draft-ietf-6man-text-addr-representation-00.txt   draft-ietf-6man-text-addr-representation-01.txt 
IPv6 Maintenance Working Group S. Kawamura IPv6 Maintenance Working Group S. Kawamura
Internet-Draft NEC BIGLOBE, Ltd. Internet-Draft NEC BIGLOBE, Ltd.
Intended status: Informational M. Kawashima Intended status: Informational M. Kawashima
Expires: February 24, 2010 NEC AccessTechnica, Ltd. Expires: April 21, 2010 NEC AccessTechnica, Ltd.
August 23, 2009 October 18, 2009
A Recommendation for IPv6 Address Text Representation A Recommendation for IPv6 Address Text Representation
draft-ietf-6man-text-addr-representation-00 draft-ietf-6man-text-addr-representation-01
Status of this Memo Status of this Memo
This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the
provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79. provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.
Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that
other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet- other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
Drafts. Drafts.
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and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
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This Internet-Draft will expire on February 24, 2010. This Internet-Draft will expire on April 21, 2010.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2009 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2009 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents in effect on the date of Provisions Relating to IETF Documents in effect on the date of
publication of this document (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info). publication of this document (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info).
Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights
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3.1. Searching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.1. Searching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3.1.1. General Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.1.1. General Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3.1.2. Searching Spreadsheets and Text Files . . . . . . . . 6 3.1.2. Searching Spreadsheets and Text Files . . . . . . . . 6
3.1.3. Searching with Whois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.1.3. Searching with Whois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3.1.4. Searching for an Address in a Network Diagram . . . . 7 3.1.4. Searching for an Address in a Network Diagram . . . . 7
3.2. Parsing and Modifying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3.2. Parsing and Modifying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.2.1. General Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3.2.1. General Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.2.2. Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3.2.2. Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.2.3. Auditing: Case 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.2.3. Auditing: Case 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3.2.4. Auditing: Case 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.2.4. Auditing: Case 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3.2.5. Unexpected Modifying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.2.5. Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3.2.6. Unexpected Modifying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3.3. Operating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.3. Operating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3.3.1. General Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.3.1. General Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3.3.2. Customer Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.3.2. Customer Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
3.3.3. Abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.3.3. Abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
3.4. Other Minor Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.4. Other Minor Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
3.4.1. Changing Platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.4.1. Changing Platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
3.4.2. Preference in Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.4.2. Preference in Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
3.4.3. Legibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.4.3. Legibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
4. A Recommendation for IPv6 Text Representation . . . . . . . . 9 4. A Recommendation for IPv6 Text Representation . . . . . . . . 10
4.1. Handling Leading Zeros in a 16 Bit Field . . . . . . . . . 10 4.1. Handling Leading Zeros in a 16 Bit Field . . . . . . . . . 10
4.2. "::" Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 4.2. "::" Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
4.2.1. Shorten As Much As Possible . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 4.2.1. Shorten As Much As Possible . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
4.2.2. Handling One 16 Bit 0 Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 4.2.2. Handling One 16 Bit 0 Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
4.2.3. Choice in Placement of "::" . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 4.2.3. Choice in Placement of "::" . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
4.3. Lower Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 4.3. Lower Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
5. Text Representation of Special Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . 10
5. Text Representation of Special Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . 11
6. Notes on Combining IPv6 Addresses with Port Numbers . . . . . 11 6. Notes on Combining IPv6 Addresses with Port Numbers . . . . . 11
7. Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 7. Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
8. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 8. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
9. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 9. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
10. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 10. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
11. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 11. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
11.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 11.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
11.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 11.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Appendix A. For Developers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Appendix A. For Developers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Appendix B. Prefix Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Appendix B. Prefix Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
A single IPv6 address can be text represented in many ways. Examples A single IPv6 address can be text represented in many ways. Examples
are shown below. are shown below.
2001:db8:0:0:1:0:0:1 2001:db8:0:0:1:0:0:1
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do not take into account address representation rules. do not take into account address representation rules.
3.2.4. Auditing: Case 2 3.2.4. Auditing: Case 2
Node configurations will be matched against an information system Node configurations will be matched against an information system
that manages IP addresses. If output notation is different, there that manages IP addresses. If output notation is different, there
will need to be a script that is implemented to cover for this. An will need to be a script that is implemented to cover for this. An
SNMP GET of an interface address and text representation in a humanly SNMP GET of an interface address and text representation in a humanly
written text file is highly unlikely to match on first try. written text file is highly unlikely to match on first try.
3.2.5. Unexpected Modifying 3.2.5. Verification
Some protocols require certain data fields to be verified. One
example of this is X.509 certificates. If an IPv6 address was
embedded in one of the fields in a certificate, and the verification
was done by just a simple textual comparison, the certificate may be
maistakenly shown as being invalid due to a difference in text
representation methods.
3.2.6. Unexpected Modifying
Sometimes, a system will take an address and modify it as a Sometimes, a system will take an address and modify it as a
convenience. For example, a system may take an input of convenience. For example, a system may take an input of
2001:0db8:0::1 and make the output 2001:db8::1 (which is seen in some 2001:0db8:0::1 and make the output 2001:db8::1 (which is seen in some
RIR databases). If the zeros were input for a reason, the outcome RIR databases). If the zeros were input for a reason, the outcome
may be somewhat unexpected. may be somewhat unexpected.
3.3. Operating 3.3. Operating
3.3.1. General Summary 3.3.1. General Summary
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o 2001:db8::1 port 80 o 2001:db8::1 port 80
o 2001:db8::1p80 o 2001:db8::1p80
o 2001:db8::1#80 o 2001:db8::1#80
The situation is not much different in IPv4, but the most ambiguous The situation is not much different in IPv4, but the most ambiguous
case with IPv6 is the second bullet. This is due to the "::"usage in case with IPv6 is the second bullet. This is due to the "::"usage in
IPv6 addresses. This style is not recommended for its ambiguity. IPv6 addresses. This style is not recommended for its ambiguity.
The most common case is the [] style as expressed in [RFC3986]. The [] style as expressed in [RFC3986] is recommended. Other styles
are acceptable when cross-platform portability does not become an
issue.
7. Conclusion 7. Conclusion
The recommended format of text representing an IPv6 address is The recommended format of text representing an IPv6 address is
summarized as follows. summarized as follows.
(1) omit leading zeros in a 16 bit field (1) omit leading zeros in a 16 bit field
(2) when using "::", shorten consecutive zero fields to their (2) when using "::", shorten consecutive zero fields to their
maximum extent (leave no zero fields behind). maximum extent (leave no zero fields behind).
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9. IANA Considerations 9. IANA Considerations
None. None.
10. Acknowledgements 10. Acknowledgements
The authors would like to thank Jan Zorz, Randy Bush, Yuichi Minami, The authors would like to thank Jan Zorz, Randy Bush, Yuichi Minami,
Toshimitsu Matsuura for their generous and helpful comments in kick Toshimitsu Matsuura for their generous and helpful comments in kick
starting this document. We also would like to thank Brian Carpenter, starting this document. We also would like to thank Brian Carpenter,
Akira Kato, Juergen Schoenwaelder, Antonio Querubin, Dave Thaler, Akira Kato, Juergen Schoenwaelder, Antonio Querubin, Dave Thaler,
Brian Haley, Suresh Krishnan, Jerry Huang, Roman Donchenko for their Brian Haley, Suresh Krishnan, Jerry Huang, Roman Donchenko, Heikki
input. Also a very special thanks to Ron Bonica, Fred Baker, Brian Vatiainen for their input. Also a very special thanks to Ron Bonica,
Haberman, Robert Hinden, Jari Arkko, and Kurt Lindqvist for their Fred Baker, Brian Haberman, Robert Hinden, Jari Arkko, and Kurt
support in bringing this document to the light of IETF working Lindqvist for their support in bringing this document to the light of
groups. IETF working groups.
11. References 11. References
11.1. Normative References 11.1. Normative References
[RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997. Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.
[RFC4291] Hinden, R. and S. Deering, "IP Version 6 Addressing [RFC4291] Hinden, R. and S. Deering, "IP Version 6 Addressing
Architecture", RFC 4291, February 2006. Architecture", RFC 4291, February 2006.
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