< draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-05.txt   draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-06.txt >
Network Working Group A. Petrescu Network Working Group A. Petrescu
Internet-Draft CEA, LIST Internet-Draft CEA, LIST
Intended status: Standards Track N. Benamar Intended status: Standards Track N. Benamar
Expires: March 14, 2018 Moulay Ismail University Expires: March 16, 2018 Moulay Ismail University
J. Haerri J. Haerri
Eurecom Eurecom
C. Huitema C. Huitema
Private Octopus Inc. Private Octopus Inc.
J. Lee J. Lee
Sangmyung University Sangmyung University
T. Ernst T. Ernst
YoGoKo YoGoKo
T. Li T. Li
Peloton Technology Peloton Technology
September 10, 2017 September 12, 2017
Transmission of IPv6 Packets over IEEE 802.11 Networks operating in mode Transmission of IPv6 Packets over IEEE 802.11 Networks operating in mode
Outside the Context of a Basic Service Set (IPv6-over-80211-OCB) Outside the Context of a Basic Service Set (IPv6-over-80211-OCB)
draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-05.txt draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-06.txt
Abstract Abstract
In order to transmit IPv6 packets on IEEE 802.11 networks run outside In order to transmit IPv6 packets on IEEE 802.11 networks run outside
the context of a basic service set (OCB, earlier "802.11p") there is the context of a basic service set (OCB, earlier "802.11p") there is
a need to define a few parameters such as the supported Maximum a need to define a few parameters such as the supported Maximum
Transmission Unit size on the 802.11-OCB link, the header format Transmission Unit size on the 802.11-OCB link, the header format
preceding the IPv6 header, the Type value within it, and others. preceding the IPv6 header, the Type value within it, and others.
This document describes these parameters for IPv6 and IEEE 802.11-OCB This document describes these parameters for IPv6 and IEEE 802.11-OCB
networks; it portrays the layering of IPv6 on 802.11-OCB similarly to networks; it portrays the layering of IPv6 on 802.11-OCB similarly to
skipping to change at page 2, line 10 skipping to change at page 2, line 10
Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on March 14, 2018. This Internet-Draft will expire on March 16, 2018.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
skipping to change at page 2, line 39 skipping to change at page 2, line 39
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3. Communication Scenarios where IEEE 802.11-OCB Links are Used 6 3. Communication Scenarios where IEEE 802.11-OCB Links are Used 6
4. Aspects introduced by the OCB mode to 802.11 . . . . . . . . 7 4. Aspects introduced by the OCB mode to 802.11 . . . . . . . . 7
5. Layering of IPv6 over 802.11-OCB as over Ethernet . . . . . . 11 5. Layering of IPv6 over 802.11-OCB as over Ethernet . . . . . . 11
5.1. Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 5.1. Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
5.2. Frame Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 5.2. Frame Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
5.2.1. Ethernet Adaptation Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 5.2.1. Ethernet Adaptation Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
5.3. Link-Local Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 5.3. Link-Local Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
5.4. Address Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 5.4. Address Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
5.4.1. Address Mapping -- Unicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 5.4.1. Address Mapping -- Unicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
5.4.2. Address Mapping -- Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 5.4.2. Address Mapping -- Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
5.5. Stateless Autoconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 5.5. Stateless Autoconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
5.6. Subnet Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 5.6. Subnet Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
6. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 6. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
7. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 7. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
8. Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 8. Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
9. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 9. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
10. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 10. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
10.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 10.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
10.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 10.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Appendix A. ChangeLog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Appendix A. ChangeLog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Appendix B. Changes Needed on a software driver 802.11a to Appendix B. Changes Needed on a software driver 802.11a to
become a 802.11-OCB driver . . . 27 become a 802.11-OCB driver . . . 27
Appendix C. Design Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Appendix C. Design Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
C.1. Vehicle ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 C.1. Vehicle ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
C.2. Reliability Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 C.2. Reliability Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
C.3. Multiple interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 C.3. Multiple interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
C.4. MAC Address Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 C.4. MAC Address Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Appendix D. IEEE 802.11 Messages Transmitted in OCB mode . . . . 31 Appendix D. IEEE 802.11 Messages Transmitted in OCB mode . . . . 31
Appendix E. Implementation Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Appendix E. Implementation Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
E.1. Capture in Monitor Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 E.1. Capture in Monitor Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
E.2. Capture in Normal Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 E.2. Capture in Normal Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
This document describes the transmission of IPv6 packets on IEEE Std This document describes the transmission of IPv6 packets on IEEE Std
802.11-OCB networks (earlier known as 802.11p) [IEEE-802.11-2012]. 802.11-OCB networks (earlier known as 802.11p) [IEEE-802.11-2016].
This involves the layering of IPv6 networking on top of the IEEE This involves the layering of IPv6 networking on top of the IEEE
802.11 MAC layer (with an LLC layer). Compared to running IPv6 over 802.11 MAC layer (with an LLC layer). Compared to running IPv6 over
the Ethernet MAC layer, there is no modification required to the the Ethernet MAC layer, there is no modification required to the
standards: IPv6 works fine directly over 802.11-OCB too (with an LLC standards: IPv6 works fine directly over 802.11-OCB too (with an LLC
layer). layer).
The term "802.11p" is an earlier definition. As of year 2012, the The term "802.11p" is an earlier definition. The behaviour of
behaviour of "802.11p" networks has been rolled in the document IEEE "802.11p" networks is rolled in the document IEEE Std 802.11-2016.
Std 802.11-2012. In that document the term 802.11p disappears. In that document the term 802.11p disappears. Instead, each 802.11p
Instead, each 802.11p feature is conditioned by a flag in the feature is conditioned by a flag in the Management Information Base.
Management Information Base. That flag is named "OCBActivated". That flag is named "OCBActivated". Whenever OCBActivated is set to
Whenever OCBActivated is set to true the feature it relates to, or true the feature it relates to, or represents, an earlier 802.11p
represents, an earlier 802.11p feature. For example, an 802.11 feature. For example, an 802.11 STAtion operating outside the
STAtion operating outside the context of a basic service set has the context of a basic service set has the OCBActivated flag set. Such a
OCBActivated flag set. Such a station, when it has the flag set, station, when it has the flag set, uses a BSS identifier equal to
uses a BSS identifier equal to ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff. ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff.
The IPv6 network layer operates on 802.11-OCB in the same manner as The IPv6 network layer operates on 802.11-OCB in the same manner as
it operates on 802.11 WiFi, with a few particular exceptions. The it operates on 802.11 WiFi, with a few particular exceptions. The
IPv6 network layer operates on WiFi by involving an Ethernet IPv6 network layer operates on WiFi by involving an Ethernet
Adaptation Layer; this Ethernet Adaptation Layer maps 802.11 headers Adaptation Layer; this Ethernet Adaptation Layer maps 802.11 headers
to Ethernet II headers. The operation of IP on Ethernet is described to Ethernet II headers. The operation of IP on Ethernet is described
in [RFC1042], [RFC2464] and [I-D.hinden-6man-rfc2464bis]. The in [RFC1042], [RFC2464] and [I-D.hinden-6man-rfc2464bis]. The
situation of IPv6 networking layer on Ethernet Adaptation Layer is situation of IPv6 networking layer on Ethernet Adaptation Layer is
illustrated below: illustrated below:
skipping to change at page 6, line 30 skipping to change at page 6, line 30
The RSU communicates with the On board Unit (OBU) in the vehicle over The RSU communicates with the On board Unit (OBU) in the vehicle over
802.11 wireless link operating in OCB mode. An RSU MAY be connected 802.11 wireless link operating in OCB mode. An RSU MAY be connected
to the Internet, and MAY be an IP router. When it is connected to to the Internet, and MAY be an IP router. When it is connected to
the Internet, the term V2I (Vehicle to Internet) is relevant. the Internet, the term V2I (Vehicle to Internet) is relevant.
OCB (outside the context of a basic service set - BSS): A mode of OCB (outside the context of a basic service set - BSS): A mode of
operation in which a STA is not a member of a BSS and does not operation in which a STA is not a member of a BSS and does not
utilize IEEE Std 802.11 authentication, association, or data utilize IEEE Std 802.11 authentication, association, or data
confidentiality. confidentiality.
802.11-OCB, or 802.11-OCB: text in document IEEE 802.11-2012 that is 802.11-OCB, or 802.11-OCB: text in document IEEE 802.11-2016 that is
flagged by "dot11OCBActivated". The text flagged "dot11OCBActivated" flagged by "dot11OCBActivated". The text flagged "dot11OCBActivated"
includes IEEE 802.11e for quality of service, 802.11j-2004 for half- includes IEEE 802.11e for quality of service, 802.11j-2004 for half-
clocked operations and (what was known earlier as) 802.11p for clocked operations and (what was known earlier as) 802.11p for
operation in the 5.9 GHz band and in mode OCB. operation in the 5.9 GHz band and in mode OCB.
3. Communication Scenarios where IEEE 802.11-OCB Links are Used 3. Communication Scenarios where IEEE 802.11-OCB Links are Used
The IEEE 802.11-OCB Networks are used for vehicular communications, The IEEE 802.11-OCB Networks are used for vehicular communications,
as 'Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments'. The IP communication as 'Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments'. The IP communication
scenarios for these environments have been described in several scenarios for these environments have been described in several
skipping to change at page 8, line 26 skipping to change at page 8, line 26
|<--- Asso Res. -------| | | |<--- Asso Res. -------| | |
| | |<------ Data -------->| | | |<------ Data -------->|
|<------ Data -------->| | | |<------ Data -------->| | |
|<------ Data -------->| |<------ Data -------->| |<------ Data -------->| |<------ Data -------->|
(a) 802.11 Infrastructure mode (b) 802.11-OCB mode (a) 802.11 Infrastructure mode (b) 802.11-OCB mode
The link 802.11-OCB was specified in IEEE Std 802.11p (TM) -2010 The link 802.11-OCB was specified in IEEE Std 802.11p (TM) -2010
[IEEE-802.11p-2010] as an amendment to IEEE Std 802.11 (TM) -2007, [IEEE-802.11p-2010] as an amendment to IEEE Std 802.11 (TM) -2007,
titled "Amendment 6: Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments". titled "Amendment 6: Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments".
Since then, this amendment has been included in IEEE 802.11(TM)-2012 Since then, this amendment has been included in IEEE 802.11(TM)-2016
[IEEE-802.11-2012], titled "IEEE Standard for Information [IEEE-802.11-2016], titled "IEEE Standard for Information
technology--Telecommunications and information exchange between technology--Telecommunications and information exchange between
systems Local and metropolitan area networks--Specific requirements systems Local and metropolitan area networks--Specific requirements
Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer
(PHY) Specifications"; the modifications are diffused throughout (PHY) Specifications"; the modifications are diffused throughout
various sections (e.g. the Time Advertisement message described in various sections (e.g. the Time Advertisement message described in
the earlier 802.11 (TM) p amendment is now described in section the earlier 802.11 (TM) p amendment is now described in section
'Frame formats', and the operation outside the context of a BSS 'Frame formats', and the operation outside the context of a BSS
described in section 'MLME'). described in section 'MLME').
In document 802.11-2012, specifically anything referring In document 802.11-2016, anything qualified specifically as
"OCBActivated", or "outside the context of a basic service set" is "OCBActivated", or "outside the context of a basic service set" is
actually referring to OCB aspects introduced to 802.11. Note that in actually referring to OCB aspects introduced to 802.11. Note that in
earlier 802.11p documents the term "OCBEnabled" was used instead of earlier 802.11p documents the term "OCBEnabled" was used instead of
the current "OCBActivated". the current "OCBActivated".
In order to delineate the aspects introduced by 802.11-OCB to 802.11, In order to delineate the aspects introduced by 802.11-OCB to 802.11,
we refer to the earlier [IEEE-802.11p-2010]. The amendment is we refer to the earlier [IEEE-802.11p-2010]. The amendment is
concerned with vehicular communications, where the wireless link is concerned with vehicular communications, where the wireless link is
similar to that of Wireless LAN (using a PHY layer specified by similar to that of Wireless LAN (using a PHY layer specified by
802.11a/b/g/n), but which needs to cope with the high mobility factor 802.11a/b/g/n), but which needs to cope with the high mobility factor
skipping to change at page 14, line 33 skipping to change at page 14, line 33
"Traffic Class", "Flow label") and fields in the "802.11 QoS Data "Traffic Class", "Flow label") and fields in the "802.11 QoS Data
Header" (e.g. "QoS Control") are not specified in this document. Header" (e.g. "QoS Control") are not specified in this document.
Guidance for a potential mapping is provided in Guidance for a potential mapping is provided in
[I-D.ietf-tsvwg-ieee-802-11], although it is not specific to OCB [I-D.ietf-tsvwg-ieee-802-11], although it is not specific to OCB
mode. mode.
5.3. Link-Local Addresses 5.3. Link-Local Addresses
The link-local address of an 802.11-OCB interface is formed in the The link-local address of an 802.11-OCB interface is formed in the
same manner as on an Ethernet interface. This manner is described in same manner as on an Ethernet interface. This manner is described in
section 5 of [RFC2464]. section 5 of [RFC2464]. Additionally, if stable identifiers are
needed, it is recommended to follow the Recommendation on Stable IPv6
Interface Identifiers [RFC8064]. Additionally, if semantically
opaque Interface Identifiers are needed, a potential method for
generating semantically opaque Interface Identifiers with IPv6
Stateless Address Autoconfiguration is given in [RFC7217].
5.4. Address Mapping 5.4. Address Mapping
For unicast as for multicast, there is no change from the unicast and For unicast as for multicast, there is no change from the unicast and
multicast address mapping format of Ethernet interfaces, as defined multicast address mapping format of Ethernet interfaces, as defined
by sections 6 and 7 of [RFC2464]. by sections 6 and 7 of [RFC2464].
5.4.1. Address Mapping -- Unicast 5.4.1. Address Mapping -- Unicast
The procedure for mapping IPv6 unicast addresses into Ethernet link- The procedure for mapping IPv6 unicast addresses into Ethernet link-
skipping to change at page 16, line 49 skipping to change at page 17, line 9
the identifier of an 802.11-OCB interface may involve privacy, MAC the identifier of an 802.11-OCB interface may involve privacy, MAC
address spoofing and IP address hijacking risks. A vehicle embarking address spoofing and IP address hijacking risks. A vehicle embarking
an On-Board Unit whose egress interface is 802.11-OCB may expose an On-Board Unit whose egress interface is 802.11-OCB may expose
itself to eavesdropping and subsequent correlation of data; this may itself to eavesdropping and subsequent correlation of data; this may
reveal data considered private by the vehicle owner; there is a risk reveal data considered private by the vehicle owner; there is a risk
of being tracked; see the privacy considerations described in of being tracked; see the privacy considerations described in
Appendix C. Appendix C.
If stable Interface Identifiers are needed in order to form IPv6 If stable Interface Identifiers are needed in order to form IPv6
addresses on 802.11-OCB links, it is recommended to follow the addresses on 802.11-OCB links, it is recommended to follow the
recommendation in [RFC8064]. recommendation in [RFC8064]. Additionally, if semantically opaque
Interface Identifiers are needed, a potential method for generating
semantically opaque Interface Identifiers with IPv6 Stateless Address
Autoconfiguration is given in [RFC7217].
5.6. Subnet Structure 5.6. Subnet Structure
A subnet is formed by the external 802.11-OCB interfaces of vehicles A subnet is formed by the external 802.11-OCB interfaces of vehicles
that are in close range (not their on-board interfaces). This that are in close range (not their on-board interfaces). This
ephemeral subnet structure is strongly influenced by the mobility of ephemeral subnet structure is strongly influenced by the mobility of
vehicles: the 802.11 hidden node effects appear. On another hand, vehicles: the 802.11 hidden node effects appear. On another hand,
the structure of the internal subnets in each car is relatively the structure of the internal subnets in each car is relatively
stable. stable.
skipping to change at page 21, line 29 skipping to change at page 21, line 39
[RFC6775] Shelby, Z., Ed., Chakrabarti, S., Nordmark, E., and C. [RFC6775] Shelby, Z., Ed., Chakrabarti, S., Nordmark, E., and C.
Bormann, "Neighbor Discovery Optimization for IPv6 over Bormann, "Neighbor Discovery Optimization for IPv6 over
Low-Power Wireless Personal Area Networks (6LoWPANs)", Low-Power Wireless Personal Area Networks (6LoWPANs)",
RFC 6775, DOI 10.17487/RFC6775, November 2012, RFC 6775, DOI 10.17487/RFC6775, November 2012,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6775>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6775>.
[RFC7136] Carpenter, B. and S. Jiang, "Significance of IPv6 [RFC7136] Carpenter, B. and S. Jiang, "Significance of IPv6
Interface Identifiers", RFC 7136, DOI 10.17487/RFC7136, Interface Identifiers", RFC 7136, DOI 10.17487/RFC7136,
February 2014, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7136>. February 2014, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7136>.
[RFC7217] Gont, F., "A Method for Generating Semantically Opaque
Interface Identifiers with IPv6 Stateless Address
Autoconfiguration (SLAAC)", RFC 7217,
DOI 10.17487/RFC7217, April 2014,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7217>.
[RFC7721] Cooper, A., Gont, F., and D. Thaler, "Security and Privacy [RFC7721] Cooper, A., Gont, F., and D. Thaler, "Security and Privacy
Considerations for IPv6 Address Generation Mechanisms", Considerations for IPv6 Address Generation Mechanisms",
RFC 7721, DOI 10.17487/RFC7721, March 2016, RFC 7721, DOI 10.17487/RFC7721, March 2016,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7721>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7721>.
[RFC8064] Gont, F., Cooper, A., Thaler, D., and W. Liu, [RFC8064] Gont, F., Cooper, A., Thaler, D., and W. Liu,
"Recommendation on Stable IPv6 Interface Identifiers", "Recommendation on Stable IPv6 Interface Identifiers",
RFC 8064, DOI 10.17487/RFC8064, February 2017, RFC 8064, DOI 10.17487/RFC8064, February 2017,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8064>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8064>.
skipping to change at page 23, line 25 skipping to change at page 23, line 37
Example URL http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7458115/ Example URL http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7458115/
accessed on August 17th, 2017.". accessed on August 17th, 2017.".
[IEEE-1609.4] [IEEE-1609.4]
"IEEE SA - 1609.4-2016 - IEEE Standard for Wireless Access "IEEE SA - 1609.4-2016 - IEEE Standard for Wireless Access
in Vehicular Environments (WAVE) -- Multi-Channel in Vehicular Environments (WAVE) -- Multi-Channel
Operation. Example URL Operation. Example URL
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7435228/ accessed on http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7435228/ accessed on
August 17th, 2017.". August 17th, 2017.".
[IEEE-802.11-2012] [IEEE-802.11-2016]
"802.11-2012 - IEEE Standard for Information technology-- "IEEE Standard 802.11-2016 - IEEE Standard for Information
Telecommunications and information exchange between Technology - Telecommunications and information exchange
systems Local and metropolitan area networks--Specific between systems Local and metropolitan area networks -
requirements Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control Specific requirements - Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium
(MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) Specifications. Downloaded Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY)
on October 17th, 2013, from IEEE Standards, document Specifications. Status - Active Standard. Description
freely available at URL retrieved freely on September 12th, 2017, at URL
http://standards.ieee.org/findstds/ https://standards.ieee.org/findstds/
standard/802.11-2012.html retrieved on October 17th, standard/802.11-2016.html".
2013.".
[IEEE-802.11p-2010] [IEEE-802.11p-2010]
"IEEE Std 802.11p (TM)-2010, IEEE Standard for Information "IEEE Std 802.11p (TM)-2010, IEEE Standard for Information
Technology - Telecommunications and information exchange Technology - Telecommunications and information exchange
between systems - Local and metropolitan area networks - between systems - Local and metropolitan area networks -
Specific requirements, Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Specific requirements, Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access
Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) Specifications, Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) Specifications,
Amendment 6: Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments; Amendment 6: Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments;
document freely available at URL document freely available at URL
http://standards.ieee.org/getieee802/ http://standards.ieee.org/getieee802/
download/802.11p-2010.pdf retrieved on September 20th, download/802.11p-2010.pdf retrieved on September 20th,
2013.". 2013.".
Appendix A. ChangeLog Appendix A. ChangeLog
The changes are listed in reverse chronological order, most recent The changes are listed in reverse chronological order, most recent
changes appearing at the top of the list. changes appearing at the top of the list.
From draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-05 to draft-ietf-ipwave-
ipv6-over-80211ocb-06
o Updated references of 802.11-OCB document from -2012 to the IEEE
802.11-2016.
o In the LL address section, and in SLAAC section, added references
to 7217 opaque IIDs and 8064 stable IIDs.
From draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-04 to draft-ietf-ipwave- From draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-04 to draft-ietf-ipwave-
ipv6-over-80211ocb-05 ipv6-over-80211ocb-05
o Lengthened the title and cleanded the abstract. o Lengthened the title and cleanded the abstract.
o Added text suggesting LLs may be easy to use on OCB, rather than o Added text suggesting LLs may be easy to use on OCB, rather than
GUAs based on received prefix. GUAs based on received prefix.
o Added the risks of spoofing and hijacking. o Added the risks of spoofing and hijacking.
 End of changes. 21 change blocks. 
41 lines changed or deleted 63 lines changed or added

This html diff was produced by rfcdiff 1.45. The latest version is available from http://tools.ietf.org/tools/rfcdiff/