Connected  . . . . . .  12
   Appendix C.  Changes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13

1.  Introduction

   Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs) are comprised of devices that
   conform to the [IEEE802.15.6], standard by the IEEE.  IEEE 802.15.6
   provides specification for the MAC layer to access the channel.  The
   coordinator divides the channel into superframe time structures to



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   allocate resources [SURVEY-WBAN] [MAC-WBAN].  Superframes are bounded
   by equal length beacons through the coordinator.  Usually beacons are
   sent at beacon periods except inactive superframes or limited by
   regulation.

   Task group for 802.15.6 was established by IEEE in November 2007 for
   standardisation of WBANs and it was approved in 2012.  This standard
   works in and around human body and focus on operating at lower
   frequencies and short range.  The focus of this document is to design
   a communication standard for MAC and physical layer to support
   different applications, namely, medical and no-medical applications.
   Medical applications refer to collection of vital information in real
   time (monitoring) for diagnoses and treatment of various diseases
   with help of different sensors (accelerometer, temperature, BP and
   EMG etc.).  It defines a MAC layer that can operate with three
   different PHY layers i.e. human body communication (HBC), ultra-
   wideband (UWB) and Narrowband (NB).  IEEE 802.15.6 provides
   specification for MAC layer to access the channel.  The coordinator
   divides the channel into superframe time structures to allocate
   resources.  Superframes are bounded by equal length beacons through
   coordinator.  The purpose of the draft is to highlight the need of
   IEEE 802.15.6 for WBASNs and its integration issues while connecting
   it with IPv6 network.  The use cases are provided to elaborate the
   scenarios with implantable and wearable biomedical sensors. 6lowpan
   provides IPv6 connectivity for IEEE 802.15.4; however, it does not
   work with IEEE 802.15.6 due to the difference in frame format in
   terms of size and composition.

1.1.  Frame Format and Addressing Modes

   Figure 1 shows the general MAC frame format consisting of a 56-bit
   header, variable length frame body, and 18-bit FrameCheck Sequence
   (FCS).  The maximum length of the frame body is 255 octets.  The MAC
   header further consists of 32-bit frame control, 8-bit recipient
   Identification (ID), 8-bit sender ID, and 8-bit WBAN ID fields.  The
   frame control field carries control information including the type of
   frame, that is, beacon, acknowledgement, or other control frames.
   The recipient and sender ID fields contain the address information of
   the recipient and the sender of the data frame, respectively.  The
   WBAN ID contains information on the WBAN in which the transmission is
   active.  The first 8-bit field in the MAC frame body carries message
   freshness information required for nonce construction and replay
   detection.  The frame payload field carries data frames, and the last
   32-bit Message Integrity Code (MIC) carries information about the
   authenticity and integrity of the frame.  The IEEE 802.15.6 standard
   supports two kinds of addresses:





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   1.  8-bit short address, which is the sender ID.  This address is
       located in the MAC header used for communication.

   2.  48-bit EUI-48 address, which is used for the association process.
       For some certain frame types, e.g.  Security Association frames,
       this MAC address exists inside the MAC payload, for the node
       joining process.

                       Octets      7          0-255            2
                              +--------+------------------+--------+
                              |  MAC   |  MAC frame body  |        |
                              | header |Variable length:  |   FCS  |
                              |        |  0-255 bytes     |        |
                              +--------+------------------+--------+
                              <--MHR--><--------X--------><---FTR-->
                               /       \
                              /         \
                             /           \
            +---------+------------+-------------+--------------+
            |  Frame  | Recipient  |   Sender    |      Ban     |
            | control |     ID     |     ID      |       ID     |
            +---------+------------+-------------+--------------+
     Octets <---4----><-----1-----><------1-----><-------1------>

          Figure 1: The general MAC frame format of IEEE 802.15.6

1.2.  Why 6lo is required for IEEE 802.15.6

   Based on the characteristics defined in the overview section, the
   following sections elaborate on the main problems with IP for WBANs.

   The requirement for IPv6 connectivity within WBANs is driven by the
   following:

   o  The number of devices in WBANs makes network auto configuration
      and statelessness highly desirable.  And for this, IPv6 has
      (default auto-configuration as a) ready solutions.

   o  The large number of devices poses the need for a large address
      space, moreover a WBAN may consist of 256 nodes maximum and IPv6
      is helpful to solve this address space limitation.

   o  Given the limited packet size of WBANs, the IPv6 address format
      allows subsuming of IEEE 802.15.6 addresses if so desired.
      Applications within WBANs are expected to originate small packets.
      Adding all layers for IP connectivity should still allow
      transmission in one frame, without incurring excessive
      fragmentation and reassembly.  Furthermore, protocols must be



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      designed or chosen so that the individual "control/protocol
      packets" fit within a single 802.15.6 frame.  Along these lines,
      IPv6's requirement of sub-IP reassembly may pose challenges for
      low-end WBANs healthcare devices that do not have enough RAM or
      storage for a 1280-octet packet [RFC2460].

   o  Simple interconnectivity to other IP networks including the
      Internet.

   o  However, given the limited packet size, headers for IPv6 and
      layers above must be compressed whenever possible.

2.  Conventions and Terminology

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].

3.  Topology and Scope of Communication

   This is a standard for short-range, wireless communication in the
   vicinity of, or inside, a human body (but not limited to humans).  It
   uses existing industrial scientific medical (ISM) bands as well as
   frequency bands approved by national medical and/or regulatory
   authorities.  Support for quality of service (QoS), extremely low
   power, and data rates from 10Kbps to 10 Mbps is required while
   simultaneously complying with strict non-interference guidelines
   where needed.  The Table 1 shows a comparison of WBAN and other
   available technologies in terms of data rate and power consumption.






















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   +----------------+---------------+-----------------+----------------+
   |    Standard    | Provided data |      Power      |    Battery     |
   |                |      rate     |   requirement   |    lifetime    |
   +----------------+---------------+-----------------+----------------+
   |   802.11 ac    |    700 Mbps   |  100 mW - 1000  |  Hours - days  |
   |     (WiFi)     |               |        mW       |                |
   |                |               |                 |                |
   |   Bluetooth    |   1Mbps - 10  |  4 mW - 100 mW  |  Days - weeks  |
   |                |      Mbps     |                 |                |
   |                |               |                 |                |
   |     Wibree     |    600 Kbps   |   2 mW - 10 mW  | Weeks - months |
   |                |    maximum    |                 |                |
   |                |               |                 |                |
   |     ZigBee     |    250 Kbps   |   3 mW - 10 mW  | Weeks - months |
   |                |               |                 |                |
   |    802.15.4    |    250 Kbps   |   3 mW - 10 mW  | Weeks - months |
   |                |    maximum    |                 |                |
   |                |               |                 |                |
   |    802.15.6    |   1Kbps - 10  |  0.1 mW - 2 mW  | Months - years |
   |                |      Mbps     |                 |                |
   +----------------+---------------+-----------------+----------------+

                        Table 1: Comparison of WBAN

   Data rates, typically up to 10Mbps, can be offered to satisfy an
   evolutionary set of entertainment and healthcare services.  Current
   personal area networks (PANs) do not meet the medical (proximity to
   human tissue) and relevant communication regulations for some
   application environments.  They also do not support the combination
   of reliability, QoS, low power, data rate, and non-interference
   required to broadly address the breadth of body area network (BAN)
   applications.

   The IEEE 802.15.6 working group has considered WBANs to operate in
   either a one-hop or two-hop star topology with the node in the centre
   of the star being placed on a location like the waist.  Two feasible
   types of data transmission exist in the one-hop star topology:
   transmission from the device to the coordinator and transmission from
   the coordinator to the device.  The communication methods that exist
   in the star topology are beacon mode and non-beacon mode.  In a two-
   hop start WBAN, a relay-capable node may be used to exchange data
   frames between a node and the hub.

4.  Protocol Stack

   The IPv6 over IEEE 802.15.6 protocol stack is presented in Figure 2.
   It contains six elements from bottom to top including IEEE 802.15.6
   PHY layer, IEEE 802.15.6 MAC layer, Adaptation layer for IPv6 over



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   IEEE 802.15.6, IPv6 layer, TCP/UDP layer and Application layer.The
   adaptation layer supports the mechanisms like stateless address auto-
   configuration, header compression and fragmentation and reassembly.

                    +----------------------------------------+
                    |           Application Layer            |
                    +----------------------------------------+
                    |                TCP/UDP                 |
                    +----------------------------------------+
                    |                                        |
                    |                  IPv6                  |
                    |                                        |
                    +----------------------------------------+
                    | Adaptation layer for IPv6 over 802.15.6|
                    +----------------------------------------+
                    |                 MAC Layer              |
                    |             (IEEE 802.15.6)            |
                    +----------------------------------------+
                    |                 PHY Layer              |
                    |             (IEEE 802.15.6)            |
                    +----------------------------------------+

           Figure 2: Protocol stack for IPv6 over IEEE 802.15.4

5.  Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU)

   The IPv6 packets have the MTU of 1280 octects and its expects from
   every link layer to send data by following this MTU or greater.  Thus
   maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) of MAC layer describes the
   implementation of fragmentation and reassembly mechanism for the
   adaption IPv6 layer over IEEE 802.15.6.

   The IEEE 802.15.6 has the MTU of 256 octects, if we consider link
   layer security overhead (16 octects for AES-128) leaves 240 octects
   which is not sufficient to complete a IPv6 packet.Therefore, an
   adaption layer below IP layer is required to manage fragmentation and
   reassembly issues.

6.  Specification of IPv6 over WBAN

   Due to stringent QoS requirements in WBAN, a 6lo adaption layer is
   needed to support the transmission of IPv6 packets.6 LoWPAN standards
   [RFC4944], [RFC6775] and [RFC6282] provides useful information
   including link-local IPv6 address,stateless address auto-
   configuration, unicast and multicast address mapping,header
   compression and fragmentation and reassembly.  These standards are
   reffered in the specifications of 6lo adaptation layer which is
   illustrated in the following following subsections:



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6.1.  Stateless Address Autoconfiguration

   An IEEE 802.15.6 device performs stateless address autoconfiguration
   to obtain an IPv6 Iterface Identifier(IID).  The IPv6 EUI-64 format
   address is obtained through the EUI-48 bit MAC address of IEEE
   802.15.6 node.The 64-bit IID SHALL be derived by utilizing 8-bit node
   address and 8-bit BAN ID (part of MAC header) as follows:

   ID: 0xYY00:00FF:FE00:00XX

   Where YY is the BAN ID, XX is the node address.  As this generated
   IID is not golbally unique, the "Universal/Local" (U/L) bit (7th bit)
   SHALL be set to zero.

6.2.  IPv6 Link-Local Address

   The IPv6 link-local address [RFC4291] for an IEEE 802.15.6 interface
   is generated by appending the interface identifier to the prefix
   FE80::/64.

     10 bits           54 bits                   64 bits
       +----------+-----------------------+----------------------------+
       |1111111010|        (zeros)        |    Interface Identifier    |
       +----------+-----------------------+----------------------------+

            Figure 3: IPv6 Link Local Address in IEEE 802.15.6

6.3.  Unicast and Multicast Address Mapping

   The address resolution procedure for mapping IPv6 unicast addresses
   into IEEE 802.15.6 link-layer addresses follows the general
   description in section 7.2 of [RFC4861], unless otherwise specified.
   Multicast address mapping is not supported in IEEE 802.15.6.

6.4.  Header Compression

   The IEEE 802.15.6 PHY layer supports a maximum PSDU (PHY Service Data
   Unit) of 256 octets.  Because of the limited PHY payload, header
   compression at 6lo adaptation layer is of great importance and MUST
   be applied.  The compression of IPv6 datagrams within IEEE 802.15.6
   frames refers to [RFC6282], which updates [RFC4944].Multiple header
   compression stacks are defined in RFC6282 which specifies the
   fragmentation methods for IPv6 datagrams on top of IEEE
   802.15.4;however, for IEEE 802.15.6, a LoWPAN encapsulated LoWPAN_HC1
   compressed IPv6 datagram can be used as IEEE 802.15.6 does not
   require mesh header due to IEEE 802.15.6 communication
   scope.Moreover, static header compression techniques of [RFC7400] can
   also be used as header compression.



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6.5.  Fragmentation and Reassembly

   IEEE 802.15.6 provides Fragmentation and reassembly (FAR) for payload
   of 256 bytes.  FAR as defined in [RFC4944], which specifies the
   fragmentation methods for IPv6 datagrams on top of IEEE 802.15.4 MUST
   be adapted to work with IEEE 802.15.6.  All headers MUST be
   compressed according to [RFC4944] encoding formats, but the default
   MTU of IEEE 802.15.6 is 256 bytes which MUST be considered.

7.  IANA Considerations

   [TBD]

8.  Security and Privacy Considerations

   IPv6 over WBAN's applications often require confidentiality and
   integrity protection.  This can be provided at the application,
   transport, network, and/or at the link.IEEE 802.15.6 considers the
   security as a key requirement for healthcare applications and defines
   a complete framework.  This framework defines three levels of
   security which can be used according to requirements.Overall, it
   covers privacy, confidentiality, encryption and authentication.AES-64
   is preffered for encryption due to its efficiency.

9.  References

9.1.  Normative References

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC2119, March 1997,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2119>.

   [RFC2460]  Deering, S. and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol, Version 6
              (IPv6) Specification", RFC 2460, DOI 10.17487/RFC2460,
              December 1998, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2460>.

   [RFC4944]  Montenegro, G., Kushalnagar, N., Hui, J., and D. Culler,
              "Transmission of IPv6 Packets over IEEE 802.15.4
              Networks", RFC 4944, DOI 10.17487/RFC4944, September 2007,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4944>.

   [RFC4861]  Narten, T., Nordmark, E., Simpson, W., and H. Soliman,
              "Neighbor Discovery for IP version 6 (IPv6)", RFC 4861,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC4861, September 2007,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4861>.





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   [RFC4291]  Hinden, R. and S. Deering, "IP Version 6 Addressing
              Architecture", RFC 4291, DOI 10.17487/RFC4291, February
              2006, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4291>.

   [RFC6282]  Hui, J., Ed. and P. Thubert, "Compression Format for IPv6
              Datagrams over IEEE 802.15.4-Based Networks", RFC 6282,
              DOI 10.17487/RFC6282, September 2011,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6282>.

   [RFC7400]  Bormann, C., "6LoWPAN-GHC: Generic Header Compression for
              IPv6 over Low-Power Wireless Personal Area Networks
              (6LoWPANs)", RFC 7400, DOI 10.17487/RFC7400, November
              2014, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7400>.

   [RFC6775]  Shelby, Z., Ed., Chakrabarti, S., Nordmark, E., and C.
              Bormann, "Neighbor Discovery Optimization for IPv6 over
              Low-Power Wireless Personal Area Networks (6LoWPANs)",
              RFC 6775, DOI 10.17487/RFC6775, November 2012,
              <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6775>.

9.2.  Informative References

   [IEEE802.15.6]
              "IEEE Standard, 802.15.6-2012 - IEEE Standard for Local
              and metropolitan area networks - Part 15.6: Wireless Body
              Area Networks", 2012,
              <https://standards.ieee.org/findstds/
              standard/802.15.6-2012.html>.

   [SURVEY-WBAN]
              Diffie, W., Samaneh Movassaghi, Mehran Abolhasan, Justin
              Lipman, David Smith, and Abbas Jamalipour, "Wireless body
              area networks: A survey", Communications Surveys and
              Tutorials, IEEE , vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 1658-1686, 2014.

   [MAC-WBAN]
              Minglei Shu, Dongfeng Yuan, Chongqing Zhang, Yinglong
              Wang, and Changfang Chen, "A MAC Protocol for Medical
              Monitoring Applications of Wireless Body Area Networks.",
              Sensors , vol. 15, no. 6, 2015.

Appendix A.  Patient monitoring use case - Spoke Hub

   Refer following diagram:







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                                 ########
                               # @ EEG    #
                             ##   |      @ # Hearing
                             #    |      | #
                              #   |      |#
                               #  |     #|
                         #####    |      |## ###
                      #           |      |   @   ## Motion Sensor
          Positioning#  @         |      /  /     #
                    #    \        |ECG /  /       #
                    #     \       |  @ | /         #
                   #         \    | / / /           #
                  #      ##   \   |/ //      ##      #
                  #      ##    \  ||//       ##      #
                 #      # #     \ ||||      # #  @   # BP
                #       # #      \||||      # # /    ##
                #      ## #       ||||      # #/      ##
           SPO2# @    ##  #   Coordinator   # /##      #
              #   \  ##  ##       +-+        /  ##     ##
             #     ------+--------| |-------/ #   #      #
          ##     ##      #        +-+         ##     #    ##
        ##      ##      #         //\         #      #      ##
     ###       #        #        //  \        #      ##        ###
       ##      #        #       //    \       #       #      ## ##
       #      #        #       //      \      #        #      #
      ###   # #        #      //  ##    \     #        #     ###
        #  ###         #     //   # #    \    #         # #  ###
        ###            #    //   # #     |    #          # ###
                       #   //    # ##    |    #
        Glucose Sensor # @ /     #  #    |   #
                       ##  |     ##  #    |   #
                        # /      #   #    |   #
                        #/     #      #  |   #
                    Emg#@      #      #  |   #
                       #      #       ## |   #
                       ##              # |   #
                        #    #         # |   #
                        #    #          #\   #
                       #     #          # |   #
                       #     #          # @   # Motion Sensor
                        ##  #            ## ##
                          ##               #

             Figure 4: Patient monitoring use case - Spoke Hub







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Appendix B.  Patient monitoring use case - Connected

   Refer following diagram:

                                 ########
                              #   @ EEG    #
                             ##   |\-----@ # Hearing
                             #     |      \#
                              #    |     # |
                               #    |   ##  |Motion Sensor
                       #######      |     ##|####
                      #              |       |   ##
          Positioning#   @            |      @    #
                    #    /\        ECG|       \   #
                    #   /  \----------@        \   #
                   #   /                        |  #
                  #  /   ##                 ##   |  #
                 # /    # #                 # #  @   # BP
                #/     ## #                 # ##  |   ##
           SPO2# @    ##  #                 #  ## |    #
             #    \ #    #                   #   #|     #
          ##     ## \    #                   ##   | #    ##
       ##      #      \ #                     #  |    #      ## ##
      ###   # #        # \        ##          #  |     #     ###
        #  ###         #   \      # #          # |       # #  ###
        ###            #   |     # #          # |        # ###
                       #   |     # ##         # |
        Glucose Sensor #   @     #  #        #  |
                        # /     #    #       # /
                        #|    ##      #      #/
                        #/     #      #      #|
                    Emg#@      #      #      #|
                       #  \    #      #      #|
                       #    \  #      #      #|
                       #     \#       ##     #|
                       ##     \        #     #|
                        #     #\       #     #|
                        #    #  \      #     #|
                        #    #    \    #     #|
                        #    #     \   ##    #/
                        #    #       \ ##    /
                        #    #        \ ##  /#
                       ##    #          \  |  #
                       #     #          # \/  #
                        #    #           # @ # Motion Sensor
                          ##               #

             Figure 5: Patient monitoring use case - Connected



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Appendix C.  Changes

   Compared with version-00, this updated draft is no longer all
   informative.  Two main changes have been made as below:

   1.  Introduction part of 802.15.6 is simplified and more focused on
       the features that relates to the 6lo-WBAN adaptation layer, e.g.
       MAC frame format including MAC address and MTU, topology and
       scope of communication, and why the 6lo-WBAN adaptation layer is
       needed.

   2.  The 6lo-WBAN adaptation layer is specified in this draft titled
       as "Specification of IPv6 over WBAN" that lists the main features
       needs to be added in the 6lo adaptation layer including the
       formation of IID, IPv6 link-local address, unicast address
       mapping, header compression, and fragmentation and reassembly.
       These parts have never been mentioned in other documents related
       to WBAN, and in this version, we provide a guidance for such IPv6
       enabled WBAN implementations.

Authors' Addresses

   Muhammad Sajjad Akbar
   Bournemouth University
   Fern Barrow, Dorset
   Poole  BH12 5BB
   United Kingdom

   Email: makbar@bournemouth.ac.uk


   Abdur Rashid Sangi
   Huaiyin Institute of Technology
   No.89 North Beijing Road, Qinghe District
   Huaian  223001
   P.R. China

   Email: sangi_bahrian@yahoo.com


   Mingui Zhang
   Huawei Technologies
   No. 156 Beiqing Rd. Haidian District
   Beijing  100095
   China

   Email: zhangmingui@huawei.com




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Internet-Draft               IPv6 over WBANs                October 2017


   Jianqiang Hou
   Huawei Technologies
   101 Software Avenue
   Nanjing  210012
   China

   Phone: +86 15852944235
   Email: houjianqiang@huawei.com


   Charles E. Perkins
   Futurewei
   2330 Central Expressway
   Santa Clara  95050
   Unites States

   Email: charliep@computer.org


   Alexandre Petrescu
   CEA, LIST
   CEA Saclay
   Gif-sur-Yvette, Ile-de-France  91190
   France

   Phone: +33169089223
   Email: alexandre.petrescu@cea.fr


   Naveed Bin Rais
   Ajman University
   University Street,Al jerf 1
   Ajman  346
   United Arab Emirates

   Email: naveedbinrais@gmail.com















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