draft-ietf-dmm-4283mnids-07.txt   draft-ietf-dmm-4283mnids-08.txt 
Distributed Mobility Management [dmm] C. Perkins Distributed Mobility Management [dmm] C. Perkins
Internet-Draft Futurewei Internet-Draft Futurewei
Intended status: Standards Track V. Devarapalli Intended status: Standards Track V. Devarapalli
Expires: September 5, 2018 Vasona Networks Expires: September 19, 2018 Vasona Networks
March 4, 2018 March 18, 2018
MN Identifier Types for RFC 4283 Mobile Node Identifier Option MN Identifier Types for RFC 4283 Mobile Node Identifier Option
draft-ietf-dmm-4283mnids-07.txt draft-ietf-dmm-4283mnids-08.txt
Abstract Abstract
Additional Identifier Type Numbers are defined for use with the Additional Identifier Type Numbers are defined for use with the
Mobile Node Identifier Option for MIPv6 (RFC 4283). Mobile Node Identifier Option for MIPv6 (RFC 4283).
Status of This Memo Status of This Memo
This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79. provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.
skipping to change at page 1, line 32 skipping to change at page 1, line 32
Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on September 5, 2018. This Internet-Draft will expire on September 19, 2018.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
skipping to change at page 2, line 23 skipping to change at page 2, line 23
4.3. Description of the EUI-48 address type . . . . . . . . . 4 4.3. Description of the EUI-48 address type . . . . . . . . . 4
4.4. Description of the EUI-64 address type . . . . . . . . . 4 4.4. Description of the EUI-64 address type . . . . . . . . . 4
4.5. Description of the DUID type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4.5. Description of the DUID type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
5. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
6. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 6. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
7. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 7. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
8. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 8. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
8.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 8.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
8.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 8.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Appendix A. RFID types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Appendix A. RFID types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
A.1. Description of the RFID types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 A.1. Description of the RFID types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
A.1.1. Description of the RFID-SGTIN-64 type . . . . . . . . 11 A.1.1. Description of the RFID-SGTIN-64 type . . . . . . . . 12
A.1.2. Description of the RFID-SGTIN-96 type . . . . . . . . 11 A.1.2. Description of the RFID-SGTIN-96 type . . . . . . . . 12
A.1.3. Description of the RFID-SSCC-64 type . . . . . . . . 11 A.1.3. Description of the RFID-SSCC-64 type . . . . . . . . 12
A.1.4. Description of the RFID-SSCC-96 type . . . . . . . . 11 A.1.4. Description of the RFID-SSCC-96 type . . . . . . . . 12
A.1.5. Description of the RFID-SGLN-64 type . . . . . . . . 11 A.1.5. Description of the RFID-SGLN-64 type . . . . . . . . 12
A.1.6. Description of the RFID-SGLN-96 type . . . . . . . . 11 A.1.6. Description of the RFID-SGLN-96 type . . . . . . . . 12
A.1.7. Description of the RFID-GRAI-64 type . . . . . . . . 12 A.1.7. Description of the RFID-GRAI-64 type . . . . . . . . 13
A.1.8. Description of the RFID-GRAI-96 type . . . . . . . . 12 A.1.8. Description of the RFID-GRAI-96 type . . . . . . . . 13
A.1.9. Description of the RFID-GIAI-64 type . . . . . . . . 12 A.1.9. Description of the RFID-GIAI-64 type . . . . . . . . 13
A.1.10. Description of the RFID-GIAI-96 type . . . . . . . . 12 A.1.10. Description of the RFID-GIAI-96 type . . . . . . . . 13
A.1.11. Description of the RFID-DoD-64 type . . . . . . . . . 12 A.1.11. Description of the RFID-DoD-64 type . . . . . . . . . 13
A.1.12. Description of the RFID-DoD-96 type . . . . . . . . . 12 A.1.12. Description of the RFID-DoD-96 type . . . . . . . . . 13
A.1.13. Description of the RFID URI types . . . . . . . . . . 12 A.1.13. Description of the RFID URI types . . . . . . . . . . 13
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
The Mobile Node Identifier Option for MIPv6 [RFC4283] has proved to The Mobile Node Identifier Option for MIPv6 [RFC4283] has proved to
be a popular design tool for providing identifiers for mobile nodes be a popular design tool for providing identifiers for mobile nodes
during authentication procedures with AAA protocols such as Diameter during authentication procedures with AAA protocols such as Diameter
[RFC3588]. To date, only a single type of identifier has been [RFC3588]. To date, only a single type of identifier has been
specified, namely the MN NAI. Other types of identifiers are in specified, namely the MN NAI. Other types of identifiers are in
common use, and even referenced in RFC 4283. In this document, we common use, and even referenced in RFC 4283. In this document, we
propose adding some basic types that are defined in various propose adding some basic types that are defined in various
skipping to change at page 7, line 25 skipping to change at page 7, line 25
[RFC3588] Calhoun, P., Loughney, J., Guttman, E., Zorn, G., and J. [RFC3588] Calhoun, P., Loughney, J., Guttman, E., Zorn, G., and J.
Arkko, "Diameter Base Protocol", RFC 3588, Arkko, "Diameter Base Protocol", RFC 3588,
DOI 10.17487/RFC3588, September 2003, DOI 10.17487/RFC3588, September 2003,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3588>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3588>.
[RFID-DoD-spec] [RFID-DoD-spec]
Department of Defense, "United States Department of Department of Defense, "United States Department of
Defense Suppliers Passive RFID Information Guide (Version Defense Suppliers Passive RFID Information Guide (Version
15.0)", January 2010. 15.0)", January 2010.
[RFID-framework]
Institut National des Telecommunication, ""Heterogeneous
RFID framework design, analysis and evaluation"", July
2012.
[ThreeGPP-IDS] [ThreeGPP-IDS]
3rd Generation Partnership Project, "3GPP Technical 3rd Generation Partnership Project, "3GPP Technical
Specification 23.003 V8.4.0: Technical Specification Group Specification 23.003 V8.4.0: Technical Specification Group
Core Network and Terminals; Numbering, addressing and Core Network and Terminals; Numbering, addressing and
identification (Release 8)", March 2009. identification (Release 8)", March 2009.
[TRACK-IoT]
IPv6.com, ""Heterogeneous IoT Network : TRACK-IoT"", March
2012.
[Using-RFID-IPv6]
IPv6.com, ""Using RFID & IPv6"", September 2006.
Appendix A. RFID types Appendix A. RFID types
The material in this non-normative appendix was originally composed
for inclusion in the main body of the specification, but was moved
into an appendix because there was insufficient support for
allocating RFID types at this time. It was observed that RFID-based
mobile devices may create privacy exposures unless confidentiality is
assured for signaling. A specification for eliminating unauthorized
RFID tracking based on layer-2 addresses would be helpful.
Much of the following text is due to contributions from Hakima
Chaouchi. For an overview and some initial suggestions about using
RFID with IPv6 on mobile devices, see [Using-RFID-IPv6].
In the context of IoT and industry 4.0 vertical domain, efficient
inventory and tracking items is of major interest, and RFID
technology is the identification technology in the hardware design of
many such items.
The "TRACKIOT: Heterogeneous IoT control" project ([TRACK-IoT],
[RFID-framework]) explored Mobile IPv6 as a mobility management
protocol for RFID-based mobile devices.
1. Passive RFID tags (that have no processing resources) need to be
handled by the gateway (likely also the RFID Reader), which is
then the end point of the mobility protocol. It is also the
point where the CoA will be created based on some combination
such as the RFID tag and the prefix of that gateway. The point
here is to offer the possibility to passive RFID items to get an
IPv6 address and take advantage of the mobility framework to
follow the mobile device (passive tag on the item). One example
scenario that has been proposed, showing the need for mobility
management of passive RFID items, would be pieces of art tagged
with passive tags that need to be monitored while transported.
2. Using active RFID tags (where processing resource is available on
the tag), the end point of the mobility protocol can be pushed up
to the RFID Active tag. We name it also an identification
sensor. Use cases include active RFID tags for traceability of
cold food respect during mobility (transport) of food. Mobility
of cars equiped with active RFID tags that we already use for
toll payement can be added with mobility management.
One major effort of connecting IETF efforts to the EPCGlobal (RFID
standardisation) led to the ONS (DNS version applied for RFID logical
names and page information retrieval). Attempts have tried to
connect IPv6 on the address space to RFID identifier format. Other
initiatives started working on gateways to map tag identifiers with
IPv6 addresses and build signaling protocols for the application
level. For instance tracking of mobile items equipped with a tag can
be triggered remotely by a remote correspondent node until a visiting
area where a mobile item equipped with an RFID tag is located. An
RFID reader will be added with an IPv6 to RFID tag translation. One
option is to build a Home IPv6 address of that tagged item by using
the prefix of the Home agent combined with the tag RFID identifier of
the mobile item; as the tag ID is unique, the home IPv6 address of
that item will be also unique. Then the visiting RFID reader will
compose the IPV6 care of address of the tagged mobile item by
combining the prefix of the RFID reader with the tag ID of the item).
MIPv6 can then provide normally the mobility management of that RFID
tagged item. A different useful example of tagged items involves
items of a factory that can be tracked while they are transported,
especially for real time localisation and tracking of precious items
transported without GPS. An automotive car manufacturer can assign
IPv6 addresses corresponding to RFID tagged cars or mechanical car
parts, and build a tracking dataset of the mobility not only of the
cars, but also of the mechanical pieces.
The Tag Data standard promoted by Electronic Product Code(TM) The Tag Data standard promoted by Electronic Product Code(TM)
(abbreviated EPC) [EPC-Tag-Data] supports several encoding systems or (abbreviated EPC) [EPC-Tag-Data] supports several encoding systems or
schemes, which are commonly used in RFID (radio-frequency schemes, which are commonly used in RFID (radio-frequency
identification) applications, including identification) applications, including
o RFID-GID (Global Identifier), o RFID-GID (Global Identifier),
o RFID-SGTIN (Serialized Global Trade Item Number), o RFID-SGTIN (Serialized Global Trade Item Number),
o RFID-SSCC (Serial Shipping Container), o RFID-SSCC (Serial Shipping Container),
o RFID-SGLN (Global Location Number), o RFID-SGLN (Global Location Number),
o RFID-GRAI (Global Returnable Asset Identifier), o RFID-GRAI (Global Returnable Asset Identifier),
 End of changes. 7 change blocks. 
19 lines changed or deleted 97 lines changed or added

This html diff was produced by rfcdiff 1.46. The latest version is available from http://tools.ietf.org/tools/rfcdiff/