draft-ietf-ccamp-rwa-wson-framework-05.txt   draft-ietf-ccamp-rwa-wson-framework-06.txt 
Network Working Group Y. Lee (ed.) Network Working Group Y. Lee (ed.)
Internet Draft Huawei Internet Draft Huawei
Intended status: Informational G. Bernstein (ed.) Intended status: Informational G. Bernstein (ed.)
Expires: August 2010 Grotto Networking Expires: October 2010 Grotto Networking
Wataru Imajuku Wataru Imajuku
NTT NTT
February 1, 2010 April 5, 2010
Framework for GMPLS and PCE Control of Wavelength Switched Optical Framework for GMPLS and PCE Control of Wavelength Switched Optical
Networks (WSON) Networks (WSON)
draft-ietf-ccamp-rwa-wson-framework-05.txt draft-ietf-ccamp-rwa-wson-framework-06.txt
Status of this Memo Status of this Memo
This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the
provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79. provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.
Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that
other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet- other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
Drafts. Drafts.
skipping to change at page 1, line 36 skipping to change at page 1, line 36
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
http://www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt http://www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt
The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html. http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.
This Internet-Draft will expire on August 1, 2010. This Internet-Draft will expire on October 5, 2010.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
skipping to change at page 2, line 37 skipping to change at page 2, line 37
are presented, along with alternative implementation architectures are presented, along with alternative implementation architectures
that could be realized via various combinations of extended GMPLS and that could be realized via various combinations of extended GMPLS and
PCE protocols. PCE protocols.
This memo focuses on topological elements and path selection This memo focuses on topological elements and path selection
constraints that are common across different WSON environments as constraints that are common across different WSON environments as
such it does not address optical impairments in any depth. such it does not address optical impairments in any depth.
Table of Contents Table of Contents
1. Introduction..................................................4 1. Introduction...................................................4
1.1. Revision History..........................................5 1.1. Revision History..........................................5
1.1.1. Changes from 00......................................5 1.1.1. Changes from 00......................................5
1.1.2. Changes from 01......................................5 1.1.2. Changes from 01......................................5
1.1.3. Changes from 02......................................5 1.1.3. Changes from 02......................................5
1.1.4. Changes from 03......................................6 1.1.4. Changes from 03......................................6
1.1.5. Changes from 04......................................6 1.1.5. Changes from 04......................................6
1.2. Related Documents.........................................6 1.1.6. Changes from 05......................................6
2. Terminology....................................................7 2. Terminology....................................................6
3. Wavelength Switched Optical Networks...........................7 3. Wavelength Switched Optical Networks...........................7
3.1. WDM and CWDM Links........................................8 3.1. WDM and CWDM Links........................................7
3.2. Optical Transmitters......................................9 3.2. Optical Transmitters......................................9
3.3. Optical Signals in WSONs.................................10 3.3. Optical Signals in WSONs.................................10
3.3.1. Optical Tributary Signals...........................11 3.3.1. Optical Tributary Signals...........................11
3.3.2. WSON Signal Characteristics.........................12 3.3.2. WSON Signal Characteristics.........................12
3.4. ROADMs, OXCs, Splitters, Combiners and FOADMs............13 3.4. ROADMs, OXCs, Splitters, Combiners and FOADMs............12
3.4.1. Reconfigurable Add/Drop Multiplexers and OXCs.......13 3.4.1. Reconfigurable Add/Drop Multiplexers and OXCs.......13
3.4.2. Splitters...........................................16 3.4.2. Splitters...........................................16
3.4.3. Combiners...........................................16 3.4.3. Combiners...........................................16
3.4.4. Fixed Optical Add/Drop Multiplexers.................17 3.4.4. Fixed Optical Add/Drop Multiplexers.................17
3.5. Electro-Optical Systems..................................17 3.5. Electro-Optical Systems..................................17
3.5.1. Regenerators........................................17 3.5.1. Regenerators........................................17
3.5.2. OEO Switches........................................20 3.5.2. OEO Switches........................................20
3.6. Wavelength Converters....................................20 3.6. Wavelength Converters....................................20
3.6.1. Wavelength Converter Pool Modeling..................22 3.6.1. Wavelength Converter Pool Modeling..................22
3.7. Characterizing Electro-Optical Network Elements..........26 3.7. Characterizing Electro-Optical Network Elements..........26
3.7.1. Input Constraints...................................27 3.7.1. Input Constraints...................................27
3.7.2. Output Constraints..................................27 3.7.2. Output Constraints..................................27
3.7.3. Processing Capabilities.............................28 3.7.3. Processing Capabilities.............................28
4. Routing and Wavelength Assignment and the Control Plane.......29 4. Routing and Wavelength Assignment and the Control Plane.......29
4.1. Architectural Approaches to RWA..........................30 4.1. Architectural Approaches to RWA..........................30
4.1.1. Combined RWA (R&WA).................................30 4.1.1. Combined RWA (R&WA).................................30
4.1.2. Separated R and WA (R+WA)...........................30 4.1.2. Separated R and WA (R+WA)...........................30
4.1.3. Routing and Distributed WA (R+DWA)..................31 4.1.3. Routing and Distributed WA (R+DWA)..................31
4.2. Conveying information needed by RWA......................32 4.2. Conveying information needed by RWA......................32
4.3. Lightpath Temporal Characteristics.......................33 5. Modeling Examples and Control Plane Use Cases.................33
5. Modeling Examples and Control Plane Use Cases.................34 5.1. Network Modeling for GMPLS/PCE Control...................33
5.1. Network Modeling for GMPLS/PCE Control...................34 5.1.1. Describing the WSON nodes...........................33
5.1.1. Describing the WSON nodes...........................34 5.1.2. Describing the links................................35
5.1.2. Describing the links................................36 5.2. RWA Path Computation and Establishment...................36
5.2. RWA Path Computation and Establishment...................37 5.3. Resource Optimization....................................37
5.3. Resource Optimization....................................38 5.4. Support for Rerouting....................................38
5.4. Support for Rerouting....................................39 5.5. Electro-Optical Networking Scenarios.....................38
5.5. Electro-Optical Networking Scenarios.....................39 5.5.1. Fixed Regeneration Points...........................38
5.5.1. Fixed Regeneration Points...........................39 5.5.2. Shared Regeneration Pools...........................39
5.5.2. Shared Regeneration Pools...........................40 5.5.3. Reconfigurable Regenerators.........................39
5.5.3. Reconfigurable Regenerators.........................40 5.5.4. Relation to Translucent Networks....................39
5.5.4. Relation to Translucent Networks....................40 6. GMPLS & PCE Implications......................................40
6. GMPLS & PCE Implications......................................41 6.1. Implications for GMPLS signaling.........................40
6.1. Implications for GMPLS signaling.........................41 6.1.1. Identifying Wavelengths and Signals.................41
6.1.1. Identifying Wavelengths and Signals.................42 6.1.2. WSON Signals and Network Element Processing.........41
6.1.2. WSON Signals and Network Element Processing.........42 6.1.3. Combined RWA/Separate Routing WA support............41
6.1.3. Combined RWA/Separate Routing WA support............42
6.1.4. Distributed Wavelength Assignment: Unidirectional, No 6.1.4. Distributed Wavelength Assignment: Unidirectional, No
Converters.................................................43 Converters.................................................42
6.1.5. Distributed Wavelength Assignment: Unidirectional, 6.1.5. Distributed Wavelength Assignment: Unidirectional,
Limited Converters.........................................44 Limited Converters.........................................42
6.1.6. Distributed Wavelength Assignment: Bidirectional, No 6.1.6. Distributed Wavelength Assignment: Bidirectional, No
Converters.................................................44 Converters.................................................42
6.2. Implications for GMPLS Routing...........................44 6.2. Implications for GMPLS Routing...........................43
6.2.1. Electro-Optical Element Signal Compatibility........45 6.2.1. Electro-Optical Element Signal Compatibility........43
6.2.2. Wavelength-Specific Availability Information........46 6.2.2. Wavelength-Specific Availability Information........44
6.2.3. WSON Routing Information Summary....................46 6.2.3. WSON Routing Information Summary....................45
6.3. Optical Path Computation and Implications for PCE........48 6.3. Optical Path Computation and Implications for PCE........46
6.3.1. Lightpath Constraints and Characteristics...........48 6.3.1. Lightpath Constraints and Characteristics...........46
6.3.2. Electro-Optical Element Signal Compatibility........49 6.3.2. Electro-Optical Element Signal Compatibility........47
6.3.3. Discovery of RWA Capable PCEs.......................49 6.3.3. Discovery of RWA Capable PCEs.......................47
6.4. Summary of Impacts by RWA Architecture...................50 7. Security Considerations.......................................48
7. Security Considerations.......................................51 8. IANA Considerations...........................................48
8. IANA Considerations...........................................51 9. Acknowledgments...............................................48
9. Acknowledgments...............................................51 10. References...................................................49
10. References...................................................52 10.1. Normative References....................................49
10.1. Normative References....................................52 10.2. Informative References..................................50
10.2. Informative References..................................53 11. Contributors.................................................53
11. Contributors.................................................56 Author's Addresses...............................................54
Author's Addresses...............................................57 Intellectual Property Statement..................................54
Intellectual Property Statement..................................57 Disclaimer of Validity...........................................55
Disclaimer of Validity...........................................58
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
This memo provides a framework for applying GMPLS and the Path This memo provides a framework for applying GMPLS and the Path
Computation Element (PCE) architecture to the control of WSONs. In Computation Element (PCE) architecture to the control of WSONs. In
particular we provide control plane models for key wavelength particular we provide control plane models for key wavelength
switched optical network subsystems and processes. The subsystems switched optical network subsystems and processes. The subsystems
include wavelength division multiplexed links, tunable laser include wavelength division multiplexed links, tunable laser
transmitters, reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexers (ROADM) transmitters, reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexers (ROADM)
and wavelength converters. In addition, electro-optical network and wavelength converters. In addition, electro-optical network
skipping to change at page 6, line 38 skipping to change at page 6, line 38
Created new section 5.5 on Electro-Optical Networking Scenarios with Created new section 5.5 on Electro-Optical Networking Scenarios with
material from [WSON-Compat]. material from [WSON-Compat].
Created new section 6.1.2 on WSON Signals and Network Element Created new section 6.1.2 on WSON Signals and Network Element
Processing with material from [WSON-Compat]. Processing with material from [WSON-Compat].
Created new section 6.3.2. Electro-Optical Related PCEP Extensions Created new section 6.3.2. Electro-Optical Related PCEP Extensions
with material from [WSON-Compat]. with material from [WSON-Compat].
1.2. Related Documents 1.1.6. Changes from 05
This framework document covers essential concepts and models for the
application and extension of the control plane to WSONs. The
following documents address specific aspects of WSONs and complement
this draft.
o [WSON-Info] This document provides an information model needed by
the routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) process in WSON.
o [WSON-Encode] This document provides efficient, protocol-agnostic
encodings for the information elements necessary to support the
routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) process in WSONs.
o [WSON-Imp] This document provides a framework for the support of
impairment aware Routing and Wavelength Assignment (RWA) in WSON.
o [PCEP-RWA] This document provides application-specific Removal of Section 1.2; Removal of section on lightpath temporal
requirements for the Path Computation Element communication characteristics; Removal of details on wavelength assignment
Protocol (PCEP) for the support of RWA in WSON. algorithms; Removal of redundant summary in section 6.
2. Terminology 2. Terminology
CWDM: Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexing. CWDM: Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexing.
DWDM: Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing. DWDM: Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing.
FOADM: Fixed Optical Add/Drop Multiplexer. FOADM: Fixed Optical Add/Drop Multiplexer.
OXC: Optical cross connect. A symmetric optical switching element in OXC: Optical cross connect. A symmetric optical switching element in
which a signal on any ingress port can reach any egress port. which a signal on any ingress port can reach any egress port.
ROADM: Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Multiplexer. An asymmetric ROADM: Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Multiplexer. An asymmetric
wavelength selective switching element featuring ingress and egress wavelength selective switching element featuring ingress and egress
line side ports as well as add/drop side ports. line side ports as well as add/drop side ports.
RWA: Routing and Wavelength Assignment. RWA: Routing and Wavelength Assignment.
Transparent Network: a wavelength switched optical network that does
not contain regenerators or wavelength converters.
Translucent Network: a wavelength switched optical network that is
predominantly transparent but may also contain limited numbers of
regenerators and/or wavelength converters.
Wavelength Conversion/Converters: The process of converting an Wavelength Conversion/Converters: The process of converting an
information bearing optical signal centered at a given wavelength to information bearing optical signal centered at a given wavelength to
one with "equivalent" content centered at a different wavelength. one with "equivalent" content centered at a different wavelength.
Wavelength conversion can be implemented via an optical-electronic- Wavelength conversion can be implemented via an optical-electronic-
optical (OEO) process or via a strictly optical process. optical (OEO) process or via a strictly optical process.
WDM: Wavelength Division Multiplexing. WDM: Wavelength Division Multiplexing.
Wavelength Switched Optical Networks (WSON): WDM based optical Wavelength Switched Optical Networks (WSON): WDM based optical
networks in which switching is performed selectively based on the networks in which switching is performed selectively based on the
skipping to change at page 33, line 5 skipping to change at page 33, line 5
of PCEs is significantly less than number of WSON NEs. Or other of PCEs is significantly less than number of WSON NEs. Or other
ways to limit flooding to "interested" NEs. ways to limit flooding to "interested" NEs.
Mechanisms to improve scaling of dynamic information: Mechanisms to improve scaling of dynamic information:
o Tailor message content to WSON. For example the use of wavelength o Tailor message content to WSON. For example the use of wavelength
ranges, or wavelength occupation bit maps. ranges, or wavelength occupation bit maps.
Utilize incremental updates if feasible. Utilize incremental updates if feasible.
4.3. Lightpath Temporal Characteristics
The temporal characteristics of a light path connection can affect
the choice of solution to the RWA process. For our purposes here we
look at the timeliness of connection establishment/teardown, and the
duration of the connection.
Connection Establishment/Teardown Timeliness can be thought of in
approximately three time frames:
1. Time Critical: For example those lightpath establishments used for
restoration of service or other high priority real time service
requests.
2. Soft time bounds: This is a more typical new connection request.
While expected to be responsive, there should be more time to take
into account network optimization.
3. Scheduled or Advanced reservations. Here lightpath connections are
requested significantly ahead of their intended "in service" time.
There is the potential for significant network optimization if
multiple lightpaths can be computed concurrently to achieve network
optimization objectives.
Lightpath connection duration has typically been thought of as
approximately three time frames:
1. Dynamic: those lightpaths with relatively short duration (holding
times).
2. Pseudo-static: lightpaths with moderately long durations.
3. Static: lightpaths with long durations.
Different types of RWA algorithms have been developed for dealing
with dynamic versus pseudo-static conditions. These can address
service provider's needs for: (a) network optimization, (b)
restoration, and (c) highly dynamic lightpath provisioning.
Hence we can model timescale related lightpath requirements via the
following notions:
o Batch or Sequential light path connection requests
o Timeliness of Connection establishment
o Duration of lightpath connection
5. Modeling Examples and Control Plane Use Cases 5. Modeling Examples and Control Plane Use Cases
This section provides examples of the fixed and switch optical node This section provides examples of the fixed and switch optical node
and wavelength constraint models of section 3. and WSON control plane and wavelength constraint models of section 3. and WSON control plane
use cases related to path computation, establishment, rerouting, and use cases related to path computation, establishment, rerouting, and
optimization. optimization.
5.1. Network Modeling for GMPLS/PCE Control 5.1. Network Modeling for GMPLS/PCE Control
Consider a network containing three routers (R1 through R3), eight Consider a network containing three routers (R1 through R3), eight
skipping to change at page 43, line 15 skipping to change at page 42, line 15
object entry in the ERO has to be translated appropriately. object entry in the ERO has to be translated appropriately.
6.1.4. Distributed Wavelength Assignment: Unidirectional, No 6.1.4. Distributed Wavelength Assignment: Unidirectional, No
Converters Converters
GMPLS signaling for a uni-directional lightpath LSP allows for the GMPLS signaling for a uni-directional lightpath LSP allows for the
use of a label set object in the RSVP-TE path message. The processing use of a label set object in the RSVP-TE path message. The processing
of the label set object to take the intersection of available lambdas of the label set object to take the intersection of available lambdas
along a path can be performed resulting in the set of available along a path can be performed resulting in the set of available
lambda being known to the destination that can then use a wavelength lambda being known to the destination that can then use a wavelength
selection algorithm to choose a lambda. For example, the following is selection algorithm to choose a lambda.
a non-exhaustive subset of wavelength assignment (WA) approaches
discussed in [HZang00]:
1. Random: Looks at all available wavelengths for the light path then
chooses from those available at random.
2. First Fit: Wavelengths are ordered, first available (on all links)
is chosen.
3. Most Used: Out of the wavelengths available on the path attempts
to select most use wavelength in network.
4. Least Loaded: For multi-fiber networks. Chooses the wavelength j
that maximizes minimum of the difference between the number of
fibers on link l and the number of fibers on link l with
wavelength j occupied.
As can be seen from the above short list, wavelength assignment
methods have differing information or processing requirements. The
information requirements of these methods are as follows:
1. Random: nothing more than the available wavelength set.
2. First Fit: nothing more than the available wavelength set.
3. Most Used: the available wavelength set and information on global
wavelength use in the network.
4. Least Loaded: the available wavelength set and information
concerning the wavelength dependent loading for each link (this
applies to multi-fiber links). This could be obtained via global
information or via supplemental information passed via the
signaling protocol.
In case (3) above the global information needed by the wavelength
assignment could be derived from suitably enhanced GMPLS routing.
Note however this information need not be accurate enough for
combined RWA computation. GMPLS signaling does not provide a way to
indicate that a particular wavelength assignment algorithm should be
used.
6.1.5. Distributed Wavelength Assignment: Unidirectional, Limited 6.1.5. Distributed Wavelength Assignment: Unidirectional, Limited
Converters Converters
The previous outlined the case with no wavelength converters. In the The previous outlined the case with no wavelength converters. In the
case of wavelength converters, nodes with wavelength converters would case of wavelength converters, nodes with wavelength converters would
need to make the decision as to whether to perform conversion. One need to make the decision as to whether to perform conversion. One
indicator for this would be that the set of available wavelengths indicator for this would be that the set of available wavelengths
which is obtained via the intersection of the incoming label set and which is obtained via the intersection of the incoming label set and
the egress links available wavelengths is either null or deemed too the egress links available wavelengths is either null or deemed too
skipping to change at page 47, line 44 skipping to change at page 46, line 11
is needed in the Combined RWA and the separate Routing and WA is needed in the Combined RWA and the separate Routing and WA
architectures, in the case of Routing + distribute WA via signaling architectures, in the case of Routing + distribute WA via signaling
we only need the following information: we only need the following information:
Information Static/Dynamic Node/Link Information Static/Dynamic Node/Link
------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------------------------
Connectivity matrix Static Node Connectivity matrix Static Node
Wavelength conversion capabilities Static(3) Node Wavelength conversion capabilities Static(3) Node
Information models and compact encodings for this information is Information models and compact encodings for this information is
provided in [WSON-Info] and [WSON-Encode]. provided in [WSON-Info], [Gen-Encode] and [WSON-Encode].
6.3. Optical Path Computation and Implications for PCE 6.3. Optical Path Computation and Implications for PCE
As previously noted the RWA problem can be computationally intensive As previously noted the RWA problem can be computationally intensive
[HZang00]. Such computationally intensive path computations and [HZang00]. Such computationally intensive path computations and
optimizations were part of the impetus for the PCE (path computation optimizations were part of the impetus for the PCE (path computation
element) architecture. element) architecture.
As the PCEP defines the procedures necessary to support both As the PCEP defines the procedures necessary to support both
sequential [RFC5440] and global concurrent path computations sequential [RFC5440] and global concurrent path computations
skipping to change at page 48, line 45 skipping to change at page 47, line 7
Lightpath constraints include: Lightpath constraints include:
o Bidirectional Assignment of wavelengths o Bidirectional Assignment of wavelengths
o Possible simultaneous assignment of wavelength to primary and o Possible simultaneous assignment of wavelength to primary and
backup paths. backup paths.
o Tuning range constraint on optical transmitter. o Tuning range constraint on optical transmitter.
Lightpath characteristics can include:
o Duration information (how long this connection may last)
o Timeliness/Urgency information (how quickly is this connection
needed)
6.3.2. Electro-Optical Element Signal Compatibility 6.3.2. Electro-Optical Element Signal Compatibility
When requesting a path computation to PCE, the PCC should be able to When requesting a path computation to PCE, the PCC should be able to
indicate the following: indicate the following:
o The GPID type of an LSP o The GPID type of an LSP
o The signal attributes at the transmitter (at the source): (i) o The signal attributes at the transmitter (at the source): (i)
modulation type; (ii) FEC type modulation type; (ii) FEC type
skipping to change at page 50, line 5 skipping to change at page 48, line 5
operator to choose an objective function that minimizes the total operator to choose an objective function that minimizes the total
network cost associated with setting up a set of paths concurrently. network cost associated with setting up a set of paths concurrently.
This would also allow operators to choose an objective function that This would also allow operators to choose an objective function that
results in a most evenly distributed link utilization. results in a most evenly distributed link utilization.
This implies that PCEP would easily accommodate wavelength selection This implies that PCEP would easily accommodate wavelength selection
algorithm in its objective function to be able to optimize the path algorithm in its objective function to be able to optimize the path
computation from the perspective of wavelength assignment if chosen computation from the perspective of wavelength assignment if chosen
by the operators. by the operators.
6.4. Summary of Impacts by RWA Architecture
The following table summarizes for each RWA strategy the list of
mandatory ("M") and optional ("O") control plane features according
to GMPLS architectural blocks:
o Information required by the path computation entity,
o LSP request parameters used in either PCC to PCE situations or in
signaling,
o RSVP-TE LSP signaling parameters used in LSP establishment.
The table shows which enhancements are common to all architectures
(R&WA, R+WA, R+DWA), which apply only to R&WA and R+WA (R+&WA), and
which apply only to R+DWA. Note that this summary serves for the
purpose of a generic reference.
+-------------------------------------+-----+-------+-------+-------+
| | |Common | R+&WA | R+DWA |
| Feature | ref +---+---+---+---+---+---+
| | | M | O | M | O | M | O |
+-------------------------------------+-----+---+---+---+---+---+---+
| Generalized Label for Wavelength |5.1.1| x | | | | | |
+-------------------------------------+-----+---+---+---+---+---+---+
| Flooding of information for the | | | | | | | |
| routing phase | | | | | | | |
| Node features | 3.3 | | | | | | |
| Node type | | | x | | | | |
| spectral X-connect constraint | | | | x | | | |
| port X-connect constraint | | | | x | | | |
| Transponders availability | | | x | | | | |
| Transponders features | 3.2 | | x | | | | |
| Converter availability | | | | x | | | |
| Converter features | 3.4 | | | x | | | x |
| TE-parameters of WDM links | 3.1 | x | | | | | |
| Total Number of wavelength | | x | | | | | |
| Number of wavelengths available | | x | | | | | |
| Grid spacing | | x | | | | | |
| Wavelength availability on links | 5.2 | | | x | | | |
+-------------------------------------+-----+---+---+---+---+---+---+
| LSP request parameters | | | | | | | |
| Signal features | 5.1 | | x | | | x | |
| Modulation format | | | x | | | x | |
| Modulation parameters | | | x | | | x | |
| Specification of RWA method | 5.1 | | x | | | x | |
| LSP time features | 4.3 | | x | | | | |
+-------------------------------------+-----+---+---+---+---+---+---+
| Enriching signaling messages | | | | | | | |
| Signal features | 5.1 | | | | | x | |
+-------------------------------------+-----+---+---+---+---+---+---+
7. Security Considerations 7. Security Considerations
This document has no requirement for a change to the security models This document has no requirement for a change to the security models
within GMPLS and associated protocols. That is the OSPF-TE, RSVP-TE, within GMPLS and associated protocols. That is the OSPF-TE, RSVP-TE,
and PCEP security models could be operated unchanged. and PCEP security models could be operated unchanged.
However satisfying the requirements for RWA using the existing However satisfying the requirements for RWA using the existing
protocols may significantly affect the loading of those protocols. protocols may significantly affect the loading of those protocols.
This makes the operation of the network more vulnerable to denial of This makes the operation of the network more vulnerable to denial of
service attacks. Therefore additional care maybe required to ensure service attacks. Therefore additional care maybe required to ensure
skipping to change at page 52, line 13 skipping to change at page 49, line 13
This document was prepared using 2-Word-v2.0.template.dot. This document was prepared using 2-Word-v2.0.template.dot.
10. References 10. References
10.1. Normative References 10.1. Normative References
[RFC3471] Berger, L., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching [RFC3471] Berger, L., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching
(GMPLS) Signaling Functional Description", RFC 3471, (GMPLS) Signaling Functional Description", RFC 3471,
January 2003. January 2003.
[RFC3630] Katz, D., Kompella, K., and D. Yeung, "Traffic Engineering [RFC3473] Berger, L., Ed., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label
(TE) Extensions to OSPF Version 2", RFC 3630, September Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Resource ReserVation Protocol-
2003. Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) Extensions", RFC 3473,
January 2003.
[RFC3945] Mannie, E., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching
(GMPLS) Architecture", RFC 3945, October 2004.
[RFC4201] Kompella, K., Rekhter, Y., and L. Berger, "Link Bundling in
MPLS Traffic Engineering (TE)", RFC 4201, October 2005.
[RFC4202] Kompella, K. and Y. Rekhter, "Routing Extensions in Support [RFC4202] Kompella, K. and Y. Rekhter, "Routing Extensions in Support
of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)", RFC of Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)", RFC
4202, October 2005. 4202, October 2005.
[RFC4328] Papadimitriou, D., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label [RFC4328] Papadimitriou, D., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label
Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Extensions for G.709 Optical Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Extensions for G.709 Optical
Transport Networks Control", RFC 4328, January 2006. Transport Networks Control", RFC 4328, January 2006.
[G.694.1] ITU-T Recommendation G.694.1, "Spectral grids for WDM [G.694.1] ITU-T Recommendation G.694.1, "Spectral grids for WDM
applications: DWDM frequency grid", June, 2002. applications: DWDM frequency grid", June, 2002.
[RFC5088] J.L. Le Roux, J.P. Vasseur, Yuichi Ikejiri, and Raymond [RFC5088] J.L. Le Roux, J.P. Vasseur, Yuichi Ikejiri, and Raymond
Zhang, "OSPF protocol extensions for Path Computation Zhang, "OSPF protocol extensions for Path Computation
Element (PCE) Discovery", January 2008. Element (PCE) Discovery", January 2008.
[RFC5212] Shiomoto, K., Papadimitriou, D., Le Roux, JL., Vigoureux,
M., and D. Brungard, "Requirements for GMPLS-Based Multi-
Region and Multi-Layer Networks (MRN/MLN)", RFC 5212, July
2008.
[RFC5557] Y. Lee, J.L. Le Roux, D. King, and E. Oki, "Path [RFC5557] Y. Lee, J.L. Le Roux, D. King, and E. Oki, "Path
Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCECP) Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCECP)
Requirements and Protocol Extensions In Support of Global Requirements and Protocol Extensions In Support of Global
Concurrent Optimization", RFC 5557, July 2009. Concurrent Optimization", RFC 5557, July 2009.
[RFC5420] Farrel, A., Ed., Papadimitriou, D., Vasseur, JP., and A.
Ayyangarps, "Encoding of Attributes for MPLS LSP
Establishment Using Resource Reservation Protocol Traffic
Engineering (RSVP-TE)", RFC 5420, February 2009.
[RFC5440] J.P. Vasseur and J.L. Le Roux (Editors), "Path Computation [RFC5440] J.P. Vasseur and J.L. Le Roux (Editors), "Path Computation
Element (PCE) Communication Protocol (PCEP)", RFC 5440, May Element (PCE) Communication Protocol (PCEP)", RFC 5440, May
2009. 2009.
[RFC5541] J.L. Le Roux, J.P. Vasseur, and Y. Lee, "Encoding of [RFC5541] J.L. Le Roux, J.P. Vasseur, and Y. Lee, "Encoding of
Objective Functions in Path Computation Element (PCE) Objective Functions in Path Computation Element (PCE)
communication and discovery protocols", RFC 5541, July communication and discovery protocols", RFC 5541, July
2009. 2009.
[WSON-Compat] G. Bernstein, Y. Lee, B. Mack-Crane, "WSON Signal [WSON-Compat] G. Bernstein, Y. Lee, B. Mack-Crane, "WSON Signal
Characteristics and Network Element Compatibility Characteristics and Network Element Compatibility
Constraints for GMPLS", draft-bernstein-ccamp-wson- Constraints for GMPLS", draft-bernstein-ccamp-wson-
compatibility, work in progress. compatibility, work in progress.
[WSON-Encode] G. Bernstein, Y. Lee, D. Li, and W. Imajuku, "Routing [WSON-Encode] G. Bernstein, Y. Lee, D. Li, and W. Imajuku, "Routing
and Wavelength Assignment Information Encoding for and Wavelength Assignment Information Encoding for
Wavelength Switched Optical Networks", draft-bernstein- Wavelength Switched Optical Networks", draft-ietf-ccamp-
ccamp-wson-encode, work in progress. wson-encode, work in progress.
[Gen-Encode] G. Bernstein, Y. Lee, D. Li, and W. Imajuku, "General
Network Element Constraint Encoding for GMPLS Controlled
Networks", draft-ietf-ccamp-general-constraint-encode, work
in progress.
[WSON-Imp] Y. Lee, G. Bernstein, D. Li, G. Martinelli, "A Framework [WSON-Imp] Y. Lee, G. Bernstein, D. Li, G. Martinelli, "A Framework
for the Control of Wavelength Switched Optical Networks for the Control of Wavelength Switched Optical Networks
(WSON) with Impairments", draft-ietf-ccamp-wson- (WSON) with Impairments", draft-ietf-ccamp-wson-
impairments, work in progress. impairments, work in progress.
[WSON-Info] Y. Lee, G. Bernstein, D. Li, W. Imajuku, "Routing and [WSON-Info] Y. Lee, G. Bernstein, D. Li, W. Imajuku, "Routing and
Wavelength Assignment Information for Wavelength Switched Wavelength Assignment Information for Wavelength Switched
Optical Networks", draft-bernstein-ccamp-wson-info, work in Optical Networks", draft-bernstein-ccamp-wson-info, work in
progress progress
[PCEP-RWA] Y. Lee, G. Bernstein, J. Martensson, T. Takeda, T. Otani,
"PCEP Requirements for WSON Routing and Wavelength
Assignment", draft-lee-pce-wson-routing-wavelength, work in
progress.
10.2. Informative References 10.2. Informative References
[HZang00] H. Zang, J. Jue and B. Mukherjeee, "A review of routing and [HZang00] H. Zang, J. Jue and B. Mukherjeee, "A review of routing and
wavelength assignment approaches for wavelength-routed wavelength assignment approaches for wavelength-routed
optical WDM networks", Optical Networks Magazine, January optical WDM networks", Optical Networks Magazine, January
2000. 2000.
[Coldren04] Larry A. Coldren, G. A. Fish, Y. Akulova, J. S. [Coldren04] Larry A. Coldren, G. A. Fish, Y. Akulova, J. S.
Barton, L. Johansson and C. W. Coldren, "Tunable Barton, L. Johansson and C. W. Coldren, "Tunable
Seiconductor Lasers: A Tutorial", Journal of Lightwave Seiconductor Lasers: A Tutorial", Journal of Lightwave
skipping to change at page 55, line 14 skipping to change at page 52, line 17
[G.Sup39] ITU-T Series G Supplement 39, Optical system design and [G.Sup39] ITU-T Series G Supplement 39, Optical system design and
engineering considerations, February 2006. engineering considerations, February 2006.
[G.Sup43] ITU-T Series G Supplement 43, Transport of IEEE 10G base-R [G.Sup43] ITU-T Series G Supplement 43, Transport of IEEE 10G base-R
in optical transport networks (OTN), November 2006. in optical transport networks (OTN), November 2006.
[Imajuku] W. Imajuku, Y. Sone, I. Nishioka, S. Seno, "Routing [Imajuku] W. Imajuku, Y. Sone, I. Nishioka, S. Seno, "Routing
Extensions to Support Network Elements with Switching Extensions to Support Network Elements with Switching
Constraint", work in progress: draft-imajuku-ccamp-rtg- Constraint", work in progress: draft-imajuku-ccamp-rtg-
switching-constraint-02.txt, July 2007. switching-constraint.
[Ozdaglar03] Asuman E. Ozdaglar and Dimitri P. Bertsekas, "Routing [Ozdaglar03] Asuman E. Ozdaglar and Dimitri P. Bertsekas, "Routing
and wavelength assignment in optical networks," IEEE/ACM and wavelength assignment in optical networks," IEEE/ACM
Transactions on Networking, vol. 11, 2003, pp. 259 -272. Transactions on Networking, vol. 11, 2003, pp. 259 -272.
[RFC4054] Strand, J. and A. Chiu, "Impairments and Other Constraints [Sambo09] N. Sambo, N. Andriolli, A. Giorgetti, L. Valcarenghi, I.
on Optical Layer Routing", RFC 4054, May 2005. Cerutti, P. Castoldi, and F. Cugini, "GMPLS-controlled
dynamic translucent optical networks," Network, IEEE, vol.
23, 2009, pp. 34-40.
[RFC4606] Mannie, E. and D. Papadimitriou, "Generalized Multi- [Sen08] A. Sen, S. Murthy, and S. Bandyopadhyay, "On Sparse Placement
Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Extensions for Synchronous of Regenerator Nodes in Translucent Optical Network,"
Optical Network (SONET) and Synchronous Digital Hierarchy Global Telecommunications Conference, 2008. IEEE GLOBECOM
(SDH) Control", RFC 4606, August 2006. 2008. IEEE, 2008, pp. 1-6.
[Trans07] Gangxiang Shen and Rodney S. Tucker, "Translucent optical
networks: the way forward [Topics in Optical
Communications]," Communications Magazine, IEEE, vol. 45,
2007, pp. 48-54.
[Yang05] Xi Yang and B. Ramamurthy, "Dynamic routing in translucent
WDM optical networks: the intradomain case," Lightwave
Technology, Journal of, vol. 23, 2005, pp. 955-971.
11. Contributors 11. Contributors
Snigdho Bardalai Snigdho Bardalai
Fujitsu Fujitsu
Email: Snigdho.Bardalai@us.fujitsu.com Email: Snigdho.Bardalai@us.fujitsu.com
Diego Caviglia Diego Caviglia
Ericsson Ericsson
Via A. Negrone 1/A 16153 Via A. Negrone 1/A 16153
 End of changes. 28 change blocks. 
240 lines changed or deleted 99 lines changed or added

This html diff was produced by rfcdiff 1.38. The latest version is available from http://tools.ietf.org/tools/rfcdiff/