draft-ietf-radext-filter-rules-00.txt   draft-ietf-radext-filter-rules-01.txt 
Networking Working Group Paul Congdon Networking Working Group Paul Congdon
INTERNET-DRAFT Mauricio Sanchez INTERNET-DRAFT Mauricio Sanchez
<draft-ietf-radext-filter-rules-00.txt> Hewlett-Packard Company <draft-ietf-radext-filter-rules-01.txt> Hewlett-Packard Company
A. Lior A. Lior
24 February 2006 Bridgewater Systems 22 June 2006 Bridgewater Systems
F. Adrangi F. Adrangi
Intel Intel
Bernard Aboba Bernard Aboba
Microsoft Microsoft
Filter Attributes RADIUS Attributes for Filtering and Redirection
By submitting this Internet-Draft, each author represents that any By submitting this Internet-Draft, each author represents that any
applicable patent or other IPR claims of which he or she is aware applicable patent or other IPR claims of which he or she is aware
have been or will be disclosed, and any of which he or she becomes have been or will be disclosed, and any of which he or she becomes
aware will be disclosed, in accordance with Section 6 of BCP 79. aware will be disclosed, in accordance with Section 6 of BCP 79.
Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups. Note that
other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet- other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
Drafts. Drafts.
skipping to change at page 1, line 37 skipping to change at page 1, line 37
documents at any time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts documents at any time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts
as reference material or to cite them other than as "work in as reference material or to cite them other than as "work in
progress." progress."
The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
http://www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt. http://www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt.
The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html. http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.
This Internet-Draft will expire on August, 24 2006. This Internet-Draft will expire on December, 22 2006.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (C) The Internet Society 2006. All rights reserved. Copyright (C) The Internet Society 2006. All rights reserved.
Abstract Abstract
In certain scenarios it is desirable to limit user access using In certain scenarios it is desirable to limit user access using
filters or redirection. This document proposes additional filters or redirection. This document proposes additional
attributes for this purpose, for use with the Remote attributes for this purpose, for use with the Remote
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scenarios. scenarios.
Table of Contents Table of Contents
1. Introduction........................................... 3 1. Introduction........................................... 3
1.1. Terminology...................................... 4 1.1. Terminology...................................... 4
1.2. Requirements Language............................ 4 1.2. Requirements Language............................ 4
1.3. Capability Advertisement ........................ 5 1.3. Capability Advertisement ........................ 5
1.4. Attribute Interpretation......................... 5 1.4. Attribute Interpretation......................... 5
2. RADIUS Authentication.................................. 6 2. RADIUS Authentication.................................. 6
2.5. NAS-Traffic-Rule................................. 6 2.5. NAS-Traffic-Rule.................................. 6
3. RADIUS Accounting...................................... 15 3. RADIUS Accounting...................................... 15
3.1. Acct-NAS-Traffic-Rule............................ 15 3.1. Acct-NAS-Traffic-Rule............................. 15
4. Table of Attributes.................................... 16 4. Table of Attributes.................................... 16
5. Diameter Considerations................................ 16 5. Diameter Considerations................................ 16
6. IANA Considerations.................................... 17 6. IANA Considerations.................................... 17
7. Security Considerations................................ 17 7. Security Considerations................................ 17
8. References............................................. 18 8. References............................................. 18
8.1 Normative References................................... 18 8.1 Normative References................................... 18
8.2 Informative References................................. 18 8.2 Informative References............................... 18
Appendix A - Traffic Redirection.............................. 19 Appendix A - Traffic Redirection............................ 19
Appendix B - NAS-Traffic-Rule Examples........................ 25 Appendix B - NAS-Traffic-Rule Examples...................... 25
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS............................................... 26 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS............................................... 26
AUTHORS' ADDRESSES............................................ 26 AUTHORS' ADDRESSES............................................ 26
Intellectual Property Statement............................... 27 Intellectual Property Statement............................... 27
Disclaimer of Validity........................................ 28 Disclaimer of Validity........................................ 28
Full Copyright Statement ..................................... 28 Full Copyright Statement ..................................... 28
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
Within the confines of RADIUS authentication, authorization, and Within the confines of RADIUS authentication, authorization, and
accounting (AAA) environments, there is a requirement for accounting (AAA) environments, there is a requirement for
standardized RADIUS attributes to limit user access using filters standardized RADIUS attributes to limit user access using filters
or redirection. and/or redirection.
For example, in IEEE 802.1X [IEEE8021X] environments, which This document describes filtering and redirection attributes that
may prove useful in IEEE 802.1X [IEEE8021X] environments, which
provides "network port authentication" for IEEE 802 [IEEE802] provides "network port authentication" for IEEE 802 [IEEE802]
media, including Ethernet [IEEE8023] and 802.11 [IEEE80211i] media (including Ethernet [IEEE8023] and 802.11 [IEEE80211],
wireless LANS, there exists a strong desire to control [IEEE80211i] wireless LANS), and a variety of other situations.
authorization beyond just the untagged VLAN parameter based on
tunnel attributes in [RFC2868] and usage of these in [RFC3580].
This document describes filtering and redirection attributes that While [RFC2865] Filter-ID attribute already exists for
may prove useful in IEEE 802.1X and a variety of situations. The provisioning filtering rules, it is not without drawbacks. The
Filter-ID attribute requires the NAS to be pre-populated with the
desired filters. This may be difficult to deploy in roaming
scenarios where the home operator may not know what filters have
been pre-populated by the local operator. The filtering
attributes specified in this document enable explicit description
of layer 2 and layer 3 filters as well as redirection, and
therefore extend the filter language described in [RFC3588]. The
attributes defined in this document may be used with RADIUS attributes defined in this document may be used with RADIUS
dynamic authorization [RFC3576]. dynamic authorization [RFC3576].
The Filter-ID attribute defined in [RFC2865] requires the NAS to Besides IEEE 802.1X environments, there is a corollary need within
be pre-populated with the desired filters. This may be difficult Internet Service Provider (ISP) environments for the attributes
to deploy in roaming scenarios where the home realm may not know described in this document to perform hot-lining. For example, an
what filters have been pre-populated by the local operator. The ISP may need to restrict a user's access to the Internet and
filtering attributes specified in this document enable explicit redirect their traffic to an alternate location because of
description of layer 2 and layer 3 filters as well as redirection, expiration of a prepaid plan. Another example is where the ISP
and therefore extend the filter language described in [RFC3588]. desires to restrict access and redirect a user that exhibited
fraudulent behavior.
User traffic redirection is supported with or without tunneling. User traffic redirection is supported with or without tunneling.
Tunneling support is provided using the tunnel attributes defined Tunneling support is provided using the tunnel attributes defined
in [RFC2868]. Redirection of traffic in mid-session may break in [RFC2868].
applications.
1.1. Terminology 1.1. Terminology
In this document when we refer to blocking of IP traffic we mean In this document when we refer to blocking of IP traffic we mean
filtering of IP traffic. Additionally, this document uses the filtering of IP traffic. Additionally, this document uses the
following terms: following terms:
Authenticator Authenticator
An authenticator is an entity that requires An authenticator is an entity that requires
authentication from the supplicant. The authenticator authentication from the supplicant. The authenticator
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Refers to an action taken by the NAS to redirect the Refers to an action taken by the NAS to redirect the
user's traffic to an alternate location. user's traffic to an alternate location.
Supplicant Supplicant
A supplicant is an entity that is being authenticated by A supplicant is an entity that is being authenticated by
an authenticator. The supplicant may be connected to the an authenticator. The supplicant may be connected to the
authenticator at one end of a point-to-point LAN segment authenticator at one end of a point-to-point LAN segment
or 802.11 wireless link. or 802.11 wireless link.
Terminal Terminal
A terminal is an endpoint, such as an 802.1X A terminal is an endpoint, such as an 802.1X supplicant,
supplicant, attached to the NAS port. attached to the NAS port.
1.2. Requirements Language 1.2. Requirements Language
In this document, several words are used to signify the In this document, several words are used to signify the
requirements of the specification. The key words "MUST", "MUST requirements of the specification. The key words "MUST", "MUST
NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT",
"RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this document are to be "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this document are to be
interpreted as described in [RFC2119]. interpreted as described in [RFC2119].
An implementation is not compliant if it fails to satisfy one or An implementation is not compliant if it fails to satisfy one or
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attributes it will most likely ignore them and the desired policy attributes it will most likely ignore them and the desired policy
will not be enforced. A method for the NAS advertising the will not be enforced. A method for the NAS advertising the
capability to support these attributes would help the RADIUS capability to support these attributes would help the RADIUS
server understand if the intended policies can be enforced. As a server understand if the intended policies can be enforced. As a
result, the attributes in this document, in particular NAS- result, the attributes in this document, in particular NAS-
Traffic-Rule(TBD), can benefit from capability advertisement, if Traffic-Rule(TBD), can benefit from capability advertisement, if
available. available.
1.4 Attribute Interpretation 1.4 Attribute Interpretation
Unless otherwise noted in the individual description of an If a NAS conforming to this specification receives an Access-
attribute contained herein, a NAS that conforms to this Accept packet containing an attribute defined in this document
specification and receives an Access-Accept message that contains which it cannot apply, it MUST act as though it had received an
an attribute from this document that it cannot apply MUST Access-Reject.
interpret this though an Access-Reject had been sent and MUST
terminate the session. If accounting is enabled on the NAS, it
MUST generate an Accounting-Request(Stop) message upon session
termination.
Similarly, if a NAS conforming to this specification and also Similarly, [RFC3576] requires that a NAS receiving a CoA-Request
conforming to RFC 3576 [RFC3576] receives a CoA-Request message containing an unsupported attribute reply with a CoA-NAK. It is
that contains an attribute from this document that it cannot recommended that an Error-Cause attribute with value set to
apply, it MUST NOT terminate the session and MUST generate a CoA- "Unsupported Attribute" (401) be included in the packet. As
NAK packet with ERROR-CAUSE(101) set to "Unsupported noted in [RFC3576], authorization changes are atomic so that this
Attribute"(401). If accounting is enabled on the NAS, it MUST NOT situation does not result in session termination and the pre-
generate an Accounting-Request(Stop) message in such instances. existing configuration remains unchanged. As a result, no
accounting packets should be generated.
2. RADIUS Authentication 2. RADIUS Authentication
This specification introduces one new RADIUS authentication This specification introduces one new RADIUS authentication
attributes. attribute.
2.5. NAS-Traffic-Rule 2.5. NAS-Traffic-Rule
Description Description
The NAS-Traffic-Rule attribute is derived from the Diameter The NAS-Traffic-Rule attribute is derived from the Diameter
IPFilterRule and enables provisioning of base encapsulation IPFilterRule and enables provisioning of base encapsulation
(Layer 2) rules, Internet Protocol (Layer 3-4) rules, and HTTP (Layer 2) rules, Internet Protocol (Layer 3-4) rules, and HTTP
(Layer 5+) rules on the NAS by the RADIUS server. Compared to (Layer 5+) rules on the NAS by the RADIUS server. Compared to
Diameter's IPFilterRule, NAS-Traffic-Rule is a superset in Diameter's IPFilterRule, NAS-Traffic-Rule is a superset in
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"assigned") "assigned")
ipv4-address = d8 "." d8 "." d8 "." d8 ipv4-address = d8 "." d8 "." d8 "." d8
ipv4mask = DIGIT ; 0-9 ipv4mask = DIGIT ; 0-9
/ %x31-32 DIGIT ; 10-29 / %x31-32 DIGIT ; 10-29
/ "3" %x30-32 ; 30-32 / "3" %x30-32 ; 30-32
ipv6-address = 1*4HEXDIG 7(":" 1*4HEXDIG) ipv6-address = 1*4HEXDIG 7(":" 1*4HEXDIG)
ipv6mask = DIGIT ; 0-9 ipv6mask = DIGIT ; 0-9
/ %x31-39 DIGIT ; 10-99 / %x31-39 DIGIT ; 10-99
/ "1" %x30-31 DIGIT ; 100-119 / "1" %x30-31 DIGIT ; 100-119
/ "1" %x32 %x30-38 ; 120-128 / "1" %x32 %x30-38 ; 120-128
tcp-ports = tcp-port *("," tcp-port) layer4-ports = layer4-port *("," layer4-port)
tcp-port = d16 / d16 "-" d16 layer4-port = d16 / d16 "-" d16
ip-option = "frag" / ip-option = "frag" /
["ipoptions " ["!"] ipopt *("," ["!"] ipopt)] ["ipoptions " ["!"] ipopt *("," ["!"] ipopt)]
["tcpoptions " ["!"] tcpopt ["tcpoptions " ["!"] tcpopt
*("," ["!"] tcpopt)] *("," ["!"] tcpopt)]
["established"] ["established"]
["setup"] ["setup"]
["tcpflags " ["!"] tcpflag ["tcpflags " ["!"] tcpflag
*("," ["!"] tcpflag)] *("," ["!"] tcpflag)]
["icmptypes " icmptype *("," icmptype)] ["icmptypes " icmptype *("," icmptype)]
ipopt = "ssrr" / "lsrr" / "rr" / "ts" ipopt = "ssrr" / "lsrr" / "rr" / "ts"
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http-redir-rule= "redirect " [redir-cnt " "] redir-url http-redir-rule= "redirect " [redir-cnt " "] redir-url
filter-body [" " org-url] filter-body [" " org-url]
[" " log-rule] [" " log-rule]
redir-cnt = 1*DIGIT redir-cnt = 1*DIGIT
org-url = http_URL org-url = http_URL
;Note: Syntax for http_URL defined in ;Note: Syntax for http_URL defined in
;[RFC2616], section 3.2.2 ;[RFC2616], section 3.2.2
redir-url = http_URL redir-url = http_URL
;Common ;Common
filter-body = " from " ip-address [" " tcp-ports] filter-body = " from " ip-address [" " layer4-ports]
" to " ip-address [" " tcp-ports] " to " ip-address [" " layer4-ports]
tunnel-id = DQUOTE tunnel-id = DQUOTE
1*(TEXTDATA / ("%" 2HEXDIG)) 1*(TEXTDATA / ("%" 2HEXDIG))
DQUOTE DQUOTE
log-rule = "cnt" log-rule = "cnt"
;Primitives ;Primitives
LF = %x0A ; linefeed LF = %x0A ; linefeed
DIGIT = %x30-39 ; 0-9 DIGIT = %x30-39 ; 0-9
DQUOTE = %x22 ; " (Double Quote) DQUOTE = %x22 ; " (Double Quote)
HEXDIG = DIGIT / "A" / "B" / "C" / "D" / "E" / "F" HEXDIG = DIGIT / "A" / "B" / "C" / "D" / "E" / "F"
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/ "6" "4" 3DIGIT ; 60000-64999 / "6" "4" 3DIGIT ; 60000-64999
/ "6" "5" %x30-34 2DIGIT ; 65000-65499 / "6" "5" %x30-34 2DIGIT ; 65000-65499
/ "6" "5" "5" %x30-32 1DIGIT ; 65500-65529 / "6" "5" "5" %x30-32 1DIGIT ; 65500-65529
/ "6" "5" "5" "3" %x30-36 ; 65530-65536 / "6" "5" "5" "3" %x30-36 ; 65530-65536
TEXTDATA = %x20-21 / %x23-24 / %x26-7E TEXTDATA = %x20-21 / %x23-24 / %x26-7E
; End of ABNF description of NAS-Traffic-Rule ; End of ABNF description of NAS-Traffic-Rule
Descriptions of notable fields and keywords follow: Descriptions of notable fields and keywords follow:
"permit" Allow packets that match the rule. 'permit' Allow packets that match the rule.
"deny" Drop packets that match the rule. 'deny' Drop packets that match the rule.
"redirect" Redirect packets that match the rule. 'redirect' Redirect packets that match the rule.
"tunnel" Tunnel packets that match the rule. 'tunnel' Tunnel packets that match the rule.
"flush" A flush rule removes all previously assigned 'flush' A flush rule removes all previously assigned
filter rules. When flush is specified, it can be filter rules. When flush is specified, it can be
followed by other NAS-Traffic-Rule attributes. This followed by other NAS-Traffic-Rule attributes. This
allows for an atomic change of authorization with a allows for an atomic change of authorization with a
single RADIUS message. single RADIUS message.
"permit inout any from any to any" 'permit inout any from any to any'
Special rule that matches against all traffic. This Special rule that matches against all traffic. This
allows the implicit deny at the end of a filter allows the implicit deny at the end of a filter
list to be overridden. list to be overridden.
"in" Is from the terminal. 'in' Is from the terminal.
"out" Is to the terminal. "out" Is to the terminal.
"inout" Is from and to the terminal. 'inout' Is from and to the terminal.
ipv4-address An IPv4 number in dotted-quad form. Only this ipv4-address An IPv4 number in dotted-quad form. Only this
exact IP number will match the rule. exact IP number will match the rule.
ipv6-address An IPv6 number in canonical IPv6 form. Only ipv6-address An IPv6 number in canonical IPv6 form. Only
this exact IP number will match the rule. this exact IP number will match the rule.
ipv4-address/ipv4mask ipv4-address/ipv4mask
An IP number with a mask width of the form An IP number with a mask width of the form
192.0.2.0/24. In this case, all IP numbers from 192.0.2.0/24. In this case, all IP numbers from
192.0.2.0 to 192.0.2.255 will match. 192.0.2.0 to 192.0.2.255 will match.
The bit width MUST be valid for the IP version and The bit width MUST be valid for the IP version and
the IP number MUST NOT have bits set beyond the the IP number MUST NOT have bits set beyond the
mask. For a match to occur, the same IP version mask. For a match to occur, the same IP version
MUST be present in the packet that was used in MUST be present in the packet that was used in
describing the IP address. To test for a describing the IP address. To test for a
particular IP version, the bits part can be set to particular IP version, the bits part can be set to
zero. zero.
"any" Keyword for 0.0.0.0/0 or the IPv6 equivalent. 'any' Keyword for 0.0.0.0/0 or the IPv6 equivalent.
"assigned" Keyword for the address or set of addresses 'assigned' Keyword for the address or set of addresses
assigned to the terminal. For IPv4, a typical assigned to the terminal. For IPv4, a typical
first rule is often "deny in ip !assigned" first rule is often "deny in ip !assigned"
The sense of the match can be inverted by preceding The sense of the match can be inverted by preceding
an address with the not modifier (!), causing all an address with the not modifier (!), causing all
other addresses to be matched instead. This does other addresses to be matched instead. This does
not affect the selection of port numbers. not affect the selection of port numbers.
tcp-port With the TCP, UDP and SCTP protocols, this field layer4-port With the TCP, UDP and SCTP protocols, this field
specifies ports to match. specifies ports to match.
Note: The '-' notation specifies a range of ports Note: The '-' notation specifies a range of ports
(including boundaries). Fragmented packets that (including boundaries). Fragmented packets that
have a non-zero offset (i.e., not the first have a non-zero offset (i.e., not the first
fragment) will never match a rule that has one or fragment) will never match a rule that has one or
more port specifications. See the "frag" keyword more port specifications. See the 'frag' keyword
for details on matching fragmented packets. for details on matching fragmented packets.
log-rule Increments rule hit counter by one every time a log-rule Increments rule hit counter by one every time a
packet matches on rule. Counters start with a zero packet matches on rule. Counters start with a zero
value at session start and are reset back to a zero value at session start and are reset back to a zero
value every time a successful authorization change value every time a successful authorization change
occurs due to a CoA message being received by the occurs due to a CoA message being received by the
NAS. NAS.
For base encapsulation rules: For base encapsulation rules:
'l2:' Prefix to designate a rule as a base encapsulation
"l2:" Prefix to designate a rule as a base encapsulation
rule. rule.
"l2:ether2" keyword means any Ethernet-II (DIX Ethernet) will 'l2:ether2' Keyword means any Ethernet-II (DIX Ethernet) will
match. match.
ether2:val Used to specify an Ethernet-II type by hexadecimal ether2:val Used to specify an Ethernet-II type by hexadecimal
number, whereby "val" is replaced by desired number, whereby 'val' is replaced by desired
number. Example: "l2:ether2:0x800" for IP ethertype number. Example: 'l2:ether2:0x800' for IP ethertype
(0x0800). (0x0800).
l2-rmon-str Used to specify base encapsulation per the octet l2-rmon-str Used to specify base encapsulation per the octet
string format defined in [RFC2895], section 4.2. string format defined in [RFC2895], section 4.2.
Example: "l2:0.0.0.2.0.0.0.240" for Netbios over Example: 'l2:0.0.0.2.0.0.0.240' for Netbios over
LLC. LLC.
macaddr For base encapsulation filter rules of "l2:ether2" macaddr For base encapsulation filter rules of 'l2:ether2'
type, the Ethernet MAC address with octet values type, the Ethernet MAC address with octet values
separated by a "-". Example: "00-10-A4-23-19-C0". separated by a '-'. Example: '00-10-A4-23-19-C0'.
macaddr/mask An Ethernet number as above with a mask width of macaddr/mask An Ethernet number as above with a mask width of
the form "00-10-A4-23-00-00/32". In this case, all the form '00-10-A4-23-00-00/32'. In this case, all
MAC addresses from 00-10-A4-23-00-00 to 00-10-A4- MAC addresses from 00-10-A4-23-00-00 to 00-10-A4-
23-FF-FF will match. The MAC address MUST NOT have 23-FF-FF will match. The MAC address MUST NOT have
bits set beyond the mask. The keyword "any" is bits set beyond the mask. The keyword 'any' is
00-00-00-00-00-00/0. 00-00-00-00-00-00/0.
The sense of the match can be inverted by preceding The sense of the match can be inverted by preceding
an address with the not modifier (!), causing all an address with the not modifier (!), causing all
other addresses to be matched instead. other addresses to be matched instead.
Note: macaddr nor macaddr/mask argument is not used Note: macaddr nor macaddr/mask argument is not used
for "l2:rmon" type rules. for 'l2:rmon' type rules.
For IP rules: For IP rules:
"ip" Keyword means any IP protocol will match. "ip" Keyword means any IP protocol will match.
ip-proto An IP protocol specified by number. ip-proto An IP protocol specified by number.
"frag" Match if the packet is a fragment and this is not 'frag' Match if the packet is a fragment and this is not
the first fragment of the datagram. frag may not the first fragment of the datagram. frag may not
be used in conjunction with either tcpflags or be used in conjunction with either tcpflags or
TCP/UDP port specifications. TCP/UDP port specifications.
"ipoptions" Match if the IP header contains the comma separated 'ipoptions' Match if the IP header contains the comma separated
list of options specified in spec. The supported list of options specified in spec. The supported
IP options are: ssrr (strict source route), lsrr IP options are: ssrr (strict source route), lsrr
(loose source route), rr (record packet route) and (loose source route), rr (record packet route) and
ts(timestamp). The absence of a particular option ts(timestamp). The absence of a particular option
may be denoted with a '!'. may be denoted with a '!'.
"tcpoptions" Match if the TCP header contains the comma 'tcpoptions' Match if the TCP header contains the comma
separated list of options specified in spec. The separated list of options specified in spec. The
supported TCP options are: supported TCP options are:
mss (maximum segment size), window (tcp window mss (maximum segment size), window (tcp window
advertisement), sack (selective ack), ts (rfc1323 advertisement), sack (selective ack), ts (rfc1323
timestamp) and cc (rfc1644 t/tcp connection count). timestamp) and cc (rfc1644 t/tcp connection count).
The absence of a particular option may be denoted The absence of a particular option may be denoted
with a '!'. with a '!'.
"established" TCP packets only. Match packets that have the 'established' TCP packets only. Match packets that have the
RST or ACK bits set. RST or ACK bits set.
"setup" TCP packets only. Match packets that have the SYN 'setup' TCP packets only. Match packets that have the SYN
bit set but no ACK bit. bit set but no ACK bit.
"tcpflags" TCP packets only. Match if the TCP header contains 'tcpflags' TCP packets only. Match if the TCP header contains
the comma separated list of flags specified in the comma separated list of flags specified in
spec. The supported TCP flags are: spec. The supported TCP flags are:
fin, syn, rst, psh, ack and urg. The absence of a fin, syn, rst, psh, ack and urg. The absence of a
particular flag may be denoted with a '!'. A rule particular flag may be denoted with a '!'. A rule
that contains a tcpflags specification can never that contains a tcpflags specification can never
match a fragmented packet that has a non-zero match a fragmented packet that has a non-zero
offset. See the "frag" option for details on offset. See the 'frag' option for details on
matching fragmented packets. matching fragmented packets.
"icmptypes" ICMP packets only. Match if the ICMP type is in 'icmptypes' ICMP packets only. Match if the ICMP type is in
the list types. The list may be specified as any the list types. The list may be specified as any
combination of ranges or individual types separated combination of ranges or individual types separated
by commas. Both the numeric values and the by commas. Both the numeric values and the
symbolic values listed below can be used. The symbolic values listed below can be used. The
supported ICMP types are: supported ICMP types are:
echo reply (0), destination unreachable (3), source echo reply (0), destination unreachable (3), source
quench (4), redirect (5), echo request(8), router quench (4), redirect (5), echo request(8), router
advertisement (9), router solicitation (10), time- advertisement (9), router solicitation (10), time-
to-live exceeded (11), IP header bad (12), to-live exceeded (11), IP header bad (12),
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+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
Counter (cont.) Counter (cont.)
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
Counter (cont.) | Text (NAS-Traffic-Rule) | Counter (cont.) | Text (NAS-Traffic-Rule) |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
Type Type
TBD TBD
Length Length
>=3 >=11
String Counter
The first eight octets of this string are used for a 64-bit The Counter field is eight octets in length and contains the
value of the rule counter. The remaining octets are used to 64-bit hit count for the rule specified in the Text field.
specify for which filter rule the counter is for a value. The
rule specification MUST conform to the syntax rules specified Text
for NAS-Traffic-Rule[TBD].
The Text field is greater than one octet in length and is used
to specify the rule for which a hit count is associated with.
The Text field MUST conform to the syntax rules specified for
the Text field of the NAS-Traffic-Rule[TBD] attribute.
4. Table of Attributes 4. Table of Attributes
The following table provides a guide to which attributes may be The following table provides a guide to which attributes may be
found in which kinds of packets, and in what quantity. found in which kinds of packets, and in what quantity.
Access- Access- Access- Access- CoA- Access- Access- Access- Access- CoA-
Request Accept Reject Challenge Req # Attribute Request Accept Reject Challenge Req # Attribute
0 0+ 0 0 0+ TBD NAS-Traffic-Rule 0 0+ 0 0 0+ TBD NAS-Traffic-Rule
skipping to change at page 17, line 10 skipping to change at page 17, line 21
5. Diameter Considerations 5. Diameter Considerations
Diameter needs to define identical attributes with the same Type Diameter needs to define identical attributes with the same Type
values. The attributes should be available as part of the NASREQ values. The attributes should be available as part of the NASREQ
application [RFC4005], as well as the Diameter EAP application application [RFC4005], as well as the Diameter EAP application
[RFC4072]. [RFC4072].
6. IANA Considerations 6. IANA Considerations
This document uses the RADIUS [RFC2865] namespace, see This document uses the RADIUS [RFC2865] namespace, see
<http://www.iana.org/assignments/radius-types>. Allocation of six <http://www.iana.org/assignments/radius-types>. Allocation of two
updates for the section "RADIUS Attribute Types" is requested. The updates for the section 'RADIUS Attribute Types' is requested. The
RADIUS attributes for which values are requested are: RADIUS attributes for which values are requested are:
TBD - NAS-Traffic-Rule TBD - NAS-Traffic-Rule
TBD - Acct-NAS-Traffic-Rule TBD - Acct-NAS-Traffic-Rule
7. Security Considerations 7. Security Considerations
Since this document describes the use of RADIUS for purposes of Since this document describes the use of RADIUS for purposes of
authentication, authorization, and accounting in [IEEE8021X] authentication, authorization, and accounting in [IEEE8021X]
enabled networks, it is vulnerable to all of the threats that are enabled networks, it is vulnerable to all of the threats that are
present in other RADIUS applications. For a discussion of these present in other RADIUS applications. For a discussion of these
threats, see [RFC2607], [RFC3162], [RFC3579], and [RFC3580]. threats, see [RFC2607], [RFC3162], [RFC3579], and [RFC3580].
This document specifies new attributes that can be included in This document specifies new attributes that can be included in
existing RADIUS messages. These messages are protected using existing RADIUS messages. These messages are protected using
existing security mechanisms; see [RFC2865] and [RFC3576] for a existing security mechanisms; see [RFC2865] and [RFC3576] for a
more detailed description and related security considerations. more detailed description and related security considerations.
The security mechanisms in [RFC2865] and [RFC3576] are primarily The security mechanisms in [RFC2865] and [RFC3576] are primarily
concerned with an outside attacker who modifies messages in concerned with an outside attacker who modifies messages in
transit or inserts new messages. They do not prevent an authorized transit, inserts new messages, or deletes messages. They do not
RADIUS server or proxy from inserting or deleting attributes with prevent an authorized RADIUS server or proxy from inserting or
a malicious purpose in messages it sends. deleting attributes with a malicious purpose in messages it sends.
An attacker who compromises an authorized RADIUS server or proxy An attacker who compromises an authorized RADIUS server or proxy
can use the attributes defined in this document to influence the can use the attributes defined in this document to influence the
behavior of the NAS in ways that previously may not have been behavior of the NAS in ways that previously may not have been
possible. For example, modifications to the VLAN-related possible. For example, inserting suitable redirection rules to the
attributes may cause the NAS to permit access to other VLANs that NAS-Traffic-Rule attribute may allow the attacker to eavesdrop or
were intended. To give another example, inserting suitable modify packets sent by a legitimate client.
redirection rules to the NAS-Traffic-Rule attribute may allow the
attacker to eavesdrop or modify packets sent by a legitimate
client.
In general, the NAS cannot know whether the attribute values it In general, the NAS cannot know whether the attribute values it
receives from an authenticated and authorized server are well- receives from an authenticated and authorized server are well-
intentioned or malicious, and thus it is not possible to intentioned or malicious, and thus it is not possible to
completely protect against attacks by compromised nodes. In some completely protect against attacks by compromised nodes. In some
cases, the extent of the possible attacks can be limited by cases, the extent of the possible attacks can be limited by
performing more fine-grained authorization checks at the NAS. performing more fine-grained authorization checks at the NAS.
For instance, a NAS could be configured not to accept any
For instance, a NAS could be configured to accept only certain
VLAN IDs from a certain RADIUS server/proxy, or not to accept any
redirection rules if it is known they are not used in this redirection rules if it is known they are not used in this
environment. environment.
8. References 8. References
8.1. Normative references 8.1. Normative references
[RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", RFC 2119, March, 1997. Requirement Levels", RFC 2119, March, 1997.
[RFC2616] Fielding, R., Gettys, J., Mogul, J., Frystyk, H., Masinter, [RFC2616] Fielding, R., Gettys, J., Mogul, J., Frystyk, H., Masinter,
L., Leach P., Berners-Lee T., "Hypertext Transfer Protocol L., Leach P., Berners-Lee T., 'Hypertext Transfer Protocol
-- HTTP/1.1", RFC 2616, June 1999. -- HTTP/1.1', RFC 2616, June 1999.
[RFC2865] Rigney, C., Rubens, A., Simpson, W. and S. Willens, "Remote [RFC2865] Rigney, C., Rubens, A., Simpson, W. and S. Willens, "Remote
Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS)", RFC 2865, Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS)", RFC 2865,
June 2000. June 2000.
[RFC2895] Bierman, A., Bucci, C., Iddon, R., "Remote Network [RFC2895] Bierman, A., Bucci, C., Iddon, R., 'Remote Network
Monitoring MIB Protocol Identifier Reference", RFC Monitoring MIB Protocol Identifier Reference', RFC
2895, August 2000 2895, August 2000
[RFC3588] Calhoun, P., Loughney, J., Guttman, E., Zorn, G., Arkko, [RFC3588] Calhoun, P., Loughney, J., Guttman, E., Zorn, G., Arkko,
J., "Diameter Base Protocol", RFC 3588, September 2003. J., "Diameter Base Protocol", RFC 3588, September 2003.
[RFC4005] Calhoun, P., Zorn, G., Spence, D., Mitton, D., "Diameter [RFC4005] Calhoun, P., Zorn, G., Spence, D., Mitton, D., 'Diameter
Network Access Server Application", RFC 4005, August 2005. Network Access Server Application', RFC 4005, August 2005.
[IEEE802] IEEE Standards for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks: [IEEE802] IEEE Standards for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks:
Overview and Architecture, ANSI/IEEE Std 802, 1990. Overview and Architecture, ANSI/IEEE Std 802, 1990.
[IEEE8021X] [IEEE8021X]
IEEE Standards for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks: IEEE Standards for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks:
Port based Network Access Control, IEEE Std 802.1X-2004, Port based Network Access Control, IEEE Std 802.1X-2004,
August 2004. August 2004.
8.2. Informative references 8.2. Informative references
[RFC2234] Croker, E., Overell, P., "Augmented BNF for Syntax [RFC2234] Croker, E., Overell, P., 'Augmented BNF for Syntax
Specifications: ABNF", RFC 2234, November 1997. Specifications: ABNF', RFC 2234, November 1997.
[RFC2607] Aboba, B., Vollbrecht, J., "Proxy Chaining and Policy [RFC2607] Aboba, B., Vollbrecht, J., "Proxy Chaining and Policy
Implementation in Roaming", RFC 2607, June 1999. Implementation in Roaming", RFC 2607, June 1999.
[RFC2818] Rescorla, E., "HTTP Over TLS", RFC2818, May 2000. [RFC2818] Rescorla, E., 'HTTP Over TLS', RFC2818, May 2000.
[RFC2868] Zorn, G., Leifer, D., Rubens, A., Shriver, J., Holdrege, M. [RFC2868] Zorn, G., Leifer, D., Rubens, A., Shriver, J., Holdrege, M.
and I. Goyret, "RADIUS Attributes for Tunnel Protocol and I. Goyret, "RADIUS Attributes for Tunnel Protocol
Support", RFC 2868, June 2000. Support", RFC 2868, June 2000.
[RFC3162] Aboba, B., Zorn, G. and D. Mitton, "RADIUS and IPv6", RFC [RFC3162] Aboba, B., Zorn, G. and D. Mitton, "RADIUS and IPv6", RFC
3162, August 2001. 3162, August 2001.
[RFC3576] Chiba, M., Dommety, G., Eklund, M., Mitton, D. and B. [RFC3576] Chiba, M., Dommety, G., Eklund, M., Mitton, D. and B.
Aboba,"Dynamic Authorization Extensions to Remote Aboba,"Dynamic Authorization Extensions to Remote
Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS)", RFC 3576, Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS)", RFC 3576,
July 2003. July 2003.
[RFC3579] Aboba, B. and P. Calhoun, "RADIUS Support for Extensible [RFC3579] Aboba, B. and P. Calhoun, "RADIUS Support for Extensible
Authentication Protocol (EAP)", RFC 3579, September 2003. Authentication Protocol (EAP)", RFC 3579, September 2003.
[RFC3580] Congdon, P., Aboba, B., Smith, A., Zorn, G., Roese, J., [RFC3580] Congdon, P., Aboba, B., Smith, A., Zorn, G., Roese, J.,
"IEEE 802.1X Remote Authentication Dial In User Service 'IEEE 802.1X Remote Authentication Dial In User Service
(RADIUS) Usage Guidelines", RFC3580, September 2003. (RADIUS) Usage Guidelines', RFC3580, September 2003.
[RFC4072] Eronen, P., Hiller, T., Zorn G., "Diameter Extensible [RFC4072] Eronen, P., Hiller, T., Zorn G., 'Diameter Extensible
Authentication Protocol (EAP) Application", RFC4072, August Authentication Protocol (EAP) Application', RFC4072, August
2005. 2005.
[IEEE8023] [IEEE8023]
ISO/IEC 8802-3 Information technology - Telecommunications ISO/IEC 8802-3 Information technology - Telecommunications
And information exchange between systems - Local and And information exchange between systems - Local and
metropolitan area networks - Common specifications - Part metropolitan area networks - Common specifications - Part
3: Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection 3: Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection
(CSMA/CD) Access Method and Physical Layer Specifications, (CSMA/CD) Access Method and Physical Layer Specifications,
(also ANSI/IEEE Std 802.3- 1996), 1996. (also ANSI/IEEE Std 802.3- 1996), 1996.
skipping to change at page 21, line 41 skipping to change at page 21, line 49
client and a selected redirection destination will issue an client and a selected redirection destination will issue an
Access-Accept that contains the specification for the tunnel using Access-Accept that contains the specification for the tunnel using
the attributes defined by RFC 2868 and a NAS-Traffic-Rule the attributes defined by RFC 2868 and a NAS-Traffic-Rule
attribute using the tunnel action and arguments. attribute using the tunnel action and arguments.
An example NAS-Traffic-Rule will look like: An example NAS-Traffic-Rule will look like:
tunnel "t1" in ip from assigned to any tunnel "t1" in ip from assigned to any
This will cause all traffic that flows from the client to any This will cause all traffic that flows from the client to any
destination to be tunneled over the named tunnel "t1" to the destination to be tunneled over the named tunnel 't1' to the
tunnel endpoint (TEP). tunnel endpoint (TEP).
+-------+ +------+ +------+ +------+ +-------+ +------+ +------+ +------+
| | | | |Tunnel| | | | | | | |Tunnel| | |
|client +<---------->+ NAS +<==t1===>+ End +<----->+ Dest | |client +<---------->+ NAS +<==t1===>+ End +<----->+ Dest |
| | | | |Point | | | | | | | |Point | | |
+-------+ +------+ +------+ +------+ +-------+ +------+ +------+ +------+
The direction argument takes the values of "in", "out" or "inout" The direction argument takes the values of 'in', 'out' or 'inout'
and is important because it controls how information is routed. and is important because it controls how information is routed.
The following diagram demonstrates how traffic is routed. In all The following diagram demonstrates how traffic is routed. In all
these diagrams time is increasing as we proceed down the page. these diagrams time is increasing as we proceed down the page.
When rule direction is "in": When rule direction is 'in':
client NAS TEP DESTINATION client NAS TEP DESTINATION
| | | | | | | |
|---------->|===t1===>|--------->| |---------->|===t1===>|--------->|
| | | | | | | |
|<----------|<-------------------| (flows directly to NAS) |<----------|<-------------------| (flows directly to NAS)
| | | | | | | |
The inbound traffic from the client matches the specified filter The inbound traffic from the client matches the specified filter
rule and the IP packet is placed in the tunnel to the TEP. The TEP rule and the IP packet is placed in the tunnel to the TEP. The TEP
skipping to change at page 22, line 42 skipping to change at page 23, line 5
|---------->|===t1===>|--------->| |---------->|===t1===>|--------->|
| | | | | | | |
|<----------|<==t1====|<---------| |<----------|<==t1====|<---------|
The client establishes a connection to the Destination, but the The client establishes a connection to the Destination, but the
TEP acting as NAT, changes the source address of the IP packet (as TEP acting as NAT, changes the source address of the IP packet (as
NATs do) to that of the TEP/NAT. Now any replies from the NATs do) to that of the TEP/NAT. Now any replies from the
Destination are sent to the TEP/NAT. The TEP/NAT then forwards Destination are sent to the TEP/NAT. The TEP/NAT then forwards
these packets to the client through the NAS. these packets to the client through the NAS.
When the TEP is acting as a NAT, using the direction argument "in" When the TEP is acting as a NAT, using the direction argument 'in'
is important. The direction argument set to "out" will have no is important. The direction argument set to 'out' will have no
effect on traffic coming from the tunnel since all traffic to the effect on traffic coming from the tunnel since all traffic to the
client should come from the TEP/NAT inside the tunnel. The client should come from the TEP/NAT inside the tunnel. The
direction argument set to "inout" will have the same effect as if direction argument set to 'inout' will have the same effect as if
it were set to "in". it were set to 'in'.
The TEP/NAT forwards all traffic for the client into the tunnel to The TEP/NAT forwards all traffic for the client into the tunnel to
the NAS. The NAS always forwards any egressing traffic from the the NAS. The NAS always forwards any egressing traffic from the
tunnel to the client. It does not apply any redirection rules on tunnel to the client. It does not apply any redirection rules on
traffic egressing a tunnel. The NAS does not care whether the TEP traffic egressing a tunnel. The NAS does not care whether the TEP
is transparent or is acting as a NAT. is transparent or is acting as a NAT.
A.2 HTTP Redirection A.2 HTTP Redirection
Another method of redirection is at the application layer, Another method of redirection is at the application layer,
skipping to change at page 23, line 41 skipping to change at page 23, line 52
If HTTP redirection is required to be applied to a service that If HTTP redirection is required to be applied to a service that
has already been started then the RADIUS server can push the has already been started then the RADIUS server can push the
redirection rules, and optionally the filter rules, to the NAS redirection rules, and optionally the filter rules, to the NAS
within a NAS-Traffic-Rule(TBD) attribute using a CoA-Request within a NAS-Traffic-Rule(TBD) attribute using a CoA-Request
message. The NAS will then commence to apply the redirection rules message. The NAS will then commence to apply the redirection rules
and/or the filter rules. and/or the filter rules.
Alternatively, the RADIUS server can request that the NAS re- Alternatively, the RADIUS server can request that the NAS re-
authorize the session using the procedures defined in [RFC3576]. authorize the session using the procedures defined in [RFC3576].
The RADIUS server responds with an Access-Accept message (with The RADIUS server responds with an Access-Accept message (with
Service-Type(6) set to "Authorize Only" that will contain the Service-Type(6) set to 'Authorize Only' that will contain the
redirection and optionally filtering rules within a NAS-Traffic- redirection and optionally filtering rules within a NAS-Traffic-
Rule(TBD) attribute. Rule(TBD) attribute.
A.2.3 HTTP Redirection Removal A.2.3 HTTP Redirection Removal
HTTP Redirection rules can be automatically removed mid-session HTTP Redirection rules can be automatically removed mid-session
from the NAS using the redir-cnt parameter or explicitly removed from the NAS using the redir-cnt parameter or explicitly removed
from the RADIUS server. The RADIUS server can explicitly turn HTTP from the RADIUS server. The RADIUS server can explicitly turn HTTP
redirection off mid-session in two ways. It can push new redirection off mid-session in two ways. It can push new
redirection rules within a NAS-Traffic-Rule(TBD) attribute using a redirection rules within a NAS-Traffic-Rule(TBD) attribute using a
CoA-Request message or it can send the NAS a CoA-Request message CoA-Request message or it can send the NAS a CoA-Request message
requesting it to re-authorize. requesting it to re-authorize.
When using CoA-Request message to return the redirection and When using CoA-Request message to return the redirection and
filtering back to "normal," there needs to be either a filter rule filtering back to 'normal,' there needs to be either a filter rule
(or filter-id) or redirection rule that corresponds to the (or filter-id) or redirection rule that corresponds to the
"normal" state. If normally the session did not have any filter 'normal' state. If normally the session did not have any filter
and or redirection rules applied, the RADIUS server can send a and or redirection rules applied, the RADIUS server can send a
NAS-Traffic-Rule(TBD) with the action of "flush" in the CoA- NAS-Traffic-Rule(TBD) with the action of 'flush' in the CoA-
Request message. This action will cause all the filter rules and Request message. This action will cause all the filter rules and
redirection rules previously assigned to the session to be redirection rules previously assigned to the session to be
removed. removed.
A.3 Accounting A.3 Accounting
Every time a session is redirected and every time the redirection Every time a session is redirected and every time the redirection
is reverted back a new session is created and the old one is is reverted back a new session is created and the old one is
terminated. Therefore the NAS MUST generate and Accounting- terminated. Therefore the NAS MUST generate and Accounting-
Request(Stop) for the old session and an Accounting-Request(Start) Request(Stop) for the old session and an Accounting-Request(Start)
skipping to change at page 25, line 22 skipping to change at page 25, line 33
permit inout any from any to any permit inout any from any to any
Example #2: Permit only L2 traffic coming from and going to a Example #2: Permit only L2 traffic coming from and going to a
user's Ethernet MAC address. Block all other traffic. Assume user's Ethernet MAC address. Block all other traffic. Assume
user's MAC address is 00-10-A4-23-19-C0. user's MAC address is 00-10-A4-23-19-C0.
permit in l2:ether2 from 00-10-A4-23-19-C0 to any permit in l2:ether2 from 00-10-A4-23-19-C0 to any
permit out l2:ether2 from any to 00-10-A4-23-19-C0 permit out l2:ether2 from any to 00-10-A4-23-19-C0
Example #3: Tunnel all L2 traffic coming from and going to a user. Example #3: Tunnel all L2 traffic coming from and going to a user.
Assume tunnel name is: tunnel "1234". Assume tunnel name is: tunnel '1234'.
permit tunnel "tunnel \"1234\"" inout l2:ether2 from any to any permit tunnel 'tunnel \'1234\'' inout l2:ether2 from any to any
Example #4: Permit only L3 traffic coming and going to from a Example #4: Permit only L3 traffic coming and going to from a
user's IP address. Block all other traffic. Assume user's IP user's IP address. Block all other traffic. Assume user's IP
address is 192.0.2.128. address is 192.0.2.128.
permit in ip from 192.0.2.128 to any permit in ip from 192.0.2.128 to any
permit out ip from any to 192.0.2.128 permit out ip from any to 192.0.2.128
Example #5: Permit only L3 traffic coming and going to the user's Example #5: Permit only L3 traffic coming and going to the user's
assigned IP address. Block all other traffic. assigned IP address. Block all other traffic.
skipping to change at page 26, line 41 skipping to change at page 27, line 10
Paul Congdon Paul Congdon
Hewlett Packard Company Hewlett Packard Company
HP ProCurve Networking HP ProCurve Networking
8000 Foothills Blvd, M/S 5662 8000 Foothills Blvd, M/S 5662
Roseville, CA 95747 Roseville, CA 95747
EMail: paul.congdon@hp.com EMail: paul.congdon@hp.com
Phone: +1 916 785 5753 Phone: +1 916 785 5753
Fax: +1 916 785 8478 Fax: +1 916 785 8478
Mauricio Sanchez (editor) Mauricio Sanchez
Hewlett Packard Company Hewlett Packard Company
HP ProCurve Networking HP ProCurve Networking
8000 Foothills Blvd, M/S 5559 8000 Foothills Blvd, M/S 5559
Roseville, CA 95747 Roseville, CA 95747
EMail: mauricio.sanchez@hp.com EMail: mauricio.sanchez@hp.com
Phone: +1 916 785 1910 Phone: +1 916 785 1910
Fax: +1 916 785 1815 Fax: +1 916 785 1815
Avi Lior Avi Lior
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