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Network Working Group                                             W. Zhu
INTERNET-DRAFT                                              Google, Inc.
Intended Status: Informational                               M. Jennings
Expires: May 28, 2011                                  November 24, 2010


                   Implications of Full-Duplex HTTP
                    draft-zhu-http-fullduplex-02.txt


Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

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Copyright and License Notice

   Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
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   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.





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Abstract

   Full-duplex HTTP follows the basic HTTP request-response semantics
   but also allows the server to send the response to the client at the
   same time that the client is transmitting the request to the server.
   Requirements for Full-duplex HTTP are under-specified in the existing
   HTTP specification, and this memo intends to clarify the requirements
   for implementing Full-duplex HTTP under the standard HTTP protocol.


Table of Contents

   1  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
      1.1  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   2  Streaming in HTTP  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
      2.1  Request and Response Streaming  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
      2.2  Full-Duplex Streaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
   3  Protocol Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
      3.1  Initialization  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
      3.2  Termination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
      3.3  Persistent Connections  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
      3.4  Time-Out  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
      3.5  Proxies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
      3.6  Errors  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
   4  Application Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
      4.1  Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
      4.2  Fall Back . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
      4.3  Buffering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
      4.4  Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
   5  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   6  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   7  Acknowledgments  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   8  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   Author's Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

















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1  Introduction

   HTTP [RFC2616] is a stateless, RPC style protocol which requires
   communication between client and server follows a strict request-
   response pattern.

   HTTP may also be used to stream data from either client or server.
   When bi-directional streaming is required, two TCP connections are
   often employed to stream client and server data separately. Using two
   separate connections not only introduce overhead, but also make HTTP
   insufficient to be used as a standalone protocol, i.e. application-
   level protocols are required to manage the two connections.

   However, if the server is allowed to send the response to the client
   at the same time that a request is being transmitted from the client
   to the server, then effectively full-duplex streaming becomes
   possible under the standard HTTP protocol [RFC2616].

   Full-duplex streaming requires end-to-end support from both the
   client and server. More specifically, the client has to be explicitly
   designed to support such a capability.

   Given the unique properties of full-duplex HTTP, special requirements
   exist for both the client and server. And those requirements need be
   identified so that implementations will be able to follow the same
   standard behaviors in adopting full-duplex HTTP.

1.1  Terminology

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].


2  Streaming in HTTP

2.1  Request and Response Streaming

   Request streaming requires the server to deliver to the application
   in real-time any streaming data that has been received by the server.

   Response streaming requires the server to send to the client in real-
   time any streaming data that has been produced by the application.

   Chunked transfer-encoding [RFC2616] is expected for both request and
   response streaming. However, client or server should not design the
   underlying streaming or messaging API based on the chunked transfer-
   encoding (which is generated only hop-by-hop).



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   Most browsers don't support chunked transfer-encoding for requests.

2.2  Full-Duplex Streaming

   When full-duplex streaming is enabled, request and response are
   transmitted between client and server simultaneously over the same
   HTTP connection.

   Full-duplex streaming may be applied to any resource that is designed
   to concurrently stream request and response, for example a voice
   translator.

   Full-duplex streaming should still follow the standard HTTP request-
   response semantics and maintain the basic temporal dependency between
   the request and response:

   1  A server SHOULD NOT generate any response until it has received a
      new request. That is, unsolicited server-initiated response is not
      allowed.

   2  A server SHOULD NOT complete the response prematurely when the
      client has not completed the request. That is, a server can only
      complete the response after it has received the complete request
      from the client.


3  Protocol Considerations

3.1  Initialization

   Full-duplex streaming may be started as soon as the server receives
   the first byte of the request body. This behavior is significantly
   different from the technique commonly-known as Hanging GET, which
   generates a separate GET request for each piece of data that is
   streamed to the client.

3.2  Termination

   A client terminates request streaming by completing the request, i.e.
   sending out the last-chunk [RFC2616]. And the server may choose to
   continue streaming the response after it receives the complete
   request from the client, as decided by the application. Eventually
   the server terminates response streaming by sending out the last-
   chunk of response.

   Before a server receives the complete request from the client, the
   only way for the server to terminate response streaming is to close
   the connection. It is considered an illegal state for an HTTP



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   connection to have a pending request when the response has already
   been completed. A client should close the connection immediately if
   it receives a complete response when it is still streaming the
   request.

3.3  Persistent Connections

   It's important that HTTP keep-alive and pipelining still work with
   full-duplex HTTP. To achieve that, the client and server should
   respect the original semantics of HTTP persistent connections
   [RFC2616].

   Request streaming will make the connection unavailable for pipelined
   (GET) requests. Also, continued (POST) response streaming after the
   request has been completed will prevent any pipelined requests from
   being transmitted over the same connection.

3.4  Time-Out

   HTTP server or client may time-out connections while waiting for
   request or response. Full-duplex HTTP should not override this
   behavior. A connection may be closed due to time-out when either
   request or response streaming becomes inactive.

   Full-duplex HTTP introduces no special requirements on time-out of
   the underlying TPC connection. When time-out does happen both request
   and response streaming will be terminated.

3.5  Proxies

   HTTP proxies may not support concurrent responses, and one of the
   purposes of this document is to increase awareness of full-duplex
   HTTP communication in proxies.

   Proxies may also buffer streamed requests or responses, or have
   problems to handle chunked transfer-encoding, especially for
   requests.

3.6  Errors

   According to RFC2616 [RFC2616], a client should close the connection
   if it receives an error response when it is still transmitting the
   request. Full-duplex HTTP must respect this requirement.

   When a server is incapable of streaming response or decides to
   timeout, it should close the connection. This is also true for the
   client when it is streaming request.




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   A client or server should stop streaming any new data after it
   notices that the underlying TCP connection has been closed by the
   other party. In-flight data will be discarded under such a half-close
   behavior.


4  Application Considerations

4.1  Compatibility

   Full-duplex streaming is completely controlled by the server
   application, and should only be enabled for clients that have been
   explicitly identified by the server.

   It is not sufficient to enable full-duplex HTTP solely based on the
   User-Agent.

   For non-controlled client applications, the client needs advise its
   capability of full-duplex streaming via URL parameters or headers
   (for example, "X-Accept-Streaming: full-duplex;timeout=30").
   Otherwise, full-duplex streaming should be disabled, or the server
   should return 404 (Not Found) status if full-duplex streaming is
   mandatory for the requested resource.

4.2  Fall Back

   Proxies may disallow early responses, or buffer requests or
   responses. In such a case, the application may have to switch to a
   different protocol that uses two TCP connections and rely on polling
   techniques.

   One efficient way to trigger a fall back will be for the client to
   wait for initial response for a short time-out period. Generally
   there is no reliable way for a server to distinguish between ill-
   behaved clients and non-compatible proxies.

4.3  Buffering

   Full-duplex HTTP expects minimized buffering from both client and
   server. However, applications may choose to buffer a certain amount
   of streaming data for optimization or application specific purposes.

4.4  Messaging

   Since chunked transfer-encoding isn't a reliable way to provide
   message framing, messaging support has to be provided by the
   application stack, along with any required delivery guarantees.




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5  Security Considerations

   Full-duplex HTTP introduces no new security concerns beyond those
   known with regular HTTP communication.


6  IANA Considerations

   This document does not require any actions by the IANA.


7  Acknowledgments

   Thanks to Henrik Nordstrom, Jamie Lokier, and Mark Nottingham for
   their feedback when the subject of this document was originally
   brought up on httpbis.


8  Normative References

   [RFC2119]   Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
               Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [RFC2616]   Fielding, R., Gettys, J., Mogul, J., Frystyk, H.,
               Masinter, L., Leach, P., and T. Berners-Lee, "Hypertext
               Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1", RFC 2616, June 1999.


Author's Addresses

   Wenbo Zhu
   Google, Inc.
   1600 Amphitheatre Parkway
   Mountain View, CA 94043
   US

   Phone: +1 650 214 5894
   Email: wenboz@google.com


   Mike Jennings

   Email: mike.c.jennings@gmail.com








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