draft-ietf-snmpv2-smi-ds-02.txt   draft-ietf-snmpv2-smi-ds-03.txt 
Structure of Management Information Structure of Management Information
for Version 2 of the for Version 2 of the
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMPv2) Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMPv2)
31 May 1995 | 20 September 1995 |
draft-ietf-snmpv2-smi-ds-02.txt |
Jeffrey D. Case draft-ietf-snmpv2-smi-ds-03.txt |
SNMP Research, Inc.
case@snmp.com
Keith McCloghrie Keith McCloghrie
Editor +
Cisco Systems, Inc. Cisco Systems, Inc.
kzm@cisco.com kzm@cisco.com
Marshall T. Rose Status of this Memo -
Dover Beach Consulting, Inc.
mrose@dbc.mtview.ca.us
Steven Waldbusser
Carnegie Mellon University
waldbusser@cmu.edu
Status of this Memo
This document is an Internet-Draft. Internet-Drafts are working This document is an Internet-Draft. Internet-Drafts are working
documents of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), its areas, and documents of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), its areas, and
its working groups. Note that other groups may also distribute working its working groups. Note that other groups may also distribute working
documents as Internet-Drafts. documents as Internet-Drafts.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet- Drafts as reference material time. It is inappropriate to use Internet- Drafts as reference material
or to cite them other than as ``work in progress.'' or to cite them other than as ``work in progress.''
skipping to change at page 3, line 23 skipping to change at page 2, line 23
authorization, access control, and privacy policies. authorization, access control, and privacy policies.
Management stations execute management applications which monitor and Management stations execute management applications which monitor and
control managed elements. Managed elements are devices such as hosts, control managed elements. Managed elements are devices such as hosts,
routers, terminal servers, etc., which are monitored and controlled via routers, terminal servers, etc., which are monitored and controlled via
access to their management information. access to their management information.
Management information is viewed as a collection of managed objects, Management information is viewed as a collection of managed objects,
residing in a virtual information store, termed the Management residing in a virtual information store, termed the Management
Information Base (MIB). Collections of related objects are defined in Information Base (MIB). Collections of related objects are defined in
MIB modules. These modules are written using an adapted subset of OSI's | MIB modules. These modules are written using an adapted subset of OSI's
Abstract Syntax | Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1) [1]. It is the purpose of this
Notation One (ASN.1) [1]. It is the purpose of this document, the document, the Structure of Management Information (SMI), to define that
Structure of Management Information (SMI), to define that adapted | adapted subset, and to assign a set of associated administrative values.
subset, and to assign a set of associated administrative values. |
The SMI is divided into three parts: module definitions, object | The SMI is divided into three parts: module definitions, object
definitions, and, notification definitions. | definitions, and, notification definitions.
(1) Module definitions are used when describing information modules. (1) Module definitions are used when describing information modules.
An ASN.1 macro, MODULE-IDENTITY, is used to concisely convey the An ASN.1 macro, MODULE-IDENTITY, is used to concisely convey the
semantics of an information module. semantics of an information module.
(2) Object definitions are used when describing managed objects. An (2) Object definitions are used when describing managed objects. An
ASN.1 macro, OBJECT-TYPE, is used to concisely convey the syntax ASN.1 macro, OBJECT-TYPE, is used to concisely convey the syntax
and semantics of a managed object. and semantics of a managed object.
(3) Notification definitions are used when describing unsolicited (3) Notification definitions are used when describing unsolicited
skipping to change at page 4, line 4 skipping to change at page 2, line 48
(3) Notification definitions are used when describing unsolicited (3) Notification definitions are used when describing unsolicited
transmissions of management information. An ASN.1 macro, transmissions of management information. An ASN.1 macro,
NOTIFICATION-TYPE, is used to concisely convey the syntax and NOTIFICATION-TYPE, is used to concisely convey the syntax and
semantics of a notification. semantics of a notification.
1.1. A Note on Terminology 1.1. A Note on Terminology
For the purpose of exposition, the original Internet-standard Network For the purpose of exposition, the original Internet-standard Network
Management Framework, as described in RFCs 1155, 1157, and 1212, is Management Framework, as described in RFCs 1155, 1157, and 1212, is
termed the SNMP version 1 framework (SNMPv1). The current framework is termed the SNMP version 1 framework (SNMPv1). The current framework is
termed the SNMP version 2 framework (SNMPv2). termed the SNMP version 2 framework (SNMPv2).
2. Definitions - 2. Definitions
SNMPv2-SMI DEFINITIONS ::= BEGIN SNMPv2-SMI DEFINITIONS ::= BEGIN
-- the path to the root -- the path to the root
org OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { iso 3 } org OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { iso 3 }
dod OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { org 6 } dod OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { org 6 }
internet OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dod 1 } internet OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dod 1 }
directory OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { internet 1 } directory OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { internet 1 }
skipping to change at page 9, line 21 skipping to change at page 8, line 21
-- application-wide types -- application-wide types
ApplicationSyntax ::= ApplicationSyntax ::=
CHOICE { CHOICE {
ipAddress-value ipAddress-value
IpAddress, IpAddress,
counter-value counter-value
Counter32, Counter32,
timeticks-value - timeticks-value
TimeTicks, TimeTicks,
arbitrary-value arbitrary-value
Opaque, Opaque,
big-counter-value - big-counter-value
Counter64, Counter64,
old-unsigned-integer-value old-unsigned-integer-value
UInteger32, UInteger32,
unsigned-integer-value -- includes Gauge32 | unsigned-integer-value -- includes Gauge32
Unsigned32 Unsigned32
} }
-- in network-byte order -- in network-byte order
-- (this is a tagged type for historical reasons) -- (this is a tagged type for historical reasons)
IpAddress ::= IpAddress ::=
[APPLICATION 0] [APPLICATION 0]
IMPLICIT OCTET STRING (SIZE (4)) IMPLICIT OCTET STRING (SIZE (4))
-- this wraps -- this wraps
skipping to change at page 10, line 26 skipping to change at page 9, line 26
-- hundredths of seconds since an epoch -- hundredths of seconds since an epoch
TimeTicks ::= TimeTicks ::=
[APPLICATION 3] [APPLICATION 3]
IMPLICIT INTEGER (0..4294967295) IMPLICIT INTEGER (0..4294967295)
-- for backward-compatibility only -- for backward-compatibility only
Opaque ::= Opaque ::=
[APPLICATION 4] [APPLICATION 4]
IMPLICIT OCTET STRING IMPLICIT OCTET STRING
-- for counters that wrap in less than one hour with only 32 bits
Counter64 ::= Counter64 ::=
[APPLICATION 6] [APPLICATION 6]
IMPLICIT INTEGER (0..18446744073709551615) IMPLICIT INTEGER (0..18446744073709551615)
-- for backward-compatibility only -- for backward-compatibility only
-- (not to be used in any new MIB modules) +
UInteger32 ::= UInteger32 ::=
[APPLICATION 7] [APPLICATION 7]
IMPLICIT INTEGER (0..4294967295) IMPLICIT INTEGER (0..4294967295)
-- definition for objects -- definition for objects
OBJECT-TYPE MACRO ::= OBJECT-TYPE MACRO ::=
BEGIN BEGIN
TYPE NOTATION ::= TYPE NOTATION ::=
"SYNTAX" Syntax | "SYNTAX" Syntax
UnitsPart UnitsPart
"MAX-ACCESS" Access "MAX-ACCESS" Access
"STATUS" Status "STATUS" Status
"DESCRIPTION" Text "DESCRIPTION" Text
ReferPart ReferPart
IndexPart IndexPart
DefValPart DefValPart
VALUE NOTATION ::= VALUE NOTATION ::=
value(VALUE ObjectName) value(VALUE ObjectName)
Syntax ::= Syntax ::=
type(ObjectSyntax) type(ObjectSyntax)
| "BITS" "{" Kibbles "}" | | "BITS" "{" Kibbles "}"
Kibbles ::= Kibbles ::=
Kibble Kibble
| Kibbles "," Kibble | | Kibbles "," Kibble
Kibble ::= Kibble ::=
identifier "(" nonNegativeNumber ")" identifier "(" nonNegativeNumber ")"
UnitsPart ::= UnitsPart ::=
"UNITS" Text "UNITS" Text
| empty | empty
Access ::= Access ::=
"not-accessible" "not-accessible"
| "accessible-for-notify" | "accessible-for-notify"
skipping to change at page 14, line 27 skipping to change at page 13, line 27
(1) MIB modules, which contain definitions of inter-related managed (1) MIB modules, which contain definitions of inter-related managed
objects, make use of the OBJECT-TYPE and NOTIFICATION-TYPE macros; objects, make use of the OBJECT-TYPE and NOTIFICATION-TYPE macros;
(2) compliance statements for MIB modules, which make use of the (2) compliance statements for MIB modules, which make use of the
MODULE-COMPLIANCE and OBJECT-GROUP macros [2]; and, MODULE-COMPLIANCE and OBJECT-GROUP macros [2]; and,
(3) capability statements for agent implementations which make use of (3) capability statements for agent implementations which make use of
the AGENT-CAPABILITIES macros [2]. the AGENT-CAPABILITIES macros [2].
This classification scheme does not imply a rigid taxonomy. For This classification scheme does not imply a rigid taxonomy. For
example, a "standard" information module will normally include | example, a "standard" information module will normally include
definitions of | definitions of managed objects and a compliance statement. Similarly,
managed objects and a compliance statement. Similarly, an "enterprise- an "enterprise-specific" information module might include definitions of
specific" information module might include definitions of managed managed objects and a capability statement. Of course, a "standard"
objects and a capability statement. Of course, a "standard" information information module may not contain capability statements.
module may not contain capability statements.
The constructs of ASN.1 allowed in SNMPv2 information modules include: + The constructs of ASN.1 allowed in SNMPv2 information modules include:
the IMPORTS clause, value definitions for OBJECT IDENTIFIERs, type + the IMPORTS clause, value definitions for OBJECT IDENTIFIERs, type
definitions for SEQUENCEs (with restrictions), ASN.1 type assignments of + definitions for SEQUENCEs (with restrictions), ASN.1 type assignments of
the restricted ASN.1 types allowed in SNMPv2, and instances of ASN.1 + the restricted ASN.1 types allowed in SNMPv2, and instances of ASN.1
macros defined in this document and in other documents [2, 3] of the + macros defined in this document and in other documents [2, 3] of the
SNMPv2 framework. Additional ASN.1 macros may not be defined in SNMPv2 + SNMPv2 framework. Additional ASN.1 macros may not be defined in SNMPv2
information modules. + information modules.
The names of all standard information modules must be unique (but + The names of all standard information modules must be unique (but
different versions of the same information module should have the same + different versions of the same information module should have the same
name). Developers of enterprise information modules are encouraged to + name). Developers of enterprise information modules are encouraged to
choose names for their information modules that will have a low + choose names for their information modules that will have a low
probability of colliding with standard or other enterprise information + probability of colliding with standard or other enterprise information
modules. An information module may not use the ASN.1 construct of + modules. An information module may not use the ASN.1 construct of
placing an object identifier value between the module name and the + placing an object identifier value between the module name and the
"DEFINITIONS" keyword. + "DEFINITIONS" keyword.
All information modules start with exactly one invocation of the All information modules start with exactly one invocation of the
MODULE-IDENTITY macro, which provides contact information as well as | MODULE-IDENTITY macro, which provides contact information as well as
revision history to distinguish between versions of the same information | revision history to distinguish between versions of the same information
module. | module. This invocation must appear immediately after any IMPORTs
This invocation must appear immediately after any IMPORTs statements. statements.
3.1. Macro Invocation 3.1. Macro Invocation
Within an information module, each macro invocation appears as: Within an information module, each macro invocation appears as:
<descriptor> <macro> <clauses> ::= <value> <descriptor> <macro> <clauses> ::= <value>
where <descriptor> corresponds to an ASN.1 identifier, <macro> names the where <descriptor> corresponds to an ASN.1 identifier, <macro> names the
macro being invoked, and <clauses> and <value> depend on the definition macro being invoked, and <clauses> and <value> depend on the definition
of the macro. (Note that this definition of a descriptor applies to all of the macro. (Note that this definition of a descriptor applies to all
macros defined in this memo and in [2].) | macros defined in this memo and in [2].)
For the purposes of this specification, an ASN.1 identifier consists of For the purposes of this specification, an ASN.1 identifier consists of
one or more letters or digits, and its initial character must be a one or more letters or digits, and its initial character must be a
lower-case letter. (Note that hyphens are not allowed by this lower-case letter. (Note that hyphens are not allowed by this
specification, even though hyphen is allowed by [1]. This restriction specification, even though hyphen is allowed by [1]. This restriction
enables arithmetic expressions in languages which use the minus sign to enables arithmetic expressions in languages which use the minus sign to
reference these descriptors without ambiguity.) reference these descriptors without ambiguity.)
For all descriptors appearing in an information module, the descriptor For all descriptors appearing in an information module, the descriptor
shall be unique and mnemonic, and shall not exceed 64 characters in shall be unique and mnemonic, and shall not exceed 64 characters in
length. (However, descriptors longer than 32 characters are not + length. (However, descriptors longer than 32 characters are not
recommended.) + recommended.) This promotes a common language for humans to use when
This promotes a common language for humans to use when discussing the discussing the information module and also facilitates simple table
information module and also facilitates simple table mappings for user- mappings for user-interfaces.
interfaces.
The set of descriptors defined in all "standard" information modules The set of descriptors defined in all "standard" information modules
shall be unique. shall be unique.
Finally, by convention, if the descriptor refers to an object with a Finally, by convention, if the descriptor refers to an object with a
SYNTAX clause value of either Counter32 or Counter64, then the SYNTAX clause value of either Counter32 or Counter64, then the
descriptor used for the object should denote plurality. descriptor used for the object should denote plurality.
3.1.1. Textual Clauses 3.1.1. Textual Clauses
skipping to change at page 16, line 4 skipping to change at page 14, line 47
shall be unique. shall be unique.
Finally, by convention, if the descriptor refers to an object with a Finally, by convention, if the descriptor refers to an object with a
SYNTAX clause value of either Counter32 or Counter64, then the SYNTAX clause value of either Counter32 or Counter64, then the
descriptor used for the object should denote plurality. descriptor used for the object should denote plurality.
3.1.1. Textual Clauses 3.1.1. Textual Clauses
Some clauses in a macro invocation may take a textual value (e.g., the Some clauses in a macro invocation may take a textual value (e.g., the
DESCRIPTION clause). Note that, in order to conform to the ASN.1 DESCRIPTION clause). Note that, in order to conform to the ASN.1
syntax, the entire value of these clauses must be enclosed in double syntax, the entire value of these clauses must be enclosed in double
quotation marks, and therefore cannot itself contain double quotation quotation marks, and therefore cannot itself contain double quotation
marks, although the value may be multi-line. marks, although the value may be multi-line.
3.2. IMPORTing Symbols 3.2. IMPORTing Symbols
To reference an external object, the IMPORTS statement must be used to To reference an external object, the IMPORTS statement must be used to
identify both the descriptor and the module in which the descriptor is | identify both the descriptor and the module in which the descriptor is
defined, where the module is identified by its ASN.1 module name. | defined, where the module is identified by its ASN.1 module name.
Note that when symbols from "enterprise-specific" information modules Note that when symbols from "enterprise-specific" information modules
are referenced (e.g., a descriptor), there is the possibility of are referenced (e.g., a descriptor), there is the possibility of
collision. As such, if different objects with the same descriptor are collision. As such, if different objects with the same descriptor are
IMPORTed, then this ambiguity is resolved by prefixing the descriptor IMPORTed, then this ambiguity is resolved by prefixing the descriptor
with the name of the information module and a dot ("."), i.e., with the name of the information module and a dot ("."), i.e.,
"module.descriptor" "module.descriptor"
(All descriptors must be unique within any information module.) (All descriptors must be unique within any information module.)
Of course, this notation can be used even when there is no collision Of course, this notation can be used even when there is no collision
when IMPORTing symbols. when IMPORTing symbols.
Finally, the IMPORTS statement may not be used to import an ASN.1 named Finally, the IMPORTS statement may not be used to import an ASN.1 named
type which corresponds to either the SEQUENCE or SEQUENCE OF type. type which corresponds to either the SEQUENCE or SEQUENCE OF type.
3.3. Exporting Symbols 3.3. Exporting Symbols
The ASN.1 EXPORTS statement is not allowed in SNMPv2 information + The ASN.1 EXPORTS statement is not allowed in SNMPv2 information
modules. All items defined in an information module are automatically + modules. All items defined in an information module are automatically
exported. + exported.
3.4. ASN.1 Comments + 3.4. ASN.1 Comments
Comments in ASN.1 commence with a pair of adjacent hyphens and end with + Comments in ASN.1 commence with a pair of adjacent hyphens and end with
the next pair of adjacent hyphens or at the end of the line, whichever + the next pair of adjacent hyphens or at the end of the line, whichever
occurs first. + occurs first.
3.5. OBJECT IDENTIFIER values + 3.5. OBJECT IDENTIFIER values
An OBJECT IDENTIFIER value is an ordered list of non-negative numbers. + An OBJECT IDENTIFIER value is an ordered list of non-negative numbers.
For the SNMPv2 framework, each number in the list is referred to as a + For the SNMPv2 framework, each number in the list is referred to as a
sub-identifier, there are at most 128 sub-identifiers in a value, and +
each sub-identifier has a maximum value of 2^32-1 (4294967295 decimal). +
All OBJECT IDENTIFIER values have at least two sub-identifiers, where +
the value of the first sub-identifier is one of the following well-known +
names: +
Value Name + sub-identifier, there are at most 128 sub-identifiers in a value, and
0 ccitt + each sub-identifier has a maximum value of 2^32-1 (4294967295 decimal).
1 iso + All OBJECT IDENTIFIER values have at least two sub-identifiers, where
2 joint-iso-ccitt + the value of the first sub-identifier is one of the following well-known
names:
Value Name
0 ccitt
1 iso
2 joint-iso-ccitt
4. Naming Hierarchy 4. Naming Hierarchy
The root of the subtree administered by the Internet Assigned Numbers The root of the subtree administered by the Internet Assigned Numbers
Authority (IANA) for the Internet is: Authority (IANA) for the Internet is:
internet OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { iso 3 6 1 } internet OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { iso 3 6 1 }
That is, the Internet subtree of OBJECT IDENTIFIERs starts with the That is, the Internet subtree of OBJECT IDENTIFIERs starts with the
prefix: prefix:
skipping to change at page 19, line 13 skipping to change at page 18, line 13
products. products.
5. Mapping of the MODULE-IDENTITY macro 5. Mapping of the MODULE-IDENTITY macro
The MODULE-IDENTITY macro is used to provide contact and revision The MODULE-IDENTITY macro is used to provide contact and revision
history for each information module. It must appear exactly once in history for each information module. It must appear exactly once in
every information module. It should be noted that the expansion of the every information module. It should be noted that the expansion of the
MODULE-IDENTITY macro is something which conceptually happens during MODULE-IDENTITY macro is something which conceptually happens during
implementation and not during run-time. implementation and not during run-time.
Note that reference in an IMPORTS clause or in clauses of SNMPv2 macros + Note that reference in an IMPORTS clause or in clauses of SNMPv2 macros
to an information module is NOT through the use of the 'descriptor' of a + to an information module is NOT through the use of the 'descriptor' of a
MODULE-IDENTITY macro; rather, an information module is referenced + MODULE-IDENTITY macro; rather, an information module is referenced
through specifying its module name. + through specifying its module name.
5.1. Mapping of the LAST-UPDATED clause 5.1. Mapping of the LAST-UPDATED clause
The LAST-UPDATED clause, which must be present, contains the date and The LAST-UPDATED clause, which must be present, contains the date and
time that this information module was last edited. The date and time time that this information module was last edited. The date and time
are represented in UTC Time format (see Appendix B). are represented in UTC Time format (see Appendix B).
5.2. Mapping of the ORGANIZATION clause 5.2. Mapping of the ORGANIZATION clause
The ORGANIZATION clause, which must be present, contains a textual The ORGANIZATION clause, which must be present, contains a textual
skipping to change at page 20, line 7 skipping to change at page 19, line 7
person to whom technical queries concerning this information module person to whom technical queries concerning this information module
should be sent. should be sent.
5.4. Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause 5.4. Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause
The DESCRIPTION clause, which must be present, contains a high-level The DESCRIPTION clause, which must be present, contains a high-level
textual description of the contents of this information module. textual description of the contents of this information module.
5.5. Mapping of the REVISION clause 5.5. Mapping of the REVISION clause
The REVISION clause, which need not be present, is repeatedly used to | The REVISION clause, which need not be present, is repeatedly used to
describe the revisions (including the initial version) made to this | describe the revisions (including the initial version) made to this
information module, in reverse chronological order (i.e., most recent | information module, in reverse chronological order (i.e., most recent
first). | first). Each instance of this clause contains the date and time of the
Each instance of this clause contains the date and time of the revision. revision. The date and time are represented in UTC Time format (see
The date and time are represented in UTC Time format (see Appendix B). Appendix B).
5.5.1. Mapping of the DESCRIPTION sub-clause 5.5.1. Mapping of the DESCRIPTION sub-clause
The DESCRIPTION clause, which must be present for each REVISION clause, The DESCRIPTION clause, which must be present for each REVISION clause,
contains a high-level textual description of the revision identified in contains a high-level textual description of the revision identified in
that REVISION clause. that REVISION clause.
5.6. Mapping of the MODULE-IDENTITY value 5.6. Mapping of the MODULE-IDENTITY value
The value of an invocation of the MODULE-IDENTITY macro is an OBJECT The value of an invocation of the MODULE-IDENTITY macro is an OBJECT
IDENTIFIER. As such, this value may be authoritatively used when | IDENTIFIER. As such, this value may be authoritatively used when
specifying an OBJECT IDENTIFIER value to refer to the information module | specifying an OBJECT IDENTIFIER value to refer to the information module
containing the invocation. | containing the invocation.
5.7. Usage Example 5.7. Usage Example
Consider how a skeletal MIB module might be constructed: e.g., Consider how a skeletal MIB module might be constructed: e.g.,
FIZBIN-MIB DEFINITIONS ::= BEGIN FIZBIN-MIB DEFINITIONS ::= BEGIN
IMPORTS IMPORTS
MODULE-IDENTITY, OBJECT-TYPE, experimental MODULE-IDENTITY, OBJECT-TYPE, experimental
FROM SNMPv2-SMI; FROM SNMPv2-SMI;
fizbin MODULE-IDENTITY fizbin MODULE-IDENTITY
LAST-UPDATED "9505241811Z" | LAST-UPDATED "9505241811Z"
ORGANIZATION "IETF SNMPv2 Working Group" ORGANIZATION "IETF SNMPv2 Working Group"
CONTACT-INFO CONTACT-INFO
" Marshall T. Rose " Marshall T. Rose
Postal: Dover Beach Consulting, Inc. Postal: Dover Beach Consulting, Inc.
420 Whisman Court 420 Whisman Court
Mountain View, CA 94043-2186 Mountain View, CA 94043-2186
US US
Tel: +1 415 968 1052 Tel: +1 415 968 1052
Fax: +1 415 968 2510 Fax: +1 415 968 2510
E-mail: mrose@dbc.mtview.ca.us" E-mail: mrose@dbc.mtview.ca.us"
DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION
"The MIB module for entities implementing the xxxx "The MIB module for entities implementing the xxxx
protocol." protocol."
REVISION "9505241811Z" + REVISION "9505241811Z"
DESCRIPTION + DESCRIPTION
"The latest version of this MIB module." + "The latest version of this MIB module."
REVISION "9210070433Z" REVISION "9210070433Z"
DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION
"The initial version of this MIB module." | "The initial version of this MIB module."
-- contact IANA for actual number -- contact IANA for actual number
::= { experimental xx } ::= { experimental xx }
END END
6. Mapping of the OBJECT-IDENTITY macro 6. Mapping of the OBJECT-IDENTITY macro
The OBJECT-IDENTITY macro is used to define information about an OBJECT The OBJECT-IDENTITY macro is used to define information about an OBJECT
IDENTIFIER assignment. All administrative OBJECT IDENTIFIER assignments IDENTIFIER assignment. All administrative OBJECT IDENTIFIER assignments
which define a type identification value (see AutonomousType, a textual which define a type identification value (see AutonomousType, a textual
skipping to change at page 24, line 7 skipping to change at page 23, line 7
Consider how an OBJECT IDENTIFIER assignment might be made: e.g., Consider how an OBJECT IDENTIFIER assignment might be made: e.g.,
fizbin69 OBJECT-IDENTITY fizbin69 OBJECT-IDENTITY
STATUS current STATUS current
DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION
"The authoritative identity of the Fizbin 69 chipset." "The authoritative identity of the Fizbin 69 chipset."
::= { fizbinChipSets 1 } ::= { fizbinChipSets 1 }
7. Mapping of the OBJECT-TYPE macro 7. Mapping of the OBJECT-TYPE macro
The OBJECT-TYPE macro is used to define a type of managed object. | The OBJECT-TYPE macro is used to define a type of managed object. It
It should be noted that the expansion of the OBJECT-TYPE macro is should be noted that the expansion of the OBJECT-TYPE macro is something
something which conceptually happens during implementation and not which conceptually happens during implementation and not during run-
during run-time. time.
For leaf objects which are not columnar objects (i.e., not contained + For leaf objects which are not columnar objects (i.e., not contained
within a conceptual table), instances of the object are identified by + within a conceptual table), instances of the object are identified by
appending a sub-identifier of zero to the name of that object. + appending a sub-identifier of zero to the name of that object.
Otherwise, the INDEX clause of the conceptual row object superior to a + Otherwise, the INDEX clause of the conceptual row object superior to a
columnar object defines instance identification information. + columnar object defines instance identification information.
7.1. Mapping of the SYNTAX clause 7.1. Mapping of the SYNTAX clause
The SYNTAX clause, which must be present, defines the abstract data The SYNTAX clause, which must be present, defines the abstract data
structure corresponding to that object. The data structure must be one | structure corresponding to that object. The data structure must be one
of the following: a base type, the BITS construct, or a textual | of the following: a base type, the BITS construct, or a textual
convention. (SEQUENCE OF and SEQUENCE are also possible for conceptual | convention. (SEQUENCE OF and SEQUENCE are also possible for conceptual
tables, see section 7.1.12). The base types are those defined in the | tables, see section 7.1.12). The base types are those defined in the
ObjectSyntax CHOICE. A textual convention is a newly-defined type | ObjectSyntax CHOICE. A textual convention is a newly-defined type
defined as a sub-type of a base type [3]. | defined as a sub-type of a base type [3].
A extended subset of the full capabilities of ASN.1 sub-typing is A extended subset of the full capabilities of ASN.1 sub-typing is
allowed, as appropriate to the underingly ASN.1 type. Any such allowed, as appropriate to the underingly ASN.1 type. Any such
restriction on size, range, enumerations or repertoire specified in this restriction on size, range, enumerations or repertoire specified in this
clause represents the maximal level of support which makes "protocol clause represents the maximal level of support which makes "protocol
sense". Restrictions on sub-typing are specified in detail in Section 9 sense". Restrictions on sub-typing are specified in detail in Section 9
and Appendix C of this memo. and Appendix C of this memo.
The semantics of ObjectSyntax are now described. The semantics of ObjectSyntax are now described.
skipping to change at page 25, line 11 skipping to change at page 24, line 11
information as named-number enumerations. In this case, only those information as named-number enumerations. In this case, only those
named-numbers so enumerated may be present as a value. Note that named-numbers so enumerated may be present as a value. Note that
although it is recommended that enumerated values start at 1 and be although it is recommended that enumerated values start at 1 and be
numbered contiguously, any valid value for Integer32 is allowed for an numbered contiguously, any valid value for Integer32 is allowed for an
enumerated value and, further, enumerated values needn't be contiguously enumerated value and, further, enumerated values needn't be contiguously
assigned. assigned.
Finally, a label for a named-number enumeration must consist of one or Finally, a label for a named-number enumeration must consist of one or
more letters or digits (no hyphens), up to a maximum of 64 characters, more letters or digits (no hyphens), up to a maximum of 64 characters,
and the initial character must be a lower-case letter. (However, labels + and the initial character must be a lower-case letter. (However, labels
longer than 32 characters are not recommended.) + longer than 32 characters are not recommended.)
7.1.2. OCTET STRING 7.1.2. OCTET STRING
The OCTET STRING type represents arbitrary binary or textual data. The OCTET STRING type represents arbitrary binary or textual data.
Although there is no SMI-specified size limitation for this type, MIB Although there is no SMI-specified size limitation for this type, MIB
designers should realize that there may be implementation and designers should realize that there may be implementation and
interoperability limitations for sizes in excess of 255 octets. interoperability limitations for sizes in excess of 255 octets.
7.1.3. OBJECT IDENTIFIER 7.1.3. OBJECT IDENTIFIER
The OBJECT IDENTIFIER type represents administratively assigned names. The OBJECT IDENTIFIER type represents administratively assigned names.
Any instance of this type may have at most 128 sub-identifiers. Any instance of this type may have at most 128 sub-identifiers.
Further, each sub-identifier must not exceed the value 2^32-1 Further, each sub-identifier must not exceed the value 2^32-1
(4294967295 decimal). (4294967295 decimal).
7.1.4. The BITS construct 7.1.4. The BITS construct
The BITS construct represents an enumeration of named bits. This The BITS construct represents an enumeration of named bits. This
collection is assigned non-negative, contiguous values, starting at collection is assigned non-negative, contiguous values, starting at
zero. Only those named-bits so enumerated may be present in a value. | zero. Only those named-bits so enumerated may be present in a value.
(Thus, enumerations must be assigned to consecutive bits; however, see | (Thus, enumerations must be assigned to consecutive bits; however, see
Section 9 for refinements of an object with this syntax.) | Section 9 for refinements of an object with this syntax.)
Although there is no SMI-specified limitation on the number of Although there is no SMI-specified limitation on the number of
enumerations (and therefore on the length of a value), MIB designers enumerations (and therefore on the length of a value), MIB designers
should realize that there may be implementation and interoperability should realize that there may be implementation and interoperability
limitations for sizes in excess of 128 bits. limitations for sizes in excess of 128 bits.
Finally, a label for a named-number enumeration must consist of one or Finally, a label for a named-number enumeration must consist of one or
more letters or digits (no hyphens), up to a maximum of 64 characters, more letters or digits (no hyphens), up to a maximum of 64 characters,
and the initial character must be a lower-case letter. (However, labels + and the initial character must be a lower-case letter. (However, labels
longer than 32 characters are not recommended.) + longer than 32 characters are not recommended.)
7.1.5. IpAddress 7.1.5. IpAddress
The IpAddress type represents a 32-bit internet address. It is The IpAddress type represents a 32-bit internet address. It is
represented as an OCTET STRING of length 4, in network byte-order. represented as an OCTET STRING of length 4, in network byte-order.
Note that the IpAddress type is a tagged type for historical reasons. Note that the IpAddress type is a tagged type for historical reasons.
Network addresses should be represented using an invocation of the Network addresses should be represented using an invocation of the
TEXTUAL-CONVENTION macro [3]. TEXTUAL-CONVENTION macro [3].
skipping to change at page 27, line 36 skipping to change at page 26, line 36
string of octets. This, in turn, is encoded as an OCTET STRING, in string of octets. This, in turn, is encoded as an OCTET STRING, in
effect "double-wrapping" the original ASN.1 value. effect "double-wrapping" the original ASN.1 value.
Note that a conforming implementation need only be able to accept and Note that a conforming implementation need only be able to accept and
recognize opaquely-encoded data. It need not be able to unwrap the data recognize opaquely-encoded data. It need not be able to unwrap the data
and then interpret its contents. and then interpret its contents.
A requirement on "standard" MIB modules is that no object may have a A requirement on "standard" MIB modules is that no object may have a
SYNTAX clause value of Opaque. SYNTAX clause value of Opaque.
7.1.10. Counter64 - 7.1.10. Counter64
The Counter64 type represents a non-negative integer which monotonically The Counter64 type represents a non-negative integer which monotonically
increases until it reaches a maximum value of 2^64-1 increases until it reaches a maximum value of 2^64-1
(18446744073709551615 decimal), when it wraps around and starts (18446744073709551615 decimal), when it wraps around and starts
increasing again from zero. increasing again from zero.
Counters have no defined "initial" value, and thus, a single value of a Counters have no defined "initial" value, and thus, a single value of a
Counter has (in general) no information content. Discontinuities in the Counter has (in general) no information content. Discontinuities in the
monotonically increasing value normally occur at re-initialization of monotonically increasing value normally occur at re-initialization of
the management system, and at other times as specified in the the management system, and at other times as specified in the
skipping to change at page 28, line 27 skipping to change at page 27, line 27
A DEFVAL clause is not allowed for objects with a SYNTAX clause value of A DEFVAL clause is not allowed for objects with a SYNTAX clause value of
Counter64. Counter64.
7.1.11. Unsigned32 7.1.11. Unsigned32
The Unsigned32 type represents integer-valued information between 0 and The Unsigned32 type represents integer-valued information between 0 and
2^32-1 inclusive (0 to 4294967295 decimal). 2^32-1 inclusive (0 to 4294967295 decimal).
7.1.12. Conceptual Tables 7.1.12. Conceptual Tables
Management operations apply exclusively to scalar objects. However, it + Management operations apply exclusively to scalar objects. However, it
is sometimes convenient for developers of management applications to + is sometimes convenient for developers of management applications to
impose an imaginary, tabular structure on an ordered collection of + impose an imaginary, tabular structure on an ordered collection of
objects within the MIB. Each such conceptual table contains zero or + objects within the MIB. Each such conceptual table contains zero or
more rows, and each row may contain one or more scalar objects, termed + more rows, and each row may contain one or more scalar objects, termed
columnar objects. This conceptualization is formalized by using the + columnar objects. This conceptualization is formalized by using the
OBJECT-TYPE macro to define both an object which corresponds to a table + OBJECT-TYPE macro to define both an object which corresponds to a table
and an object which corresponds to a row in that table. A conceptual + and an object which corresponds to a row in that table. A conceptual
table has SYNTAX of the form: + table has SYNTAX of the form:
SEQUENCE OF <EntryType> + SEQUENCE OF <EntryType>
where <EntryType> refers to the SEQUENCE type of its subordinate + where <EntryType> refers to the SEQUENCE type of its subordinate
conceptual row. A conceptual row has SYNTAX of the form: + conceptual row. A conceptual row has SYNTAX of the form:
<EntryType> + <EntryType>
where <EntryType> is a SEQUENCE type defined as follows: + where <EntryType> is a SEQUENCE type defined as follows:
<EntryType> ::= SEQUENCE { <type1>, ... , <typeN> } + <EntryType> ::= SEQUENCE { <type1>, ... , <typeN> }
where there is one <type> for each subordinate object, and each <type> + where there is one <type> for each subordinate object, and each <type>
is of the form: + is of the form:
<descriptor> <syntax> + <descriptor> <syntax>
where <descriptor> is the descriptor naming a subordinate object, and + where <descriptor> is the descriptor naming a subordinate object, and
<syntax> has the value of that subordinate object's SYNTAX clause, + <syntax> has the value of that subordinate object's SYNTAX clause,
normally omitting the sub-typing information. Further, these ASN.1 + normally omitting the sub-typing information. Further, these ASN.1
types are always present (the DEFAULT and OPTIONAL clauses are + types are always present (the DEFAULT and OPTIONAL clauses are
disallowed in the SEQUENCE definition). The MAX-ACCESS clause for + disallowed in the SEQUENCE definition). The MAX-ACCESS clause for
conceptual tables and rows is "not-accessible". + conceptual tables and rows is "not-accessible".
7.1.12.1. Creation and Deletion of Conceptual Rows + 7.1.12.1. Creation and Deletion of Conceptual Rows
For newly-defined conceptual rows which allow the creation of new object + For newly-defined conceptual rows which allow the creation of new object
instances and/or the deletion of existing object instances, there should + instances and/or the deletion of existing object instances, there should
be one columnar object with a SYNTAX clause value of RowStatus (a + be one columnar object with a SYNTAX clause value of RowStatus (a
textual convention defined in [3]) and a MAX-ACCESS clause value of + textual convention defined in [3]) and a MAX-ACCESS clause value of
read-create. By convention, this is termed the status column for the + read-create. By convention, this is termed the status column for the
conceptual row. + conceptual row.
7.2. Mapping of the UNITS clause 7.2. Mapping of the UNITS clause
This UNITS clause, which need not be present, contains a textual This UNITS clause, which need not be present, contains a textual
definition of the units associated with that object. definition of the units associated with that object.
7.3. Mapping of the MAX-ACCESS clause 7.3. Mapping of the MAX-ACCESS clause
The MAX-ACCESS clause, which must be present, defines whether it makes The MAX-ACCESS clause, which must be present, defines whether it makes
"protocol sense" to read, write and/or create an instance of the object, "protocol sense" to read, write and/or create an instance of the object,
skipping to change at page 30, line 18 skipping to change at page 29, line 18
If any columnar object in a conceptual row has "read-create" as its If any columnar object in a conceptual row has "read-create" as its
maximal level of access, then no other columnar object of the same maximal level of access, then no other columnar object of the same
conceptual row may have a maximal access of "read-write". (Note that conceptual row may have a maximal access of "read-write". (Note that
"read-create" is a superset of "read-write".) "read-create" is a superset of "read-write".)
7.4. Mapping of the STATUS clause 7.4. Mapping of the STATUS clause
The STATUS clause, which must be present, indicates whether this The STATUS clause, which must be present, indicates whether this
definition is current or historic. definition is current or historic.
The values "current", and "obsolete" are self-explanatory. The | The values "current", and "obsolete" are self-explanatory. The
"deprecated" value indicates that the definition is obsolete, | "deprecated" value indicates that the definition is obsolete, but that
but that an implementor may wish to support that object to foster an implementor may wish to support that object to foster
interoperability with older implementations. interoperability with older implementations.
7.5. Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause 7.5. Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause
The DESCRIPTION clause, which must be present, contains a textual The DESCRIPTION clause, which must be present, contains a textual
definition of that object which provides all semantic definitions definition of that object which provides all semantic definitions
necessary for implementation, and should embody any information which necessary for implementation, and should embody any information which
would otherwise be communicated in any ASN.1 commentary annotations would otherwise be communicated in any ASN.1 commentary annotations
associated with the object. associated with the object.
skipping to change at page 31, line 5 skipping to change at page 30, line 5
This is useful when de-osifying a MIB module produced by some other This is useful when de-osifying a MIB module produced by some other
organization. organization.
7.7. Mapping of the INDEX clause 7.7. Mapping of the INDEX clause
The INDEX clause, which must be present if that object corresponds to a The INDEX clause, which must be present if that object corresponds to a
conceptual row (unless an AUGMENTS clause is present instead), and must conceptual row (unless an AUGMENTS clause is present instead), and must
be absent otherwise, defines instance identification information for the be absent otherwise, defines instance identification information for the
columnar objects subordinate to that object. columnar objects subordinate to that object.
The instance identification information in an INDEX clause must specify - The instance identification information in an INDEX clause must specify
object(s) such that value(s) of those object(s) will unambiguously object(s) such that value(s) of those object(s) will unambiguously
distinguish a conceptual row. The syntax of those objects indicate how distinguish a conceptual row. The syntax of those objects indicate how
to form the instance-identifier: to form the instance-identifier:
(1) integer-valued: a single sub-identifier taking the integer value (1) integer-valued: a single sub-identifier taking the integer value
(this works only for non-negative integers); (this works only for non-negative integers);
(2) string-valued, fixed-length strings (or variable-length preceded by (2) string-valued, fixed-length strings (or variable-length preceded by
the IMPLIED keyword): `n' sub-identifiers, where `n' is the length the IMPLIED keyword): `n' sub-identifiers, where `n' is the length
of the string (each octet of the string is encoded in a separate of the string (each octet of the string is encoded in a separate
skipping to change at page 32, line 15 skipping to change at page 31, line 15
auxiliary objects. The MAX-ACCESS clause for auxiliary objects is auxiliary objects. The MAX-ACCESS clause for auxiliary objects is
"not-accessible", except in the following circumstances: "not-accessible", except in the following circumstances:
(1) within a MIB module originally written to conform to the SNMPv1 (1) within a MIB module originally written to conform to the SNMPv1
framework, and later converted to conform to the SNMPv2 framework; framework, and later converted to conform to the SNMPv2 framework;
or or
(2) a conceptual row must contain at least one columnar object which is (2) a conceptual row must contain at least one columnar object which is
not an auxiliary object. In the event that all of a conceptual not an auxiliary object. In the event that all of a conceptual
row's columnar objects are also specified in its INDEX clause, then row's columnar objects are also specified in its INDEX clause, then
one of them must be accessible, i.e., have a MAX-ACCESS clause of | one of them must be accessible, i.e., have a MAX-ACCESS clause of
"read-only". (Note that this situation does not arise for a | "read-only". (Note that this situation does not arise for a
conceptual row allowing create access, since such a row will have a | conceptual row allowing create access, since such a row will have a
status column which will not be an auxiliary object.) | status column which will not be an auxiliary object.)
Note that objects specified in a conceptual row's INDEX clause need not Note that objects specified in a conceptual row's INDEX clause need not
be columnar objects of that conceptual row. In this situation, the be columnar objects of that conceptual row. In this situation, the
DESCRIPTION clause of the conceptual row must include a textual DESCRIPTION clause of the conceptual row must include a textual
explanation of how the objects which are included in the INDEX clause explanation of how the objects which are included in the INDEX clause
but not columnar objects of that conceptual row, are used in uniquely but not columnar objects of that conceptual row, are used in uniquely
identifying instances of the conceptual row's columnar objects. identifying instances of the conceptual row's columnar objects.
7.8. Mapping of the AUGMENTS clause - 7.8. Mapping of the AUGMENTS clause
The AUGMENTS clause, which must not be present unless the object The AUGMENTS clause, which must not be present unless the object
corresponds to a conceptual row, is an alternative to the INDEX clause. corresponds to a conceptual row, is an alternative to the INDEX clause.
Every object corresponding to a conceptual row has either an INDEX Every object corresponding to a conceptual row has either an INDEX
clause or an AUGMENTS clause. clause or an AUGMENTS clause.
If an object corresponding to a conceptual row has an INDEX clause, that If an object corresponding to a conceptual row has an INDEX clause, that
row is termed a base conceptual row; alternatively, if the object has an row is termed a base conceptual row; alternatively, if the object has an
AUGMENTS clause, the row is said to be a conceptual row augmentation, AUGMENTS clause, the row is said to be a conceptual row augmentation,
where the AUGMENTS clause names the object corresponding to the base where the AUGMENTS clause names the object corresponding to the base
skipping to change at page 33, line 11 skipping to change at page 32, line 11
subordinate columnar objects of the base conceptual row being augmented. subordinate columnar objects of the base conceptual row being augmented.
As such, note that creation of a base conceptual row implies the As such, note that creation of a base conceptual row implies the
correspondent creation of any conceptual row augmentations. correspondent creation of any conceptual row augmentations.
For example, a MIB designer might wish to define additional columns in For example, a MIB designer might wish to define additional columns in
an "enterprise-specific" MIB which logically extend a conceptual row in an "enterprise-specific" MIB which logically extend a conceptual row in
a "standard" MIB. The "standard" MIB definition of the conceptual row a "standard" MIB. The "standard" MIB definition of the conceptual row
would include the INDEX clause and the "enterprise-specific" MIB would would include the INDEX clause and the "enterprise-specific" MIB would
contain the definition of a conceptual row using the AUGMENTS clause. contain the definition of a conceptual row using the AUGMENTS clause.
On the other hand, it would be incorrect to use the AUGMENTS clause for On the other hand, it would be incorrect to use the AUGMENTS clause for
the the relationship between RFC 1573's ifTable and the many media- the relationship between RFC 1573's ifTable and the many media-specific |
specific MIBs which extend it for specific media (e.g., the dot3Table in MIBs |
RFC 1650), since not all interfaces are of the same media. which extend it for specific media (e.g., the dot3Table in RFC 1650),
since not all interfaces are of the same media.
Note that a base conceptual row may be augmented by multiple conceptual Note that a base conceptual row may be augmented by multiple conceptual
row augmentations. row augmentations.
7.8.1. Relation between INDEX and AUGMENTS clauses 7.8.1. Relation between INDEX and AUGMENTS clauses
When defining instance identification information for a conceptual When defining instance identification information for a conceptual
table: table:
(1) If there is a one-to-one correspondence between the conceptual rows (1) If there is a one-to-one correspondence between the conceptual rows
skipping to change at page 33, line 47 skipping to change at page 33, line 4
within the INDEX clause for the conceptual row. within the INDEX clause for the conceptual row.
7.9. Mapping of the DEFVAL clause 7.9. Mapping of the DEFVAL clause
The DEFVAL clause, which need not be present, defines an acceptable The DEFVAL clause, which need not be present, defines an acceptable
default value which may be used at the discretion of a SNMPv2 entity default value which may be used at the discretion of a SNMPv2 entity
acting in an agent role when an object instance is created. acting in an agent role when an object instance is created.
During conceptual row creation, if an instance of a columnar object is During conceptual row creation, if an instance of a columnar object is
not present as one of the operands in the correspondent management not present as one of the operands in the correspondent management
protocol set operation, then the value of the DEFVAL clause, if present,
protocol set operation, then the value of the DEFVAL clause, if present,
indicates an acceptable default value that a SNMPv2 entity acting in an indicates an acceptable default value that a SNMPv2 entity acting in an
agent role might use. agent role might use.
The value of the DEFVAL clause must, of course, correspond to the SYNTAX The value of the DEFVAL clause must, of course, correspond to the SYNTAX
clause for the object. If the value is an OBJECT IDENTIFIER, then it clause for the object. If the value is an OBJECT IDENTIFIER, then it
must be expressed as a single ASN.1 identifier, and not as a collection must be expressed as a single ASN.1 identifier, and not as a collection
of sub-identifiers. of sub-identifiers.
Note that if an operand to the management protocol set operation is an Note that if an operand to the management protocol set operation is an
instance of a read-only object, then the error `notWritable' [6] will be instance of a read-only object, then the error `notWritable' [6] will be
returned. As such, the DEFVAL clause can be used to provide an returned. As such, the DEFVAL clause can be used to provide an
acceptable default value that a SNMPv2 entity acting in an agent role acceptable default value that a SNMPv2 entity acting in an agent role
might use. might use.
By way of example, consider the following possible DEFVAL clauses: By way of example, consider the following possible DEFVAL clauses:
ObjectSyntax DEFVAL clause | ObjectSyntax DEFVAL clause
---------------- ------------ | ---------------- ------------
Integer32 DEFVAL { 1 } | Integer32 DEFVAL { 1 }
-- same for Gauge32, TimeTicks, Unsigned32 | -- same for Gauge32, TimeTicks, Unsigned32
INTEGER DEFVAL { valid } -- enumerated value | INTEGER DEFVAL { valid } -- enumerated value
OCTET STRING DEFVAL { 'ffffffffffff'H } | OCTET STRING DEFVAL { 'ffffffffffff'H }
OBJECT IDENTIFIER DEFVAL { sysDescr } | OBJECT IDENTIFIER DEFVAL { sysDescr }
BITS DEFVAL { { primary, secondary } } | BITS DEFVAL { { primary, secondary } }
-- enumerated values that are set | -- enumerated values that are set
IpAddress DEFVAL { 'c0210415'H } -- 192.33.4.21 | IpAddress DEFVAL { 'c0210415'H } -- 192.33.4.21
Object types with SYNTAX of Counter32 and Counter64 may not have DEFVAL Object types with SYNTAX of Counter32 and Counter64 may not have DEFVAL
clauses, since they do not have defined initial values. However, it is clauses, since they do not have defined initial values. However, it is
recommended that they be initialized to zero. recommended that they be initialized to zero.
7.10. Mapping of the OBJECT-TYPE value 7.10. Mapping of the OBJECT-TYPE value
The value of an invocation of the OBJECT-TYPE macro is the name of the The value of an invocation of the OBJECT-TYPE macro is the name of the
object, which is an OBJECT IDENTIFIER, an administratively assigned object, which is an OBJECT IDENTIFIER, an administratively assigned
name. name.
skipping to change at page 38, line 16 skipping to change at page 37, line 16
The NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro is used to define the information contained The NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro is used to define the information contained
within an unsolicited transmission of management information (i.e., within an unsolicited transmission of management information (i.e.,
within either a SNMPv2-Trap-PDU or InformRequest-PDU). It should be within either a SNMPv2-Trap-PDU or InformRequest-PDU). It should be
noted that the expansion of the NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro is something noted that the expansion of the NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro is something
which conceptually happens during implementation and not during run- which conceptually happens during implementation and not during run-
time. time.
8.1. Mapping of the OBJECTS clause 8.1. Mapping of the OBJECTS clause
The OBJECTS clause, which need not be present, defines the ordered | The OBJECTS clause, which need not be present, defines the ordered
sequence of MIB object types which are contained within every instance | sequence of MIB object types which are contained within every instance
of | of the notification. An object type specified in this clause may not
the notification. An object type specified in this clause may not have + have an MAX-ACCESS clause of "not-accessible".
an MAX-ACCESS clause of "not-accessible". +
8.2. Mapping of the STATUS clause 8.2. Mapping of the STATUS clause
The STATUS clause, which must be present, indicates whether this The STATUS clause, which must be present, indicates whether this
definition is current or historic. definition is current or historic.
The values "current", and "obsolete" are self-explanatory. The | The values "current", and "obsolete" are self-explanatory. The
"deprecated" value indicates that the definition is obsolete, but that | "deprecated" value indicates that the definition is obsolete, but that
an implementor may wish to support the notification to foster | an implementor may wish to support the notification to foster
interoperability with older implementations. interoperability with older implementations.
8.3. Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause 8.3. Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause
The DESCRIPTION clause, which must be present, contains a textual The DESCRIPTION clause, which must be present, contains a textual
definition of the notification which provides all semantic definitions definition of the notification which provides all semantic definitions
necessary for implementation, and should embody any information which necessary for implementation, and should embody any information which
would otherwise be communicated in any ASN.1 commentary annotations | would otherwise be communicated in any ASN.1 commentary annotations
associated with the notification. | associated with the notification. In particular, the DESCRIPTION clause
In particular, the DESCRIPTION clause should document which instances of should document which instances of the objects mentioned in the OBJECTS
the objects mentioned in the OBJECTS clause should be contained within clause should be contained within notifications of this type.
notifications of this type.
8.4. Mapping of the REFERENCE clause 8.4. Mapping of the REFERENCE clause
The REFERENCE clause, which need not be present, contains a textual The REFERENCE clause, which need not be present, contains a textual
cross-reference to a notification defined in some other information cross-reference to a notification defined in some other information
module. This is useful when de-osifying a MIB module produced by some module. This is useful when de-osifying a MIB module produced by some
other organization. other organization.
8.5. Mapping of the NOTIFICATION-TYPE value 8.5. Mapping of the NOTIFICATION-TYPE value
The value of an invocation of the NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro is the name of The value of an invocation of the NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro is the name of
the notification, which is an OBJECT IDENTIFIER, an administratively the notification, which is an OBJECT IDENTIFIER, an administratively
assigned name. In order to achieve compatibility with the procedures assigned name. In order to achieve compatibility with the procedures
employed by proxy agents (see Section 3.1.2 of [8]), the next to last employed by proxy agents (see Section 3.1.2 of [7]), the next to last |
sub-identifier in the name of any newly-defined notification must have sub-identifier in |
the value zero. the name of any newly-defined notification must have the value zero.
Sections 4.2.6 and 4.2.7 of [6] describe how the NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro Sections 4.2.6 and 4.2.7 of [6] describe how the NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro
is used to generate a SNMPv2-Trap-PDU or InformRequest-PDU, is used to generate a SNMPv2-Trap-PDU or InformRequest-PDU,
respectively. respectively.
8.6. Usage Example 8.6. Usage Example
Consider how a linkUp trap might be described: Consider how a linkUp trap might be described:
linkUp NOTIFICATION-TYPE linkUp NOTIFICATION-TYPE
skipping to change at page 40, line 22 skipping to change at page 39, line 22
DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION
"A linkUp trap signifies that the SNMPv2 entity, acting in "A linkUp trap signifies that the SNMPv2 entity, acting in
an agent role, recognizes that one of the communication an agent role, recognizes that one of the communication
links represented in its configuration has come up." links represented in its configuration has come up."
::= { snmpTraps 4 } ::= { snmpTraps 4 }
According to this invocation, the trap authoritatively identified as According to this invocation, the trap authoritatively identified as
{ snmpTraps 4 } { snmpTraps 4 }
is used to report a link coming up. is used to report a link coming up. -
Note that a SNMPv2 entity acting in an agent role can be configured to
send this trap to zero or more SNMPv2 entities acting in a manager role,
depending on the contents of the acTable and viewTable [7] tables. For
example, by judicious use of the viewTable, a SNMPv2 entity acting in an
agent role might be configured to send all linkUp traps to one
particular SNMPv2 entity, and linkUp traps for only certain interfaces
to other SNMPv2 entities.
9. Refined Syntax 9. Refined Syntax
Some macros have clauses which allows syntax to be refined, Some macros have clauses which allows syntax to be refined,
specifically: the SYNTAX clause of the OBJECT-TYPE macro, and the specifically: the SYNTAX clause of the OBJECT-TYPE macro, and the
SYNTAX/WRITE-SYNTAX clauses of the MODULE-COMPLIANCE and AGENT- SYNTAX/WRITE-SYNTAX clauses of the MODULE-COMPLIANCE and AGENT-
CAPABILITIES macros [2]. However, not all refinements of syntax are CAPABILITIES macros [2]. However, not all refinements of syntax are
appropriate. In particular, the object's primitive or application type appropriate. In particular, the object's primitive or application type
must not be changed. must not be changed.
skipping to change at page 41, line 38 skipping to change at page 40, line 38
Gauge32 (1) - - - Gauge32 (1) - - -
TimeTicks - - - - TimeTicks - - - -
where: where:
(1) the range of permitted values may be refined by raising the lower- (1) the range of permitted values may be refined by raising the lower-
bounds, by reducing the upper-bounds, and/or by reducing the bounds, by reducing the upper-bounds, and/or by reducing the
alternative value/range choices; alternative value/range choices;
(2) the enumeration of named-values may be refined by removing one or (2) the enumeration of named-values may be refined by removing one or
more named-values (note that for BITS, a refinement may cause the | more named-values (note that for BITS, a refinement may cause the
enumerations to no longer be contiguous); | enumerations to no longer be contiguous);
(3) the size in characters of the value may be refined by raising the (3) the size in characters of the value may be refined by raising the
lower-bounds, by reducing the upper-bounds, and/or by reducing the lower-bounds, by reducing the upper-bounds, and/or by reducing the
alternative size choices; or, alternative size choices; or,
(4) the repertoire of characters in the value may be reduced by further (4) the repertoire of characters in the value may be reduced by further
sub-typing. sub-typing.
Otherwise no refinements are possible. Further details on sub-typing Otherwise no refinements are possible. Further details on sub-typing
are provided in Appendix C. are provided in Appendix C.
skipping to change at page 51, line 35 skipping to change at page 50, line 35
OCTET STRING (SIZE(-10..100)) -- negative SIZE OCTET STRING (SIZE(-10..100)) -- negative SIZE
13.3. Rules for Textual Conventions 13.3. Rules for Textual Conventions
Sub-typing of Textual Conventions (see [3]) is allowed but must be Sub-typing of Textual Conventions (see [3]) is allowed but must be
valid. In particular, each range specified for the textual convention valid. In particular, each range specified for the textual convention
must be a subset of a range specified for the base type. For example, must be a subset of a range specified for the base type. For example,
Tc1 ::= INTEGER (1..10 | 11..20) Tc1 ::= INTEGER (1..10 | 11..20)
Tc2 ::= Tc1 (2..10 | 12..15) -- is valid Tc2 ::= Tc1 (2..10 | 12..15) -- is valid
Tc3 ::= Tc1 (4..8) -- is valid | Tc3 ::= Tc1 (4..8) -- is valid
Tc4 ::= Tc1 (8..12) -- is invalid | Tc4 ::= Tc1 (8..12) -- is invalid
14. Acknowledgements 14. Acknowledgements
The authors wish to acknowledge the contributions of the SNMPv2 Working This document is the result of significant work by the four major
Group in general. In particular, the following individuals contributors:
Dave Arneson (Cabletron), Jeffrey Case (SNMP Research, case@snmp.com)
Uri Blumenthal (IBM), Keith McCloghrie (Cisco Systems, kzm@cisco.com)
Doug Book (Chipcom), Marshall Rose (Dover Beach Consulting, mrose@dbc.mtview.ca.us)
Maria Greene (Ascom Timeplex), Steven Waldbusser (International Network Services, stevew@uni.ins.com)
Deirdre Kostik (Bellcore),
Dave Harrington (Cabletron),
Jeff Johnson (Cisco Systems),
Brian O'Keefe (Hewlett Packard),
Dave Perkins (Bay Networks),
Randy Presuhn (Peer Networks),
Shawn Routhier (Epilogue),
Bob Stewart (Cisco Systems),
Kaj Tesink (Bellcore).
deserve special thanks for their contributions. In addition, the contributions of the SNMPv2 Working Group are
acknowledged. In particular, a special thanks is extended for the
contributions of:
Alexander I. Alten (Novell)
Dave Arneson (Cabletron)
Uri Blumenthal (IBM)
Doug Book (Chipcom)
Kim Curran (Bell-Northern Research)
Jim Galvin (Trusted Information Systems)
Maria Greene (Ascom Timeplex)
Iain Hanson (Digital)
Dave Harrington (Cabletron)
Nguyen Hien (IBM)
Jeff Johnson (Cisco Systems)
Michael Kornegay (Object Quest)
Deirdre Kostick (AT&T Bell Labs)
David Levi (SNMP Research)
Daniel Mahoney (Cabletron)
Bob Natale (ACE*COMM)
Brian O'Keefe (Hewlett Packard)
Andrew Pearson (SNMP Research)
Dave Perkins (Peer Networks)
Randy Presuhn (Peer Networks)
Aleksey Romanov (Quality Quorum)
Shawn Routhier (Epilogue)
Jon Saperia (BGS Systems)
Bob Stewart (Cisco Systems, bstewart@cisco.com), chair
Kaj Tesink (Bellcore)
Glenn Waters (Bell-Northern Research)
Bert Wijnen (IBM)
15. References 15. References
[1] Information processing systems - Open Systems Interconnection - [1] Information processing systems - Open Systems Interconnection -
Specification of Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1), Specification of Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1),
International Organization for Standardization. International International Organization for Standardization. International
Standard 8824, (December, 1987). Standard 8824, (December, 1987).
[2] Case, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M., and Waldbusser, S., [2] McCloghrie, K., Editor, "Conformance Statements for Version 2 of |
"Conformance Statements for Version 2 of the the Simple Network the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMPv2)", |
Management Protocol (SNMPv2)", Internet Draft, SNMP Research, Inc., Internet Draft, Cisco Systems, September 1995. |
Cisco Systems, Dover Beach Consulting, Inc., Carnegie Mellon
University, May 1995. |
[3] Case, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M., and Waldbusser, S., "Textual [3] McCloghrie, K., Editor, "Textual Conventions for Version 2 of the |
Conventions for Version 2 of the the Simple Network Management Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMPv2)", |
Protocol (SNMPv2)", Internet Draft, SNMP Research, Inc., Cisco Internet Draft, Cisco Systems, September 1995. |
Systems, Dover Beach Consulting, Inc., Carnegie Mellon University, |
May 1995. |
[4] Information processing systems - Open Systems Interconnection - [4] Information processing systems - Open Systems Interconnection -
Specification of Basic Encoding Rules for Abstract Syntax Notation Specification of Basic Encoding Rules for Abstract Syntax Notation
One (ASN.1), International Organization for Standardization. One (ASN.1), International Organization for Standardization.
International Standard 8825, (December, 1987). International Standard 8825, (December, 1987).
[5] Case, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M., and Waldbusser, S., "Management [5] McCloghrie, K., Editor, |
Information Base for Version 2 of the Simple Network Management "Management Information Base for Version 2 of the Simple Network
Protocol (SNMPv2)", Internet Draft, SNMP Research, Inc., Cisco Management Protocol (SNMPv2)", Internet Draft, Cisco Systems, |
Systems, Dover Beach Consulting, Inc., Carnegie Mellon University, | September 1995. |
May 1995. |
[6] Case, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M., and Waldbusser, S., "Protocol
Operations for Version 2 of the Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMPv2)", Internet Draft, SNMP Research, Inc., Cisco Systems,
Dover Beach Consulting, Inc., Carnegie Mellon University, May 1995. |
[7] Case, J., Galvin, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M., and Waldbusser, S., [6] McCloghrie, K., Editor, |
"Party MIB for Version 2 of the Simple Network Management Protocol "Protocol Operations for Version 2 of the Simple Network Management
(SNMPv2)", Internet Draft, SNMP Research, Inc., Trusted Information Protocol (SNMPv2)", Internet Draft, Cisco Systems, September 1995. |
Systems, Cisco Systems, Dover Beach Consulting, Inc., Carnegie
Mellon University, May 1995. |
[8] Case, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M., and Waldbusser, S., [7] McCloghrie, K., Editor, |
"Coexistence between Version 1 and Version 2 of the Internet- "Coexistence between Version 1 and Version 2 of the Internet-
standard Network Management Framework", Internet Draft, SNMP standard Network Management Framework", Internet Draft, Cisco |
Research, Inc., Cisco Systems, Dover Beach Consulting, Inc., Systems, September 1995. |
Carnegie Mellon University, May 1995. |
[9] Reynolds, J., and Postel, J., "Assigned Numbers", RFC 1700, ISI, |
November 1994. |
16. Security Considerations - 16. Security Considerations
Security issues are not discussed in this memo. Security issues are not discussed in this memo.
17. Authors' Addresses 17. Editor's Address
Jeffrey D. Case
SNMP Research, Inc.
3001 Kimberlin Heights Rd.
Knoxville, TN 37920-9716
US
Phone: +1 615 573 1434
Email: case@snmp.com
Keith McCloghrie Keith McCloghrie -
Cisco Systems, Inc. Cisco Systems, Inc.
170 West Tasman Drive, 170 West Tasman Drive |
San Jose CA 95134-1706. San Jose, CA 95134-1706 |
US |
Phone: +1 408 526 5260 Phone: +1 408 526 5260
Email: kzm@cisco.com Email: kzm@cisco.com
Marshall T. Rose Table of Contents -
Dover Beach Consulting, Inc.
420 Whisman Court
Mountain View, CA 94043-2186
US
Phone: +1 415 968 1052
Email: mrose@dbc.mtview.ca.us
Steven Waldbusser
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes Ave
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
US
Phone: +1 412 268 6628
Email: waldbusser@cmu.edu
Table of Contents
1 Introduction .................................................... 3 1 Introduction .................................................... 2
1.1 A Note on Terminology ......................................... 3 1.1 A Note on Terminology ......................................... 2
2 Definitions ..................................................... 5 2 Definitions ..................................................... 4
3.1 The MODULE-IDENTITY macro ..................................... 6 3.1 The MODULE-IDENTITY macro ..................................... 5
3.2 Object Names and Syntaxes ..................................... 8 3.2 Object Names and Syntaxes ..................................... 7
3.3 The OBJECT-TYPE macro ......................................... 11 3.3 The OBJECT-TYPE macro ......................................... 10
3.5 The NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro ................................... 13 3.5 The NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro ................................... 12
3.6 Administrative Identifiers .................................... 13 3.6 Administrative Identifiers .................................... 12
3 Information Modules ............................................. 14 3 Information Modules ............................................. 13
3.1 Macro Invocation .............................................. 15 3.1 Macro Invocation .............................................. 14
3.1.1 Textual Clauses ............................................. 15 3.1.1 Textual Clauses ............................................. 14
3.2 IMPORTing Symbols ............................................. 16 3.2 IMPORTing Symbols ............................................. 15
3.3 Exporting Symbols ............................................. 16 3.3 Exporting Symbols ............................................. 15
3.4 ASN.1 Comments ................................................ 16 3.4 ASN.1 Comments ................................................ 15
3.5 OBJECT IDENTIFIER values ...................................... 17 3.5 OBJECT IDENTIFIER values ...................................... 15
4 Naming Hierarchy ................................................ 18 4 Naming Hierarchy ................................................ 17
5 Mapping of the MODULE-IDENTITY macro ............................ 19 5 Mapping of the MODULE-IDENTITY macro ............................ 18
5.1 Mapping of the LAST-UPDATED clause ............................ 19 5.1 Mapping of the LAST-UPDATED clause ............................ 18
5.2 Mapping of the ORGANIZATION clause ............................ 19 5.2 Mapping of the ORGANIZATION clause ............................ 18
5.3 Mapping of the CONTACT-INFO clause ............................ 19 5.3 Mapping of the CONTACT-INFO clause ............................ 18
5.4 Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause ............................. 19 5.4 Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause ............................. 18
5.5 Mapping of the REVISION clause ................................ 20 5.5 Mapping of the REVISION clause ................................ 19
5.5.1 Mapping of the DESCRIPTION sub-clause ....................... 20 5.5.1 Mapping of the DESCRIPTION sub-clause ....................... 19
5.6 Mapping of the MODULE-IDENTITY value .......................... 20 5.6 Mapping of the MODULE-IDENTITY value .......................... 19
5.7 Usage Example ................................................. 21 5.7 Usage Example ................................................. 20
6 Mapping of the OBJECT-IDENTITY macro ............................ 22 6 Mapping of the OBJECT-IDENTITY macro ............................ 21
6.1 Mapping of the STATUS clause .................................. 22 6.1 Mapping of the STATUS clause .................................. 21
6.2 Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause ............................. 22 6.2 Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause ............................. 21
6.3 Mapping of the REFERENCE clause ............................... 22 6.3 Mapping of the REFERENCE clause ............................... 21
6.4 Mapping of the OBJECT-IDENTITY value .......................... 22 6.4 Mapping of the OBJECT-IDENTITY value .......................... 21
6.5 Usage Example ................................................. 23 6.5 Usage Example ................................................. 22
7 Mapping of the OBJECT-TYPE macro ................................ 24 7 Mapping of the OBJECT-TYPE macro ................................ 23
7.1 Mapping of the SYNTAX clause .................................. 24 7.1 Mapping of the SYNTAX clause .................................. 23
7.1.1 Integer32 and INTEGER ....................................... 24 7.1.1 Integer32 and INTEGER ....................................... 23
7.1.2 OCTET STRING ................................................ 25 7.1.2 OCTET STRING ................................................ 24
7.1.3 OBJECT IDENTIFIER ........................................... 25 7.1.3 OBJECT IDENTIFIER ........................................... 24
7.1.4 The BITS construct .......................................... 25 7.1.4 The BITS construct .......................................... 24
7.1.5 IpAddress ................................................... 26 7.1.5 IpAddress ................................................... 25
7.1.6 Counter32 ................................................... 26 7.1.6 Counter32 ................................................... 25
7.1.7 Gauge32 ..................................................... 26 7.1.7 Gauge32 ..................................................... 25
7.1.8 TimeTicks ................................................... 27 7.1.8 TimeTicks ................................................... 26
7.1.9 Opaque ...................................................... 27 7.1.9 Opaque ...................................................... 26
7.1.10 Counter64 .................................................. 27 7.1.10 Counter64 .................................................. 26
7.1.11 Unsigned32 ................................................. 28 7.1.11 Unsigned32 ................................................. 27
7.1.12 Conceptual Tables .......................................... 28 7.1.12 Conceptual Tables .......................................... 27
7.1.12.1 Creation and Deletion of Conceptual Rows ................. 29 7.1.12.1 Creation and Deletion of Conceptual Rows ................. 28
7.2 Mapping of the UNITS clause ................................... 29 7.2 Mapping of the UNITS clause ................................... 28
7.3 Mapping of the MAX-ACCESS clause .............................. 29 7.3 Mapping of the MAX-ACCESS clause .............................. 28
7.4 Mapping of the STATUS clause .................................. 30 7.4 Mapping of the STATUS clause .................................. 29
7.5 Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause ............................. 30 7.5 Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause ............................. 29
7.6 Mapping of the REFERENCE clause ............................... 30 7.6 Mapping of the REFERENCE clause ............................... 29
7.7 Mapping of the INDEX clause ................................... 30 7.7 Mapping of the INDEX clause ................................... 29
7.8 Mapping of the AUGMENTS clause ................................ 32 7.8 Mapping of the AUGMENTS clause ................................ 31
7.8.1 Relation between INDEX and AUGMENTS clauses ................. 33 7.8.1 Relation between INDEX and AUGMENTS clauses ................. 32
7.9 Mapping of the DEFVAL clause .................................. 33 7.9 Mapping of the DEFVAL clause .................................. 32
7.10 Mapping of the OBJECT-TYPE value ............................. 34 7.10 Mapping of the OBJECT-TYPE value ............................. 33
7.11 Usage Example ................................................ 36 7.11 Usage Example ................................................ 35
8 Mapping of the NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro .......................... 38 8 Mapping of the NOTIFICATION-TYPE macro .......................... 37
8.1 Mapping of the OBJECTS clause ................................. 38 8.1 Mapping of the OBJECTS clause ................................. 37
8.2 Mapping of the STATUS clause .................................. 38 8.2 Mapping of the STATUS clause .................................. 37
8.3 Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause ............................. 38 8.3 Mapping of the DESCRIPTION clause ............................. 37
8.4 Mapping of the REFERENCE clause ............................... 39 8.4 Mapping of the REFERENCE clause ............................... 37
8.5 Mapping of the NOTIFICATION-TYPE value ........................ 39 8.5 Mapping of the NOTIFICATION-TYPE value ........................ 38
8.6 Usage Example ................................................. 40 8.6 Usage Example ................................................. 39
9 Refined Syntax .................................................. 41 9 Refined Syntax .................................................. 40
10 Extending an Information Module ................................ 42 10 Extending an Information Module ................................ 41
10.1 Object Assignments ........................................... 42 10.1 Object Assignments ........................................... 41
10.2 Object Definitions ........................................... 42 10.2 Object Definitions ........................................... 41
10.3 Notification Definitions ..................................... 43 10.3 Notification Definitions ..................................... 42
11 Appendix A: de-OSIfying a MIB module ........................... 44 11 Appendix A: de-OSIfying a MIB module ........................... 43
11.1 Managed Object Mapping ....................................... 44 11.1 Managed Object Mapping ....................................... 43
11.1.1 Mapping to the SYNTAX clause ............................... 45 11.1.1 Mapping to the SYNTAX clause ............................... 44
11.1.2 Mapping to the UNITS clause ................................ 46 11.1.2 Mapping to the UNITS clause ................................ 45
11.1.3 Mapping to the MAX-ACCESS clause ........................... 46 11.1.3 Mapping to the MAX-ACCESS clause ........................... 45
11.1.4 Mapping to the STATUS clause ............................... 46 11.1.4 Mapping to the STATUS clause ............................... 45
11.1.5 Mapping to the DESCRIPTION clause .......................... 46 11.1.5 Mapping to the DESCRIPTION clause .......................... 45
11.1.6 Mapping to the REFERENCE clause ............................ 46 11.1.6 Mapping to the REFERENCE clause ............................ 45
11.1.7 Mapping to the INDEX clause ................................ 46 11.1.7 Mapping to the INDEX clause ................................ 45
11.1.8 Mapping to the DEFVAL clause ............................... 46 11.1.8 Mapping to the DEFVAL clause ............................... 45
11.2 Action Mapping ............................................... 47 11.2 Action Mapping ............................................... 46
11.2.1 Mapping to the SYNTAX clause ............................... 47 11.2.1 Mapping to the SYNTAX clause ............................... 46
11.2.2 Mapping to the MAX-ACCESS clause ........................... 47 11.2.2 Mapping to the MAX-ACCESS clause ........................... 46
11.2.3 Mapping to the STATUS clause ............................... 47 11.2.3 Mapping to the STATUS clause ............................... 46
11.2.4 Mapping to the DESCRIPTION clause .......................... 47 11.2.4 Mapping to the DESCRIPTION clause .......................... 46
11.2.5 Mapping to the REFERENCE clause ............................ 47 11.2.5 Mapping to the REFERENCE clause ............................ 46
11.3 Event Mapping ................................................ 47 11.3 Event Mapping ................................................ 46
11.3.1 Mapping to the STATUS clause ............................... 48 11.3.1 Mapping to the STATUS clause ............................... 47
11.3.2 Mapping to the DESCRIPTION clause .......................... 48 11.3.2 Mapping to the DESCRIPTION clause .......................... 47
11.3.3 Mapping to the REFERENCE clause ............................ 48 11.3.3 Mapping to the REFERENCE clause ............................ 47
12 Appendix B: UTC Time Format .................................... 49 12 Appendix B: UTC Time Format .................................... 48
13 Appendix C: Detailed Sub-typing Rules .......................... 50 13 Appendix C: Detailed Sub-typing Rules .......................... 49
13.1 Syntax Rules ................................................. 50 13.1 Syntax Rules ................................................. 49
13.2 Examples ..................................................... 51 13.2 Examples ..................................................... 50
13.3 Rules for Textual Conventions ................................ 51 13.3 Rules for Textual Conventions ................................ 50
14 Acknowledgements ............................................... 52 14 Acknowledgements ............................................... 51
15 References ..................................................... 52 15 References ..................................................... 52
16 Security Considerations ........................................ 54 16 Security Considerations ........................................ 53
17 Authors' Addresses ............................................. 54 17 Editor's Address ............................................... 53
 End of changes. 90 change blocks. 
383 lines changed or deleted 343 lines changed or added

This html diff was produced by rfcdiff 1.34. The latest version is available from http://tools.ietf.org/tools/rfcdiff/