draft-ietf-rtgwg-enterprise-pa-multihoming-01.txt   draft-ietf-rtgwg-enterprise-pa-multihoming-02.txt 
Routing Working Group F. Baker Routing Working Group F. Baker
Internet-Draft Internet-Draft
Intended status: Informational C. Bowers Intended status: Informational C. Bowers
Expires: January 3, 2018 Juniper Networks Expires: May 2, 2018 Juniper Networks
J. Linkova J. Linkova
Google Google
July 2, 2017 October 29, 2017
Enterprise Multihoming using Provider-Assigned Addresses without Network Enterprise Multihoming using Provider-Assigned Addresses without Network
Prefix Translation: Requirements and Solution Prefix Translation: Requirements and Solution
draft-ietf-rtgwg-enterprise-pa-multihoming-01 draft-ietf-rtgwg-enterprise-pa-multihoming-02
Abstract Abstract
Connecting an enterprise site to multiple ISPs using provider- Connecting an enterprise site to multiple ISPs using provider-
assigned addresses is difficult without the use of some form of assigned addresses is difficult without the use of some form of
Network Address Translation (NAT). Much has been written on this Network Address Translation (NAT). Much has been written on this
topic over the last 10 to 15 years, but it still remains a problem topic over the last 10 to 15 years, but it still remains a problem
without a clearly defined or widely implemented solution. Any without a clearly defined or widely implemented solution. Any
multihoming solution without NAT requires hosts at the site to have multihoming solution without NAT requires hosts at the site to have
addresses from each ISP and to select the egress ISP by selecting a addresses from each ISP and to select the egress ISP by selecting a
skipping to change at page 1, line 46 skipping to change at page 1, line 46
of an enterprise site network administrator . of an enterprise site network administrator .
Status of This Memo Status of This Memo
This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79. provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.
Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on January 3, 2018. This Internet-Draft will expire on May 2, 2018.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
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described in the Simplified BSD License. described in the Simplified BSD License.
Table of Contents Table of Contents
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
skipping to change at page 14, line 48 skipping to change at page 14, line 48
method for generating a source-prefix-scoped forwarding table on a method for generating a source-prefix-scoped forwarding table on a
router that supports SADR. router that supports SADR.
1. Compute the next-hops for the source-prefix-scoped destination 1. Compute the next-hops for the source-prefix-scoped destination
prefixes using only routers in the connected SADR domain. These prefixes using only routers in the connected SADR domain. These
are the initial source-prefix-scoped forwarding table entries. are the initial source-prefix-scoped forwarding table entries.
2. Compute the next-hops for the unscoped destination prefixes using 2. Compute the next-hops for the unscoped destination prefixes using
all routers in the IGP. This is the unscoped forwarding table. all routers in the IGP. This is the unscoped forwarding table.
3. Augment each source-prefix-scoped forwarding table with unscoped 3. Augment each less specific source-prefix-scoped forwarding table
forwarding table entries based on the following rule. If the with all more specific source-prefix-scoped forwarding tables
destination prefix of the unscoped forwarding entry exactly entries based on the following rule. If the destination prefix
matches the destination prefix of an existing source-prefix- of the less specific source-prefix-scoped forwarding entry
scoped forwarding entry (including destination prefix length), exactly matches the destination prefix of an existing more
then do not add the unscoped forwarding entry. If the specific source-prefix-scoped forwarding entry (including
destination prefix does NOT match an existing entry, then add the destination prefix length), then do not add the less specific
entry to the source-prefix-scoped forwarding table. source-prefix-scoped forwarding entry. If the destination prefix
does NOT match an existing entry, then add the entry to the more
source-prefix-scoped forwarding table. As the unscoped
forwarding table is considered to be scoped to ::/0 this process
starts with propagating routes from the unscoped forwarding table
to source-prefix-scoped forwarding tables and then continues with
propagating routes to more-specific-source-prefix-scoped
forwarding tables should they exist.
The forward tables produced by this process are used in the following The forward tables produced by this process are used in the following
way to forward packets. way to forward packets.
1. If the source address of the packet matches one of the source 1. Select the most specific (longerst prefix match) source-prefix-
prefixes, then look up the destination address of the packet in scoped forwarding table that matches the source address of the
the corresponding source-prefix-scoped forwarding table to packet (again, the unscoped forwarding table is considered to be
determine the next-hop for the packet. scoped to ::/0).
2. If the source address of the packet does NOT match one of the 2. Look up the destination address of the packet in the selected
source prefixes, then look up the destination address of the forwarding table to determine the next-hop for the packet.
packet in unscoped forwarding table to determine the next-hop for
the packet.
The following example illustrates how this process is used to create The following example illustrates how this process is used to create
a forwarding table for each provider-assigned source prefix. We a forwarding table for each provider-assigned source prefix. We
consider the multihomed site network in Figure 3. Initially we consider the multihomed site network in Figure 3. Initially we
assume that all of the routers in the site network support SADR. assume that all of the routers in the site network support SADR.
Figure 4 shows the routes that are originated by the routers in the Figure 4 shows the routes that are originated by the routers in the
site network. site network.
Routes originated by SERa: Routes originated by SERa:
(S=2001:db8:0:a000::/52, D=2001:db8:0:5555/64) (S=2001:db8:0:a000::/52, D=2001:db8:0:5555/64)
skipping to change at page 17, line 29 skipping to change at page 17, line 29
D=2001:db8:0:a010::/64 NH=R2 D=2001:db8:0:a010::/64 NH=R2
D=2001:db8:0:b010::/64 NH=R2 D=2001:db8:0:b010::/64 NH=R2
D=2001:db8:0:a020::/64 NH=R5 D=2001:db8:0:a020::/64 NH=R5
D=2001:db8:0:b020::/64 NH=R5 D=2001:db8:0:b020::/64 NH=R5
D=2001:db8:0:5555::/64 NH=R7 D=2001:db8:0:5555::/64 NH=R7
D=2001:db8:0:6666::/64 NH=SERb2 D=2001:db8:0:6666::/64 NH=SERb2
D=::/0 NH=SERb1 D=::/0 NH=SERb1
Figure 5: Forwarding Entries Computed at R8 Figure 5: Forwarding Entries Computed at R8
The final step is for R8 to augment the source-prefix-scoped The final step is for R8 to augment the less specific source-prefix-
forwarding entries with unscoped forwarding entries. If an unscoped scoped forwarding entries with more specific source-prefix-scoped
forwarding entry has the exact same destination prefix as an source- forwarding entries. As unscoped forwarding table is considered being
prefix-scoped forwarding entry (including destination prefix length), scoped to ::/0 and both 2001:db8:0:a000::/52 and 2001:db8:0:b000::/52
then the source-prefix-scoped forwarding entry wins. are more specific prefixes of ::/0, the unscoped (scoped to ::/0)
forwarding table needs to be augmented with both more specific
source-prefix-scoped tables. If an less specific scoped forwarding
entry has the exact same destination prefix as an more specific
source-prefix-scoped forwarding entry (including destination prefix
length), then the more specific source-prefix-scoped forwarding entry
wins.
As as an example of how the source scoped forwarding entries are As as an example of how the source scoped forwarding entries are
augmented with unscoped forwarding entries, we consider how the two augmented, we consider how the two entries in the first table in
entries in the first table in Figure 5 (the table for source prefix = Figure 5 (the table for source prefix = 2001:db8:0:a000::/52) are
2001:db8:0:a000::/52) are augmented with entries from the third table augmented with entries from the third table in Figure 5 (the table of
in Figure 5 (the table of unscoped forwarding entries). The first unscoped or scoped for ::/0 forwarding entries). The first four
four unscoped forwarding entries (D=2001:db8:0:a010::/64, unscoped forwarding entries (D=2001:db8:0:a010::/64,
D=2001:db8:0:b010::/64, D=2001:db8:0:a020::/64, and D=2001:db8:0:b010::/64, D=2001:db8:0:a020::/64, and
D=2001:db8:0:b020::/64) are not an exact match for any of the D=2001:db8:0:b020::/64) are not an exact match for any of the
existing entries in the forwarding table for source prefix existing entries in the forwarding table for source prefix
2001:db8:0:a000::/52. Therefore, these four entries are added to the 2001:db8:0:a000::/52. Therefore, these four entries are added to the
final forwarding table for source prefix 2001:db8:0:a000::/52. The final forwarding table for source prefix 2001:db8:0:a000::/52. The
result of adding these entries is reflected in first four entries the result of adding these entries is reflected in first four entries the
first table in Figure 6. first table in Figure 6.
The next unscoped forwarding table entry is for The next less specific scoped (scope is ::/0) forwarding table entry
D=2001:db8:0:5555::/64. This entry is an exact match for the is for D=2001:db8:0:5555::/64. This entry is an exact match for the
existing entry in the forwarding table for source prefix existing entry in the forwarding table for the more specific source
2001:db8:0:a000::/52. Therefore, we do not replace the existing prefix 2001:db8:0:a000::/52. Therefore, we do not replace the
entry with the entry from the unscoped forwarding table. This is existing entry with the entry from the unscoped forwarding table.
reflected in the fifth entry in the first table in Figure 6. (Note This is reflected in the fifth entry in the first table in Figure 6.
that since both scoped and unscoped entries have R7 as the next hop, (Note that since both scoped and unscoped entries have R7 as the next
the result of applying this rule is not visible.) hop, the result of applying this rule is not visible.)
The next unscoped forwarding table entry is for The next less specific prefix scoped (scope is ::/0) forwarding table
D=2001:db8:0:6666::/64. This entry is not an exact match for any entry is for D=2001:db8:0:6666::/64. This entry is not an exact
existing entries in the forwarding table for source prefix match for any existing entries in the forwarding table for source
2001:db8:0:a000::/52. Therefore, we add this entry. This is prefix 2001:db8:0:a000::/52. Therefore, we add this entry. This is
reflected in the sixth entry in the first table in Figure 6. reflected in the sixth entry in the first table in Figure 6.
The next unscoped forwarding table entry is for D=::/0. This entry The next less specific prefix scoped (scope is ::/0) forwarding table
is an exact match for the existing entry in the forwarding table for entry is for D=::/0. This entry is an exact match for the existing
source prefix 2001:db8:0:a000::/52. Therefore, we do not overwrite entry in the forwarding table for more specific source prefix
the existing source-prefix-scoped entry, as can be seen in the last 2001:db8:0:a000::/52. Therefore, we do not overwrite the existing
entry in the first table in Figure 6. source-prefix-scoped entry, as can be seen in the last entry in the
first table in Figure 6.
if source address matches 2001:db8:0:a000::/52 if source address matches 2001:db8:0:a000::/52
then use this forwarding table then use this forwarding table
============================================ ============================================
D=2001:db8:0:a010::/64 NH=R2 D=2001:db8:0:a010::/64 NH=R2
D=2001:db8:0:b010::/64 NH=R2 D=2001:db8:0:b010::/64 NH=R2
D=2001:db8:0:a020::/64 NH=R5 D=2001:db8:0:a020::/64 NH=R5
D=2001:db8:0:b020::/64 NH=R5 D=2001:db8:0:b020::/64 NH=R5
D=2001:db8:0:5555::/64 NH=R7 D=2001:db8:0:5555::/64 NH=R7
D=2001:db8:0:6666::/64 NH=SERb2 D=2001:db8:0:6666::/64 NH=SERb2
skipping to change at page 19, line 27 skipping to change at page 19, line 27
then use this forwarding table then use this forwarding table
============================================ ============================================
D=2001:db8:0:a010::/64 NH=R2 D=2001:db8:0:a010::/64 NH=R2
D=2001:db8:0:b010::/64 NH=R2 D=2001:db8:0:b010::/64 NH=R2
D=2001:db8:0:a020::/64 NH=R5 D=2001:db8:0:a020::/64 NH=R5
D=2001:db8:0:b020::/64 NH=R5 D=2001:db8:0:b020::/64 NH=R5
D=2001:db8:0:5555::/64 NH=R7 D=2001:db8:0:5555::/64 NH=R7
D=2001:db8:0:6666::/64 NH=SERb2 D=2001:db8:0:6666::/64 NH=SERb2
D=::/0 NH=SERb1 D=::/0 NH=SERb1
else use this forwarding table else if source address matches ::/0 use this forwarding table
============================================ ============================================
D=2001:db8:0:a010::/64 NH=R2 D=2001:db8:0:a010::/64 NH=R2
D=2001:db8:0:b010::/64 NH=R2 D=2001:db8:0:b010::/64 NH=R2
D=2001:db8:0:a020::/64 NH=R5 D=2001:db8:0:a020::/64 NH=R5
D=2001:db8:0:b020::/64 NH=R5 D=2001:db8:0:b020::/64 NH=R5
D=2001:db8:0:5555::/64 NH=R7 D=2001:db8:0:5555::/64 NH=R7
D=2001:db8:0:6666::/64 NH=SERb2 D=2001:db8:0:6666::/64 NH=SERb2
D=::/0 NH=SERb1 D=::/0 NH=SERb1
Figure 6: Complete Forwarding Tables Computed at R8 Figure 6: Complete Forwarding Tables Computed at R8
skipping to change at page 42, line 47 skipping to change at page 42, line 47
The original outline was suggested by Ole Troan. The original outline was suggested by Ole Troan.
9. References 9. References
9.1. Normative References 9.1. Normative References
[RFC1122] Braden, R., Ed., "Requirements for Internet Hosts - [RFC1122] Braden, R., Ed., "Requirements for Internet Hosts -
Communication Layers", STD 3, RFC 1122, Communication Layers", STD 3, RFC 1122,
DOI 10.17487/RFC1122, October 1989, DOI 10.17487/RFC1122, October 1989,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc1122>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc1122>.
[RFC1123] Braden, R., Ed., "Requirements for Internet Hosts - [RFC1123] Braden, R., Ed., "Requirements for Internet Hosts -
Application and Support", STD 3, RFC 1123, Application and Support", STD 3, RFC 1123,
DOI 10.17487/RFC1123, October 1989, DOI 10.17487/RFC1123, October 1989,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc1123>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc1123>.
[RFC1918] Rekhter, Y., Moskowitz, B., Karrenberg, D., de Groot, G., [RFC1918] Rekhter, Y., Moskowitz, B., Karrenberg, D., de Groot, G.,
and E. Lear, "Address Allocation for Private Internets", and E. Lear, "Address Allocation for Private Internets",
BCP 5, RFC 1918, DOI 10.17487/RFC1918, February 1996, BCP 5, RFC 1918, DOI 10.17487/RFC1918, February 1996,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc1918>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc1918>.
[RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119,
DOI 10.17487/RFC2119, March 1997, DOI 10.17487/RFC2119, March 1997,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2119>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2119>.
[RFC2460] Deering, S. and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol, Version 6 [RFC2460] Deering, S. and R. Hinden, "Internet Protocol, Version 6
(IPv6) Specification", RFC 2460, DOI 10.17487/RFC2460, (IPv6) Specification", RFC 2460, DOI 10.17487/RFC2460,
December 1998, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2460>. December 1998, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2460>.
[RFC2827] Ferguson, P. and D. Senie, "Network Ingress Filtering: [RFC2827] Ferguson, P. and D. Senie, "Network Ingress Filtering:
Defeating Denial of Service Attacks which employ IP Source Defeating Denial of Service Attacks which employ IP Source
Address Spoofing", BCP 38, RFC 2827, DOI 10.17487/RFC2827, Address Spoofing", BCP 38, RFC 2827, DOI 10.17487/RFC2827,
May 2000, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2827>. May 2000, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2827>.
[RFC3315] Droms, R., Ed., Bound, J., Volz, B., Lemon, T., Perkins, [RFC3315] Droms, R., Ed., Bound, J., Volz, B., Lemon, T., Perkins,
C., and M. Carney, "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol C., and M. Carney, "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
for IPv6 (DHCPv6)", RFC 3315, DOI 10.17487/RFC3315, July for IPv6 (DHCPv6)", RFC 3315, DOI 10.17487/RFC3315, July
2003, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3315>. 2003, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3315>.
[RFC3582] Abley, J., Black, B., and V. Gill, "Goals for IPv6 Site- [RFC3582] Abley, J., Black, B., and V. Gill, "Goals for IPv6 Site-
Multihoming Architectures", RFC 3582, Multihoming Architectures", RFC 3582,
DOI 10.17487/RFC3582, August 2003, DOI 10.17487/RFC3582, August 2003,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3582>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3582>.
[RFC4116] Abley, J., Lindqvist, K., Davies, E., Black, B., and V. [RFC4116] Abley, J., Lindqvist, K., Davies, E., Black, B., and V.
Gill, "IPv4 Multihoming Practices and Limitations", Gill, "IPv4 Multihoming Practices and Limitations",
RFC 4116, DOI 10.17487/RFC4116, July 2005, RFC 4116, DOI 10.17487/RFC4116, July 2005,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4116>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4116>.
[RFC4191] Draves, R. and D. Thaler, "Default Router Preferences and [RFC4191] Draves, R. and D. Thaler, "Default Router Preferences and
More-Specific Routes", RFC 4191, DOI 10.17487/RFC4191, More-Specific Routes", RFC 4191, DOI 10.17487/RFC4191,
November 2005, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4191>. November 2005, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4191>.
[RFC4193] Hinden, R. and B. Haberman, "Unique Local IPv6 Unicast [RFC4193] Hinden, R. and B. Haberman, "Unique Local IPv6 Unicast
Addresses", RFC 4193, DOI 10.17487/RFC4193, October 2005, Addresses", RFC 4193, DOI 10.17487/RFC4193, October 2005,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4193>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4193>.
[RFC4218] Nordmark, E. and T. Li, "Threats Relating to IPv6 [RFC4218] Nordmark, E. and T. Li, "Threats Relating to IPv6
Multihoming Solutions", RFC 4218, DOI 10.17487/RFC4218, Multihoming Solutions", RFC 4218, DOI 10.17487/RFC4218,
October 2005, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4218>. October 2005, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4218>.
[RFC4219] Lear, E., "Things Multihoming in IPv6 (MULTI6) Developers [RFC4219] Lear, E., "Things Multihoming in IPv6 (MULTI6) Developers
Should Think About", RFC 4219, DOI 10.17487/RFC4219, Should Think About", RFC 4219, DOI 10.17487/RFC4219,
October 2005, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4219>. October 2005, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4219>.
[RFC4242] Venaas, S., Chown, T., and B. Volz, "Information Refresh [RFC4242] Venaas, S., Chown, T., and B. Volz, "Information Refresh
Time Option for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for Time Option for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for
IPv6 (DHCPv6)", RFC 4242, DOI 10.17487/RFC4242, November IPv6 (DHCPv6)", RFC 4242, DOI 10.17487/RFC4242, November
2005, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4242>. 2005, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4242>.
[RFC6106] Jeong, J., Park, S., Beloeil, L., and S. Madanapalli, [RFC6106] Jeong, J., Park, S., Beloeil, L., and S. Madanapalli,
"IPv6 Router Advertisement Options for DNS Configuration", "IPv6 Router Advertisement Options for DNS Configuration",
RFC 6106, DOI 10.17487/RFC6106, November 2010, RFC 6106, DOI 10.17487/RFC6106, November 2010,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6106>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6106>.
[RFC6296] Wasserman, M. and F. Baker, "IPv6-to-IPv6 Network Prefix [RFC6296] Wasserman, M. and F. Baker, "IPv6-to-IPv6 Network Prefix
Translation", RFC 6296, DOI 10.17487/RFC6296, June 2011, Translation", RFC 6296, DOI 10.17487/RFC6296, June 2011,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6296>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6296>.
[RFC7157] Troan, O., Ed., Miles, D., Matsushima, S., Okimoto, T., [RFC7157] Troan, O., Ed., Miles, D., Matsushima, S., Okimoto, T.,
and D. Wing, "IPv6 Multihoming without Network Address and D. Wing, "IPv6 Multihoming without Network Address
Translation", RFC 7157, DOI 10.17487/RFC7157, March 2014, Translation", RFC 7157, DOI 10.17487/RFC7157, March 2014,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7157>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7157>.
9.2. Informative References 9.2. Informative References
[I-D.baker-ipv6-isis-dst-src-routing] [I-D.baker-ipv6-isis-dst-src-routing]
Baker, F. and D. Lamparter, "IPv6 Source/Destination Baker, F. and D. Lamparter, "IPv6 Source/Destination
Routing using IS-IS", draft-baker-ipv6-isis-dst-src- Routing using IS-IS", draft-baker-ipv6-isis-dst-src-
routing-06 (work in progress), October 2016. routing-07 (work in progress), July 2017.
[I-D.baker-rtgwg-src-dst-routing-use-cases] [I-D.baker-rtgwg-src-dst-routing-use-cases]
Baker, F., Xu, M., Yang, S., and J. Wu, "Requirements and Baker, F., Xu, M., Yang, S., and J. Wu, "Requirements and
Use Cases for Source/Destination Routing", draft-baker- Use Cases for Source/Destination Routing", draft-baker-
rtgwg-src-dst-routing-use-cases-02 (work in progress), rtgwg-src-dst-routing-use-cases-02 (work in progress),
April 2016. April 2016.
[I-D.boutier-babel-source-specific] [I-D.boutier-babel-source-specific]
Boutier, M. and J. Chroboczek, "Source-Specific Routing in Boutier, M. and J. Chroboczek, "Source-Specific Routing in
Babel", draft-boutier-babel-source-specific-02 (work in Babel", draft-boutier-babel-source-specific-03 (work in
progress), June 2017. progress), July 2017.
[I-D.huitema-shim6-ingress-filtering] [I-D.huitema-shim6-ingress-filtering]
Huitema, C., "Ingress filtering compatibility for IPv6 Huitema, C., "Ingress filtering compatibility for IPv6
multihomed sites", draft-huitema-shim6-ingress- multihomed sites", draft-huitema-shim6-ingress-
filtering-00 (work in progress), September 2005. filtering-00 (work in progress), September 2005.
[I-D.ietf-6man-rdnss-rfc6106bis] [I-D.ietf-6man-rdnss-rfc6106bis]
Jeong, J., Park, S., Beloeil, L., and S. Madanapalli, Jeong, J., Park, S., Beloeil, L., and S. Madanapalli,
"IPv6 Router Advertisement Options for DNS Configuration", "IPv6 Router Advertisement Options for DNS Configuration",
draft-ietf-6man-rdnss-rfc6106bis-16 (work in progress), draft-ietf-6man-rdnss-rfc6106bis-16 (work in progress),
skipping to change at page 45, line 23 skipping to change at page 45, line 23
draft-ietf-mif-mpvd-arch-11 (work in progress), March draft-ietf-mif-mpvd-arch-11 (work in progress), March
2015. 2015.
[I-D.ietf-mptcp-experience] [I-D.ietf-mptcp-experience]
Bonaventure, O., Paasch, C., and G. Detal, "Use Cases and Bonaventure, O., Paasch, C., and G. Detal, "Use Cases and
Operational Experience with Multipath TCP", draft-ietf- Operational Experience with Multipath TCP", draft-ietf-
mptcp-experience-07 (work in progress), October 2016. mptcp-experience-07 (work in progress), October 2016.
[I-D.ietf-rtgwg-dst-src-routing] [I-D.ietf-rtgwg-dst-src-routing]
Lamparter, D. and A. Smirnov, "Destination/Source Lamparter, D. and A. Smirnov, "Destination/Source
Routing", draft-ietf-rtgwg-dst-src-routing-04 (work in Routing", draft-ietf-rtgwg-dst-src-routing-05 (work in
progress), May 2017. progress), July 2017.
[I-D.pfister-6man-sadr-ra] [I-D.pfister-6man-sadr-ra]
Pfister, P., "Source Address Dependent Route Information Pfister, P., "Source Address Dependent Route Information
Option for Router Advertisements", draft-pfister-6man- Option for Router Advertisements", draft-pfister-6man-
sadr-ra-01 (work in progress), June 2015. sadr-ra-01 (work in progress), June 2015.
[I-D.xu-src-dst-bgp] [I-D.xu-src-dst-bgp]
Xu, M., Yang, S., and J. Wu, "Source/Destination Routing Xu, M., Yang, S., and J. Wu, "Source/Destination Routing
Using BGP-4", draft-xu-src-dst-bgp-00 (work in progress), Using BGP-4", draft-xu-src-dst-bgp-00 (work in progress),
March 2016. March 2016.
[PATRICIA] [PATRICIA]
Morrison, D., "Practical Algorithm to Retrieve Information Morrison, D., "Practical Algorithm to Retrieve Information
Coded in Alphanumeric", Journal of the ACM 15(4) Coded in Alphanumeric", Journal of the ACM 15(4)
pp514-534, October 1968. pp514-534, October 1968.
[RFC3704] Baker, F. and P. Savola, "Ingress Filtering for Multihomed [RFC3704] Baker, F. and P. Savola, "Ingress Filtering for Multihomed
Networks", BCP 84, RFC 3704, DOI 10.17487/RFC3704, March Networks", BCP 84, RFC 3704, DOI 10.17487/RFC3704, March
2004, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3704>. 2004, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3704>.
[RFC3736] Droms, R., "Stateless Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol [RFC3736] Droms, R., "Stateless Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(DHCP) Service for IPv6", RFC 3736, DOI 10.17487/RFC3736, (DHCP) Service for IPv6", RFC 3736, DOI 10.17487/RFC3736,
April 2004, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3736>. April 2004, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3736>.
[RFC4443] Conta, A., Deering, S., and M. Gupta, Ed., "Internet [RFC4443] Conta, A., Deering, S., and M. Gupta, Ed., "Internet
Control Message Protocol (ICMPv6) for the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMPv6) for the Internet
Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Specification", RFC 4443, Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Specification", STD 89,
DOI 10.17487/RFC4443, March 2006, RFC 4443, DOI 10.17487/RFC4443, March 2006,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4443>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4443>.
[RFC4861] Narten, T., Nordmark, E., Simpson, W., and H. Soliman, [RFC4861] Narten, T., Nordmark, E., Simpson, W., and H. Soliman,
"Neighbor Discovery for IP version 6 (IPv6)", RFC 4861, "Neighbor Discovery for IP version 6 (IPv6)", RFC 4861,
DOI 10.17487/RFC4861, September 2007, DOI 10.17487/RFC4861, September 2007,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4861>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4861>.
[RFC4862] Thomson, S., Narten, T., and T. Jinmei, "IPv6 Stateless [RFC4862] Thomson, S., Narten, T., and T. Jinmei, "IPv6 Stateless
Address Autoconfiguration", RFC 4862, Address Autoconfiguration", RFC 4862,
DOI 10.17487/RFC4862, September 2007, DOI 10.17487/RFC4862, September 2007,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4862>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4862>.
[RFC4941] Narten, T., Draves, R., and S. Krishnan, "Privacy [RFC4941] Narten, T., Draves, R., and S. Krishnan, "Privacy
Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in Extensions for Stateless Address Autoconfiguration in
IPv6", RFC 4941, DOI 10.17487/RFC4941, September 2007, IPv6", RFC 4941, DOI 10.17487/RFC4941, September 2007,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4941>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc4941>.
[RFC5533] Nordmark, E. and M. Bagnulo, "Shim6: Level 3 Multihoming [RFC5533] Nordmark, E. and M. Bagnulo, "Shim6: Level 3 Multihoming
Shim Protocol for IPv6", RFC 5533, DOI 10.17487/RFC5533, Shim Protocol for IPv6", RFC 5533, DOI 10.17487/RFC5533,
June 2009, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc5533>. June 2009, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc5533>.
[RFC5534] Arkko, J. and I. van Beijnum, "Failure Detection and [RFC5534] Arkko, J. and I. van Beijnum, "Failure Detection and
Locator Pair Exploration Protocol for IPv6 Multihoming", Locator Pair Exploration Protocol for IPv6 Multihoming",
RFC 5534, DOI 10.17487/RFC5534, June 2009, RFC 5534, DOI 10.17487/RFC5534, June 2009,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc5534>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc5534>.
[RFC6555] Wing, D. and A. Yourtchenko, "Happy Eyeballs: Success with [RFC6555] Wing, D. and A. Yourtchenko, "Happy Eyeballs: Success with
Dual-Stack Hosts", RFC 6555, DOI 10.17487/RFC6555, April Dual-Stack Hosts", RFC 6555, DOI 10.17487/RFC6555, April
2012, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6555>. 2012, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6555>.
[RFC6724] Thaler, D., Ed., Draves, R., Matsumoto, A., and T. Chown, [RFC6724] Thaler, D., Ed., Draves, R., Matsumoto, A., and T. Chown,
"Default Address Selection for Internet Protocol Version 6 "Default Address Selection for Internet Protocol Version 6
(IPv6)", RFC 6724, DOI 10.17487/RFC6724, September 2012, (IPv6)", RFC 6724, DOI 10.17487/RFC6724, September 2012,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6724>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6724>.
[RFC7078] Matsumoto, A., Fujisaki, T., and T. Chown, "Distributing [RFC7078] Matsumoto, A., Fujisaki, T., and T. Chown, "Distributing
Address Selection Policy Using DHCPv6", RFC 7078, Address Selection Policy Using DHCPv6", RFC 7078,
DOI 10.17487/RFC7078, January 2014, DOI 10.17487/RFC7078, January 2014,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7078>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7078>.
[RFC7788] Stenberg, M., Barth, S., and P. Pfister, "Home Networking [RFC7788] Stenberg, M., Barth, S., and P. Pfister, "Home Networking
Control Protocol", RFC 7788, DOI 10.17487/RFC7788, April Control Protocol", RFC 7788, DOI 10.17487/RFC7788, April
2016, <http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7788>. 2016, <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7788>.
[RFC8028] Baker, F. and B. Carpenter, "First-Hop Router Selection by [RFC8028] Baker, F. and B. Carpenter, "First-Hop Router Selection by
Hosts in a Multi-Prefix Network", RFC 8028, Hosts in a Multi-Prefix Network", RFC 8028,
DOI 10.17487/RFC8028, November 2016, DOI 10.17487/RFC8028, November 2016,
<http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8028>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8028>.
Appendix A. Change Log Appendix A. Change Log
Initial Version: July 2016 Initial Version: July 2016
Authors' Addresses Authors' Addresses
Fred Baker Fred Baker
Santa Barbara, California 93117 Santa Barbara, California 93117
USA USA
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