draft-ietf-dhc-addr-registration-05.txt   draft-ietf-dhc-addr-registration-06.txt 
DHC Working Group S. Jiang DHC Working Group S. Jiang
Internet-Draft Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd Internet-Draft Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd
Intended status: Standards Track G. Chen Intended status: Standards Track G. Chen
Expires: December 25, 2014 China Mobile Expires: January 21, 2015 China Mobile
S. Krishnan S. Krishnan
Ericsson Ericsson
R. Asati R. Asati
Cisco Systems, Inc. Cisco Systems, Inc.
June 23, 2014 July 20, 2014
Registering Self-generated IPv6 Addresses in DNS using DHCPv6 Registering Self-generated IPv6 Addresses in DNS using DHCPv6
draft-ietf-dhc-addr-registration-05 draft-ietf-dhc-addr-registration-06
Abstract Abstract
In networks that are centrally managed, self-generated addresses In networks that are centrally managed, self-generated addresses
cause some traceability issues due to their decentralized nature. cause some traceability issues due to their decentralized nature.
One of the most important issues in this regard is the inability to One of the most important issues in this regard is the inability to
register such addresses in DNS. This document defines a mechanism to register such addresses in DNS. This document defines a mechanism to
register self-generated and statically configured addresses in DNS register self-generated and statically configured addresses in DNS
through a DHCPv6 server. through a DHCPv6 server.
skipping to change at page 1, line 40 skipping to change at page 1, line 40
Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on December 25, 2014. This Internet-Draft will expire on January 21, 2015.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
skipping to change at page 2, line 17 skipping to change at page 2, line 17
include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
described in the Simplified BSD License. described in the Simplified BSD License.
Table of Contents Table of Contents
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3. Solution Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3. Solution Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
4. DHCPv6 ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST Message . . . . . . . . . . 4 4. DHCPv6 ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST Message . . . . . . . . . . 4
5. DHCPv6 Address Registration Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5. DHCPv6 Address Registration Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
5.1. DHCPv6 Address Registration Request . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5.1. DHCPv6 Address Registration Request . . . . . . . . . . . 5
5.2. Registration Expiry and Refresh . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5.2. Registration Expiry and Refresh . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
5.3. Acknowledging Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5.3. Acknowledging Registration and Retransmission . . . . . . 6
6. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 6. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
7. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 7. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
8. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 8. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
9. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 9. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
9.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 9.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
9.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 9.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
In several common network scenarios, IPv6 addresses are self- In several common network scenarios, IPv6 addresses are self-
generated by the end-hosts by appending a self-generated interface generated by the end-hosts by appending a self-generated interface
identifier to a network-specified prefix. Examples of self-generated identifier to a network-specified prefix. Examples of self-generated
addresses include those created using IPv6 Stateless Address addresses include those created using IPv6 Stateless Address
Configuration [RFC4862] , temporary addresses [RFC4941] and Configuration [RFC4862] , temporary addresses [RFC4941] and
Cryptographically Generated Addresses (CGA) [RFC3972] etc. In Cryptographically Generated Addresses (CGA) [RFC3972] etc. In
several tighly controlled networks, hosts with self-generated several tighly controlled networks, hosts with self-generated
skipping to change at page 3, line 25 skipping to change at page 3, line 25
Certificate In this document, the term "Certificate" is all referred Certificate In this document, the term "Certificate" is all referred
to public key certificate. to public key certificate.
3. Solution Overview 3. Solution Overview
After successfully assigning a self-generated IPv6 address on one of After successfully assigning a self-generated IPv6 address on one of
its interfaces, an end-host implementing this specification SHOULD its interfaces, an end-host implementing this specification SHOULD
send an ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message to a DHCPv6 address send an ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message to a DHCPv6 address
registration server. After receiving the address registration registration server. After receiving the address registration
request, the DHCPv6 server registers the IPv6 address to FQDN binding request, the DHCPv6 server registers the IPv6 address to FQDN binding
towards a configured DNS server. An acknowledgement MAY be sent back towards a configured DNS server. An acknowledgement MUST be sent
to the end host to indicate whether or not the registration operation back to the end host to indicate whether or not the registration
succeeded. operation succeeded.
+----+ +-----------+ +---------------+ +----+ +-----------+ +---------------+
|Host| |Edge router| |Addr-Reg Server| |Host| |Edge router| |Addr-Reg Server|
+----+ +-----------+ +---------------+ +----+ +-----------+ +---------------+
| SLAAC | | | SLAAC | |
|<--------->| | |<--------->| |
| | | | | |
| | ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST | | | ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST |
|------------------------------------------------->| |-------------------------------------------->|
| | |Register | | |Register
| | |address | | |address
| | Optional Acknowledgment |in DNS | | Acknowledgment |in DNS
|<-------------------------------------------------| |<--------------------------------------------|
Figure 1: Address Registration Procedure Figure 1: Address Registration Procedure
It is RECOMMENDED to only set up one address registration server It is RECOMMENDED to only set up one address registration server
within an administration domain, although there may be multiple within an administration domain, although there may be multiple
DHCPv6 servers. The coordination of multiple address registration DHCPv6 servers. While multiple address registration servers does
potentially increase the load on DNS, because of how [RFC4703] and
[RFC4704] work, this should NOT be an issue - the servers should work
correctly in updating DNS (either adding or removing the entries).
The broken part with multiple servers is the 'extension' of the
registration. If there are two address registration servers and both
receive the initial registration and (correctly) update DNS, the
problem comes when the client extends this but one of the servers
does not receive this extension. Then, the server that missed the
extension removes the entry prematurely (i.e., when it expired
originally). The coordination of multiple address registration
servers is out of scope. servers is out of scope.
4. DHCPv6 ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST Message 4. DHCPv6 ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST Message
The DHCPv6 client sends an ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message to a The DHCPv6 client sends an ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message to a
server to request an address to be registered in the DNS. The format server to request an address to be registered in the DNS. The format
of the ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message is described as follows: of the ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message is described as follows:
0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
skipping to change at page 4, line 39 skipping to change at page 4, line 44
The ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message MUST NOT contain server- The ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message MUST NOT contain server-
identifier option and MUST contain the IA_NA option and the DHCPv6 identifier option and MUST contain the IA_NA option and the DHCPv6
FQDN option [RFC4704]. The ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message is FQDN option [RFC4704]. The ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message is
dedicated for clients to initiate an address registration request dedicated for clients to initiate an address registration request
toward an address registration server. Consequently, clients MUST toward an address registration server. Consequently, clients MUST
NOT put any Option Request Option(s) in the ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST NOT put any Option Request Option(s) in the ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST
message. message.
Clients MUST discard any received ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST messages. Clients MUST discard any received ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST messages.
Servers MUST discard any ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST messages that meet
any of the following conditions:
o the message does not include a Client Identifier option.
o the message includes a Server Identifier option.
o the message does not include at least one IA_NA option.
o the message does not include an IAADDR option encapsulated within
the IA_NA option(s).
o the message does not include FQDN option (or include multiple FQDN
options).
o the message includes an Option Request Option.
Servers MUST discard any ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST messages that do Servers MUST discard any ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST messages that do
not include a Client Identifier option or that do include a Server not Servers MUST discard any ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST messages that
Identifier option. Servers MUST discard any ADDR-REGISTRATION- do include any Option Request Option(s).
REQUEST messages that do not include IA_NA option. Servers MUST
discard any ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST messages that do not include
FQDN option or include more than one FQDN options. Servers MUST
discard any ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST messages that do include any
Option Request Option(s).
5. DHCPv6 Address Registration Procedure 5. DHCPv6 Address Registration Procedure
The DHCPv6 protocol is used as the address registration protocol when The DHCPv6 protocol is used as the address registration protocol when
a DHCPv6 server performs the role of an address registration server. a DHCPv6 server performs the role of an address registration server.
The DHCPv6 IA_NA option [RFC3315] and the DHCPv6 FQDN option The DHCPv6 IA_NA option [RFC3315] and the DHCPv6 FQDN option
[RFC4704] are adopted in order to fulfill the address registration [RFC4704] are adopted in order to fulfill the address registration
interactions. interactions.
5.1. DHCPv6 Address Registration Request 5.1. DHCPv6 Address Registration Request
The end-host sends a DHCPv6 ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message to the The end-host sends a DHCPv6 ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message to the
address registration server to the All_DHCP_Relay_Agents_and_Servers address registration server to the All_DHCP_Relay_Agents_and_Servers
multicast address (ff02::1:2). multicast address (ff02::1:2).
The end-host MUST include a Client Identifier option in the ADDR- The end-host MUST include a Client Identifier option in the ADDR-
skipping to change at page 5, line 43 skipping to change at page 6, line 13
valid-lifetimes in its storage. valid-lifetimes in its storage.
The address registration client MUST refresh the registration before The address registration client MUST refresh the registration before
it expires (i.e. before the valid-lifetime of the IA address elapses) it expires (i.e. before the valid-lifetime of the IA address elapses)
by sending a new ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST to the address by sending a new ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST to the address
registration server. If the address registration server does not registration server. If the address registration server does not
receive such a refresh after the valid-lifetime has passed, it SHOULD receive such a refresh after the valid-lifetime has passed, it SHOULD
remove the IPv6-address-to-FQDN bindings in DNS, also the local remove the IPv6-address-to-FQDN bindings in DNS, also the local
record. record.
5.3. Acknowledging Registration It is RECOMMENDED that clients initiate a refresh at about 85% of the
valid-lifetime. Because RAs may periodically 'reset' the valid-
lifetime, the refresh timer MUST be independently maintained from the
address valid-lifetime. Clients SHOULD set a refresh timer to 85% of
the valid-lifetime when they complete a registration operation and
only update this timer if 85% of any updated valid-lifetime would be
sooner than the timer.
After all the addresses have been successfully registered in DNS, the 5.3. Acknowledging Registration and Retransmission
address registration server MUST send a Reply message as the response
to registration requests. The server generates a Reply message and After an address registration server accepts an address registration
includes a Status Code option with value Success, a Server Identifier request, it MUST send a Reply message as the response to registration
option with the server's DUID, and a Client Identifier option with The server is responsilbe to register all the addresses in DNS. The
the client's DUID. server generates a Reply message and includes a Status Code option
with value Success, a Server Identifier option with the server's
DUID, and a Client Identifier option with the client's DUID.
If there is no reply received within some interval, the client SHOULD
retransmits the message according to section 14 of [RFC3315], using
the following parameters:
o IRT ADDR_REG_TIMEOUT
o MRT ADDR_REG_MAX_RT
o MRC ADDR_REG_MAX_RC
o MRD 0
Where ADDR_REG_TIMEOUT might be 1 second, ADDR_REG_MAX_RT might be 30
minutes and ADDR_REG_MAX_RC might be 5.
For each IA in the ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message for which the For each IA in the ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message for which the
server does not succeed in registering, the server adds an IA option server does not accept its associated in registration request, the
using the IAID from the ADDR-REGISTRATION-REQUEST message, and server adds an IA option using the IAID from the ADDR-REGISTRATION-
includes a Status Code option with the value RegistrationDenied REQUEST message, and includes a Status Code option with the value
(TBA3) in the IA option. No other options are included in the IA RegistrationDenied (TBA3) in the IA option. No other options are
option. included in the IA option.
Upon receiving a RegistrationDenied error status code, the client MAY Upon receiving a RegistrationDenied error status code, the client MAY
resend the message following normal retransmission routines defined also resend the message following normal retransmission routines
in [RFC3315]. defined in [RFC3315] with above parameters.
6. Security Considerations 6. Security Considerations
An attacker may attempt to register large number of addresses in An attacker may attempt to register large number of addresses in
quick succession in order to overwhelm the address registration quick succession in order to overwhelm the address registration
server. These attacks may be prevented generic DHCPv6 protection by server. These attacks may be prevented generic DHCPv6 protection by
using the AUTH option [RFC3315] or Secure DHCPv6 using the AUTH option [RFC3315] or Secure DHCPv6
[I-D.ietf-dhc-sedhcpv6]. [I-D.ietf-dhc-sedhcpv6].
7. IANA Considerations 7. IANA Considerations
skipping to change at page 7, line 20 skipping to change at page 8, line 12
"Dynamic Updates in the Domain Name System (DNS UPDATE)", "Dynamic Updates in the Domain Name System (DNS UPDATE)",
RFC 2136, April 1997. RFC 2136, April 1997.
[RFC3315] Droms, R., Bound, J., Volz, B., Lemon, T., Perkins, C., [RFC3315] Droms, R., Bound, J., Volz, B., Lemon, T., Perkins, C.,
and M. Carney, "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for and M. Carney, "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for
IPv6 (DHCPv6)", RFC 3315, July 2003. IPv6 (DHCPv6)", RFC 3315, July 2003.
[RFC3972] Aura, T., "Cryptographically Generated Addresses (CGA)", [RFC3972] Aura, T., "Cryptographically Generated Addresses (CGA)",
RFC 3972, March 2005. RFC 3972, March 2005.
[RFC4703] Stapp, M. and B. Volz, "Resolution of Fully Qualified
Domain Name (FQDN) Conflicts among Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Clients", RFC 4703, October
2006.
[RFC4704] Volz, B., "The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for [RFC4704] Volz, B., "The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for
IPv6 (DHCPv6) Client Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) IPv6 (DHCPv6) Client Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN)
Option", RFC 4704, October 2006. Option", RFC 4704, October 2006.
[RFC4862] Thomson, S., Narten, T., and T. Jinmei, "IPv6 Stateless [RFC4862] Thomson, S., Narten, T., and T. Jinmei, "IPv6 Stateless
Address Autoconfiguration", RFC 4862, September 2007. Address Autoconfiguration", RFC 4862, September 2007.
[RFC4941] Narten, T., Draves, R., and S. Krishnan, "Privacy [RFC4941] Narten, T., Draves, R., and S. Krishnan, "Privacy
Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in
IPv6", RFC 4941, September 2007. IPv6", RFC 4941, September 2007.
 End of changes. 18 change blocks. 
50 lines changed or deleted 100 lines changed or added

This html diff was produced by rfcdiff 1.41. The latest version is available from http://tools.ietf.org/tools/rfcdiff/