MMUSIC Working Group                                        G. Camarillo
Internet-Draft                                                  Ericsson
Expires: July 14, November 5, 2005                                  January 13,                                    May 4, 2005

   Session Description Protocol (SDP) Format for Binary Floor Control
                        Protocol (BFCP) Streams
                   draft-ietf-mmusic-sdp-bfcp-00.txt
                   draft-ietf-mmusic-sdp-bfcp-01.txt

Status of this Memo

   This document is an Internet-Draft and is subject to all provisions
   of section 3 of RFC 3667.

   By submitting this Internet-Draft, each author represents that any
   applicable patent or other IPR claims of which he or she is aware
   have been or will be disclosed, and any of which he or she become becomes
   aware will be disclosed, in accordance with
   RFC 3668. Section 6 of BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
   other groups may also distribute working documents as
   Internet-Drafts. Internet-
   Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt.

   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.

   This Internet-Draft will expire on July 14, November 5, 2005.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2005).

Abstract

   This document specifies how to describe BFCP streams in SDP session
   descriptions.  User agents using the offer/answer model to establish
   BFCP streams use this format in their offers and their answers.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.  Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   3.  Fields in the m Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   4.  Floor Control Server Determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   5.  The confid 'confid' and userid 'userid' SDP Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   5.   The k line
   6.  Association between Streams and Floors . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
   7.  TCP Connection Management  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   6.   The nonce Attribute . . . .  5
   8.  Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   7.   Association between Streams . . . . . . . .  6
     8.1   Mutual Authentication Using Certificates and Floors TLS . . . . .  6
     8.2   Client Authentication at the BFCP Level  . . . . . . . . .  7
       8.2.1   Generating a Shared Secret .   5
   8.   Certificate Choice and Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . .   5 .  7
       8.2.2   The 'nonce' Attribute  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
   9.   TCP Connection Management  Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   10. . . . . . . . . . .  8
     9.1   Example Using TLS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
     9.2   Example Using the 'crypto' Attribute . . . . . . .   6
   11. . . . .  9
   10.   Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   12. 10
   11.   IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     12.1 10
     11.1  Registration of the confid Attribute 'TCP/BFCP' and 'TCP/TLS/BFCP' SDP
           'proto' values . . . . . . . . . .   8
     12.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
     11.2  Registration of the userid SDP 'confid' Attribute . . . . . . . . . .   8
     12.3 11
     11.3  Registration of the floorid SDP 'userid' Attribute . . . . . . . . 11
     11.4  Registration of the SDP 'floorid' Attribute  . . . . . . .   8
     12.4 12
     11.5  Registration of the nonce SDP 'nonce' Attribute  . . . . . . . . 12
     11.6  Registration of the crypto-suites for 'TCP/BFCP' . .   9
   13. . . . 13
   12.   Acknowledgments  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   14. 13
   13.   Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9 13
       Author's Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10 . 14
       Intellectual Property and Copyright Statements . . . . . . .  11 . 15

1.  Introduction

   As discussed in the BFCP (Binary Floor Control Protocol)
   specification [7], [8], a given BFCP client needs a set of data in order
   to establish a BFCP connection to a floor control server.  These data
   include the transport address of the server, the conference
   identifier, and the user identifier.

   One way for clients to obtain this information consists of using an
   offer/answer [5] exchange.  This document specifies how to encode
   this information in the SDP session descriptions which are part of an
   offer/answer exchange.

   User agents typically use the offer/answer model to establish a
   number of media streams of different types.  Following this model, a
   BFCP connection is described as any other media stream by using an
   SDP 'm' line, possibly followed by a number of attributes encoded in
   'a' lines.

2.  Terminology

   In this document, the key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED",
   "SHALL", "SHALL NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "NOT
   RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" are to be interpreted as
   described in BCP 14, RFC 2119 [1] [2] and indicate requirement levels for
   compliant implementations.

3.  Fields in the m Line

   According to RFC 2327 [3], the SDP specification [11], the 'm'line format is the
   following:

      m=<media> <port> <transport> <fmt list> <fmt> ...

   The media field MUST have a value of "application".

   The port field is set following the rules in [6]. [7].  Depending on the
   value of the 'setup' attribute (disccused in Section 9), 7), the port
   field contains the port the remote endpoint will initiate its TCP
   connection to, or is irrelevant (i.e., the endpoint will initiate the
   connection towards the remote endpoint) and should be set to a value
   of 9, which is the discard port.  Since BFCP only runs on top of TCP,
   the port is always a TCP port.  A port field value of zero has the
   standard SDP meaning (i.e., rejection of the media stream).

   We define two new values for the transport field: TCP/BFCP and TCP/
   TLS/BFCP.  The former is used when BFCP runs directly on top of TCP
   and the latter is used when BFCP runs on top of TLS, which in turn
   runs on top of TCP.

   The fmt (format) list is ignored for BFCP.  The fmt list of BFCP m
   lines SHOULD contain a single "*" character.

   The following is an example of an m line for a BFCP connection:

   m=application 20000 TCP/TLS/BFCP *

4.  Floor Control Server Determination

   The confid and userid SDP Attributes

   We define the 'confid' and the 'userid' SDP media-level attributes.
   Their Augmented BNF syntax [2] is: attributes are used by a floor control
   server to provide a client with a conference ID and a user ID.  In
   the context of an offer/answer exchange, the entity including these
   attributes is the floor control server.

   The most common scenario consists of a client establishing a BFCP
   stream with a floor control server.  In this case, there is only one
   floor control server (the offerer or the answerer).  However, there
   are scenarios where both the offerer and the answerer are both
   clients and floor control servers.  For example, in a two-party
   session that involves an audio stream and a shared whiteboard, one
   party acts as the floor control server for the audio stream and the
   other acts as the floor control server for the shared whiteboard.  In
   such a case, both the offerer and the answerer would include the
   'confid' and the 'userid' attributes in their respective session
   descriptions.

5.  The 'confid' and 'userid' SDP Attributes

   We define the 'confid' and the 'userid' SDP media-level attributes.
   These attributes attributes are used by a floor control server to
   provide a client with a conference ID and a user ID respectively.
   Their Augmented BNF syntax [3] is:

   confid-attribute      = "a=confid: " conference-id
   conference-id         = token

   userid-attribute      = "a=userid: " user-id
   user-id               = token

   The confid and the userid attributes carry the integer representation
   of a conference ID and a user ID respectively.

   Endpoints which use the offer/answer model to establish BFCP
   connections MUST support the confid and the userid attributes.  A
   floor control server acting as an offerer or as an answerers SHOULD
   include these attributes in its session descriptions.

5.  The k line

   The floor control server MAY use an SDP 'k' line to provide clients
   with a shared secret to be used to calculate the value of the DIGEST
   TLVs.  The following is an example of a 'k' line:

   k=base64:c2hhcmVkLXNlY3JldA==

   Endpoints MAY use other mechanisms (including out-of-band mechanisms)
   to come up with a share secret.  However, if the 'k' line is used in
   the way just described, the session description containing the 'k'
   line with the shared secret MUST be encrypted.

6.  The nonce Attribute  Association between Streams and Floors

   We define the 'nonce' floorid SDP media-level attribute.  Its Augmented BNF
   syntax [2] [3] is:

   nonce-attribute       = "a=nonce: " nonce-value
   nonce-value           = token

   The 'nonce' attribute carries the integer representation of the nonce
   to be used by the client in its next BFCP message (typically the
   first message from the client) towards the floor control server.
   This is an optimization so that the client does not need to generate
   an initial BFCP message only to have it rejected by the floor control
   server with an Error response containing a nonce.

   Endpoints which use the offer/answer model to establish BFCP
   connections SHOULD support the 'nonce' attribute.  A floor control
   server acting as an offerer or as an answerers MAY include this
   attribute in its session descriptions.

7.  Association between Streams and Floors

   We define the floorid SDP media-level attribute.  Its Augmented BNF
   syntax [2] is:

   floor-id-attribute

   floor-id-attribute = "a=floorid:" token [" mstrm:" token *(SP token)]

   The floorid attribute is used in BFCP 'm' lines.  It defined defines a floor
   identifier and, possibly, associates it with one or more media
   streams.  The token representing the floor ID is the integer
   representation of the Floor ID to be used in BFCP.  The token
   representing the media stream is a pointer to the media stream, which
   is identified by an SDP label attribute [8] [9]

   Endpoints which use the offer/answer model to establish BFCP
   connections MUST support the 'floorid' and the 'label' attributes.  A
   floor control server acting as an offerer or as an answerer SHOULD
   include these attributes in its session descriptions.

8.  Certificate Choice and Presentation

   Floor control servers follow the rules in [9] regarding certificate
   choice and presentation.  This implies that unless the floor control
   server includes a 'fingerprint' attribute in its session description,
   the certificate provided by the floor control server must be signed
   by a certificate authority known to the client.

   Endpoints which use the offer/answer model to establish BFCP
   connections MUST support the 'fingerprint' attribute.  Floor control
   servers SHOULD include this attribute in their session descriptions
   (no matter whether they are offers or answers).

   When TLS is used, once the underlaying TCP connection is established,
   the floor control server acts as the TLS server regardless of its
   role (passive or active) in the TCP establishment procedure.

9.

7.  TCP Connection Management

   The management of the TCP connection used to transport BFCP is
   performed using the 'setup' and 'connection' attributes as defined in
   [6].
   [7].

   The setup attribute indicates which of the endpoints (client or floor
   control server) initiates the TCP connection.  The 'connection'
   attribute handles TCP connection reestablishment.

   The BFCP specification [7] [8] describes a number of situations when the
   TCP connection between a client and the floor control server needs to
   be reestablished.  However, that specification does not describe the
   reestablishment process because this process depends on how the
   connection was established in the first place.  BFCP entities using
   the offer/answer model follow the following rules.

   When the existing TCP connection is reseted following the rules in
   [7],
   [8], the client SHOULD generate an offer towards the floor control
   server in order to reestablish the connection.  If a TCP connection
   cannot deliver a BFCP message and times out, the entity that
   attempted to send the message (i.e., the one that detected the TCP
   timeout) SHOULD generate an offer in order offer in order to reestablish the TCP
   connection.

   Endpoints which use the offer/answer model to establish BFCP
   connections MUST support the 'setup' and the 'connection' attributes.

8.  Authentication

   When a BFCP connection is established using the offer/answer model,
   it is assumed that the offerer and the answerer authenticate each
   other using some mechanism.  Once this mutual authentication takes
   place, all the offerer and the answerer need to make sure is that the
   entity they are receiving BFCP messages from is the same as the one
   that generated the previous offer or answer.

   When SIP is used to perform an offer/answer exchange, the initial
   mutual authentication takes place at the SIP level.  Additionally,
   SIP uses S/MIME to provide an integrity protected channel with
   optional confidentiality for the offer/answer exchange.  BFCP takes
   advantage of this integrity protected offer/answer exchange to
   perform authentication.  Within the offer/answer exchange, the
   offerer and the answerer exchange the fingerprints of their self-
   signed certificates.  These self-signed certificates are then used to
   establish the TLS connection that will carry BFCP traffic between the
   offerer and the answerer.  Of course, certificates signed by a
   certificate authority known to both parties can also be used.
   Section 8.1 describes mutual authentication using certificates and
   TLS, which is the RECOMMENDED mechanism to perform mutual
   authentication.

   BFCP also provides a digest mechanism based on a shared secret to
   provide client authentication in situations where TLS is not used for
   some reason.  Section 8.2 describes how to set up this mechanism
   using an offer/answer model.  Note that when mutual authentication is
   performed using TLS, it is not necessary to use this digest
   mechanism.

8.1  Mutual Authentication Using Certificates and TLS

   BFCP clients and floor control servers follow the rules in [10]
   regarding certificate choice and presentation.  This implies that
   unless a 'fingerprint' attribute is included in the session
   description, the certificate provided at the TLS-level must be signed
   by a certificate authority known to other party.  Endpoints which use
   the offer/answer model to establish BFCP connections MUST support the
   'fingerprint' attribute and SHOULD include it in their session
   descriptions.

   When TLS is used, once the underlaying TCP connection is established,
   the answerer acts as the TLS server regardless of its role (passive
   or active) in the TCP establishment procedure.

8.2  Client Authentication at the BFCP Level

   Digest authentication in BFCP is based on a shared secret between the
   client and the floor control server.  Section 8.2.1 describes how to
   set up such a secret using an encrypted offer/answer exchange.
   Section 8.2.2 describes how a floor control server can provide a
   client with an initial nonce.

8.2.1  Generating a Shared Secret

   This section describes how to generate a shared secret between a
   client and a floor control server using SDP security descriptions and
   the SDP 'crypto' attribute [12].

   The following is the format of the 'crypto' attribute as defined in
   [12]:

      a=crypto:<tag> <crypto-suite> <key-params> [<session-params>]

   The use of the tag field is specified in [12].

   The possible values for the crypto-suite field are defined within the
   context of a transport; TCP/BFCP in our case.  Within the context of
   TCP/BFCP, we define the following value for the crypto-suite field:

                    +-----------+-----------------+
                    | Value     | BFCP Identifier |
                    +-----------+-----------------+
                    | HMAC-SHA1 |        0        |
                    +-----------+-----------------+

          Table 1: Values for the crypto-suite field in TCP/BFCP

   The IANA registry for Digest Algorithms in BFCP contains references
   to the specifications that describe the usage of each digest
   algorithm (identified by its BFCP identifier) in BFCP.

   The key-params field SHOULD use the 'inline' key method followed by a
   base64-encoded [6] unguessable secret [1].

   The use of the optional session-params field is for further study.

   The following is an example of a 'crypto' attribute:

      a=crypto:1 HMAC-SHA1 inline:c2hhcmVkLXNlY3JldA==

   The use of the 'crypto' attribute in an offer/answer exchange is
   described in [12].  Additionally, when this attribute is used with
   BFCP streams, the answerer MUST use the same value in the key-params
   field as the one received in the offer.

   Endpoints MAY use other mechanisms (including out-of-band mechanisms)
   to generate a shared secret.  However, if the mechanism described in
   this section is used, the session descriptions MUST be encrypted.

8.2.2  The 'nonce' Attribute

   We define the SDP media-level 'nonce' attribute.  Its Augmented BNF
   syntax [3] is:

   nonce-attribute       = "a=nonce: " nonce-value
   nonce-value           = token

   The 'nonce' attribute carries the integer representation of the nonce
   to be used by the client in its next BFCP message (typically the
   first message from the client) towards the floor control server.
   This is an optimization so that the client does not need to generate
   an initial BFCP message only to reestablish have it rejected by the TCP
   connection. floor control
   server with an Error response containing a nonce.

   Endpoints which use the offer/answer model to establish BFCP
   connections MUST SHOULD support the 'setup' and the 'connection' attributes.

10.  Example

   The following is 'nonce' attribute.  A floor control
   server acting as an example of offerer or as an offer sent by a conference server
   to a client. answerers MAY include this
   attribute in its session descriptions.

9.  Examples

   For the purpose of brevity, the main portion of the session
   description is omitted in the examples, which only show m= 'm' lines and
   their attributes.

9.1  Example Using TLS

   The following is an example of an offer sent by a conference server
   to a client.

   m=application 20000 TCP/TLS/BFCP *
   k=base64:c2hhcmVkLXNlY3JldA==
   a=setup:passive
   a=connection:new
   a=fingerprint:SHA-1 \
        4A:AD:B9:B1:3F:82:18:3B:54:02:12:DF:3E:5D:49:6B:19:E5:7C:AB
   a=nonce:5678
   a=confid:4321
   a=userid:1234
   a=floorid:1 m-stream:10
   a=floorid:2 m-stream:11
   m=audio 20000 RTP/AVP 0
   a=label:10
   m=video 30000 RTP/AVP 31
   a=label:11

   Note that due to RFC formatting conventions, this document splits SDP
   across lines whose content would exceed 72 characters.  A backslash
   character marks where this line folding has taken place.  This
   backslash and its trailing CRLF and whitespace would not appear in
   actual SDP content.

   The following is the answer returned by the user.

   m=application 9 TCP/TLS/BFCP *
   a=setup:active
   a=connection:new
   m=audio 25000 RTP/AVP 0
   m=video 35000 RTP/AVP 31

9.2  Example Using the 'crypto' Attribute

   The following is an example of an offer sent by a conference server
   to a client.  In this case, TLS is not used to perform mutual
   authentication.  The 'crypto' attribute is used to generate a shared
   secret between the client and the floor control server.

   m=application 20000 TCP/BFCP *
   a=setup:passive
   a=connection:new
   a=crypto:1 HMAC-SHA1 inline:c2hhcmVkLXNlY3JldA==
   a=nonce:5736
   a=confid:4321
   a=userid:1234
   a=floorid:1 m-stream:10
   a=floorid:2 m-stream:11
   m=audio 20000 RTP/AVP 0
   a=label:10
   m=video 30000 RTP/AVP 31
   a=label:11

   The following is the answer returned by the participant.

   m=application 9 TCP/BFCP *
   a=setup:active
   a=connection:new
   a=crypto:1 HMAC-SHA1 inline:c2hhcmVkLXNlY3JldA==
   m=audio 25000 RTP/AVP 0
   m=video 35000 RTP/AVP 31

11.

10.  Security Considerations

   The BFCP [7], [8], SDP [3], [11], and the offer/answer [5] specifications
   discuss security issues related to BFCP, SDP, and the offer/answer
   respectively.  In addition, [6] [7] and [9] [10] discuss security issues
   related to the establishment of TCP and TLS connections using an
   offer/answer model.

   An issue which is discussed in the previous specifications and is of
   particular importance for this specification relates to the usage of
   the 'k' line SDP 'crypto' attribute to provide generate shared secrets to clients. secrets.  When the 'k' line
   'crypto' attribute is used in this way, used, the session description carrying it SHOULD must
   be
   encrypted. encrypted, as specified in Section 8.2.1.  Otherwise, an attacker
   could get access to the shared secret and impersonate the client.
   For session descriptions carried in SIP [4], S/MIME is the natural choice natural
   choice to provide such end-to-end encryption.  Other applications MAY
   use different encryption mechanisms.

11.  IANA Considerations

   The following sections instruct the IANA to perform a set of actions.

11.1  Registration of the 'TCP/BFCP' and 'TCP/TLS/BFCP' SDP 'proto'
      values

   This section instructs the IANA to register the following two new
   values for the SDP 'proto' field under the Session Description
   Protocol (SDP) Parameters registry:

                      +--------------+-----------+
                      | Value        | Reference |
                      +--------------+-----------+
                      | TCP/BFCP     |  RFCxxxx  |
                      | TCP/TLS/BFCP |  RFCxxxx  |
                      +--------------+-----------+

                 Table 2: Values for the SDP 'proto' field

   [Note to provide such end-to-end
   encryption.  Other applications MAY use different encryption
   mechanisms.

12.  IANA Considerations

   This the RFC editor: please, replace RFCxxxx with the RFC number
   that this document will be assigned.]

11.2  Registration of the SDP 'confid' Attribute

   This section instructs the IANA to register four new media-level the following SDP
   attributes: 'confid', 'userid', 'floorid', and 'nonce'.

12.1  Registration of att-
   field under the confid Attribute Session Description Protocol (SDP) Parameters
   registry:

   Contact name:          Gonzalo.Camarillo@ericsson.com

   Attribute name:        confid

   Type of attribute      Media level

   Subject to charset:    No

   Purpose of attribute:  The 'confid' attribute carries the integer
      representation of a Conference ID.

   Allowed attribute values:  A token

12.2

11.3  Registration of the userid SDP 'userid' Attribute

   This section instructs the IANA to register the following SDP att-
   field under the Session Description Protocol (SDP) Parameters
   registry:

   Contact name:          Gonzalo.Camarillo@ericsson.com

   Attribute name:        userid

   Type of attribute      Media level

   Subject to charset:    No

   Purpose of attribute:  The 'userid' attribute carries the integer
      representation of a User ID.

   Allowed attribute values:  A token

12.3

11.4  Registration of the floorid SDP 'floorid' Attribute

   This section instructs the IANA to register the following SDP att-
   field under the Session Description Protocol (SDP) Parameters
   registry:

   Contact name:          Gonzalo.Camarillo@ericsson.com

   Attribute name:        floorid

   Type of attribute      Media level

   Subject to charset:    No

   Purpose of attribute:  The 'floorid' attribute associates a floor
      with one or more media streams.

   Allowed attribute values:  Tokens

12.4

11.5  Registration of the nonce SDP 'nonce' Attribute

   This section instructs the IANA to register the following SDP att-
   field under the Session Description Protocol (SDP) Parameters
   registry:

   Contact name:          Gonzalo.Camarillo@ericsson.com

   Attribute name:        nonce

   Type of attribute      Media level
   Subject to charset:    No

   Purpose of attribute:  The 'nonce' attribute carried a nonce to be
      used in the media stream (e.g., in the BFCP connection).

   Allowed attribute values:  A token

13.

11.6  Registration of the crypto-suites for 'TCP/BFCP'

   This section instructs the IANA to register the 'TCP/BFCP' media
   transport under the SDP Security Description registry.  The key
   methods supported is "inline".  The reference for the SDP security
   description for 'TCP/BFCP' is this document.

   The following crypto-suite needs to be registered under the 'TCP/
   BFCP' transport:

                    +-----------+-----------------+
                    | Value     | BFCP Identifier |
                    +-----------+-----------------+
                    | HMAC-SHA1 |        0        |
                    +-----------+-----------------+

          Table 3: Values for the crypto-suite field in TCP/BFCP

   The IANA registry for Digest Algorithms in BFCP contains references
   to the specifications that describe the usage of each digest
   algorithm (identified by its BFCP identifier) in BFCP.

   At this point, there are no session parameters defined for the 'TCP/
   BFCP' media transport.  Consequently, the IANA does not need to
   create a session parameter subregistry under 'TCP/BFCP'.

12.  Acknowledgments

   Joerg Ott, Keith Drage, Alan Johnston, and Eric Rescorla provided
   useful ideas for this document.

14

13.  Normative References

   [1]   Eastlake, D., Crocker, S., and J. Schiller, "Randomness
         Recommendations for Security", RFC 1750, December 1994.

   [2]   Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement
         Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [2]

   [3]   Crocker, D. D., Ed. and P. Overell, "Augmented BNF for Syntax
         Specifications: ABNF", RFC 2234, November 1997.

   [3]  Handley, M. and V. Jacobson, "SDP: Session Description
        Protocol", RFC 2327, April 1998.

   [4]   Rosenberg, J., Schulzrinne, H., Camarillo, G., Johnston, A.,
         Peterson, J., Sparks, R., Handley, M. M., and E. Schooler, "SIP:
         Session Initiation Protocol", RFC 3261, June 2002.

   [5]   Rosenberg, J. and H. Schulzrinne, "An Offer/Answer Model with
         Session Description Protocol (SDP)", RFC 3264, June 2002.

   [6]   Josefsson, S., "The Base16, Base32, and Base64 Data Encodings",
         RFC 3548, July 2003.

   [7]   Yon, D., "Connection-Oriented Media Transport in the Session
         Description Protocol  (SDP)", draft-ietf-mmusic-sdp-comedia-09 draft-ietf-mmusic-sdp-comedia-10
         (work in progress), September November 2004.

   [7]

   [8]   Camarillo, G., "The Binary Floor Control Protocol (BFCP)",
        draft-ietf-xcon-bfcp-01
         draft-ietf-xcon-bfcp-03 (work in progress), October 2004.

   [8] January 2005.

   [9]   Levin, O. and G. Camarillo, "The SDP (Session Description
         Protocol) Label Attribute",
         draft-levin-mmmusic-sdp-media-label-00 (work in progress),
         July 2004.

   [9]

   [10]  Lennox, J., "Connection-Oriented Media Transport over the
         Transport Layer Security (TLS)  Protocol in the Session
         Description Protocol (SDP)", draft-ietf-mmusic-comedia-tls-02
         (work in progress), October 2004.

   [11]  Handley, M., "SDP: Session Description Protocol",
         draft-ietf-mmusic-sdp-new-24 (work in progress), February 2005.

   [12]  Andreasen, F., Baugher, M., and D. Wing, "Session Description
         Protocol Security Descriptions for Media Streams",
         draft-ietf-mmusic-sdescriptions-09 (work in progress),
         February 2005.

Author's Address

   Gonzalo Camarillo
   Ericsson
   Hirsalantie 11
   Jorvas  02420
   Finland

   EMail:

   Email: Gonzalo.Camarillo@ericsson.com

Intellectual Property Statement

   The IETF takes no position regarding the validity or scope of any
   Intellectual Property Rights or other rights that might be claimed to
   pertain to the implementation or use of the technology described in
   this document or the extent to which any license under such rights
   might or might not be available; nor does it represent that it has
   made any independent effort to identify any such rights.  Information
   on the procedures with respect to rights in RFC documents can be
   found in BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Copies of IPR disclosures made to the IETF Secretariat and any
   assurances of licenses to be made available, or the result of an
   attempt made to obtain a general license or permission for the use of
   such proprietary rights by implementers or users of this
   specification can be obtained from the IETF on-line IPR repository at
   http://www.ietf.org/ipr.

   The IETF invites any interested party to bring to its attention any
   copyrights, patents or patent applications, or other proprietary
   rights that may cover technology that may be required to implement
   this standard.  Please address the information to the IETF at
   ietf-ipr@ietf.org.

Disclaimer of Validity

   This document and the information contained herein are provided on an
   "AS IS" basis and THE CONTRIBUTOR, THE ORGANIZATION HE/SHE REPRESENTS
   OR IS SPONSORED BY (IF ANY), THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND THE INTERNET
   ENGINEERING TASK FORCE DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
   INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE
   INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED
   WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

Copyright Statement

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2005).  This document is subject
   to the rights, licenses and restrictions contained in BCP 78, and
   except as set forth therein, the authors retain all their rights.

Acknowledgment

   Funding for the RFC Editor function is currently provided by the
   Internet Society.