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Versions: 00 01

Internet Engineering Task Force                              M. MacFaden
Internet-Draft                                               VMware Inc.
Intended status: Standards Track                        J. Schoenwaelder
Expires: January 17, 2013                              Jacobs University
                                                                 T. Tsou
                                               Huawei Technologies (USA)
                                                                 C. Zhou
                                                     Huawei Technologies
                                                           July 16, 2012


   Definition of Managed Objects for Virtual Machines Controlled by a
                               Hypervisor
                     draft-schoenw-opsawg-vm-mib-01

Abstract

   This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB)
   for use with network management protocols in the Internet community.
   In particular, it defines objects for managing virtual machines
   controlled by a hypervisor.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 17, 2013.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents



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   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.  The Internet-Standard Management Framework . . . . . . . . . .  3
   3.  Conventions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   4.  Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   5.  Relationship to Other MIB Modules  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     5.1.  Relationship to the HOST-RESOURCES-MIB . . . . . . . . . .  5
     5.2.  Relationship to the IF-MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     5.3.  Relationship to the IEEE8021-BRIDGE-MIB  . . . . . . . . .  5
     5.4.  Relationship to the ENTITY-MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   6.  Definitions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
   7.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
   8.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
   9.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
   10. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
     10.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
     10.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
   Appendix A.  Open Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21


























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1.  Introduction

   This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB)
   for use with network management protocols.  In particular, it defines
   objects for managing virtual machines controlled by a hypervisor.

   The design of this MIB module has been derived from enterprise
   specific MIB modules, namely a MIB module for managing guests of the
   XEN hypervisor, a MIB module for managing virtual machines controlled
   by the VMware hypervisor, and a MIB module using the libvirt
   programming interface to access different hypervisors.

2.  The Internet-Standard Management Framework

   For a detailed overview of the documents that describe the current
   Internet-Standard Management Framework, please refer to section 7 of
   RFC 3410 [RFC3410].

   Managed objects are accessed via a virtual information store, termed
   the Management Information Base or MIB.  MIB objects are generally
   accessed through the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP).
   Objects in the MIB are defined using the mechanisms defined in the
   Structure of Management Information (SMI).  This memo specifies a MIB
   module that is compliant to the SMIv2, which is described in STD 58,
   RFC 2578 [RFC2578], STD 58, RFC 2579 [RFC2579] and STD 58, RFC 2580
   [RFC2580].

3.  Conventions

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "NOT RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and
   "OPTIONAL" in this document are to be interpreted as described in RFC
   2119 [RFC2119].

4.  Overview

   The MIB module is organized into a group of scalars and tables.  The
   scalars below vmHypervisor provide basic information about the
   hypervisor.  The vmGuestTable lists the guests (virtual machines)
   that are known to the hypervisor.  The vmStorageTable and the
   vmIfTable provide the mapping of logical storage areas and network
   interfaces to virtual machines.

   The GuestState textual convention defines a state model for virtual
   machines.  Events causing transitions between major states will cause
   the generation of notifications (vmGuestStarted, vmGuestStopped,
   vmGuestSuspended, vmGuestResumed).




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   The MIB module provides a few writable objects that can be used to
   make non-persistent changes, e.g., changing the memory allocation or
   the CPU allocation.  It is not the goal of this MIB module to provide
   a configuration interface for virtual machines since other protocols
   and data modeling languages are more suitable for this task.

   The OID tree structure of the MIB module is shown below.

   --vmMib(1.3.6.1.2.1.XXXX)
     +--vmNotifications(0)
     |  +--vmGuestStarted(1) [vmGuestName,vmGuestUUID,vmGuestState]
     |  +--vmGuestStopped(2) [vmGuestName,vmGuestUUID,vmGuestState]
     |  +--vmGuestSuspended(3) [vmGuestName,vmGuestUUID,vmGuestState]
     |  +--vmGuestResumed(4) [vmGuestName,vmGuestUUID,vmGuestState]
     +--vmObjects(1)
        +--vmHypervisor(1)
        |  +-- r-n SnmpAdminString vmHypervisorVersion(1)
        +--vmGuestTable(2)
        |  +--vmGuestEntry(1) [vmGuestIndex]
        |     +-- --- GuestIndex      vmGuestIndex(1)
        |     +-- r-n SnmpAdminString vmGuestName(2)
        |     +-- r-n UUIDOrZero      vmGuestUUID(3)
        |     +-- r-n GuestState      vmGuestState(4)
        |     +-- r-n SnmpAdminString vmGuestOS(6)
        |     +-- r-n Unsigned32      vmGuestCurCPUs(7)
        |     +-- rwn Unsigned32      vmGuestMinCPUs(8)
        |     +-- rwn Unsigned32      vmGuestMaxCPUs(9)
        |     +-- r-n KBytes          vmGuestCurMem(10)
        |     +-- rwn KBytes          vmGuestMinMem(11)
        |     +-- rwn KBytes          vmGuestMaxMem(12)
        |     +-- r-n Unsigned32      vmGuestCPUTime(13)
        +--vmStorageTable(3)
        |  +--vmStorageEntry(1) [vmGuestIndex,vmStorageIndex]
        |     +-- --- GuestIndexOrZero vmStorageGuest(1)
        |     +-- --- StorageIndex     vmStorageIndex(2)
        |     +-- r-n SnmpAdminString  vmStorageName(3)
        +--vmIfTable(4)
           +--vmIfEntry(1) [vmGuestIndex,vmIfIndex]
              +-- --- GuestIndexOrZero vmIfGuest(1)
              +-- --- InterfaceIndex   vmIfIndex(2)
              +-- r-n PhysAddress      vmIfPhysAddr(3)

5.  Relationship to Other MIB Modules

   The MIB module IMPORTS definitions from SNMPv2-SMI [RFC2578],
   SNMPv2-TC [RFC2579], SNMPv2-CONF [RFC2580], SNMP-FRAMEWORK-MIB
   [RFC3411], and IF-MIB [RFC2863].




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   Hypervisors implementing this MIB module should implement the HOST-
   RESOURCES-MIB [RFC2790] and the IF-MIB [RFC2863] in order to export
   information about the resources (e.g., processors, memory, logical
   storage devices, network interfaces) of the physical machine.  If the
   hypervisor emulates a bridge to network virtual machines, then it
   should implement the IEEE8021-BRIDGE-MIB.  (Note that the BRIDGE-MIB
   defined in [RFC4188] is now further maintained by the IEEE
   [RFC4663].)  Details of the hardware configuration of a physical
   machine can be made available by implementing the ENTITY-MIB
   [RFC4133].

5.1.  Relationship to the HOST-RESOURCES-MIB

   The HOST-RESOURCES-MIB implemented on the physical machine provides
   information about the number of CPUs and the amount of memory
   available.  Furthermore, the HOST-RESOURCES-MIB provides information
   about logical storage devices.

   The MIB module defined in this memo provides a mapping of logical
   storage devices to virtual machines.  Further details about the
   storage devices (such as the size and the amount of allocated
   storage) is provided by the HOST-RESOURCES-MIB.  Note that the number
   of storage types can be extended through the IANA maintained HOST-
   RESOURCES-TYPES MIB module.

5.2.  Relationship to the IF-MIB

   The MIB module provides a mapping of network interfaces to virtual
   machines.  Further details about the network interfaces (such as
   statistics about the number of packets/bytes sent or received) can be
   obtained from the IF-MIB.

5.3.  Relationship to the IEEE8021-BRIDGE-MIB

   Hypervisors implementing virtual bridges should export the bridging
   topologies by implementing the IEEE8021-BRIDGE-MIB.  For backwards
   compatibility with existing management applications, they may also
   choose to implement the BRIDGE-MIB [RFC4188].

5.4.  Relationship to the ENTITY-MIB

   The ENTITY-MIB [RFC4133] describes managed objects used for managing
   multiple logical and physical entities managed by a single SNMP
   agent.  Implementations of the MIB module defined in this document
   may want to use the ENTITY-MIB to provide the logical to physical
   entity mapping and if needed to point to the agent in the virtual
   machine and vice versa.




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6.  Definitions

 VM-MIB DEFINITIONS ::= BEGIN

 IMPORTS
     MODULE-IDENTITY, OBJECT-TYPE, NOTIFICATION-TYPE,
     Integer32, Unsigned32, mib-2
         FROM SNMPv2-SMI                                 -- RFC 2578
     TEXTUAL-CONVENTION, PhysAddress
         FROM SNMPv2-TC                                  -- RFC 2579
     OBJECT-GROUP, NOTIFICATION-GROUP, MODULE-COMPLIANCE
         FROM SNMPv2-CONF                                -- RFC 2580
     SnmpAdminString
         FROM SNMP-FRAMEWORK-MIB                         -- RFC 3411
     InterfaceIndex
         FROM IF-MIB;                                    -- RFC 2863

 vmMib MODULE-IDENTITY
     LAST-UPDATED "201203150000Z"
     ORGANIZATION
         "Jacobs University Bremen"
     CONTACT-INFO
         "Michael MacFaden
          VMware Inc.
          Email: mrm@vmware.com

          Juergen Schoenwaelder
          Jacobs University Bremen
          Email: j.schoenwaelder@jacobs-university.de

          Tina Tsou
          Huawei Technologies (USA)
          Email: tina.tsou.zouting@huawei.com

          Cathy Zhou
          Huawei Technologies
          Email: cathyzhou@huawei.com"
     DESCRIPTION
         "The MIB module for monitoring virtual machines controlled
          by a hypervisor.

          Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as
          authors of the code.  All rights reserved.

          Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or
          without modification, is permitted pursuant to, and subject
          to the license terms contained in, the Simplified BSD
          License set forth in Section 4.c of the IETF Trust's



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          Legal Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
          (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info)."

     REVISION "201203150000Z"
     DESCRIPTION
         "Initial version, published as RFC XXXX."
     -- RFC Ed.: replace XXXX with actual RFC number & remove this note
     ::= { mib-2 XXXX }

 vmNotifications OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { vmMib 0 }
 vmObjects       OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { vmMib 1 }
 vmConformance   OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { vmMib 2 }

 -- Textual convention definitions:

 GuestIndex ::= TEXTUAL-CONVENTION
     DISPLAY-HINT "d"
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A unique value, greater than zero, identifying a virtual
          machine. The value for each virtual machine must remain
          constant at least from one re-initialization of the
          hypervisor to the next re-initialization."
     SYNTAX      Integer32 (1..2147483647)

 GuestIndexOrZero ::= TEXTUAL-CONVENTION
     DISPLAY-HINT "d"
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "This textual convention is an extension of the VmGuestIndex
          convention.  This extension permits the additional value
          of zero.  The meaning of the value zero is object-specific
          and must therefore be defined as part of the description of
          any object which uses this syntax.  Examples of the usage of
          zero might include situations where a virtual machine is
          unknown, or when none or all virtual machines need to be
          referenced."
     SYNTAX      Integer32 (0..2147483647)

 StorageIndex ::= TEXTUAL-CONVENTION
     DISPLAY-HINT "d"
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A unique value, greater than zero, identifying a logical
          storage area. The value for each logical storage area must
          remain constant at least from one re-initialization of the
          hypervisor to the next re-initialization."
     SYNTAX      Integer32 (1..2147483647)



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 UUID ::= TEXTUAL-CONVENTION
     DISPLAY-HINT "4x-2x-2x-2x-6x"
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The Universally Unique IDentifier (UUID) identifying a
          virtual machine. The UUID format is defined in RFC 4122."
     REFERENCE
         "RFC4122: A Universally Unique IDentifier (UUID) URN Namespace"
     SYNTAX      OCTET STRING (SIZE (16))

 UUIDOrZero ::= TEXTUAL-CONVENTION
     DISPLAY-HINT "4x-2x-2x-2x-6x"
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The Universally Unique IDentifier (UUID) identifying a
          virtual machine or a zero-length string. The UUID format is
          defined in RFC 4122. The meaning of the zero-length string is
          object-specific and must therefore be defined as part of the
          description of any object which uses this syntax."
     SYNTAX      OCTET STRING (SIZE (0|16))

 GuestState ::= TEXTUAL-CONVENTION
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The state of a guest (virtual machine):

          unknown(1)     The state is unknown, e.g., because the
                         implementation failed to obtain the state
                         from the hypervisor.

          other(2)       The state has been obtained but it is
                         not a known state.

          running(3)     The virtual machine is currently running.

          blocked(4)     The virtual machine is currently blocked.

          paused(5)      The virtual machine is currently paused.

          migrating(6)   The virtual machine is currently migrating.

          shutdown(7)    The virtual machine is currently in the
                         process of shutting down.

          shutoff(8)     The virtual machine is down.

          crashed(9)     The virtual machine has crashed."
     SYNTAX      INTEGER {



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             unknown(1),
             other(2),
             running(3),
             blocked(4),
             paused(5),
             migrating(6),
             shutdown(7),
             shutoff(8),
             crashed(9)
     }

 KBytes ::= TEXTUAL-CONVENTION
     DISPLAY-HINT "d"
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "Storage size measured in units of 1024 octets (bytes). This
          textual convention allows to represent storage sizes up to
          4096 gigabytes."
     SYNTAX Unsigned32

 -- Object definitions

 vmHypervisor OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { vmObjects 1 }

 vmHypervisorVersion OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      SnmpAdminString
     MAX-ACCESS  read-only
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
        "The version string indicating the version of the hypervisor
         running on the physical host."
     ::= { vmHypervisor 1 }

     -- The number of CPUs and the amount of memory can be found
     -- in the objects of the HOST-RESOURCES-MIB

 vmGuestTable OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      SEQUENCE OF VmGuestEntry
     MAX-ACCESS  not-accessible
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A (conceptual) table of all guests (virtual machines)
          on the physical host."
     ::= { vmObjects 2 }

 vmGuestEntry OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      VmGuestEntry
     MAX-ACCESS  not-accessible



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     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "An (conceptual) table entry describing a particular
          guest (virtual machine)."
     INDEX   { vmGuestIndex }
     ::= { vmGuestTable 1 }

 VmGuestEntry ::= SEQUENCE {
     vmGuestIndex        GuestIndex,
     vmGuestName         SnmpAdminString,
     vmGuestUUID         UUIDOrZero,
     vmGuestState        GuestState,
 -- XXX add information about the CPU type
 -- XXX the cpu type may be different from the host CPU
     vmGuestOS           SnmpAdminString,
     vmGuestCurCPUs      Unsigned32,
     vmGuestMinCPUs      Unsigned32,
     vmGuestMaxCPUs      Unsigned32,
     vmGuestCurMem       KBytes,
     vmGuestMinMem       KBytes,
     vmGuestMaxMem       KBytes,
     vmGuestCPUTime      Unsigned32
 }

 vmGuestIndex OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      GuestIndex
     MAX-ACCESS  not-accessible
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A unique value identifying a guest (virtual machine)."
     ::= { vmGuestEntry 1 }

 vmGuestName OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      SnmpAdminString
     MAX-ACCESS  read-only
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The name of this guest (virtual machine)."
     ::= { vmGuestEntry 2 }

 vmGuestUUID OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      UUIDOrZero
     MAX-ACCESS  read-only
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A UUID identifying this guest (virtual machine). The UUID
          is expected to be a long-term persistent identifier and
          to remain the same across reboots of the virtual machines



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          and the hypervisor. The zero-length string is returned
          in case a virtual machine does not have a suitable
          persistent UUID."
     ::= { vmGuestEntry 3 }

 vmGuestState OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      GuestState
     MAX-ACCESS  read-only
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The current operational state of the guest (virtual
          machine)."
     ::= { vmGuestEntry 4 }

 vmGuestOS OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      SnmpAdminString
     MAX-ACCESS  read-only
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The operating system running on this guest (virtual
          machine). This value corresponds to the operating
          system the hypervisor assumes to be running when the
          virtual machine is started. This may differ from the
          actual operating system in case the virtual machine
          boots into a different operating system."
     ::= { vmGuestEntry 6 }

 vmGuestCurCPUs OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      Unsigned32
     UNITS       "CPUs"
     MAX-ACCESS  read-only
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The number of CPUs currently assigned to this guest
          (virtual machine). Virtual machines that are not
          operational typically have 0 CPUs assigned."
     ::= { vmGuestEntry 7 }

 vmGuestMinCPUs OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      Unsigned32
     UNITS       "CPUs"
     MAX-ACCESS  read-write
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The minimum number of CPUs that are assigned to this
          guest (virtual machine) when it is in a running state.
          Changes to this value may not persist across restarts
          of the hypervisor."



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     ::= { vmGuestEntry 8 }

 vmGuestMaxCPUs OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      Unsigned32
     UNITS       "CPUs"
     MAX-ACCESS  read-write
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The maximum number of CPUs that are assigned to this
          guest (virtual machine) when it is in a running state.
          The value zero denotes that there is no limit. Changes
          to this value may not persist across restarts of the
          hypervisor."
     ::= { vmGuestEntry 9 }

 vmGuestCurMem OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      KBytes
     UNITS       "KBytes"
     MAX-ACCESS  read-only
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The amount of main memory currently assigned to this
          guest (virtual machine). Virtual machines that are not
          operational typically have no memory assigned."
     ::= { vmGuestEntry 10 }

 vmGuestMinMem OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      KBytes
     UNITS       "KBytes"
     MAX-ACCESS  read-write
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The minimum amount of main memory that is assigned to
          this guest (virtual machine) when it is in a running
          state. Changes to this value may not persist across
          the restart of the hypervisor."
    ::= { vmGuestEntry 11 }

 vmGuestMaxMem OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      KBytes
     UNITS       "KBytes"
     MAX-ACCESS  read-write
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The maximum amount of main memory that can be assigned to
          this guest (virtual machine) when it is in a running state.
          The value zero denotes that there is no limit. Changes to
          this value may not persist across the restart of the



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          hypervisor."
    ::= { vmGuestEntry 12 }

 vmGuestCPUTime OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      Unsigned32
     UNITS       "seconds"
     MAX-ACCESS  read-only
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The number of CPU seconds consumed by this guest (virtual
          machine). Note that on a virtual machines with multiple
          CPUs, this value may increment by more than one second
          in a second of real (wall clock) time."
     ::= { vmGuestEntry 13 }

 vmStorageTable OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      SEQUENCE OF VmStorageEntry
     MAX-ACCESS  not-accessible
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A (conceptual) table of storage devices attached to
          guests (virtual machines)."
     ::= { vmObjects 3 }

 vmStorageEntry OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      VmStorageEntry
     MAX-ACCESS  not-accessible
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "An (conceptual) table entry describing a particular
          storage device attached to a guest (virtual machine)"
     INDEX       { vmStorageGuest, vmStorageIndex }
     ::= { vmStorageTable 1 }

 VmStorageEntry ::= SEQUENCE {
     vmStorageGuest      GuestIndexOrZero,
     vmStorageIndex      StorageIndex,
     vmStorageName       SnmpAdminString
 }

 vmStorageGuest OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      GuestIndexOrZero
     MAX-ACCESS  not-accessible
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "Identifies the guest (virtual machine) this storage has
          been allocated to. The value 0 indicates that the storage
          is currently not allocated to a guest (virtual machine)."



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     ::= { vmStorageEntry 1 }

 vmStorageIndex OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      StorageIndex
     MAX-ACCESS  not-accessible
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A unique value identifying a logical storage area. On
          systems implementing the HOST-RESOURCES-MIB, the value
          must be the same value that is used as the index into
          the hrStorageTable (hrStorageIndex)."
     ::= { vmStorageEntry 2 }

 vmStorageName OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      SnmpAdminString
     MAX-ACCESS  read-only
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The name of the storage area as seen on the hypervisor."
     ::= { vmStorageEntry 3 }

 vmIfTable OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      SEQUENCE OF VmIfEntry
     MAX-ACCESS  not-accessible
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A (conceptual) table of network interfaces attached to
          guests (virtual machines)."
     ::= { vmObjects 4 }

 vmIfEntry OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      VmIfEntry
     MAX-ACCESS  not-accessible
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "An (conceptual) table entry describing a particular
          network interface attached to a guest (virtual machine)"
     INDEX       { vmGuestIndex, vmIfIndex }
     ::= { vmIfTable 1 }

 VmIfEntry ::= SEQUENCE {
     vmIfGuest      GuestIndexOrZero,
     vmIfIndex      InterfaceIndex,
     vmIfPhysAddr   PhysAddress
 }

 vmIfGuest OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      GuestIndexOrZero



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     MAX-ACCESS  not-accessible
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "Identifies the guest (virtual machine) this network interface
          has been allocated to. The value 0 indicates that the network
          interface is currently not allocated to a guest (virtual
          machine)."
     ::= { vmIfEntry 1 }

 vmIfIndex OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      InterfaceIndex
     MAX-ACCESS  not-accessible
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The interface index of the network interface under which it
          is known on the system running the hypervisor. If the
          interface is a port of a virtual bridge, then the port
          of the virtual bridge should map to this interface index."
     ::= { vmIfEntry 2 }

 vmIfPhysAddr OBJECT-TYPE
     SYNTAX      PhysAddress
     MAX-ACCESS  read-only
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "The physical address used by the interface. For interfaces
          associated to a port of a virtual bridge, this object
          normally contains a MAC address. For interfaces which do not
          have such an address, this object should contain a
          zero-length octet string."
     ::= { vmIfEntry 3 }


 -- Notification definitions:

 vmGuestStarted NOTIFICATION-TYPE
     OBJECTS     {
                   vmGuestName,
                   vmGuestUUID,
                   vmGuestState
                 }
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "This notification is generated when a guest (virtual machine)
          has been started and the start process has reached a stable
          state (e.g., running or crashed)."
     ::= { vmNotifications 1 }




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 vmGuestStopped NOTIFICATION-TYPE
     OBJECTS     {
                   vmGuestName,
                   vmGuestUUID,
                   vmGuestState
                 }
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "This notification is generated when a guest (virtual machine)
          has been stopped and the shutdown process has reached a stable
          state (e.g., shutdown or shutoff or crashed)."
     ::= { vmNotifications 2 }

 vmGuestSuspended NOTIFICATION-TYPE
     OBJECTS     {
                   vmGuestName,
                   vmGuestUUID,
                   vmGuestState
                 }
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "This notification is generated when a guest (virtual machine)
          has been suspended and the suspension process has reached a
          stable state (e.g., paused or crashed)."
     ::= { vmNotifications 3 }

 vmGuestResumed NOTIFICATION-TYPE
     OBJECTS     {
                   vmGuestName,
                   vmGuestUUID,
                   vmGuestState
                 }
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "This notification is generated when a guest (virtual machine)
          has been resumed and the resumption process has reached a
          stable state (e.g., running or crashed)."
     ::= { vmNotifications 4 }

 -- Compliance definitions:

 vmGroups      OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { vmConformance 1 }
 vmCompliances OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { vmConformance 2 }

 vmFullCompliance MODULE-COMPLIANCE
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "Compliance statement for implementations supporting



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          read/write access, according to the object definitions."
     MODULE      -- this module
     MANDATORY-GROUPS {
         vmHypervisorGroup,
         vmGuestGroup,
         vmStorageGroup,
         vmIfGroup,
         vmNotificationGroup
     }
     ::= { vmCompliances 1 }

 vmReadOnlyCompliance MODULE-COMPLIANCE
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "Compliance statement for implementations supporting
          only readonly access."
     MODULE      -- this module
     MANDATORY-GROUPS {
         vmHypervisorGroup,
         vmGuestGroup,
         vmStorageGroup,
         vmIfGroup,
         vmNotificationGroup
     }

     OBJECT vmGuestMinCPUs
     MIN-ACCESS  read-only
     DESCRIPTION
         "Write access is not required."

     OBJECT vmGuestMaxCPUs
     MIN-ACCESS  read-only
     DESCRIPTION
         "Write access is not required."

     OBJECT vmGuestMinMem
     MIN-ACCESS  read-only
     DESCRIPTION
         "Write access is not required."

     OBJECT vmGuestMaxMem
     MIN-ACCESS  read-only
     DESCRIPTION
         "Write access is not required."
     ::= { vmCompliances 2 }

 vmHypervisorGroup OBJECT-GROUP
     OBJECTS {



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         vmHypervisorVersion
     }
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A collection of objects providing insight into the
          hypervisor itself."
     ::= { vmGroups 1 }

 vmGuestGroup OBJECT-GROUP
     OBJECTS {
         -- vmGuestIndex,
         vmGuestName,
         vmGuestUUID,
         vmGuestState,
         vmGuestOS,
         vmGuestCurCPUs,
         vmGuestMinCPUs,
         vmGuestMaxCPUs,
         vmGuestCurMem,
         vmGuestMinMem,
         vmGuestMaxMem,
         vmGuestCPUTime
     }
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A collection of objects providing insight into the
          guests (virtual machines) controlled by a hypervisor."
     ::= { vmGroups 2 }

 vmStorageGroup OBJECT-GROUP
     OBJECTS {
         -- vmStorageGuest,
         -- vmStorageIndex,
         vmStorageName
     }
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A collection of objects providing insight into the
          logical storage areas controlled by a hypervisor."
     ::= { vmGroups 3 }

 vmIfGroup OBJECT-GROUP
     OBJECTS {
         -- vmIfGuest,
         -- vmIfIndex,
         vmIfPhysAddr
     }
     STATUS      current



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     DESCRIPTION
         "A collection of objects providing insight into the
          network interfaces controlled by a hypervisor."
     ::= { vmGroups 4 }

 vmNotificationGroup NOTIFICATION-GROUP
     NOTIFICATIONS {
         vmGuestStarted,
         vmGuestStopped,
         vmGuestSuspended,
         vmGuestResumed
     }
     STATUS      current
     DESCRIPTION
         "A collection of notifications for virtual machines
          controlled by a hypervisor."
     ::= { vmGroups 5 }

 END

7.  Security Considerations

   There are a number of management objects defined in this MIB module
   with a MAX-ACCESS clause of read-write and/or read-create.  Such
   objects may be considered sensitive or vulnerable in some network
   environments.  The support for SET operations in a non-secure
   environment without proper protection can have a negative effect on
   network operations.  These are the tables and objects and their
   sensitivity/vulnerability:

   o  Unauthorized changes to vmGuestMinCPUs, vmGuestMaxCPUs,
      vmGuestMinMem, and vmGuestMaxMem can significantly slow down
      virtual machines or prevent the start of new virtual machines.

   Some of the readable objects in this MIB module (i.e., objects with a
   MAX-ACCESS other than not-accessible) may be considered sensitive or
   vulnerable in some network environments.  It is thus important to
   control even GET and/or NOTIFY access to these objects and possibly
   to even encrypt the values of these objects when sending them over
   the network via SNMP.  These are the tables and objects and their
   sensitivity/vulnerability:

   o  The tables vmGuestTable, vmStorageTable, and vmIfTable provide
      insight into the resources allocated to virtual machines and this
      knowledge might be exploited for targeted denial of service
      attacks.





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   o  The vmGuestStarted, vmGuestStopped, vmGuestSuspended, and
      vmGuestResumed notifications provides information about state
      changes of virtual machines and implicitly also on which physical
      hosts virtual machines are located.  Furthermore, the generation
      of fake notifications might trigger false alarms and subsequent
      actions in a network management system, which can amplify denial
      of service attacks or simply lead to less efficient resource
      usage.

   SNMP versions prior to SNMPv3 did not include adequate security.
   Even if the network itself is secure (for example by using IPsec),
   even then, there is no control as to who on the secure network is
   allowed to access and GET/SET (read/change/create/delete) the objects
   in this MIB module.

   It is RECOMMENDED that implementers consider the security features as
   provided by the SNMPv3 framework (see [RFC3410], section 8),
   including full support for the SNMPv3 cryptographic mechanisms (for
   authentication and privacy).

   Further, deployment of SNMP versions prior to SNMPv3 is NOT
   RECOMMENDED.  Instead, it is RECOMMENDED to deploy SNMPv3 and to
   enable cryptographic security.  It is then a customer/operator
   responsibility to ensure that the SNMP entity giving access to an
   instance of this MIB module is properly configured to give access to
   the objects only to those principals (users) that have legitimate
   rights to indeed GET or SET (change/create/delete) them.

8.  IANA Considerations

   IANA is requested to assign a value for "XXXX" under the 'mib-2'
   subtree and to record the assignment in the SMI Numbers registry.
   When the assignment has been made, the RFC Editor is asked to replace
   "XXXX" (here and in the MIB module) with the assigned value and to
   remove this note.

9.  Acknowledgements

   Thanks to David Black and Robert Story for helpful comments during
   the development of this specification.

10.  References

10.1.  Normative References

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.




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   [RFC2578]  McCloghrie, K., Ed., Perkins, D., Ed., and J.
              Schoenwaelder, Ed., "Structure of Management Information
              Version 2 (SMIv2)", STD 58, RFC 2578, April 1999.

   [RFC2579]  McCloghrie, K., Ed., Perkins, D., Ed., and J.
              Schoenwaelder, Ed., "Textual Conventions for SMIv2",
              STD 58, RFC 2579, April 1999.

   [RFC2580]  McCloghrie, K., Perkins, D., and J. Schoenwaelder,
              "Conformance Statements for SMIv2", STD 58, RFC 2580,
              April 1999.

   [RFC2790]  Waldbusser, S. and P. Grillo, "Host Resources MIB",
              RFC 2790, March 2000.

   [RFC2863]  McCloghrie, K. and F. Kastenholz, "The Interfaces Group
              MIB", RFC 2863, June 2000.

   [RFC3411]  Harrington, D., Presuhn, R., and B. Wijnen, "An
              Architecture for Describing Simple Network Management
              Protocol (SNMP) Management Frameworks", STD 62, RFC 3411,
              December 2002.

   [RFC4133]  Bierman, A. and K. McCloghrie, "Entity MIB (Version 3)",
              RFC 4133, August 2005.

10.2.  Informative References

   [RFC3410]  Case, J., Mundy, R., Partain, D., and B. Stewart,
              "Introduction and Applicability Statements for Internet-
              Standard Management Framework", RFC 3410, December 2002.

   [RFC4188]  Norseth, K. and E. Bell, "Definitions of Managed Objects
              for Bridges", RFC 4188, September 2005.

   [RFC4663]  Harrington, D., "Transferring MIB Work from IETF Bridge
              MIB WG to IEEE 802.1 WG", RFC 4663, September 2006.

Appendix A.  Open Issues

  This file is used to track issues that were discussed during the
  development of the SMIv2 to YANG translation in the IETF NETMOD
  working group. This issues covered here concern major design choices;
  this file does not attempt to track minor clarification requests etc.

  To comment on issues on the mailing list, please include the issue
  number in the subject line of the email message.




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  * vm-mib-01: storage sizes

    The MIB does not provide storage sizes, assuming this is provided by
    the hrStorageTable of the HOST-RESOURCES-MIB. However, some well
    known implementations of the HOST-RESOURCES-MIB only report about
    file systems used by the host system and not file systems residing
    in files used by virtual machines. Furthermore, the hrStorageTable
    reports sizes "usable by the requesting entity", "excluding loss due
    to formatting of file system reference information". For storage
    provided to virtual machines, this information is often not readily
    available since all you have is the raw block size.

  ** Solution #01-01

     Provide the storage block sizes as part of the VM-MIB. Provide a
     pointer to the hrStorageTable on systems that can provide this
     linkage but allow the pointer to be NULL.

  ** Resolution

     TBD

  * vm-mib-02: scaling and caching support

    It was mentioned that large data centers are characterized by
    100.000 physical hosts running 2.000.000 virtual machines. The NASA
    is reported with 1.000.000 physical hosts and 60.000.000 virtual
    machines. Bottom line is that we need to make the MIB module
    scalable. We can assume up hundreds of VMs running on a single
    virtual machine.

  ** Solution #02-01

     Add ...LastChange objects to tables so that management applications
     can easily validate cached information without having to read
     through potentially larger tables. For the vmGuestTable, we might
     also provide a ...LastStateChange object so that state changes can
     be polled with reading a simple scalar.

  ** Solution #02-02

     Make some tables time filtered. Unclear which tables would have to
     be time filtered.

  ** Resolution

     TBD




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  * vm-mib-03: virtual cpu type identification

    It is necessary to identify the CPU architecture or type since some
    virtual machine systems can emulate different CPU types.


  ** Solution #03-01

     Provide an IANA controlled enumeration that provides a CPU
     classification. The problem will be to provide rules about what
     constitutes a new CPU type and what not.

  ** Solution #03-02

     Use OBJECT IDENTITIES to identify CPU types. Such a distributed
     enumeration will not achieve a great deal of interoperability
     and is likely close to #03-03.

  ** Solution #03-03

     Use a string data type and rely on systems to put meaningful
     information there, perhaps provide guidelines how to structure the
     CPU type names, e.g. vendor-arch-model(-features)* that is
     amd-x86_64-opteron or intel-i686-pentium3-vmx-acpi (perhaps using a
     different separator character since a dash might easily clash).
     Applications may have to do some normalization across VM-MIB
     implementations (e.g., regular expression matching) but on the
     other hand this allows to provide details where necessary.

  ** Solution #03-04

     Following #03-03, we provide ...GuestCpuVendor, ...GuestCpuArch
     and ...GuestCpuModel objects plus an additional table that provides
     details about the features of the CPUs used by a certain virtual
     machine. This essentially breaks the string into a set of separate
     MIB objects.

  ** Solution #03-05

     Following #03-04, we provide ...GuestCpuVendor, ...GuestCpuArch and
     ...GuestCpuModel objects plus a string object containing a list of
     features. This way, things are more compact but still the most
     important components (vendor, arch, model) are broken out as
     separate objects.

  ** Resolution

     TBD



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  * vm-mib-04: physical CPU type identification

    VM migration sometimes requires to match physical CPUs and more
    important also feature sets of physical CPUs.

  ** Solution #04-01:

     Extend the ENTITY-MIB with a new MIB module, say an ENTITY-CPU-MIB,
     providing an entPhyCPUTable, sparsely augmenting the
     entPhysicalTable for physical entities with entPhysicalClass = cpu.
     The entPhyCPUTable would contain information about CPU vendor, CPU
     architecture, CPU mode, CPU features, clock speeds, etc. (see also
     vm-mib-03).

  ** Resolution

     TBD

  * vm-mib-05: per virtual cpu statistics

    It seems to be useful to provide statistics for each virtual CPU.
    However, it remains unclear what can be expected to be provided by a
    typical hypervisor implementation. There are a number of things to
    consider:

    a) Reporting the time the virtual CPU has been running (CPU time
       consumed) seems relatively straight forward.

    b) Reporting the current state of a virtual CPU requires to first
       define a suitable state model that is course grained enough to be
       useful (otherwise CPU state changes far too quickly to yield
       meaningful results). Libvirt, for example, has CPU states
       offline, running, blocked on resource. It is not further defined
       what blocked on resource really means. Anyway, with a suitable
       state model, the MIB could provide the time spent in the various
       CPU states rather than or in addition to the current snapshot
       state.

    c) Reporting the affinity mapping of virtual CPUs to physical CPUs.
       This, of course, requires to have a representation of physical
       CPUs.

  ** Resolution

     TBD

  * representing networks (vmNetTable)




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    Not yet well enough understood to write up this issue. ;-)

Authors' Addresses

   Michael MacFaden
   VMware Inc.

   EMail: mrm@vmware.com


   Juergen Schoenwaelder
   Jacobs University
   Campus Ring 1
   Bremen  28759
   Germany

   EMail: j.schoenwaelder@jacobs-university.de


   Tina Tsou
   Huawei Technologies (USA)
   2330 Central Expressway
   Santa Clara  CA 95050
   USA

   EMail: tina.tsou.zouting@huawei.com


   Cathy Zhou
   Huawei Technologies
   Bantian, Longgang District
   Shenzhen  518129
   P.R. China

   EMail: cathyzhou@huawei.com
















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