draft-ietf-lisp-lig-04.txt   draft-ietf-lisp-lig-05.txt 
Network Working Group D. Farinacci Network Working Group D. Farinacci
Internet-Draft D. Meyer Internet-Draft D. Meyer
Intended status: Experimental cisco Systems Intended status: Experimental cisco Systems
Expires: February 11, 2012 August 10, 2011 Expires: March 9, 2012 September 6, 2011
LISP Internet Groper (LIG) LISP Internet Groper (LIG)
draft-ietf-lisp-lig-04 draft-ietf-lisp-lig-05
Abstract Abstract
A simple tool called the LISP Internet Groper or 'lig' can be used to A simple tool called the LISP Internet Groper or 'lig' can be used to
query the LISP mapping database. This draft describes how it works. query the LISP mapping database. This draft describes how it works.
Status of this Memo Status of this Memo
This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79. provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.
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Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on February 11, 2012. This Internet-Draft will expire on March 9, 2012.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2011 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2011 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
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10. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 10. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
10.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 10.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
10.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 10.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Appendix A. Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Appendix A. Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
LISP [LISP] specifies an architecture and mechanism for replacing the LISP [LISP] specifies an architecture and mechanism for replacing the
addresses currently used by IP with two separate name spaces: addresses currently used by IP with two separate name spaces:
Endpoint IDS (EIDs), used within sites, and Routing Locators (RLOCs), Endpoint IDs (EIDs), used within sites, and Routing Locators (RLOCs),
used on the transit networks that make up the Internet used on the transit networks that make up the Internet
infrastructure. To achieve this separation, the Locator/ID infrastructure. To achieve this separation, the Locator/ID
Separation Protocol (LISP) defines protocol mechanisms for mapping Separation Protocol (LISP) defines protocol mechanisms for mapping
from EIDs to RLOCs. In addition, LISP assumes the existence of a from EIDs to RLOCs. In addition, LISP assumes the existence of a
database to store and propagate those mappings globally. Several database to store and propagate those mappings globally. Several
such databases have been proposed, among them: LISP-CONS [CONS], such databases have been proposed, among them: LISP-CONS [CONS],
LISP-NERD [NERD], and LISP+ALT [ALT], with LISP+ALT being the system LISP-NERD [NERD], and LISP+ALT [ALT], with LISP+ALT being the system
that is currently being implemented and deployed on the pilot LISP that is currently being implemented and deployed on the pilot LISP
network. network.
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numbered from topologically-aggregatable blocks that are assigned numbered from topologically-aggregatable blocks that are assigned
to a site at each point to which it attaches to the global to a site at each point to which it attaches to the global
Internet; where the topology is defined by the connectivity of Internet; where the topology is defined by the connectivity of
provider networks, RLOCs can be thought of as PA addresses. provider networks, RLOCs can be thought of as PA addresses.
Multiple RLOCs can be assigned to the same ETR device or to Multiple RLOCs can be assigned to the same ETR device or to
multiple ETR devices at a site. multiple ETR devices at a site.
Endpoint ID (EID): a 32-bit (for IPv4) or 128-bit (for IPv6) value Endpoint ID (EID): a 32-bit (for IPv4) or 128-bit (for IPv6) value
used in the source and destination address fields of the first used in the source and destination address fields of the first
(most inner) LISP header of a packet. The host obtains a (most inner) LISP header of a packet. The host obtains a
destination EID the same way it obtains an destination address destination EID the same way it obtains a destination address
today, for example through a DNS lookup or SIP exchange. The today, for example through a DNS lookup or SIP exchange. The
source EID is obtained via existing mechanisms used to set a source EID is obtained via existing mechanisms used to set a
host's "local" IP address. An EID is allocated to a host from an host's "local" IP address. An EID is allocated to a host from an
EID-prefix block associated with the site where the host is EID-prefix block associated with the site where the host is
located. An EID can be used by a host to refer to other hosts. located. An EID can be used by a host to refer to other hosts.
EIDs must not be used as LISP RLOCs. Note that EID blocks may be EIDs must not be used as LISP RLOCs. Note that EID blocks may be
assigned in a hierarchical manner, independent of the network assigned in a hierarchical manner, independent of the network
topology, to facilitate scaling of the mapping database. In topology, to facilitate scaling of the mapping database. In
addition, an EID block assigned to a site may have site-local addition, an EID block assigned to a site may have site-local
structure (subnetting) for routing within the site; this structure structure (subnetting) for routing within the site; this structure
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