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Versions: (draft-serhrouchni-tls-certieee1609) 00 01 02 draft-msahli-ipwave-extension-ieee1609

TLS Working Group                                     P. Kampanakis, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                                     Cisco
Intended status: Informational                            M. Msahli, Ed.
Expires: April 25, 2019                                Telecom ParisTech
                                                        October 22, 2018


 TLS Authentication using ETSI TS 103 097 and IEEE 1609.2 certificates
                     draft-tls-certieee1609-02.txt

Abstract

   This document specifies the use of a new certificate type to
   authenticate TLS entities.  The first type enables the use of a
   certificate specified by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics
   Engineers (IEEE) and the European Telecommunications Standards
   Institute (ETSI).

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 25, 2019.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of




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   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Requirements Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Extension Overview  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  TLS Client and Server Handshake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.1.  Client Hello  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.2.  Server Hello  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  Certificate Verification  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   6.  Examples  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     6.1.  TLS Server and TLS Client use the 1609Dot2 Certificate  .   7
     6.2.  TLS Client uses the IEEE 1609.2 certificate and TLS
           Server uses the X 509 certificate . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   8.  Privacy Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   9.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   10. Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   11. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     11.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     11.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   Appendix A.  Co-Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11

1.  Introduction

   The TLS protocol [RFC8446] [RFC5246] uses X509 and Raw Public Key in
   order to authenticate servers and clients.  This document describes
   the use of certificates specified either by the Institute of
   Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) [IEEE1609.2] or the
   European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) [TS103097].
   It is worth mentioning that the ETSI TS 103097 certificate is a
   profile of IEEE 1609.2 certificate and uses the same data structure.
   These standards are defined in order to secure communications in
   vehicular environments.  Existing authentication methods, such as
   X509 and Raw Public Key, are designed for Internet use, particularly
   for flexibility and extensibility, and are not optimized for
   bandwidth and processing time to support delay-sensitive
   applications.  That is why size-optimized certificates were
   standardized by ETSI and IEEE to secure data exchange in highly
   dynamic vehicular environment in Intelligent Transportation System
   (ITS).







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2.  Requirements Terminology

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].

3.  Extension Overview

   This specification extends the Client Hello and Server Hello
   messages, by using the "extension_data" field of the ClientCertType
   Extension and the ServerCertType Extension structures defined in
   RFC7250.  In order to negotiate the support of IEEE 1609.2 or ETSI TS
   103097 certificate-based authentication, the clients and the servers
   MAY include the extension of type "client_certificate_type" and
   "server_certificate_type" in the extended Client Hello and
   "EncryptedExtensions".  The "extension_data" field of this extension
   SHALL contain a list of supported certificate types proposed by the
   client as provided in the figure below:


     /* Managed by IANA */
      enum {
          X509(0),
          RawPublicKey(2),
          1609Dot2(?), /* Number 3 will be requested for 1609.2 */
          (255)
      } CertificateType;

      struct {
          select (certificate_type) {

              /* certificate type defined in this document.*/
               case 1609Dot2:
               opaque cert_data<1..2^24-1>;

               /* RawPublicKey defined in RFC 7250*/
              case RawPublicKey:
              opaque ASN.1_subjectPublicKeyInfo<1..2^24-1>;

              /* X.509 certificate defined in RFC 5246*/
              case X.509:
              opaque cert_data<1..2^24-1>;

               };

             Extension extensions<0..2^16-1>;
         } CertificateEntry;




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   In case where the TLS server accepts the described extension, it
   selects one of the certificate types in the extension described
   above.  Note that a server MAY authenticate the client using other
   authentication methods.  The end-entity certificate's public key has
   to be compatible with one of the certificate types listed in the
   extension described above.

4.  TLS Client and Server Handshake

   The "client_certificate_type" and "server_certificate_type"
   extensions MUST be sent in handshake phase as illustrated in Figure 1
   below.  The same extension shall be sent in Server Hello for TLS 1.2.







































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   Client                                           Server

 Key  ^ ClientHello
 Exch | + server_certificate_type*
      | + client_certificate_type*
      | + key_share*
      v + signature_algorithms*       -------->
                                                   ServerHello  ^ Key
                                                  + key_share*  v Exch
                                         {EncryptedExtensions}  ^ Server
                                    {+ server_certificate_type*}| Params
                                    {+ client_certificate_type*}|
                                         {CertificateRequest*}  v
                                                {Certificate*}  ^
                                          {CertificateVerify*}  | Auth
                                                    {Finished}  v
                                <-------   [Application Data*]
      ^ {Certificate*}
 Auth | {CertificateVerify*}
      v {Finished}              -------->
        [Application Data]      <------->   [Application Data]

               +  Indicates noteworthy extensions sent in the
                  previously noted message.

               *  Indicates optional or situation-dependent
                  messages/extensions that are not always sent.

               {} Indicates messages protected using keys
                  derived from a [sender]_handshake_traffic_secret.

               [] Indicates messages protected using keys
                  derived from [sender]_application_traffic_secret_N.



    Figure 1: Message Flow with certificate type extension for Full TLS
                               1.3 Handshake

4.1.  Client Hello

   In order to indicate the support of IEEE 1609.2 or ETSI TS 103097
   certificates, client MUST include an extension of type
   "client_certificate_type" and "server_certificate_type" in the
   extended Client Hello message.  The Hello extension is described in
   Section 4.1.2 of TLS 1.3 [RFC8446].





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   The extension 'client_certificate_type' sent in the client hello MAY
   carry a list of supported certificate types, sorted by client
   preference.  It is a list in the case where the client supports
   multiple certificate types.

   Client MAY respond along with supported certificates by sending a
   "Certificate" message immediately followed by the "CetificateVerify"
   message.  These specifications are valid for TLS 1.2 and TLS 1.3.

   All implementations SHOULD be prepared to handle extraneous
   certificates and arbitrary orderings from any TLS version, with the
   exception of the end-entity certificate which MUST be first.

4.2.  Server Hello

   When the server receives the Client Hello containing the
   client_certificate_type extension and/or the server_certificate_type
   extension, the following options are possible:

      - The server supports the extension described in this document.
      It selects a certificate type from the client_certificate_type
      field in the extended Client Hello and must take into account the
      client authentication list priority.

      - The server does not support the proposed certificate type and
      terminates the session with a fatal alert of type
      "unsupported_certificate".

      - The server does not support the extension defined in this
      document.  In this case, the server returns the server hello
      without the extensions defined in this document in case of TLS
      1.2.

      - The server supports the extension defined in this document, but
      it does not have any certificate type in common with the client.
      Then, the server terminates the session with a fatal alert of type
      "unsupported_certificate".

      - The server supports the extensions defined in this document and
      has at least one certificate type in common with the client.  In
      this case, the server MUST include the client_certificate_type
      extension in the Server Hello for TLS 1.2 or in Encrypted
      Extension for TLS 1.3.  Then, the server requests a certificate
      from the client (via the certificate_request message)

   It is worth to mention that the TLS client or server public keys are
   obtained from a certificate chain from a web page.




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5.  Certificate Verification

   Verification of an IEEE 1609.2/ ETSI TS 103097 certificates or
   certificate chain is described in section 5.5.2 of [IEEE1609.2].

6.  Examples

   Some of exchanged messages examples are illustrated in Figures 2 and
   3.

6.1.  TLS Server and TLS Client use the 1609Dot2 Certificate

   This section shows an example where the TLS client as well as the TLS
   server use the IEEE 1609.2 certificate.  In consequence, both the
   server and the client populate the client_certificate_type and
   server_certificate_type with extension IEEE 1609.2 certificates as
   mentioned in figure 2.

      Client                                           Server

   ClientHello,
   client_certificate_type*=1609Dot2,
   server_certificate_type*=1609Dot2,   -------->     ServerHello,
                                             {EncryptedExtensions}
                               {client_certificate_type*=1609Dot2}
                               {server_certificate_type*=1609Dot2}
                                             {CertificateRequest*}
                                                    {Certificate*}
                                              {CertificateVerify*}
                                                        {Finished}
     {Certificate*}           <-------         [Application Data*]
     {CertificateVerify*}
     {Finished}              -------->
     [Application Data]      <------->          [Application Data]


    Figure 2: TLS Client and TLS Server use the IEEE 1609.2 certificate

6.2.  TLS Client uses the IEEE 1609.2 certificate and TLS Server uses
      the X 509 certificate

   This example shows the TLS authentication, where the TLS Client
   populates the server_certificate_type extension with the X509
   certificate and Raw Public Key type as presented in figure 3. the
   client indicates its ability to receive and to validate an X509
   certificate from the server.  The server chooses the X509
   certificateto make its authentication with the Client.




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  Client                                           Server

ClientHello,
client_certificate_type*=(1609Dot2),
server_certificate_type*=(1609.9Dot, X509,RawPublicKey), ------->    ServerHello,
                                        {EncryptedExtensions}
                             {client_certificate_type*=1609Dot2}
                          {server_certificate_type*=X509}
                                               {Certificate*}
                                         {CertificateVerify*}
                                                   {Finished}
                            <---------    [Application Data*]
{Finished}                  --------->
[Application Data]          <-------->     [Application Data]


   Figure 3: TLS Client uses the IEEE 1609.2 certificate and TLS Server
                        uses the X 509 certificate

7.  Security Considerations

   This section provides an overview of the basic security
   considerations which need to be taken into account before
   implementing the necessary security mechanisms.  The security
   considerations described throughout [RFC8446] and [RFC5246] apply
   here as well.

   For security considerations in a vehicular environment, the minimal
   use of any TLS extensions is recommended such as :

      The "client_certificate_type" [IANA value 19] extension who's
      purpose was previously described in [RFC7250].

      The "server_certificate_type" [IANA value 20] extension who's
      purpose was previously described in [RFC7250].

      The "SessionTicket" [IANA value 35] extension for session
      resumption.

      In addition, servers SHOULD not support renegotiation [RFC5746]
      which presented Man-In-The-Middle (MITM) type attacks over the
      past years for TLS 1.2.

8.  Privacy Considerations

   For privacy considerations in a vehicular environment the use of EEE
   1609.2/ETSI TS 103097 certificate is recommended for many reasons:




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      In order to address the risk of a personal data leakage, messages
      exchanged for V2V communications are signed using IEEE 1609.2/ETSI
      TS 103097 pseudonym certificates

      The purpose of these certificates is to provide privacy relying on
      geographical and/or temporal validity criteria, and minimizing the
      exchange of private data

9.  IANA Considerations

   Existing IANA references have not been updated yet to point to this
   document.

   IANA is asked to register a new value in the "TLS Certificate Types"
   registry of Transport Layer Security (TLS) Extensions [TLS-
   Certificate-Types-Registry], as follows:

   o  Value: TBD Description: 1609Dot2 Reference: [THIS RFC]

10.  Acknowledgements

   The authors wish to thank Eric Rescola and Ilari Liusvaara for their
   feedback and suggestions on improving this document.  Thanks are due
   to Sean Turner for his valuable and detailed comments.  Special
   thanks to William Whyte and Maik Seewald for their guidance and
   support in the early stages of the draft.

11.  References

11.1.  Normative References

   [IEEE1609.2]
              IEEE, "IEEE Standard for Wireless Access in Vehicular
              Environments - Security Services for Applications and
              Management Messages", 2016.

   [RFC2119]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", March 1997.

   [RFC4492]  Blake-Wilson, S., Bolyard, N., Gupta, V., Hawk, C., and B.
              Moeller, "Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) Cipher Suites
              for Transport Layer Security (TLS)", May 2006.

   [RFC5246]  Dierks, T. and E. Rescorla, "The Transport Layer Security
              (TLS) Protocol Version 1.2", August 2008.






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   [RFC5746]  Rescorla, E., Ray, M., Dispensa, S., and N. Oskov,
              "Transport Layer Security (TLS) Renegotiation Indication
              Extension"", February 2010.

   [RFC7250]  Wouters, P., Tschofenig, H., Weiler, S., and T.  Kivinen,
              "Using Raw Public Keys in Transport Layer Security (TLS)
              and Datagram Transport Layer Security (DTLS)", June 2014.

   [RFC8446]  Rescorla, E., "The Transport Layer Security (TLS) Protocol
              Version 1.3", August 2018.

   [TS103097]
              ETSI, "ETSI TS 103 097 v1.3.1 (2017-10): Intelligent
              Transport Systems (ITS); Security; Security header and
              certificate formats", October 2017.

11.2.  Informative References

   [draft-serhrouchni-tls-certieee1609-00]
              KAISER, A., LABIOD, H., LONC, B., MSAHLI, M., and A.
              SERHROUCHNI, "Transport Layer Security (TLS)
              Authentication using ITS ETSI and IEEE certificates",
              august 2017.




























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Appendix A.  Co-Authors

   o  Nancy Cam-Winget
      CISCO, USA
      ncamwing@cisco.com

   o  Houda Labiod
      Telecom Paristech, France
      houda.labiod@telecom-paristech.fr

   o  Ahmed Serhrouchni
      Telecom ParisTech
      ahmed.serhrouchni@telecom-paristech.fr

Authors' Addresses

   Panos Kampanakis (editor)
   Cisco
   USA

   EMail: EMail: pkampana@cisco.com


   Mounira Msahli (editor)
   Telecom ParisTech
   France

   EMail: mounira.msahli@telecom-paristech.fr























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