draft-ietf-netmod-arch-08.txt   draft-ietf-netmod-arch-09.txt 
Network Working Group P. Shafer Network Working Group P. Shafer
Internet-Draft Juniper Networks Internet-Draft Juniper Networks
Intended status: Informational August 20, 2010 Intended status: Informational September 22, 2010
Expires: February 21, 2011 Expires: March 26, 2011
An Architecture for Network Management using NETCONF and YANG An Architecture for Network Management using NETCONF and YANG
draft-ietf-netmod-arch-08 draft-ietf-netmod-arch-09
Abstract Abstract
NETCONF gives access to native capabilities of the devices within a NETCONF gives access to native capabilities of the devices within a
network, defining methods for manipulating configuration databases, network, defining methods for manipulating configuration databases,
retrieving operational data, and invoking specific operations. YANG retrieving operational data, and invoking specific operations. YANG
provides the means to define the content carried via NETCONF, both provides the means to define the content carried via NETCONF, both
data and operations. Using both technologies, standard modules can data and operations. Using both technologies, standard modules can
be defined to give interoperability and commonality to devices, while be defined to give interoperability and commonality to devices, while
still allowing devices to express their unique capabilities. still allowing devices to express their unique capabilities.
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Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
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modifications of such material outside the IETF Standards Process. modifications of such material outside the IETF Standards Process.
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than English. than English.
Table of Contents Table of Contents
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1. Origins of NETCONF and YANG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.1. Origins of NETCONF and YANG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2. Elements of the Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2. Elements of the Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.1. NETCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.1. NETCONF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.1.1. NETCONF Transport Mappings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.1.1. NETCONF Transport Mappings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.2. YANG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.2. YANG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.2.1. Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.2.1. Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.2.2. Flexibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.2.2. Flexibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.2.3. Extensibility Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.2.3. Extensibility Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.3. YANG Translations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.3. YANG Translations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.3.1. YIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.3.1. YIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.3.2. DSDL (Relax NG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.3.2. DSDL (Relax NG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
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4.3. Data Distinctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 4.3. Data Distinctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
4.3.1. Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 4.3.1. Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
4.3.2. Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 4.3.2. Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
4.3.3. Implications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 4.3.3. Implications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
4.4. Direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 4.4. Direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
5. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 5. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
6. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 6. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
7. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 7. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Author's Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Author's Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
1. Introduction 1. Origins of NETCONF and YANG
1.1. Origins of NETCONF and YANG
Networks are increasing in complexity and capacity, as well as the Networks are increasing in complexity and capacity, as well as the
density of the services deployed upon them. Uptime, reliability, and density of the services deployed upon them. Uptime, reliability, and
predictable latency requirements drive the need for automation. The predictable latency requirements drive the need for automation. The
problems with network management are not simple. They are complex problems with network management are not simple. They are complex
and intricate. But these problems must be solved for networks to and intricate. But these problems must be solved for networks to
meet the stability needs of existing services while incorporating new meet the stability needs of existing services while incorporating new
services in a world where the growth of networks is exhausting the services in a world where the growth of networks is exhausting the
supply of qualified networking engineers. supply of qualified networking engineers.
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organization of the data in that model, and to define constraints on organization of the data in that model, and to define constraints on
that data. Once published, the YANG module acts as a contract that data. Once published, the YANG module acts as a contract
between the client and server, with both parties understanding how between the client and server, with both parties understanding how
their peer will expect them to behave. A client knows how to create their peer will expect them to behave. A client knows how to create
valid data for the server, and knows what data will be sent from the valid data for the server, and knows what data will be sent from the
server. A server knows the rules that govern the data and how it server. A server knows the rules that govern the data and how it
should behave. should behave.
YANG also incorporates a level of extensibility and flexibility not YANG also incorporates a level of extensibility and flexibility not
present in other model languages. New modules can augment the data present in other model languages. New modules can augment the data
hierarchies defined in other modules, seemlessly adding data at hierarchies defined in other modules, seamlessly adding data at
appropriate places in the existing data organization. YANG also appropriate places in the existing data organization. YANG also
allows new statements to be defined, allowing the language itself to allows new statements to be defined, allowing the language itself to
be expanded in a consistent way. be expanded in a consistent way.
This document presents an architecture for YANG, describing how YANG- This document presents an architecture for YANG, describing how YANG-
related technologies work and how solutions built on them can address related technologies work and how solutions built on them can address
the network management problem domain. the network management problem domain.
2. Elements of the Architecture 2. Elements of the Architecture
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<vendorx:no-neighbor-down-notification/> <vendorx:no-neighbor-down-notification/>
</interface> </interface>
</area> </area>
</ospf> </ospf>
Augmentations are seamlessly integrated with base modules, allowing Augmentations are seamlessly integrated with base modules, allowing
them to be fetched, archived, loaded, and deleted within their them to be fetched, archived, loaded, and deleted within their
natural hierarchy. If a client application asks for the natural hierarchy. If a client application asks for the
configuration for a specific OSPF area, it will receive the sub- configuration for a specific OSPF area, it will receive the sub-
hierarchy for that area, complete with any augmentated data. hierarchy for that area, complete with any augmented data.
2.3. YANG Translations 2.3. YANG Translations
The YANG data modeling language is the central piece of a group of The YANG data modeling language is the central piece of a group of
related technologies. The YANG language itself, described in related technologies. The YANG language itself, described in
[RFCYANG], defines the syntax of the language and its statements, the [RFCYANG], defines the syntax of the language and its statements, the
meaning of those statements, and how to combine them to build the meaning of those statements, and how to combine them to build the
hierarchy of nodes that describe a data model. hierarchy of nodes that describe a data model.
That document also defines the "on the wire" XML content for NETCONF That document also defines the "on the wire" XML content for NETCONF
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