draft-ietf-ipv6-over-ppp-v2-01.txt   draft-ietf-ipv6-over-ppp-v2-02.txt 
Internet Draft S.Varada (Transwitch) Internet Draft S.Varada (Transwitch)
Document: draft-ietf-ipv6-over-ppp-v2-01.txt D.Haskins Document: draft-ietf-ipv6-over-ppp-v2-02.txt D.Haskins
Expires: December 2004 Ed Allen Expires: December 2005 Ed Allen
June 2004 June 2005
IP Version 6 over PPP IP Version 6 over PPP
<draft-ietf-ipv6-over-ppp-v2-01.txt> <draft-ietf-ipv6-over-ppp-v2-02.txt>
Status of this Memo Status of this Memo
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accordance with RFC 3668. becomes aware will be disclosed, in accordance with Section 6 of
BCP 79.
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Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
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Abstract Abstract
The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) provides a standard method of The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) provides a standard method of
encapsulating Network Layer protocol information over encapsulating Network Layer protocol information over
point-to-point links. PPP also defines an extensible Link Control point-to-point links. PPP also defines an extensible Link Control
Protocol, and proposes a family of Network Control Protocols Protocol, and proposes a family of Network Control Protocols
(NCPs) for establishing and configuring different network-layer (NCPs) for establishing and configuring different network-layer
protocols. protocols.
This document defines the method for transmission of IP Version 6 This document defines the method for sending IPv6 packets over PPP
packets over PPP links as well as the NCP for establishing and links, the NCP for establishing and configuring the IPv6 over PPP
configuring the IPv6 over PPP. It also specifies the method of and the method for forming IPv6 link-local addresses on PPP links.
forming IPv6 link-local addresses on PPP links. It also specifies the conditions for performing Duplicate Address
Detection on IPv6 global unicast addresses configured for PPP
links either through stateful or stateless address
autoconfiguration.
This document is an update to RFC 2472 and, hence, obsoletes it. This document is an update to RFC 2472 and, hence, obsoletes it.
Table of Contents Table of Contents
1. Introduction...................................................2 1. Introduction...................................................2
1.1 Specification of Requirements..............................3 1.1 Specification of Requirements..............................3
2. Sending IPv6 Datagrams.........................................3 2. Sending IPv6 Datagrams.........................................3
3. A PPP Network Control Protocol for IPv6........................3 3. A PPP Network Control Protocol for IPv6........................3
4. IPV6CP Configuration Options...................................4 4. IPV6CP Configuration Options...................................4
4.1 Interface-Identifier.......................................5 4.1 Interface-Identifier.......................................5
4.2 IPv6-Compression-Protocol.................................10 4.2 IPv6-Compression-Protocol.................................10
5. Stateless Autoconfiguration and Link-Local Addresses..........11 5. Stateless Autoconfiguration and Link-Local Addresses..........11
6. Security Considerations.......................................12 6. Security Considerations.......................................12
7. Acknowledgments...............................................12 7. Acknowledgments...............................................12
8. Normative References..........................................13 8. References....................................................13
9. Informative references........................................13 8.1 Normative References......................................13
Appendix A: Global Scope Addresses..............................13 8.2 Informative references....................................13
Appendix A: Global Scope Addresses..............................14
Appendix B: Changes from RFC-2472...............................14 Appendix B: Changes from RFC-2472...............................14
Authors' Addresses...............................................14 Authors' Addresses...............................................14
IPR Disclosure...................................................14 IPR Disclosure...................................................14
IPR Notice .....................................................14 IPR Notice .....................................................15
Copyright Notice and Disclaimer..................................15 Copyright Notice and Disclaimer..................................15
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
PPP has three main components: PPP has three main components:
1) A method for encapsulating datagrams over serial links. 1) A method for encapsulating datagrams over serial links.
2) A Link Control Protocol (LCP) for establishing, configuring, 2) A Link Control Protocol (LCP) for establishing, configuring,
and testing the data-link connection. and testing the data-link connection.
skipping to change at page 11, line 35 skipping to change at page 11, line 35
The Interface Identifier of IPv6 unicast addresses [6] of a PPP The Interface Identifier of IPv6 unicast addresses [6] of a PPP
interface, SHOULD be negotiated in the IPV6CP phase of the PPP interface, SHOULD be negotiated in the IPV6CP phase of the PPP
connection setup (see section 4.1). If no valid Interface connection setup (see section 4.1). If no valid Interface
Identifier has been successfully negotiated, procedures for Identifier has been successfully negotiated, procedures for
recovering from such a case are unspecified. One approach is to recovering from such a case are unspecified. One approach is to
manually configure the Interface-Identifier of the interface. manually configure the Interface-Identifier of the interface.
The negotiated Interface-Identifier is used by the local end of The negotiated Interface-Identifier is used by the local end of
the PPP link to autoconfigure IPv6 link-local unicast address for the PPP link to autoconfigure IPv6 link-local unicast address for
the PPP interface. However, it cannot be assumed that the same the PPP interface. However, it SHOULD NOT be assumed that the
Interface-Identifier is used in configuring global unicast same Interface-Identifier is used in configuring global unicast
addresses for the PPP interface using IPv6 stateless address addresses for the PPP interface using IPv6 stateless address
autoconfiguration [3]. The PPP peer MAY generate one or more autoconfiguration [3]. The PPP peer MAY generate one or more
Interface Identifiers, for instance, using a method described in Interface Identifiers, for instance, using a method described in
[9], to autoconfigure one or more global unicast addresses. [9], to autoconfigure one or more global unicast addresses.
As long as the Interface-Identifier is negotiated in the IPV6CP As long as the Interface-Identifier is negotiated in the IPV6CP
phase of the PPP connection setup, it is redundant to perform phase of the PPP connection setup, it is redundant to perform
duplicate address detection (DAD) as a part of the IPv6 Stateless duplicate address detection (DAD) as a part of the IPv6 Stateless
Address Autoconfiguration protocol [3] on the IPv6 link-local Address Autoconfiguration protocol [3] on the IPv6 link-local
address generated by the PPP peer. It MAY also be redundant to address generated by the PPP peer. It MAY also be redundant to
perform DAD on any global unicast addresses created (using an perform DAD on any global unicast addresses configured (using an
Interface-Identifier that is either negotiated during IPV6CP or Interface-Identifier that is either negotiated during IPV6CP or
generated, for instance, as per [9]) for the interface as part of generated, for instance, as per [9]) for the interface as part of
the IPv6 Stateless Address Autoconfiguration protocol [3] provided the IPv6 Stateless Address Autoconfiguration protocol [3] provided
that the following two conditions are met: that the following two conditions are met:
1) The prefixes advertised, through the Router Advertisement 1) The prefixes advertised, through the Router Advertisement
messages, by the access router terminating the PPP link are messages, by the access router terminating the PPP link are
exclusive to the PPP link. exclusive to the PPP link.
2) The access router terminating the PPP link does not 2) The access router terminating the PPP link does not
autoconfigure any IPv6 global unicast addresses from the autoconfigure any IPv6 global unicast addresses from the
prefixes that it advertises. prefixes that it advertises.
Therefore, it is recommended that for PPP links with the IPV6CP Therefore, it is RECOMMENDED that for PPP links with the IPV6CP
Interface-Identifier option enabled and that satisfy the Interface-Identifier option enabled and satisfying the
aforementioned two conditions, the default value of the aforementioned two conditions, the default value of the
DupAddrDetectTransmits autoconfiguration variable [3] be zero. DupAddrDetectTransmits autoconfiguration variable [3] is set to
3GPP2 networks are an example of a technology that uses PPP to zero by the system management. 3GPP2 networks are an example of a
enable a host to obtain an IPv6 global unicast address and technology that uses PPP to enable a host to obtain an IPv6 global
satisfies the aforementioned two conditions [10]. 3GPP networks unicast address and satisfies the aforementioned two conditions
are another example [11]. [10]. 3GPP networks are another example [11] & [13].
Link-local addresses Link-local addresses
Link-local addresses of PPP interfaces have the following Link-local addresses of PPP interfaces have the following
format: format:
| 10 bits | 54 bits | 64 bits | | 10 bits | 54 bits | 64 bits |
+----------+------------------------+-----------------------------+ +----------+------------------------+-----------------------------+
|1111111010| 0 | Interface-Identifier | |1111111010| 0 | Interface-Identifier |
+----------+------------------------+-----------------------------+ +----------+------------------------+-----------------------------+
The most significant 10 bits of the address is the Link-Local The most significant 10 bits of the address is the Link-Local
prefix FE80::. 54 zero bits pad out the address between the prefix FE80::. 54 zero bits pad out the address between the
Link-Local prefix and the Interface-Identifier fields. Link-Local prefix and the Interface-Identifier fields.
6. Security Considerations 6. Security Considerations
The IPv6 Control Protocol extension to PPP can be used with all The IPv6 Control Protocol extension to PPP can be used with all
defined PPP authentication and encryption mechanisms. defined PPP authentication and encryption mechanisms.
The information learned via the NCP protocol SHOULD not be trusted
for making security relevant decisions.
7. Acknowledgments 7. Acknowledgments
This document borrows from the Magic-Number LCP option and as such This document borrows from the Magic-Number LCP option and as such
is partially based on previous work done by the PPP working group. is partially based on previous work done by the PPP working group.
The editor is grateful for the input provided by members of the The editor is grateful for the input provided by members of the
IPv6 community in the spirit of updating the RFC 2472. Thanks, in IPv6 community in the spirit of updating the RFC 2472. Thanks, in
particular, go to Pete Barany and Karim El-malki for their particular, go to Pete Barany and Karim El-malki for their
contributions. Also, thanks to Alex Conta for a thorough technical contributions. Also, thanks to Alex Conta for a
reviewing. thorough reviewing and Pekka Savola for the nits.
8. Normative References 8. References
8.1 Normative References
[1] Simpson, W., "The Point-to-Point Protocol", STD 51, RFC [1] Simpson, W., "The Point-to-Point Protocol", STD 51, RFC
1661, July 1994. 1661, July 1994.
[2] Deering, S., and R. Hinden, Editors, "Internet Protocol, [2] Deering, S., and R. Hinden, Editors, "Internet Protocol,
Version 6 (IPv6) Specification", RFC 2460, December 1998. Version 6 (IPv6) Specification", RFC 2460, December 1998.
[3] Thomson, S., and T. Narten, "IPv6 Stateless Address [3] Thomson, S., and T. Narten, "IPv6 Stateless Address
Autoconfiguration", RFC 2462, December 1998. Autoconfiguration", RFC 2462, December 1998.
skipping to change at page 13, line 33 skipping to change at page 13, line 38
[7] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement [7] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement
Levels," BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997. Levels," BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.
[8] Narten T., and C. Burton, "A Caution On The Canonical Ordering [8] Narten T., and C. Burton, "A Caution On The Canonical Ordering
Of Link-Layer Addresses,÷ RFC 2469, December 1998. Of Link-Layer Addresses,÷ RFC 2469, December 1998.
[9] Narten T., and R. Draves, "Privacy Extensions for Stateless [9] Narten T., and R. Draves, "Privacy Extensions for Stateless
Address Autoconfiguration in IPv6,÷ RFC 3041, January 2001. Address Autoconfiguration in IPv6,÷ RFC 3041, January 2001.
9.Informative references 8.2 Informative references
[10] 3GPP2 X.S0011-002-C v1.0, "cdma2000 Wireless IP Network [10] 3GPP2 X.S0011-002-C v1.0, "cdma2000 Wireless IP Network
Standard: Simple IP and Mobile IP Access Services,÷ September Standard: Simple IP and Mobile IP Access Services,÷ September
2003. 2003.
[11] 3GPP TS 29.061 V5.8.0, "Interworking between the Public Land [11] 3GPP TS 29.061 V6.4.0, "Interworking between the Public Land
Mobile Network (PLMN) Supporting packet based services and Mobile Network (PLMN) Supporting packet based services and
Packet Data Networks (PDN) (Release 5),÷ January 2004. Packet Data Networks (PDN) (Release 6),÷ April 2005.
[12] Droms, E., et al., ˘Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for [12] Droms, E., et al., ˘Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for
IPv6 (DHCPv6),÷ RFC 3315, July 2003. IPv6 (DHCPv6),÷ RFC 3315, July 2003.
[13] 3GPP TS 23.060 v6.8.0, ˘General Packet Radio Service (GPRS);
Service description; Stage 2 (Release 6),÷ March 2005.
Appendix A: Global Scope Addresses Appendix A: Global Scope Addresses
A node on the PPP link MUST create global unicast addresses either A node on the PPP link MUST create global unicast addresses either
through stateless or stateful address auto-configuration through stateless or stateful address auto-configuration
mechanisms. In the stateless address auto-configuration [3], the mechanisms. In the stateless address auto-configuration [3], the
node relies on sub-net prefixes advertised by the router via the node relies on sub-net prefixes advertised by the router via the
Router Advertisement messages to obtain global unicast addresses Router Advertisement messages to obtain global unicast addresses
from an interface identifier. In the stateful address auto- from an interface identifier. In the stateful address auto-
configuration, the host relies on a Stateful Server, like, DHCPv6 configuration, the host relies on a Stateful Server, like, DHCPv6
[12], to obtain global unicast addresses. [12], to obtain global unicast addresses.
Appendix B: Changes from RFC-2472 Appendix B: Changes from RFC-2472
The following changes were made from RFC-2472 "IP Version 6 over The following changes were made from RFC-2472 "IPv6 over PPP":
PPP":
- Minor updates to sections 3 and 4 - Minor updates to sections 3 and 4
- Updated the text in section 4.1 to include the reference to - Updated the text in section 4.1 to include the reference to
Appendix A and minor text clarifications. Appendix A and minor text clarifications.
- Updated the text in Section 5 to: (a) option the use of one or - Updated the text in Section 5 to: (a) option the use of one or
more Interface-Identifiers generated, other than the IPV6CP more Interface-Identifiers generated, other than the IPV6CP
negotiated, in the creation of global unicast addresses, and negotiated, in the creation of global unicast addresses, and
(b) identify cases against the DAD of created non-link-local (b) identify cases against the DAD of created non-link-local
skipping to change at page 14, line 37 skipping to change at page 14, line 43
- Added the Appendix A - Added the Appendix A
Authors' Addresses Authors' Addresses
Dimitry Haskin Dimitry Haskin
Ed Allen Ed Allen
Srihari Varada (Editor) Srihari Varada (Editor)
TranSwitch Corporation TranSwitch Corporation
3 Enterprise Dr. 3 Enterprise Dr.
Shelton, CT 06484. Shelton, CT 06484. US.
Phone: +1 203 929 8810
EMail: varada@txc.com EMail: varada@txc.com
IPR Disclosure IPR Disclosure
By submitting this Internet-Draft, I certify that any applicable By submitting this Internet-Draft, each author represents that
patent or other IPR claims of which I am aware have been any applicable patent or other IPR claims of which he or she is
disclosed, and any of which I become aware will be disclosed, in aware have been or will be disclosed, and any of which he or she
accordance with RFC 3668. becomes aware will be disclosed, in accordance with Section 6 of
BCP 79.
IPR Notice IPR Notice
The IETF takes no position regarding the validity or scope of any The IETF takes no position regarding the validity or scope of any
Intellectual Property Rights or other rights that might be claimed Intellectual Property Rights or other rights that might be claimed
to pertain to the implementation or use of the technology to pertain to the implementation or use of the technology
described in this document or the extent to which any license described in this document or the extent to which any license
under such rights might or might not be available; nor does it under such rights might or might not be available; nor does it
represent that it has made any independent effort to identify any represent that it has made any independent effort to identify any
such rights. Information on the procedures with respect to rights such rights. Information on the procedures with respect to rights
skipping to change at page 15, line 25 skipping to change at page 15, line 33
at http://www.ietf.org/ipr. at http://www.ietf.org/ipr.
The IETF invites any interested party to bring to its attention The IETF invites any interested party to bring to its attention
any copyrights, patents or patent applications, or other any copyrights, patents or patent applications, or other
proprietary rights that may cover technology that may be required proprietary rights that may cover technology that may be required
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IETF at ietf-ipr@ietf.org. IETF at ietf-ipr@ietf.org.
Copyright Notice and Disclaimer Copyright Notice and Disclaimer
Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2004). This document is Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2005). This document is
subject to the rights, licenses and restrictions contained in BCP subject to the rights, licenses and restrictions contained in BCP
78, and except as set forth therein, the authors retain all their 78, and except as set forth therein, the authors retain all their
rights. rights.
This document and the information contained herein are provided This document and the information contained herein are provided
on an "AS IS" basis and THE CONTRIBUTOR, THE ORGANIZATION HE/SHE on an "AS IS" basis and THE CONTRIBUTOR, THE ORGANIZATION HE/SHE
REPRESENTS OR IS SPONSORED BY (IF ANY), THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND REPRESENTS OR IS SPONSORED BY (IF ANY), THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND
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THE USE OF THE INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR THE USE OF THE INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR
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