draft-ietf-6man-rfc4291bis-06.txt   draft-ietf-6man-rfc4291bis-07.txt 
Network Working Group R. Hinden Network Working Group R. Hinden
Internet-Draft Check Point Software Internet-Draft Check Point Software
Obsoletes: 4291 (if approved) S. Deering Obsoletes: 4291 (if approved) S. Deering
Intended status: Standards Track Retired Intended status: Standards Track Retired
Expires: May 19, 2017 November 15, 2016 Expires: August 4, 2017 January 31, 2017
IP Version 6 Addressing Architecture IP Version 6 Addressing Architecture
draft-ietf-6man-rfc4291bis-06 draft-ietf-6man-rfc4291bis-07
Abstract Abstract
This specification defines the addressing architecture of the IP This specification defines the addressing architecture of the IP
Version 6 (IPv6) protocol. The document includes the IPv6 addressing Version 6 (IPv6) protocol. The document includes the IPv6 addressing
model, text representations of IPv6 addresses, definition of IPv6 model, text representations of IPv6 addresses, definition of IPv6
unicast addresses, anycast addresses, and multicast addresses, and an unicast addresses, anycast addresses, and multicast addresses, and an
IPv6 node's required addresses. IPv6 node's required addresses.
This document obsoletes RFC 4291, "IP Version 6 Addressing This document obsoletes RFC 4291, "IP Version 6 Addressing
skipping to change at page 1, line 38 skipping to change at page 1, line 38
Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on May 19, 2017. This Internet-Draft will expire on August 4, 2017.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2016 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must
include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
skipping to change at page 2, line 44 skipping to change at page 2, line 44
2.4.3. The Loopback Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.4.3. The Loopback Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.4.4. Global Unicast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.4.4. Global Unicast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.4.5. IPv6 Addresses with Embedded IPv4 Addresses . . . . . 13 2.4.5. IPv6 Addresses with Embedded IPv4 Addresses . . . . . 13
2.4.5.1. IPv4-Compatible IPv6 Address . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.4.5.1. IPv4-Compatible IPv6 Address . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.4.5.2. IPv4-Mapped IPv6 Address . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.4.5.2. IPv4-Mapped IPv6 Address . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.4.6. Link-Local IPv6 Unicast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.4.6. Link-Local IPv6 Unicast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.4.7. Other Local Unicast IPv6 Addresses . . . . . . . . . 14 2.4.7. Other Local Unicast IPv6 Addresses . . . . . . . . . 14
2.5. Anycast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.5. Anycast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.5.1. Required Anycast Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.5.1. Required Anycast Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.6. Multicast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 2.6. Multicast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.6.1. Pre-Defined Multicast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.6.1. Pre-Defined Multicast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.7. A Node's Required Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 2.7. A Node's Required Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
4. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 4. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
5. Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 5. Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
6. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 6. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
6.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 6.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
6.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 6.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Appendix A. Modified EUI-64 Format Interface Identifiers . . . . 25 Appendix A. Modified EUI-64 Format Interface Identifiers . . . . 26
A.1. Creating Modified EUI-64 Format Interface Identifiers . . 26 A.1. Creating Modified EUI-64 Format Interface Identifiers . . 27
Appendix B. CHANGES SINCE RFC 4291 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Appendix B. CHANGES SINCE RFC 4291 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
This specification defines the addressing architecture of the IP This specification defines the addressing architecture of the IP
Version 6 protocol. It includes the basic formats for the various Version 6 protocol. It includes the basic formats for the various
types of IPv6 addresses (unicast, anycast, and multicast). types of IPv6 addresses (unicast, anycast, and multicast).
2. IPv6 Addressing 2. IPv6 Addressing
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the node address 2001:0db8:0:cd30:123:4567:89ab:cdef the node address 2001:0db8:0:cd30:123:4567:89ab:cdef
and its subnet number 2001:0db8:0:cd30::/60 and its subnet number 2001:0db8:0:cd30::/60
can be abbreviated as 2001:0db8:0:cd30:123:4567:89ab:cdef/60 can be abbreviated as 2001:0db8:0:cd30:123:4567:89ab:cdef/60
2.2.3. Recommendation for outputting IPv6 addresses 2.2.3. Recommendation for outputting IPv6 addresses
This section provides a recommendation for systems generating and This section provides a recommendation for systems generating and
outputting IPv6 addresses as text. Note, all implementations must outputting IPv6 addresses as text. Note, all implementations must
accept and process all addresses in the formats defined in the accept and process all addresses in the formats defined in the
previous two sections of this document. The recommendations are as previous two sections of this document. Background on this
follows: recommendation can be found in [RFC5952].
The recommendations are as follows:
1. The hexadecimal digits "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", and "f" in an IPv6 1. The hexadecimal digits "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", and "f" in an IPv6
address must be represented in lowercase. address must be represented in lowercase.
2. Leading zeros in a 16-Bit Field must be suppressed. For example, 2. Leading zeros in a 16-Bit Field must be suppressed. For example,
2001:0db8::0001 2001:0db8::0001
is not correct and must be represented as is not correct and must be represented as
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is correct, but is correct, but
2001:db8::1:1:1:1:1 2001:db8::1:1:1:1:1
is not correct. is not correct.
7. The text representation method describe in this section should 7. The text representation method describe in this section should
also be use for text Representation of IPv6 Address Prefixes. For also be use for text Representation of IPv6 Address Prefixes. For
example example
0:0:0:0:0:ffff:192.0.2.1 2001:0db8:0000:cd30:0000:0000:0000:0000/60
should be shown as should be shown as
::ffff:192.0.2.1 2001:0db8:0:cd30::/60
8. The text representation method describe in this section should be 8. The text representation method describe in this section should be
applied for IPv6 addresses with embedded IPv4 address. For applied for IPv6 addresses with embedded IPv4 address. For
example example
2001:0db8:0000:cd30:0000:0000:0000:0000/60 0:0:0:0:0:ffff:192.0.2.1
should be shown as should be shown as
2001:0db8:0:cd30::/60 ::ffff:192.0.2.1
2.3. Address Type Identification 2.3. Address Type Identification
The type of an IPv6 address is identified by the high-order bits of The type of an IPv6 address is identified by the high-order bits of
the address, as follows: the address, as follows:
Address type Binary prefix IPv6 notation Section Address type Binary prefix IPv6 notation Section
------------ ------------- ------------- ------- ------------ ------------- ------------- -------
Unspecified 00...0 (128 bits) ::/128 2.4.2 Unspecified 00...0 (128 bits) ::/128 2.4.2
Loopback 00...1 (128 bits) ::1/128 2.4.3 Loopback 00...1 (128 bits) ::1/128 2.4.3
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be found in the IANA Internet Protocol Version 6 Address Space be found in the IANA Internet Protocol Version 6 Address Space
registry [IANA-AD] and the IANA IPv6 Special-Purpose Address Registry registry [IANA-AD] and the IANA IPv6 Special-Purpose Address Registry
[IANA-SP]. [IANA-SP].
2.4. Unicast Addresses 2.4. Unicast Addresses
IPv6 unicast addresses are aggregatable with prefixes of arbitrary IPv6 unicast addresses are aggregatable with prefixes of arbitrary
bit-length, similar to IPv4 addresses under Classless Inter-Domain bit-length, similar to IPv4 addresses under Classless Inter-Domain
Routing. Routing.
IPv6 unicast routing is based on prefixes of any valid length up to
128 [BCP198]. For example, [RFC6164] standardises 127 bit prefixes
on inter-router point-to-point links. However, the Interface ID of
all unicast addresses, except those that start with the binary value
000, is required to be 64 bits long. The rationale for the 64 bit
boundary in IPv6 addresses can be found in [RFC7421]
There are several types of unicast addresses in IPv6, in particular, There are several types of unicast addresses in IPv6, in particular,
Global Unicast, Local unicast, and Link-Local unicast. There are Global Unicast, Local unicast, and Link-Local unicast. There are
also some special-purpose subtypes of Global Unicast, such as IPv6 also some special-purpose subtypes of Global Unicast, such as IPv6
addresses with embedded IPv4 addresses. Additional address types or addresses with embedded IPv4 addresses. Additional address types or
subtypes can be defined in the future. subtypes can be defined in the future.
IPv6 nodes may have considerable or little knowledge of the internal IPv6 nodes may have considerable or little knowledge of the internal
structure of the IPv6 address, depending on the role the node plays structure of the IPv6 address, depending on the role the node plays
(for instance, host versus router). At a minimum, a node may (for instance, host versus router). At a minimum, a node may
consider that unicast addresses (including its own) have no internal consider that unicast addresses (including its own) have no internal
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Interface IDs must be viewed outside of the node that created Interface IDs must be viewed outside of the node that created
Interface ID as an opaque bit string without any internal structure. Interface ID as an opaque bit string without any internal structure.
Note that the uniqueness of interface identifiers is independent of Note that the uniqueness of interface identifiers is independent of
the uniqueness of IPv6 addresses. For example, a Global Unicast the uniqueness of IPv6 addresses. For example, a Global Unicast
address may be created with an interface identifier that is only address may be created with an interface identifier that is only
unique on a single subnet, and a Link-Local address may be created unique on a single subnet, and a Link-Local address may be created
with interface identifier that is unique over multiple subnets. with interface identifier that is unique over multiple subnets.
For all unicast addresses, except those that start with the binary As noted in Section 2.4, all unicast addresses, except those that
value 000, Interface IDs are required to be 64 bits long. Background start with the binary value 000, Interface IDs are required to be 64
on the 64 bit boundary in IPv6 addresses can be found in [RFC7421]. bits long.
The details of forming interface identifiers are defined in other The details of forming interface identifiers are defined in other
specifications, such as "Privacy Extensions for Stateless Address specifications, such as "Privacy Extensions for Stateless Address
Autoconfiguration in IPv6" [RFC4941] or "A Method for Generating Autoconfiguration in IPv6" [RFC4941] or "A Method for Generating
Semantically Opaque Interface Identifiers with IPv6 Stateless Address Semantically Opaque Interface Identifiers with IPv6 Stateless Address
Autoconfiguration (SLAAC)"[RFC7217]. Specific cases are described in Autoconfiguration (SLAAC)"[RFC7217]. Specific cases are described in
appropriate "IPv6 over <link>" specifications, such as "IPv6 over appropriate "IPv6 over <link>" specifications, such as "IPv6 over
Ethernet" [RFC2464] and "Transmission of IPv6 Packets over ITU-T Ethernet" [RFC2464] and "Transmission of IPv6 Packets over ITU-T
G.9959 Networks" [RFC7428]. The security and privacy considerations G.9959 Networks" [RFC7428]. The security and privacy considerations
for IPv6 address generation is described in [RFC7721]. for IPv6 address generation is described in [RFC7721].
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| n bits | m bits | 128-n-m bits | | n bits | m bits | 128-n-m bits |
+------------------------+-----------+----------------------------+ +------------------------+-----------+----------------------------+
| global routing prefix | subnet ID | interface ID | | global routing prefix | subnet ID | interface ID |
+------------------------+-----------+----------------------------+ +------------------------+-----------+----------------------------+
where the global routing prefix is a (typically hierarchically- where the global routing prefix is a (typically hierarchically-
structured) value assigned to a site (a cluster of subnets/links), structured) value assigned to a site (a cluster of subnets/links),
the subnet ID is an identifier of a link within the site, and the the subnet ID is an identifier of a link within the site, and the
interface ID is as defined in Section 2.4.1. interface ID is as defined in Section 2.4.1.
All Global Unicast addresses other than those that start with binary As noted in Section 2.4, all Global Unicast addresses other than
000 have a 64-bit interface ID field (i.e., n + m = 64), formatted as those that start with binary 000 have a 64-bit interface ID field
described in Section 2.4.1. Global Unicast addresses that start with (i.e., n + m = 64), formatted as described in Section 2.4.1. Global
binary 000 have no such constraint on the size or structure of the Unicast addresses that start with binary 000 have no such constraint
interface ID field. on the size or structure of the interface ID field.
Examples of Global Unicast addresses that start with binary 000 are Examples of Global Unicast addresses that start with binary 000 are
the IPv6 address with embedded IPv4 addresses described in the IPv6 address with embedded IPv4 addresses described in
Section 2.4.5. An example of global addresses starting with a binary Section 2.4.5. An example of global addresses starting with a binary
value other than 000 (and therefore having a 64-bit interface ID value other than 000 (and therefore having a 64-bit interface ID
field) can be found in [RFC3587]. field) can be found in [RFC3587].
2.4.5. IPv6 Addresses with Embedded IPv4 Addresses 2.4.5. IPv6 Addresses with Embedded IPv4 Addresses
Two types of IPv6 addresses are defined that carry an IPv4 address in Two types of IPv6 addresses are defined that carry an IPv4 address in
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2.6.1. Pre-Defined Multicast Addresses 2.6.1. Pre-Defined Multicast Addresses
The following well-known multicast addresses are pre-defined. The The following well-known multicast addresses are pre-defined. The
group IDs defined in this section are defined for explicit scope group IDs defined in this section are defined for explicit scope
values. values.
Use of these group IDs for any other scope values, with the T flag Use of these group IDs for any other scope values, with the T flag
equal to 0, is not allowed. equal to 0, is not allowed.
reserved multicast addresses: ff00:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 Reserved Multicast Addresses: ff00:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff01:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff01:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff02:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff02:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff03:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff03:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff04:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff04:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff05:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff05:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff06:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff06:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff07:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff07:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff08:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff08:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff09:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff09:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff0a:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff0a:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff0b:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff0b:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff0c:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff0c:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff0d:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff0d:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff0e:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff0e:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
ff0f:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 ff0f:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
The above multicast addresses are reserved and shall never be The above multicast addresses are reserved and shall never be
assigned to any multicast group. assigned to any multicast group.
all nodes addresses: ff01:0:0:0:0:0:0:1 All Nodes Addresses: ff01:0:0:0:0:0:0:1
ff02:0:0:0:0:0:0:1 ff02:0:0:0:0:0:0:1
The above multicast addresses identify the group of all IPv6 nodes, The above multicast addresses identify the group of all IPv6 nodes,
within scope 1 (interface-local) or 2 (link-local). within scope 1 (interface-local) or 2 (link-local).
all routers addresses: ff01:0:0:0:0:0:0:2 All Routers Addresses: ff01:0:0:0:0:0:0:2
ff02:0:0:0:0:0:0:2 ff02:0:0:0:0:0:0:2
ff05:0:0:0:0:0:0:2 ff05:0:0:0:0:0:0:2
The above multicast addresses identify the group of all IPv6 routers, The above multicast addresses identify the group of all IPv6 routers,
within scope 1 (interface-local), 2 (link-local), or 5 (site-local). within scope 1 (interface-local), 2 (link-local), or 5 (site-local).
Solicited-Node Address: ff02:0:0:0:0:1:ffxx:xxxx Solicited-Node Address: ff02:0:0:0:0:1:ffxx:xxxx
Solicited-Node multicast address are computed as a function of a Solicited-Node multicast address are computed as a function of a
node's unicast and anycast addresses. A Solicited-Node multicast node's unicast and anycast addresses. A Solicited-Node multicast
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addresses that differ only in the high-order bits (e.g., due to addresses that differ only in the high-order bits (e.g., due to
multiple high-order prefixes associated with different aggregations) multiple high-order prefixes associated with different aggregations)
will map to the same Solicited-Node address, thereby reducing the will map to the same Solicited-Node address, thereby reducing the
number of multicast addresses a node must join. number of multicast addresses a node must join.
A node is required to compute and join (on the appropriate interface) A node is required to compute and join (on the appropriate interface)
the associated Solicited-Node multicast addresses for all unicast and the associated Solicited-Node multicast addresses for all unicast and
anycast addresses that have been configured for the node's interfaces anycast addresses that have been configured for the node's interfaces
(manually or automatically). (manually or automatically).
Additional defined multicast address can be found in the IANA IPv6
Multicast Address Allocation registry [IANA-MC]
2.7. A Node's Required Addresses 2.7. A Node's Required Addresses
A host is required to recognize the following addresses as A host is required to recognize the following addresses as
identifying itself: identifying itself:
o Its required Link-Local address for each interface. o Its required Link-Local address for each interface.
o Any additional Unicast and Anycast addresses that have been o Any additional Unicast and Anycast addresses that have been
configured for the node's interfaces (manually or configured for the node's interfaces (manually or
automatically). automatically).
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Congxiao Bao, Mohamed Boucadair, Brian Carpenter, Ralph Droms, Congxiao Bao, Mohamed Boucadair, Brian Carpenter, Ralph Droms,
Christian Huitema, Sheng Jiang, Seiichi Kawamura, Masanobu Kawashima, Christian Huitema, Sheng Jiang, Seiichi Kawamura, Masanobu Kawashima,
Xing Li, and Stig Venaas. Xing Li, and Stig Venaas.
6. References 6. References
6.1. Normative References 6.1. Normative References
[I-D.ietf-6man-rfc2460bis] [I-D.ietf-6man-rfc2460bis]
Deering, S. and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol, Version 6 Deering, S. and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol, Version 6
(IPv6) Specification", draft-ietf-6man-rfc2460bis-07 (work (IPv6) Specification", draft-ietf-6man-rfc2460bis-08 (work
in progress), October 2016. in progress), November 2016.
6.2. Informative References 6.2. Informative References
[BCP198] Boucadair, M., Petrescu, A., and F. Baker, "IPv6 Prefix
Length Recommendation for Forwarding", BCP 198, RFC 7608,
DOI 10.17487/RFC7608, July 2015,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7608>.
[EUI64] "IEEE, "Guidelines for 64-bit Global Identifier (EUI-64) [EUI64] "IEEE, "Guidelines for 64-bit Global Identifier (EUI-64)
Registration Authority"", March 1997, Registration Authority"", March 1997,
<http://standards.ieee.org/regauth/oui/tutorials/ <http://standards.ieee.org/regauth/oui/tutorials/
EUI64.html>. EUI64.html>.
[IANA-AC] "Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Anycast Addresses", [IANA-AC] "Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Anycast Addresses",
<http://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv6-anycast-addresses/ <http://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv6-anycast-addresses/
ipv6-anycast-addresses.xhtml>. ipv6-anycast-addresses.xhtml>.
[IANA-AD] "Internet Protocol Version 6 Address Space", [IANA-AD] "Internet Protocol Version 6 Address Space",
skipping to change at page 25, line 10 skipping to change at page 25, line 23
[RFC4632] Fuller, V. and T. Li, "Classless Inter-domain Routing [RFC4632] Fuller, V. and T. Li, "Classless Inter-domain Routing
(CIDR): The Internet Address Assignment and Aggregation (CIDR): The Internet Address Assignment and Aggregation
Plan", BCP 122, RFC 4632, DOI 10.17487/RFC4632, August Plan", BCP 122, RFC 4632, DOI 10.17487/RFC4632, August
2006, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4632>. 2006, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4632>.
[RFC4941] Narten, T., Draves, R., and S. Krishnan, "Privacy [RFC4941] Narten, T., Draves, R., and S. Krishnan, "Privacy
Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in
IPv6", RFC 4941, DOI 10.17487/RFC4941, September 2007, IPv6", RFC 4941, DOI 10.17487/RFC4941, September 2007,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4941>. <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4941>.
[RFC5952] Kawamura, S. and M. Kawashima, "A Recommendation for IPv6
Address Text Representation", RFC 5952, DOI 10.17487/
RFC5952, August 2010,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc5952>.
[RFC6164] Kohno, M., Nitzan, B., Bush, R., Matsuzaki, Y., Colitti,
L., and T. Narten, "Using 127-Bit IPv6 Prefixes on Inter-
Router Links", RFC 6164, DOI 10.17487/RFC6164, April 2011,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6164>.
[RFC7217] Gont, F., "A Method for Generating Semantically Opaque [RFC7217] Gont, F., "A Method for Generating Semantically Opaque
Interface Identifiers with IPv6 Stateless Address Interface Identifiers with IPv6 Stateless Address
Autoconfiguration (SLAAC)", RFC 7217, DOI 10.17487/ Autoconfiguration (SLAAC)", RFC 7217, DOI 10.17487/
RFC7217, April 2014, RFC7217, April 2014,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7217>. <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7217>.
[RFC7421] Carpenter, B., Ed., Chown, T., Gont, F., Jiang, S., [RFC7421] Carpenter, B., Ed., Chown, T., Gont, F., Jiang, S.,
Petrescu, A., and A. Yourtchenko, "Analysis of the 64-bit Petrescu, A., and A. Yourtchenko, "Analysis of the 64-bit
Boundary in IPv6 Addressing", RFC 7421, DOI 10.17487/ Boundary in IPv6 Addressing", RFC 7421, DOI 10.17487/
RFC7421, January 2015, RFC7421, January 2015,
skipping to change at page 29, line 21 skipping to change at page 29, line 48
and that it doesn't cause any problems in practice. and that it doesn't cause any problems in practice.
Appendix B. CHANGES SINCE RFC 4291 Appendix B. CHANGES SINCE RFC 4291
This document has the following changes from RFC4291, "IP Version 6 This document has the following changes from RFC4291, "IP Version 6
Addressing Architecture". Numbers identify the Internet-Draft Addressing Architecture". Numbers identify the Internet-Draft
version that the change was made.: version that the change was made.:
Working Group Internet Drafts Working Group Internet Drafts
07) Added text to Section 2.4 summarizing IPv6 unicast routing
and referencing BCP198, citing RFC6164 as an example of
longer prefixes, and that IIDs are required to be 64 bits
long as described in RFC7421.
07) Based on review by Brian Haberman added reference to RFC5952
in Section 2.2.3, corrected case errors in Section 2.6.1, and
added a reference to the IANA Multicast address registry in
Section 2.6.1.
07) Corrected errors in Section 2.2.3 where the examples in 7.
and 8. were reversed.
07) Editorial changes.
06) Editorial changes. 06) Editorial changes.
05) Expanded Security Considerations Section to discuss privacy 05) Expanded Security Considerations Section to discuss privacy
issues related to using stable interface identifiers to issues related to using stable interface identifiers to
create IPv6 addresses, and reference solutions that mitigate create IPv6 addresses, and reference solutions that mitigate
these issues such as RFC7721, RFC4941, RFC7271. these issues such as RFC7721, RFC4941, RFC7271.
05) Added instructions in IANA Considerations to update 05) Added instructions in IANA Considerations to update
references in the IANA registries that currently point to references in the IANA registries that currently point to
RFC4291 to point to this document. RFC4291 to point to this document.
 End of changes. 23 change blocks. 
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