draft-ietf-teas-actn-framework-03.txt   draft-ietf-teas-actn-framework-04.txt 
TEAS Working Group Daniele Ceccarelli (Ed) TEAS Working Group Daniele Ceccarelli (Ed)
Internet Draft Ericsson Internet Draft Ericsson
Intended status: Informational Young Lee (Ed) Intended status: Informational Young Lee (Ed)
Expires: August 2017 Huawei Expires: August 2017 Huawei
February 2, 2017 February 16, 2017
Framework for Abstraction and Control of Traffic Engineered Networks Framework for Abstraction and Control of Traffic Engineered Networks
draft-ietf-teas-actn-framework-03 draft-ietf-teas-actn-framework-04
Abstract Abstract
Traffic Engineered networks have a variety of mechanisms to Traffic Engineered networks have a variety of mechanisms to
facilitate the separation of the data plane and control plane. They facilitate the separation of the data plane and control plane. They
also have a range of management and provisioning protocols to also have a range of management and provisioning protocols to
configure and activate network resources. These mechanisms configure and activate network resources. These mechanisms
represent key technologies for enabling flexible and dynamic represent key technologies for enabling flexible and dynamic
networking. networking.
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Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
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publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
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3.4. ACTN Interfaces..........................................17 3.4. ACTN Interfaces..........................................17
4. VN Creation Process...........................................20 4. VN Creation Process...........................................20
4.1. VN Creation Example......................................20 4.1. VN Creation Example......................................20
5. Access Points and Virtual Network Access Points...............22 5. Access Points and Virtual Network Access Points...............22
5.1. Dual homing scenario.....................................25 5.1. Dual homing scenario.....................................25
6. End Point Selection Based On Network Status...................26 6. End Point Selection Based On Network Status...................26
6.1. Pre-Planned End Point Migration..........................27 6.1. Pre-Planned End Point Migration..........................27
6.2. On the Fly End Point Migration...........................28 6.2. On the Fly End Point Migration...........................28
7. Manageability Considerations..................................28 7. Manageability Considerations..................................28
7.1. Policy...................................................28 7.1. Policy...................................................29
7.2. Policy applied to the Customer Network Controller........29 7.2. Policy applied to the Customer Network Controller........29
7.3. Policy applied to the Multi Domain Service Coordinator...29 7.3. Policy applied to the Multi Domain Service Coordinator...30
7.4. Policy applied to the Physical Network Controller........30 7.4. Policy applied to the Physical Network Controller........30
8. Security Considerations.......................................30 8. Security Considerations.......................................31
8.1. Interface between the Customer Network Controller and Multi 8.1. Interface between the Customer Network Controller and Multi
Domain Service Coordinator (MDSC), CNC-MDSC Interface (CMI)...31 Domain Service Coordinator (MDSC), CNC-MDSC Interface (CMI)...32
8.2. Interface between the Multi Domain Service Coordinator and 8.2. Interface between the Multi Domain Service Coordinator and
Physical Network Controller (PNC), MDSC-PNC Interface (MPI)...32 Physical Network Controller (PNC), MDSC-PNC Interface (MPI)...32
9. References....................................................32 9. References....................................................33
9.1. Informative References...................................32 9.1. Informative References...................................33
10. Contributors.................................................33 10. Contributors.................................................34
Authors' Addresses...............................................34 Authors' Addresses...............................................35
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
Traffic Engineered networks have a variety of mechanisms to Traffic Engineered networks have a variety of mechanisms to
facilitate separation of data plane and control plane including facilitate separation of data plane and control plane including
distributed signaling for path setup and protection, centralized distributed signaling for path setup and protection, centralized
path computation for planning and traffic engineering, and a range path computation for planning and traffic engineering, and a range
of management and provisioning protocols to configure and activate of management and provisioning protocols to configure and activate
network resources. These mechanisms represent key technologies for network resources. These mechanisms represent key technologies for
enabling flexible and dynamic networking. enabling flexible and dynamic networking.
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/ | \ / | \
+------------------+ +------------------+ +------------------+ +------------------+ +------------------+ +------------------+
|Network Provider 1| |Network Provider 2| |Network Provider 3| |Network Provider 1| |Network Provider 2| |Network Provider 3|
+------------------+ +------------------+ +------------------+ +------------------+ +------------------+ +------------------+
Figure 2: Three tier model. Figure 2: Three tier model.
There can be multiple service providers to which a customer may There can be multiple service providers to which a customer may
interface. interface.
There are multiple types of service providers: There are multiple types of service providers, for example:
. Data Center providers can be viewed as a service provider type . Data Center providers can be viewed as a service provider type
as they own and operate data center resources for various WAN as they own and operate data center resources for various WAN
customers, and they can lease physical network resources from customers, and they can lease physical network resources from
network providers. network providers.
. Internet Service Providers (ISP) are service providers of . Internet Service Providers (ISP) are service providers of
internet services to their customers while leasing physical internet services to their customers while leasing physical
network resources from network providers. network resources from network providers.
. Mobile Virtual Network Operators (MVNO) provide mobile services . Mobile Virtual Network Operators (MVNO) provide mobile services
to their end-users without owning the physical network to their end-users without owning the physical network
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The types of controller defined in the ACTN architecture are shown The types of controller defined in the ACTN architecture are shown
in Figure 3 below and are as follows: in Figure 3 below and are as follows:
. CNC - Customer Network Controller . CNC - Customer Network Controller
. MDSC - Multi Domain Service Coordinator . MDSC - Multi Domain Service Coordinator
. PNC - Physical Network Controller . PNC - Physical Network Controller
Figure 3 also shows the following interfaces: Figure 3 also shows the following interfaces:
. CMI - CNC-MPI Interface . CMI - CNC-MDSC Interface
. MPI - MDSC-PNC Interface . MPI - MDSC-PNC Interface
VPN customer NW Mobile Customer ISP NW service Customer VPN customer NW Mobile Customer ISP NW service Customer
| | | | | |
+-------+ +-------+ +-------+ +-------+ +-------+ +-------+
| CNC-A | | CNC-B | | CNC-C | | CNC-A | | CNC-B | | CNC-C |
+-------+ +-------+ +-------+ +-------+ +-------+ +-------+
\ | / \ | /
----------- |CMI I/F -------------- ----------- |CMI I/F --------------
\ | / \ | /
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the request. What the customer sees is only that his CEs are the request. What the customer sees is only that his CEs are
connected with a given SLA. In the case of grey/white topology the connected with a given SLA. In the case of grey/white topology the
customer creates his own LSPs accordingly to the topology that was customer creates his own LSPs accordingly to the topology that was
presented to him. presented to him.
4.1. VN Creation Example 4.1. VN Creation Example
This section illustrates how a VN creation process is conducted over This section illustrates how a VN creation process is conducted over
a hierarchy of MDSCs via MMIs and MPIs, which is shown in Figure 6. a hierarchy of MDSCs via MMIs and MPIs, which is shown in Figure 6.
+-----+ +-----+
| CNC | CNC wants to create a VN | CNC | CNC wants to create a VN
+-----+ between CE A and CE B +-----+ between CE A and CE B
| |
| |
+-----------------------+ +-----------------------+
| MDSC 1 | --o-o---o-o-- | MDSC 1 |
+-----------------------+ +-----------------------+
/ \ / \
.. .. / \ .. .. / \
( ) ( ) +--------+ +--------+ ( ) ( ) +--------+ +--------+
( ) ( ) +--------+ +--------+ ( ) ( ) | MDSC 2 | | MDSC 3 |
.. .. / \ / \ .. .. +--------+ +--------+
/ \ / \ / \ / \
+-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ / \ / \
|PNC 1| |PNC 2| |PNC 3| |PNC 4| +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+
+-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ CE A o----|PNC 1| |PNC 2| |PNC 3| |PNC 4|----o CE B
| | | | +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+
... ... ... ...
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
CE A o------(o-o-o)--(o-o-o)--------(o-o-o)--(o-o-o)----o CE B
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
... ... ... ...
Domain 1 Domain 2 Domain 3 Domain 4 Topology Seen at MDSC 1
Figure 6: Illustration of topology abstraction granularity levels in --o-o--o-o-
the MDSC Hierarchy
Topology Seen at MDSC 2 Topology Seen at MDSC 3
_ _ _ _
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
--(o---o)==(o---o)== ==(o---o)==(o---o)--
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
(_) (_) (_) (_)
Actual Topology
___ ___ ___ ___
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( o ) ( o ) ( o--o) ( o )
( / \ ) ( |\ ) ( | | ) ( / \ )
----(o-o---o-o)==(o-o-o-o-o)==(o--o--o-o)==(o-o-o-o-o)----
( \ / ) ( | |/ ) ( | | ) ( \ / )
( o ) (o-o ) ( o--o) ( o )
(___) (___) (___) (___)
Domain 1 Domain 2 Domain 3 Domain 4
Where o is a node and -- is a link and === a border link
Figure 6: Illustration of topology abstraction granularity levels in
the MDSC Hierarchy
In the example depicted in Figure 6, there are four domains under In the example depicted in Figure 6, there are four domains under
control of the respective PNCs, namely, PNC 1, PNC 2, PNC3 and PNC4. control of the respective PNCs, namely, PNC 1, PNC 2, PNC3 and PNC4.
Assume that MDSC 2 is controlling PNC 1 and PNC 2 while MDSC 3 is Assume that MDSC 2 is controlling PNC 1 and PNC 2 while MDSC 3 is
controlling PNC 3 and PNC 4. Let us assume that each of the PNCs controlling PNC 3 and PNC 4. Let us assume that each of the PNCs
provides a grey topology abstraction in which to present only border provides a grey topology abstraction in which to present only border
nodes and border links. The abstract topology MDSC 2 would operate nodes and border links. The abstract topology MDSC 2 would operate
is shown on the left side of MDSC 2 in Figure 6. It is basically a is shown on the left side of MDSC 2 in Figure 6. It is basically a
combination of the two topologies the PNCs (PNC 1 and PNC 2) combination of the two topologies the PNCs (PNC 1 and PNC 2)
provide. Likewise, the abstract topology MDSC 3 would operate is provide. Likewise, the abstract topology MDSC 3 would operate is
shown on the right side of MDSC 3 in Figure 6. Both MDSC 2 and MDSC shown on the right side of MDSC 3 in Figure 6. Both MDSC 2 and MDSC
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Networking: A Perspective from within a Service Provider Networking: A Perspective from within a Service Provider
Environment", RFC 7149, March 2014. Environment", RFC 7149, March 2014.
[RFC7926] A. Farrel (Ed.), "Problem Statement and Architecture for [RFC7926] A. Farrel (Ed.), "Problem Statement and Architecture for
Information Exchange between Interconnected Traffic- Information Exchange between Interconnected Traffic-
Engineered Networks", RFC 7926, July 2016. Engineered Networks", RFC 7926, July 2016.
[GMPLS] Manning, E., et al., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label [GMPLS] Manning, E., et al., "Generalized Multi-Protocol Label
Switching (GMPLS) Architecture", RFC 3945, October 2004. Switching (GMPLS) Architecture", RFC 3945, October 2004.
[ONF-ARCH] Open Networking Foundation, "SDN architecture" Issue 1 - [ONF-ARCH] Open Networking Foundation, "SDN architecture", Issue
TR-502, June 2014. 1.1, ONF TR-521, June 2016.
[RFC7491] King, D., and Farrel, A., "A PCE-based Architecture for [RFC7491] King, D., and Farrel, A., "A PCE-based Architecture for
Application-based Network Operations", RFC 7491, March Application-based Network Operations", RFC 7491, March
2015. 2015.
[Transport NBI] Busi, I., et al., "Transport North Bound Interface [Transport NBI] Busi, I., et al., "Transport North Bound Interface
Use Cases", draft-tnbidt-ccamp-transport-nbi-use-cases, Use Cases", draft-tnbidt-ccamp-transport-nbi-use-cases,
work in progress. work in progress.
10. Contributors 10. Contributors
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Email: adrian@olddog.co.uk Email: adrian@olddog.co.uk
Italo Busi Italo Busi
Huawei Huawei
Email: Italo.Busi@huawei.com Email: Italo.Busi@huawei.com
Khuzema Pithewan Khuzema Pithewan
Infinera Infinera
Email: kpithewan@infinera.com Email: kpithewan@infinera.com
Michael Scharf
Nokia
Email: michael.scharf@nokia.com
Authors' Addresses Authors' Addresses
Daniele Ceccarelli (Editor) Daniele Ceccarelli (Editor)
Ericsson Ericsson
Torshamnsgatan,48 Torshamnsgatan,48
Stockholm, Sweden Stockholm, Sweden
Email: daniele.ceccarelli@ericsson.com Email: daniele.ceccarelli@ericsson.com
Young Lee (Editor) Young Lee (Editor)
Huawei Technologies Huawei Technologies
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