draft-ietf-6lo-nfc-02.txt   draft-ietf-6lo-nfc-03.txt 
6Lo Working Group Y-G. Hong 6Lo Working Group Y-G. Hong
Internet-Draft Y-H. Choi Internet-Draft Y-H. Choi
Intended status: Standards Track ETRI Intended status: Standards Track ETRI
Expires: April 19, 2016 J-S. Youn Expires: September 22, 2016 J-S. Youn
DONG-EUI Univ DONG-EUI Univ
D-K. Kim D-K. Kim
KNU KNU
J-H. Choi J-H. Choi
Samsung Electronics Co., Samsung Electronics Co.,
October 17, 2015 March 21, 2016
Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Near Field Communication Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Near Field Communication
draft-ietf-6lo-nfc-02 draft-ietf-6lo-nfc-03
Abstract Abstract
Near field communication (NFC) is a set of standards for smartphones Near field communication (NFC) is a set of standards for smartphones
and portable devices to establish radio communication with each other and portable devices to establish radio communication with each other
by touching them together or bringing them into proximity, usually no by touching them together or bringing them into proximity, usually no
more than 10 cm. NFC standards cover communications protocols and more than 10 cm. NFC standards cover communications protocols and
data exchange formats, and are based on existing radio-frequency data exchange formats, and are based on existing radio-frequency
identification (RFID) standards including ISO/IEC 14443 and FeliCa. identification (RFID) standards including ISO/IEC 14443 and FeliCa.
The standards include ISO/IEC 18092 and those defined by the NFC The standards include ISO/IEC 18092 and those defined by the NFC
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Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
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and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on April 19, 2016. This Internet-Draft will expire on September 22, 2016.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2015 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2016 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
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to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must
include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
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4.6. Dispatch Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 4.6. Dispatch Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
4.7. Header Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 4.7. Header Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
4.8. Fragmentation and Reassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 4.8. Fragmentation and Reassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
4.9. Unicast Address Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 4.9. Unicast Address Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
4.10. Multicast Address Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 4.10. Multicast Address Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
5. Internet Connectivity Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 5. Internet Connectivity Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
5.1. NFC-enabled Device Connected to the Internet . . . . . . 14 5.1. NFC-enabled Device Connected to the Internet . . . . . . 14
5.2. Isolated NFC-enabled Device Network . . . . . . . . . . . 15 5.2. Isolated NFC-enabled Device Network . . . . . . . . . . . 15
6. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 6. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
7. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 7. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
8. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 8. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
9. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 9. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
9.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 9.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
9.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 9.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
NFC is a set of short-range wireless technologies, typically NFC is a set of short-range wireless technologies, typically
requiring a distance of 10 cm or less. NFC operates at 13.56 MHz on requiring a distance of 10 cm or less. NFC operates at 13.56 MHz on
ISO/IEC 18000-3 air interface and at rates ranging from 106 kbit/s to ISO/IEC 18000-3 air interface and at rates ranging from 106 kbit/s to
424 kbit/s. NFC always involves an initiator and a target; the 424 kbit/s. NFC always involves an initiator and a target; the
initiator actively generates an RF field that can power a passive initiator actively generates an RF field that can power a passive
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point-to-point link only. Unlike in BT-LE, NFC link does not point-to-point link only. Unlike in BT-LE, NFC link does not
consider star topology and mesh network topology but peer-to-peer consider star topology and mesh network topology but peer-to-peer
topology and simple multi-hop topology. Due to this characteristics, topology and simple multi-hop topology. Due to this characteristics,
6LoWPAN functionality, such as addressing and auto-configuration, and 6LoWPAN functionality, such as addressing and auto-configuration, and
header compression, is specialized into NFC. header compression, is specialized into NFC.
4.3. Stateless Address Autoconfiguration 4.3. Stateless Address Autoconfiguration
A NFC-enabled device (i.e., 6LN) performs stateless address A NFC-enabled device (i.e., 6LN) performs stateless address
autoconfiguration as per RFC4862 [6]. A 64-bit Interface identifier autoconfiguration as per RFC4862 [6]. A 64-bit Interface identifier
(IID) for a NFC interface MAY be formed by utilizing the 6-bit NFC (IID) for a NFC interface is formed by utilizing the 6-bit NFC LLCP
LLCP address (i.e., SSAP or DSAP) (see Section 3.3). In the address (i.e., SSAP or DSAP) (see Section 3.3). In the viewpoint of
viewpoint of address configuration, such an IID MAY guarantee a address configuration, such an IID MAY guarantee a stable IPv6
stable IPv6 address because each data link connection is uniquely address because each data link connection is uniquely identified by
identified by the pair of DSAP and SSAP included in the header of the pair of DSAP and SSAP included in the header of each LLC PDU in
each LLC PDU in NFC. NFC.
Following the guidance of RFC7136 [10], interface Identifiers of all Following the guidance of RFC7136 [10], interface Identifiers of all
unicast addresses for NFC-enabled devices are formed on the basis of unicast addresses for NFC-enabled devices are formed on the basis of
64 bits long and constructed in a modified EUI-64 format as shown in 64 bits long and constructed in a modified EUI-64 format as shown in
Figure 6. Figure 6.
0 1 3 4 5 6 0 1 3 4 5 6
0 6 2 8 8 3 0 6 2 8 8 3
+----------------+----------------+----------------+----------+------+ +----------------+----------------+----------------+----------+------+
|0000000000000000|0000000011111111|1111111000000000|0000000000| SSAP | |0000000000000000|0000000011111111|1111111000000000|0000000000| SSAP |
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followed by payload, as depicted in Figure 8. followed by payload, as depicted in Figure 8.
+---------------+---------------+--------------+ +---------------+---------------+--------------+
| IPHC Dispatch | IPHC Header | Payload | | IPHC Dispatch | IPHC Header | Payload |
+---------------+---------------+--------------+ +---------------+---------------+--------------+
Figure 8: A IPv6-over-NFC Encapsulated 6LOWPAN_IPHC Compressed IPv6 Figure 8: A IPv6-over-NFC Encapsulated 6LOWPAN_IPHC Compressed IPv6
Datagram Datagram
The dispatch value may be treated as an unstructured namespace. Only The dispatch value may be treated as an unstructured namespace. Only
a single pattern is used to represent current LoBAC functionality. a single pattern is used to represent current IPv6-over-NFC
functionality.
+------------+--------------------+-----------+ +------------+--------------------+-----------+
| Pattern | Header Type | Reference | | Pattern | Header Type | Reference |
+------------+--------------------+-----------+ +------------+--------------------+-----------+
| 01 1xxxxx | 6LOWPAN_IPHC | [RFC6282] | | 01 1xxxxx | 6LOWPAN_IPHC | [RFC6282] |
+------------+--------------------+-----------+ +------------+--------------------+-----------+
Figure 9: Dispatch Values Figure 9: Dispatch Values
Other IANA-assigned 6LoWPAN Dispatch values do not apply to this Other IANA-assigned 6LoWPAN Dispatch values do not apply to this
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can play multi-channel sound of music together. In addition, can play multi-channel sound of music together. In addition,
attached three or more mobile phones can make an extended banner to attached three or more mobile phones can make an extended banner to
show longer sentences in a concert hall. show longer sentences in a concert hall.
6. IANA Considerations 6. IANA Considerations
There are no IANA considerations related to this document. There are no IANA considerations related to this document.
7. Security Considerations 7. Security Considerations
The method of deriving Interface Identifiers from 6-bit NFC Link When interface identifiers (IIDs) are generated, devices and users
layer addresses is intended to preserve global uniqueness when it is are required to consider mitigating various threats, such as
possible. Therefore, it is to required to protect from duplication correlation of activities over time, location tracking, device-
through accident or forgery. specific vulnerability exploitation, and address scanning.
IPv6-over-NFC is, in practice, not used for long-lived links for big
size data transfer or multimedia streaming, but used for extremely
short-lived links (i.e., single touch-based approaches) for ID
verification and mobile payment. This will mitigate the threat of
correlation of activities over time.
IPv6-over-NFC uses an IPv6 interface identifier formed from a "Short
Address" and a set of well-known constant bits (such as padding with
'0's) for the modified EUI-64 format. However, the short address of
NFC link layer (LLC) is not generated as a physically permanent value
but logically generated for each connection. Thus, every single
touch connection can use a different short address of NFC link with
an extremely short-lived link. This can mitigate address scanning as
well as location tracking and device-specific vulnerability
exploitation.
However, malicious tries for one connection of a long-lived link with
NFC technology are not secure, so the method of deriving interface
identifiers from 6-bit NFC Link layer addresses is intended to
preserve global uniqueness when it is possible. Therefore, it
requires to protect from duplication through accident or forgery and
to define a way to include sufficient bit of entropy in the IPv6
interface identifier, such as random EUI-64.
8. Acknowledgements 8. Acknowledgements
We are grateful to the members of the IETF 6lo working group. We are grateful to the members of the IETF 6lo working group.
Michael Richardson, Suresh Krishnan, Pascal Thubert, Carsten Bormann, Michael Richardson, Suresh Krishnan, Pascal Thubert, Carsten Bormann,
and Alexandru Petrescu have provided valuable feedback for this and Alexandru Petrescu have provided valuable feedback for this
draft. draft.
9. References 9. References
 End of changes. 9 change blocks. 
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