< draft-jeong-ipwave-iot-dns-autoconf-05.txt   draft-jeong-ipwave-iot-dns-autoconf-06.txt >
IPWAVE Working Group J. Jeong IPWAVE Working Group J. Jeong
Internet-Draft Sungkyunkwan University Internet-Draft Sungkyunkwan University
Intended status: Standards Track S. Lee Intended status: Standards Track S. Lee
Expires: September 12, 2019 Ericsson-LG Expires: January 9, 2020 Ericsson-LG
J. Park J. Park
ETRI ETRI
March 11, 2019 July 8, 2019
DNS Name Autoconfiguration for Internet of Things Devices DNS Name Autoconfiguration for Internet of Things Devices
draft-jeong-ipwave-iot-dns-autoconf-05 draft-jeong-ipwave-iot-dns-autoconf-06
Abstract Abstract
This document specifies an autoconfiguration scheme for device This document specifies an autoconfiguration scheme for device
discovery and service discovery. Through the device discovery, this discovery and service discovery. Through the device discovery, this
document supports the global (or local) DNS naming of Internet of document supports the global (or local) DNS naming of Internet of
Things (IoT) devices, such as sensors, actuators, and in-vehicle Things (IoT) devices, such as sensors, actuators, and in-vehicle
units. By this scheme, the DNS name of an IoT device can be units. By this scheme, the DNS name of an IoT device can be
autoconfigured with the device's model information in wired and autoconfigured with the device's model information in wired and
wireless target networks (e.g., vehicle, road network, home, office, wireless target networks (e.g., vehicle, road network, home, office,
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Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on September 12, 2019. This Internet-Draft will expire on January 9, 2020.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2019 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2019 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
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5. DNS Name Autoconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5. DNS Name Autoconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
5.1. DNS Name Format with Object Identifier . . . . . . . . . 5 5.1. DNS Name Format with Object Identifier . . . . . . . . . 5
5.2. Procedure of DNS Name Autoconfiguration . . . . . . . . . 6 5.2. Procedure of DNS Name Autoconfiguration . . . . . . . . . 6
5.2.1. DNS Name Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.2.1. DNS Name Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
5.2.2. DNS Name Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 5.2.2. DNS Name Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
5.2.3. DNS Name Retrieval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.2.3. DNS Name Retrieval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
6. Location-Aware DNS Name Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 6. Location-Aware DNS Name Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
7. Macro-Location-Aware DNS Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 7. Macro-Location-Aware DNS Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
8. Micro-Location-Aware DNS Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 8. Micro-Location-Aware DNS Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
9. DNS Name Management for Mobile IoT Devices . . . . . . . . . 11 9. DNS Name Management for Mobile IoT Devices . . . . . . . . . 11
10. Service Discovery for IoT Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 10. Device Discovery for IoT Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
11. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 11. Service Discovery for IoT Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
12. Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 12. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
13. Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 13. Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
14. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 14. Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
14.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 15. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
14.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 15.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Appendix A. Changes from draft-jeong-ipwave-iot-dns-autoconf-04 16 15.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Appendix A. Changes from draft-jeong-ipwave-iot-dns-autoconf-05 17
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
Many Internet of Things (IoT) devices (e.g., sensors, actuators, and Many Internet of Things (IoT) devices (e.g., sensors, actuators, and
in-vehicle units) have begun to have wireless communication in-vehicle units) have begun to have wireless communication
capability (e.g., WiFi, Bluetooth, and ZigBee) for monitoring and capability (e.g., WiFi, Bluetooth, and ZigBee) for monitoring and
remote-controlling in a local network or the Internet. According to remote-controlling in a local network or the Internet. According to
the capacity, such IoT devices can be categorized into high-capacity the capacity, such IoT devices can be categorized into high-capacity
devices and low-capacity devices. High-capacity devices have a high- devices and low-capacity devices. High-capacity devices have a high-
power processor and a large storage, such as vehicles, road power processor and a large storage, such as vehicles, road
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pool. The clients respond to this request message by sending the pool. The clients respond to this request message by sending the
DHCPv6 server a reply message with their DNS information. Thus, the DHCPv6 server a reply message with their DNS information. Thus, the
DHCPv6 server can collect the pairs of DNS names and the DHCPv6 server can collect the pairs of DNS names and the
corresponding IPv6 addresses of the IoT devices. Then, as a corresponding IPv6 addresses of the IoT devices. Then, as a
collector, the DHCPv6 server can register the DNS names and the collector, the DHCPv6 server can register the DNS names and the
corresponding IPv6 addresses of IoT devices into the designated DNS corresponding IPv6 addresses of IoT devices into the designated DNS
server. server.
5.2.3. DNS Name Retrieval 5.2.3. DNS Name Retrieval
A smart device like smartphone can retrieve the DNS names of IoT For device discovery, a smart device (e.g., smartphone) can retrieve
devices by contacting a global (or local) DNS server having the IoT the DNS names of IoT devices by contacting a global (or local) DNS
device DNS names. If the smart device can retrieve the zone file server having the IoT device DNS names. If the smart device can
with the DNS names, it can display the information of IoT devices in retrieve the zone file with the DNS names, it can display the
a target network, such as home network and office network. With this information of IoT devices in a target network, such as a vehicle's
internal network, home network, and office network. With this
information, the user can monitor and control the IoT devices in the information, the user can monitor and control the IoT devices in the
Internet (or local network). To monitor or remote-control IoT Internet (or local network). To monitor or remote-control IoT
devices, Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) can be used devices, Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) can be used
[RFC7252]. [RFC7252].
6. Location-Aware DNS Name Configuration 6. Location-Aware DNS Name Configuration
If the DNS name of an IoT device includes location information, it If the DNS name of an IoT device includes location information, it
allows users to easily identify the physical location of each device. allows users to easily identify the physical location of each device.
This document proposes the representation of a location in a DNS This document proposes the representation of a location in a DNS
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it generates its new DNS names and registers them into a designated it generates its new DNS names and registers them into a designated
DNS server, specified by RDNSS option. DNS server, specified by RDNSS option.
When the IoT device recognizes the movement to another subnet, it can When the IoT device recognizes the movement to another subnet, it can
delete its previous DNS name(s) from the DNS server having the DNS delete its previous DNS name(s) from the DNS server having the DNS
name(s), using DNS dynamic update [RFC2136]. For at least one DNS name(s), using DNS dynamic update [RFC2136]. For at least one DNS
name to remain in a DNS server for the location management in Mobile name to remain in a DNS server for the location management in Mobile
IPv6 [RFC6275], the IoT device does not delete its default DNS name IPv6 [RFC6275], the IoT device does not delete its default DNS name
in its home network in Mobile IPv6. in its home network in Mobile IPv6.
10. Service Discovery for IoT Devices 10. Device Discovery for IoT Devices
DNSNA can facilitate the device discovery of a user for IoT devices
using a global (or local) DNS server having the IoT device DNS
information, as discussed in Section 5.2.3. This device discovery
based on unicast outperforms mDNS [RFC6762] using multicast in terms
of the discovery speed and the network bandwidth usage for discovery.
For example, a vehicle can have its own internal network having in-
vehicle devices (e.g., Electronic Control Units (ECUs) such as engine
control module, powertrain control module, transmission control
module, and brake control module). When the vehicle's internal
network is constructed by the Ethernet, those ECUs can autoconfigure
their DNS names with the DNSNA and register them with the vehicle's
local DNS server [IPWAVE-PS]. The local DNS server can register them
with a global DNS server accessible by the automotive service center
to monitor and make on-line diagnosis on them.
11. Service Discovery for IoT Devices
DNS SRV resource record (RR) can be used to support the service DNS SRV resource record (RR) can be used to support the service
discovery of the services provided by IoT devices [RFC2782]. This discovery of the services provided by IoT devices [RFC2782]. This
SRV RR specifies a service name, a transport layer protocol, the SRV RR specifies a service name, a transport layer protocol, the
corresponding port number, and an IP address of a process running in corresponding port number, and an IP address of a process running in
an IP host as a server to provide a service. An instance for a an IP host as a server to provide a service. An instance for a
service can be specified in this SRV RR in DNS-based service service can be specified in this SRV RR in DNS-based service
discovery [RFC6763]. After the DNS name registration in Section 5.2, discovery [RFC6763]. After the DNS name registration in Section 5.2,
IoT devices can register their services in the DNS server via a IoT devices can register their services in the DNS server via a
router with DNS SRV RRs for their services. router with DNS SRV RRs for their services.
After the service registration, an IoT user can retrieve services After the service registration, an IoT user can retrieve services
available in his/her target network through service discovery, which available in his/her target network through service discovery, which
can fetch the SRV RRs from the DNS server in the target network. can fetch the SRV RRs from the DNS server in the target network.
Once (s)he retrieves the list of the SRV RRs, (s)he can monitor or Once (s)he retrieves the list of the SRV RRs, (s)he can monitor or
remote-control the devices or their services by using the known remote-control the devices or their services by using the known
protocols and domain information of the devices or their services. protocols and domain information of the devices or their services.
For this monitoring or remote-controlling of IoT devices, Constrained For this monitoring or remote-controlling of IoT devices, Constrained
Application Protocol (CoAP) can be used [RFC7252]. Application Protocol (CoAP) can be used [RFC7252].
11. Security Considerations 12. Security Considerations
This document shares all the security issues of the NI protocol that This document shares all the security issues of the NI protocol that
are specified in the "Security Considerations" section of [RFC4620]. are specified in the "Security Considerations" section of [RFC4620].
To prevent the disclosure of location information for privacy To prevent the disclosure of location information for privacy
concern, the subdomains related to location can be encrypted by a concern, the subdomains related to location can be encrypted by a
shared key or public-and-private keys. For example, a DNS name of shared key or public-and-private keys. For example, a DNS name of
vehicle1.oid1.OID.coordinate1.road_segment_id1.LOC.road can be vehicle1.oid1.OID.coordinate1.road_segment_id1.LOC.road can be
represented as vehicle1.oid1.OID.xxx.yyy.LOC.road where vehicle1 is represented as vehicle1.oid1.OID.xxx.yyy.LOC.road where vehicle1 is
unique ID, oid1 is object ID, xxx is a string of the encrypted unique ID, oid1 is object ID, xxx is a string of the encrypted
representation of the coordinate (denoted as coordinate1) in a road representation of the coordinate (denoted as coordinate1) in a road
segment, and yyy is a string of the encrypted representation of the segment, and yyy is a string of the encrypted representation of the
road segment ID (denoted as road_segment_id1). Thus, the location of road segment ID (denoted as road_segment_id1). Thus, the location of
the vehicle1 can be protected from unwanted users by encryption. the vehicle1 can be protected from unwanted users by encryption.
12. Acknowledgments 13. Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the This work was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the
National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of
Education (2017R1D1A1B03035885). Education (2017R1D1A1B03035885).
This work was supported in part by Global Research Laboratory Program This work was supported by the MSIT (Ministry of Science and ICT),
through the NRF funded by the Ministry of Science and ICT (MSIT) Korea, under the ITRC (Information Technology Research Center)
(NRF-2013K1A1A2A02078326) and by the DGIST R&D Program of the MSIT support program (IITP-2019-2017-0-01633) supervised by the IITP
(18-EE-01). (Institute for Information & communications Technology Promotion).
13. Contributors 14. Contributors
This document is the group work of IPWAVE working group. This This document is the group work of IPWAVE working group. This
document has the following contributing authors considered co- document has the following contributing authors considered co-
authors: authors:
o Keuntae Lee (Sungkyunkwan University) o Keuntae Lee (Sungkyunkwan University)
o Seokhwa Kim (Sungkyunkwan University) o Seokhwa Kim (Sungkyunkwan University)
14. References 15. References
14.1. Normative References 15.1. Normative References
[RFC1035] Mockapetris, P., "Domain Names - Implementation and [RFC1035] Mockapetris, P., "Domain Names - Implementation and
Specification", RFC 1035, November 1987. Specification", RFC 1035, November 1987.
[RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997. Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.
[RFC3315] Droms, R., Ed., Bound, J., Volz, B., Lemon, T., Perkins, [RFC3315] Droms, R., Ed., Bound, J., Volz, B., Lemon, T., Perkins,
C., and M. Carney, "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol C., and M. Carney, "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
for IPv6 (DHCPv6)", RFC 3315, July 2003. for IPv6 (DHCPv6)", RFC 3315, July 2003.
skipping to change at page 13, line 45 skipping to change at page 14, line 20
Address Autoconfiguration", RFC 4862, September 2007. Address Autoconfiguration", RFC 4862, September 2007.
[RFC6840] Weiler, S., Ed. and D. Blacka, Ed., "Clarifications and [RFC6840] Weiler, S., Ed. and D. Blacka, Ed., "Clarifications and
Implementation Notes for DNS Security (DNSSEC)", RFC 6840, Implementation Notes for DNS Security (DNSSEC)", RFC 6840,
February 2013. February 2013.
[RFC8106] Jeong, J., Park, S., Beloeil, L., and S. Madanapalli, [RFC8106] Jeong, J., Park, S., Beloeil, L., and S. Madanapalli,
"IPv6 Router Advertisement Options for DNS Configuration", "IPv6 Router Advertisement Options for DNS Configuration",
RFC 8106, March 2017. RFC 8106, March 2017.
14.2. Informative References 15.2. Informative References
[DSRC-WAVE] [DSRC-WAVE]
Morgan, Y., "Notes on DSRC & WAVE Standards Suite: Its Morgan, Y., "Notes on DSRC & WAVE Standards Suite: Its
Architecture, Design, and Characteristics", Architecture, Design, and Characteristics",
IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials, 12(4), 2012. IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials, 12(4), 2012.
[IEEE-802.11] [IEEE-802.11]
"Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and "Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and
Physical Layer (PHY) Specifications", March 2012. Physical Layer (PHY) Specifications", March 2012.
skipping to change at page 15, line 6 skipping to change at page 15, line 28
Area Networks (WPANs)", June 2005. Area Networks (WPANs)", June 2005.
[IEEE-802.15.4] [IEEE-802.15.4]
"Part 15.4: Low-Rate Wireless Personal Area Networks (LR- "Part 15.4: Low-Rate Wireless Personal Area Networks (LR-
WPANs)", September 2011. WPANs)", September 2011.
[IEEE-802.3] [IEEE-802.3]
"IEEE Standard for Ethernet", December 2012. "IEEE Standard for Ethernet", December 2012.
[IPv6-over-802.11-OCB] [IPv6-over-802.11-OCB]
Petrescu, A., Benamar, N., Haerri, J., Lee, J., and T. Benamar, N., Haerri, J., Lee, J., and T. Ernst, "Basic
Ernst, "Transmission of IPv6 Packets over IEEE 802.11 support for IPv6 over IEEE Std 802.11 Networks operating
Networks operating in mode Outside the Context of a Basic Outside the Context of a Basic Service Set (IPv6-over-
Service Set (IPv6-over-80211-OCB)", draft-ietf-ipwave- 80211-OCB)", draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-47 (work
ipv6-over-80211ocb-34 (work in progress), December 2018. in progress), June 2019.
[IPWAVE-PS]
Jeong, J., Ed., "IP Wireless Access in Vehicular
Environments (IPWAVE): Problem Statement and Use Cases",
draft-ietf-ipwave-vehicular-networking-09 (work in
progress), May 2019.
[oneM2M-OID] [oneM2M-OID]
"Object Identifier based M2M Device Identification "Object Identifier based M2M Device Identification
Scheme", February 2014. Scheme", February 2014.
[RFC2136] Vixie, P., Ed., Thomson, S., Rekhter, Y., and J. Bound, [RFC2136] Vixie, P., Ed., Thomson, S., Rekhter, Y., and J. Bound,
"Dynamic Updates in the Domain Name System (DNS UPDATE)", "Dynamic Updates in the Domain Name System (DNS UPDATE)",
RFC 2136, April 1997. RFC 2136, April 1997.
[RFC2782] Gulbrandsen, A., Vixie, P., and L. Esibov, "A DNS RR for [RFC2782] Gulbrandsen, A., Vixie, P., and L. Esibov, "A DNS RR for
skipping to change at page 16, line 5 skipping to change at page 17, line 5
Discovery", RFC 6763, February 2013. Discovery", RFC 6763, February 2013.
[RFC7252] Shelby, Z., Hartke, K., and C. Bormann, "The Constrained [RFC7252] Shelby, Z., Hartke, K., and C. Bormann, "The Constrained
Application Protocol (CoAP)", RFC 7252, June 2014. Application Protocol (CoAP)", RFC 7252, June 2014.
[SALA] Jeong, J., Yeon, S., Kim, T., Lee, H., Kim, S., and S. [SALA] Jeong, J., Yeon, S., Kim, T., Lee, H., Kim, S., and S.
Kim, "SALA: Smartphone-Assisted Localization Algorithm for Kim, "SALA: Smartphone-Assisted Localization Algorithm for
Positioning Indoor IoT Devices", Springer Wireless Positioning Indoor IoT Devices", Springer Wireless
Networks, Vol. 24, No. 1, January 2018. Networks, Vol. 24, No. 1, January 2018.
Appendix A. Changes from draft-jeong-ipwave-iot-dns-autoconf-04 Appendix A. Changes from draft-jeong-ipwave-iot-dns-autoconf-05
The following changes are made from draft-jeong-ipwave-iot-dns- The following changes are made from draft-jeong-ipwave-iot-dns-
autoconf-04: autoconf-05:
o In Introduction Section, IPv6-over-802.11-OCB is mentioned for the o In Section 10, device discovery is explained. Especially, in-
IPv6 packet delivery over an IEEE-802.11-OCB link. In Informative vehicle devices can be registered with a vehicle's local DNS
References, the reference to IPv6-over-802.11-OCB is added. server through DNSNA for on-line diagnosis.
Authors' Addresses Authors' Addresses
Jaehoon Paul Jeong Jaehoon Paul Jeong
Department of Software Department of Computer Science and Engineering
Sungkyunkwan University Sungkyunkwan University
2066 Seobu-Ro, Jangan-Gu 2066 Seobu-Ro, Jangan-Gu
Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do 16419 Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do 16419
Republic of Korea Republic of Korea
Phone: +82 31 299 4957 Phone: +82 31 299 4957
Fax: +82 31 290 7996 Fax: +82 31 290 7996
EMail: pauljeong@skku.edu EMail: pauljeong@skku.edu
URI: http://iotlab.skku.edu/people-jaehoon-jeong.php URI: http://iotlab.skku.edu/people-jaehoon-jeong.php
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