draft-ietf-trade-iotp-v1.0-protocol-00.txt   draft-ietf-trade-iotp-v1.0-protocol-01.txt 
September 1998
Expires March 1999
TRADE Working Group Surendra Reddy(Oracle) Internet Open Trading Protocol (IOTP) Version 1.0
Internet Draft David Burdett(Mondex) -------- ---- ------- -------- ------ ------- ---
Expires March 21, 1999 Donald E. Eastlake 3rd
Internet Open Trading Protocol - IOTP Status of This Document
Status of this Memo A later version of this draft, file name draft-ietf-trade-iotp-v1.0-
protocol-01.txt, is intended to become an Informational RFC.
Distribution of this document is unlimited. Comments should be sent
to the TRADE WG mailing list <ietf-trade@eListX.com>.
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Distribution of this document is unlimited. Please send comments Technical control over the Internet Open Trading Protocol is being
to the TRADE working group at <ietf-trade@lists.elistx.com >, transfered to the IETF TRADE working group from the OTP Consortium.
which may be joined by sending a message with subject "subscribe" In some cases, the most current version of techncial documents is an
to <ietf-trade-request@lists.elistx.com>. OTP Consortium version that has not yet been republished as an RFC
and is available from <http://www.otp.org> web site (which has not
yet been fully updates to indicate the technical switch to the IETF).
Discussions of the TRADE working group are archived at In this case, see
http://www.elistx.com/archives/ietf-trade. <http://www.otp.org/otp/Home.nsf/f86055a20977be50862564b3004d010a/
42b496239c5956aa8625655a007b1835/$FILE/OTP_Spec_v_0-9-9_ltr.pdf>. It
is intended that that document be published as an later verson of
this internet-draft and then as an Informational RFC.
Abstract Abstract
The Internet Open Trading Protocol (IOTP) provides an The Internet Open Trading Protocol (IOTP) provides an interoperable
interoperable framework for Internet commerce. It is payment framework for Internet commerce. It is payment system independent
system independent and encapsulates payment systems such as SET, and can encapsulates a variety of payment systems. IOTP is able to
Mondex, CyberCash, DigiCash, GeldKarte, etc. IOTP is able to
handle cases where such merchant roles as the shopping site, the handle cases where such merchant roles as the shopping site, the
payment handler, the Delivery Handler of goods or services, and payment handler, the delivery handler of goods or services, and the
the provider of customer support are performed by different provider of customer care are performed by different parties or by
parties or by one party. one party.
The developers of IOTP seek to provide a virtual capability that
safely replicates the real world, the paper based, traditional,
understood, accepted methods of trading, buying, selling, value
exchanging that has existed for many hundreds of years. The
negotiation of who will be the parties to the trade, how it will
be conducted, the presentment of an offer, the method of payment,
the provision of a payment receipt, the delivery of goods and the
receipt of goods. These are events that are taken for granted in
the course of real world trade. IOTP has been produced to provide
the same for the virtual world, and to prepare and provide for
the introduction of new models of trading made possible by the
expanding presence of the virtual world.
The other fundamental ideal of the IOTP effort is to produce a
definition of these trading events in such a way that no matter
where produced, two unfamiliar parties using electronic commerce
capabilities to buy and sell that conform to the IOTP
specifications will be able to complete the business safely and
successfully.
Acknowledgements
The Internet Open Trading Protocol has benefited from a large and [This draft is a place holder for an internet-draft version of the
active developer community who have participated on the otp-dev v1.0 starting point for the trade working group.]
mailing list and has been most responsible for the successful
completion of this specification.
Phillip Mullarkey, British Telecom plc, Andrew Marchewka, Canadian
Imperial Bank of Commerce, Brian Boesch, CyberCash Inc., Donald
Eastlake 3rd, CyberCash Inc., Mark Linehan, International Business
Machines, Peter Chang, Hewlett Packard, Masaaki Hiroya, Hitachi
Ltd, Yoshiaki Kawatsura, Hitachi Ltd, Jonathan Sowler, JCP Computer
Services Ltd, John Wankmueller, MasterCard International, Steve
Fabes, Mondex International Ltd, Akihiro Nakano, Plat Home, Inc.
(ex Hitachi Ltd), Chris Smith, Royal Bank of Canada, Hans
Bernhard-Beykirch, SIZ (IT Development and Coordination Centre of
the German Savings Banks Organisation), W. Reid Carlisle, Spyrus
(ex Citibank Universal Card Services, formally AT&T Universal
Card Services), Efrem Lipkin, Sun Microsystems, Terry Allen, Veo
Systems deserve special recognition for their efforts in
defining early aspects of the protocol.
Table of Contents Table of Contents
i. Status of this Memo .......................................... 1 Status of This Document....................................1
ii. Abstract ..................................................... 1
iii. Acknowledgements ............................................. 2
1 Introduction .................................................... 6
1.1 Commerce on the Internet - a Different Model ................ 6
1.2 What is IOTP? ............................................... 7
1.3 Benefits of IOTP ............................................ 7
1.4 Terminology ................................................. 9
1.5 IOTP - Abstract Model ....................................... 11
1.6 Interoperability Model ...................................... 12
1.7 Document Framework .......................................... 12
1.8 Document Scope .............................................. 12
1.9 Requirements ................................................ 13
2 Internet Open Trading Protocol .................................. 13
2.1 Introduction ................................................ 14
2.2 Trading Roles ............................................... 15
2.3 Trading Exchanges ........................................... 16
2.4 Offer Exchange .............................................. 17
2.5 Payment Exchange ............................................ 18
2.6 Delivery Exchange ........................................... 20
2.7 Authentication Exchange ..................................... 22
2.8 Brands and Brand Selection .................................. 22
3 IOTP Elements ................................................... 25
3.1 IOTP Message Structure ...................................... 25
3.2 IOTP Transactions ........................................... 27
3.3 IOTP Message ................................................ 28
3.4 XML Document Prolog ......................................... 29
3.5 Transaction Reference Block ................................. 29
3.6 ID Attributes ............................................... 34
3.7 Element References .......................................... 37
3.8 Packaged Content Element .................................... 37
3.9 Extending IOTP .............................................. 39
3.10 Identifying Languages ...................................... 41
3.11 Secure and Insecure Net Locations .......................... 42
4 Internet Open Trading Protocol Transactions ..................... 42
4.1 Baseline Authentication IOTP Transaction .................... 43
4.2 Baseline Deposit IOTP Transaction ........................... 44
4.3 Baseline Purchase IOTP Transaction .......................... 49
4.4 Baseline Refund IOTP Transaction ............................ 56
4.5 Baseline Withdrawal IOTP Transaction ........................ 61
4.6 Baseline Value Exchange IOTP Transaction .................... 67
4.7 Payment Instrument Customer Care IOTP Transaction ........... 75
4.8 Baseline Transaction Status Inquiry IOTP Transactin ......... 77
4.9 Baseline Ping IOTP Transaction .............................. 80
5 Trading Blocks .................................................. 81
5.1 Trading Protocol Options Block .............................. 82
5.2 TPO Selection Block ......................................... 83
5.3 Offer Response Block ........................................ 84
5.4 Authentication Request Block ................................ 85
5.5 Authentication Response Block ............................... 86
5.6 Payment Request Block ....................................... 86
5.7 Payment Exchange Block ...................................... 88
5.8 Payment Response Block ...................................... 88
5.9 Delivery Request Block ...................................... 89
5.10 Delivery Response Block .................................... 90
5.11 Payment Instrument Customer Care Request Block ............. 91
5.12 Payment Instrument Customer Care Exchange Block ............ 91
5.13 Payment Instrument Customer Care Response Block ............ 92
5.14 Inquiry Request Trading Block .............................. 92
5.15 Inquiry Response Trading Block ............................. 93
5.16 Ping Request Block ......................................... 94
5.17 Ping Response Block ........................................ 95
5.18 Signature Block ............................................ 97
5.19 Error Block ................................................ 98
6 Trading Components .............................................. 99
6.1 Protocol Options Component .................................. 100
6.2 Authentication Data Component ............................... 102
6.3 Authentication Response Component ........................... 103
6.4 Order Component ............................................. 104
6.5 Order Description Content ................................... 106
6.6 OkFrom and OkTo Timestamps .................................. 106
6.7 Organization Component ...................................... 107
6.8 Trading Role Element ........................................ 110
6.9 Contact Information Element ................................. 111
6.10 Person Name Element ........................................ 112
6.11 Postal Address Element ..................................... 113
6.12 Brand List Component ....................................... 114
6.13 Brand Element .............................................. 116
6.14 Protocol Amount Element .................................... 118
6.15 Currency Amount Element .................................... 120
6.16 Pay Protocol Element ....................................... 121
6.17 Brand Selection Component .................................. 123
6.18 Brand Selection Brand Info Element ......................... 125
6.19 Brand Selection Protocol Amount Info Element ............... 126
6.20 Brand Selection Currency Amount Info Element ............... 126
6.21 Payment Component .......................................... 127
6.22 Payment Scheme Component ................................... 128
6.23 Payment Receipt Component .................................. 130
6.24 Delivery Component ......................................... 131
6.25 Delivery Data Element ...................................... 133
6.26 Delivery Note Component .................................... 135
6.27 Payment Method Information Component ....................... 137
6.28 Status Component ........................................... 137
6.29 Inquiry Type Component ..................................... 142
6.30 Signature Component ........................................ 143
6.31 Offer Response Signature Component ......................... 144
6.32 Payment Receipt Signature Component ........................ 145
6.33 Ping Signature Components .................................. 145
6.34 Error Component ............................................ 145
6.35 Error Processing Guidelines ................................ 148
6.36 Error Codes ................................................ 149
6.37 Error Location Element ..................................... 153
7 IOTP Error Handling ............................................. 154
7.1 Technical Errors ............................................ 155
7.2 Business Errors ............................................. 155
7.3 Error Depth ................................................. 156
7.4 Idempotency, Processing Sequence, and Message Flow .......... 158
7.5 Client Role Processing Sequence ............................. 163
8 Retrieving Logos ................................................ 166
8.1 Logo Size ................................................... 167
8.2 Logo Color Depth ............................................ 167
8.3 Logo Net Location Examples .................................. 168
9 Security Considerations ......................................... 168
9.1 Digital Signatures and IOTP ................................. 168
9.2 IOTP Signature Example ...................................... 169
9.3 SignerOrgRef and VerifierOrgRef Attributes .................. 169
9.4 Symmetric and Asymmetric Cryptography ....................... 170
9.5 Mandatory and Optional Signatures ........................... 170
9.6 Using signatures to Prove Actions Complete
Successfully ................................................ 171
9.7 Check the Action Request was sent to the Correct
Organization ................................................ 173
9.8 Check the Correct Components are present in the
Request Block ............................................... 175
9.9 Check an Action is Authorised ............................... 175
9.10 Data Integrity and Privacy ................................. 177
10 Internationalization ........................................... 178
11 IANA Considerations ............................................ 178
12 Copyrights ..................................................... 178
13 References ..................................................... 179
14 Appendices ..................................................... 181
14.1 IOTP DTD Specification .................................... 181
15 Author's Address ............................................... 191
1. Introduction
1.1. Commerce on the Internet - a Different Model
The growth of the Internet and the advent of electronic commerce
are bringing about enormous changes around the world in society,
politics and government, and in business. The ways in which
trading partners communicate, conduct commerce, are governed have
been enriched and changed forever.
One of the very fundamental changes about which IOTP is concerned
is taking place in the way consumers and merchants trade.
Characteristics of trading that have changed markedly include:
- Presence: Face-to-face transactions become the exception,
not the rule. Already with the rise of mail order and
telephone order placement this change has been felt in
western commerce. Electronic commerce over the Internet will
further expand the scope and volume of transactions
conducted without ever seeing the people who are a part of
the enterprise with whom one does business.
- Authentication: An important part of personal presence is
the ability of the parties to use familiar objects and
dialogue to confirm they are who they claim to be. The
seller displays one or several well known financial logos
that declaim his ability to accept widely used credit and
debit instruments in the payment part of a purchase. The
buyer brings government or financial institution
identification that assures the seller she will be paid.
People use intangibles such as personal appearance and
conduct, location of the store, apparent quality and
familiarity with brands of merchandise, and a good clear
look in the eye to reinforce formal means of authentication.
- Payment Instruments: Despite the enormous size of bank card
financial payments associations and their members, most of
the world`s trade still takes place using the coin of the
realm or barter. The present infrastructure of the payments
business cannot economically support low value transactions
and could not survive under the consequent volumes of
transactions if it did accept low value transactions.
- Transaction Values: New meaning for low value transactions
arises in the Internet where sellers may wish to offer for
example, pages of information for fractions of currency that
do not exist in the real world.
- Delivery: New modes of delivery must be accommodated such as
direct electronic delivery. The means by which receipt is
confirmed and the execution of payment change dramatically
where the goods or services have extremely low delivery cost
but may in fact have very high value. Or, maybe the value is
not high, but once delivery occurs the value is
irretrievably delivered so payment must be final and
non-refundable but delivery nonetheless must still be
confirmed before payment. Incremental delivery such as
listening or viewing time or playing time are other models
that operate somewhat differently in the virtual world.
1.2. What is IOTP?
The Internet Open Trading Protocol (IOTP) provides an
interoperable framework for Internet commerce. It is payment
system independent and encapsulates payment systems such as SET,
Mondex, CyberCash, DigiCash, GeldKarte, etc. IOTP is able to
handle cases where such merchant roles as the shopping site, the
payment handler, the Delivery Handler of goods or services, and
the provider of customer support are performed by different
parties or by one party.
The main goal of IOTP is to provide a virtual capability that
safely replicates the real world, the paper based, traditional,
understood, accepted methods of trading, buying, selling, value
exchanging that has existed for many hundreds of years. The
negotiation of who will be the parties to the trade, how it will
be conducted, the presentment of an offer, the method of payment,
the provision of a payment receipt, the delivery of goods and the
receipt of goods. These are events that are taken for granted in
the course of real world trade. IOTP has been produced to provide
the same for the virtual world, and to prepare and provide for
the introduction of new models of trading made possible by the
expanding presence of the virtual world.
The other fundamental goal of the IOTP effort is to define these
trading events in such a way that no matter where produced, two
unfamiliar parties using electronic commerce capabilities to buy
and sell that conform to the IOTP specifications will be able
to complete the business safely and successfully.
1.3. Benefits of IOTP
1. Electronic Commerce Software Vendors will be able to develop
e-commerce products which are more attractive as they will
inter-operate with any other vendors' software. However
since IOTP focuses on how these solutions communicate, there
is still plenty of opportunity for product differentiation.
2. IOTP provides a standard framework for encapsulating payment
protocols. This means that it is easier for payment products
to be incorporated into IOTP solutions. As a result the
payment brands will be more widely distributed and available
on a wider variety of platforms.
3. There are several benefits for Merchants:
o they will be able to offer a wider variety of payment
brands,
o they can be more certain that the customer will have the
software needed to complete the purchase
o through receiving payment and delivery receipts from
their customers, they will be able to provide customer
care knowing that they are dealing with the individual or
organisation with which they originally traded
o new merchants will be able to enter this new (Internet)
market-place with new products and services, using the
new trading opportunities which IOTP presents
4. There are also several benefits for Banks and Financial
Institutions:
o they will be able to provide IOTP support for merchants
o they will find new opportunities for IOTP related
services:
o providing customer care for merchants
o fees from processing new payments and deposits
o they have an opportunity to build relationships with new
types of merchants
5. For Customers there are several benefits:
o they will have a larger selection of merchants with whom
they can trade
o there is a more consistent interface when making the
purchase
o there are ways in which they can get their problems fixed
through the merchant (rather than the bank!)
o there is a record of their transaction which can be used,
for example, to feed into accounting systems or,
potentially, to present to the tax authorities
1.4. Terminology
Consumer
The person or organisation which is to receive and pay for
the goods or services
Merchant
The person or organisation from whom the purchase is being
made and who is legally responsible for providing the goods
or services and receives the benefit of the payment made
Payment Handler
The entity that physically receives the payment from the
Consumer on behalf of the Merchant
Delivery Handler
The entity that physically delivers the goods or services to
the Consumer on behalf of the Merchant.
Merchant Customer Care Provider
The entity that is involved with customer dispute
negotiation and resolution on behalf of the Merchant
Payment Instrument Customer Care Provider
The entity that resolves problems with a particular Payment
Instrument
Payment Instrument
A Payment Instrument is the means by which Consumer pays for
goods or services offered by a Merchant. It can be, for
example:
o a credit card such as MasterCard or Visa;
o a debit card such as MasterCard's Maestro;
o a smart card based electronic cash payment instrument
such as a Mondex Card, a GeldKarte card or a Visa Cash
card
o a software based electronic payment account such as a
CyberCash or DigiCash account.
All Payment Instruments have a number, typically an account
number, by which the Payment Instrument can be identified.
Brand
A Brand is the mark which identifies a particular type of
Payment Instrument. A list of Brands are the payment
options which are presented by the Merchant to the Consumer
and from which the Consumer makes a selection. Each Brand
may have a different Payment Handler. Examples of Brands
include:
o payment association and proprietary Brands, for example
MasterCard, Visa, American Express, Diners Club, American
Express, Mondex, GeldKarte, CyberCash, etc.
o promotional brands (see below). These include:
o store brands, where the Payment Instrument is issued to a
Consumer by a particular Merchant, for example Walmart,
Sears, or Marks and Spencer (UK)
o cobrands, for example American Advantage Visa, where an
organisation uses their own brand in conjunction with,
typically, a payment association Brand.
Dual Brand
A Dual Brand means that a single payment instrument may be
used as if it were two separate Brands. For example there
could be a single Japanese "UC" MasterCard which can be used
as either a UC card or a regular MasterCard. The UC card
Brand and the MasterCard Brand could each have their own
separate Payment Handlers. This means that:
o the merchant treats, for example "UC" and "MasterCard" as
two separate Brands when offering a list of Brands to the
Consumer,
o the consumer chooses a Brand, for example either "UC" or
"MasterCard,
o the consumer IOTP aware application determines which
Payment Instrument(s) match the chosen Brand, and
selects, perhaps with user assistance, the correct
Payment Instrument to use.
Promotional Brand
A Promotional Brand means that, if the Consumer pays with
that Brand, then the Consumer will receive some additional
benefit which can be received in two ways:
o at the time of purchase. For example if a Consumer pays
with a "Walmart MasterCard" at a Walmart web site, then a
5% discount might apply, which means the consumer
actually pays less,
o from their Payment Instrument (card) issuer when the
payment appears on their statement. For example loyalty
points in a frequent flyer scheme could be awarded based
on the total payments made with the Payment Instrument
since the last statement was issued.
each Promotional Brand should be identified as a separate
Brand in the list of Brands offered by the Merchant. For
example: "Walmart", "Sears", "Marks and Spencer" and
"American Advantage Visa", would each be a separate Brand.
1.5. IOTP - Abstract Model
The Internet Open Trading Protocol is described as a set of IOTP
messages trasnferred between the Trading Roles. The IOTP message is
a collection of IOTP Trading Blocks which carries the specification
Trading Transaction. Following sections describe each component
in detail:
1.5.1. Trading Roles:
Trading Roles identify the different parts which organizations
can participate in trade. There are five trading roles: Consumer,
Merchant, Payment Handler, Delivery Handler, Merchant Customer
Care Provider and Payment Instrument Customer Care Provider. A
Trading Role (OTR) performs a trading transactions using a IOTP
USER AGENT (OUA). A OUA uses the IOTP Transport-Independent
Interoperability Protocol (IOTP) to deliver Trading Components to
a Trading Role.
1.5.2. IOTP Messages
IOTP messages are well formed XML document sent between the IOTP
trading roles that are taking part in a trade.
1.5.3. Trading Transactions
A predefined set of IOTP Messages exchanged between the Trading
Roles constitute an IOTP Transaction.
1.5.4. Trading Blocks
Trading Blocks consist of one or more Trading Components and
optionally one or more Signature Components. One or more Trading
Blocks may be contained within the IOTP Messages which are
physically sent in the form of [XML] documents between the
different organizations that are taking part in a trade.
1.5.5. Trading Components
Trading Components are collections of property values. Trading
Components are the child elements of the Trading Blocks.
1.5.6. Properties
Properties are attributes of a Trading Component. They consist of
a name and a value. Properties are strongly typed. Some
properties are multi-valued.
1.6. Interoperability Model
There are two distinct protocols relevant to interoperability: an
"Application Protocol" and a "Transport Protocol". The
Application Protocol defines the content of the IOTP objects sent
between Trading Roles. The Transport Protocol defines how the IOTP
objects are sent between the sender and reciver. This document
focuses on the Application Protocol. Binding documents such as
[IOTP/HTTP] focus on the Transport Protocol.
1.7. Document Framework
Internet Open Trading Protocol is contained in a series of
related documents. This section describes the relationship
between the documents.
1.7.1. IOTP - Core Object Specification and Transport Independent
Trading Protocol
The IOTP, this document, is the dictionary Trading Blocks, Trading
Components and Transactions for Internet Trading protocol. It provides
the authoritative definition of all properties that may be used in
the Internet Open Trading protocols as well as the rules for
encoding and representing the trading objects that are
constructed from those properties. This document also specifies
how different systems use Trading Components to interoperate with
other systems. It does so in a general way so as to allow
multiple methods of communication between systems.
1.7.2. IOTP/HTTP: Binding of IOTP to HTTP
This document specifies an IOTP protocol over HTTP.
1.8. Document Scope
The Internet Open Trading Protocol (IOTP) is an application-level
protocol to provide an interoperable framework for Internet
commerce. The first version of IOTP, referred to as IOTP/1.0,
is a simple protocol for exchanging IOTP messages between
trading roles participating in e-commerce over the Internet.
This specification defines the protocol referred to as
"IOTP/1.0". This protocol is designed to be applicable to any
electronic payment scheme since it targets the complete purchase
process where the movement of electronic value from the payer to
the payee is only one, but important, step of many that may be
involved to complete the trade.
The protocol describes the content, format and sequences of
messages that pass among the participants in an electronic trade
- consumers, merchants and banks or other financial institutions,
and customer care providers. These are required to support the
electronic commerce transactions outlined in the objectives
above.
Payment Scheme which IOTP could support include MasterCard Credit,
Visa Credit, Mondex Cash, Visa Cash, GeldKarte, DigiCash,
CyberCoin, Millicent, Proton etc. Each payment scheme contains
some message flows which are specific to that scheme. These
scheme-specific parts of the protocol are contained in a set of
payment scheme supplements to this specification.
The document does not prescribe the software and processes that
will need to be implemented by each participant. It does describe
the framework necessary for trading to take place.
This document also does not address any legal or regulatory
issues surrounding the implementation of the protocol or the
information systems which use them.
1.9. Requirements
The key words MUST, MUST NOT, REQUIRED, SHALL, SHALL
NOT, SHOULD, SHOULD NOT, RECOMMENDED, MAY, and
OPTIONAL in this document are to be interpreted as described in
RFC 2119.
An implementation is not compliant if it fails to satisfy one or
more of the MUST requirements for the protocols it implements. An
implementation that satisfies all the MUST and all the SHOULD
requirements for its protocols is said to be unconditionally
compliant; one that satisfies all the MUST requirements but not
all the SHOULD requirements for its protocols is said to be
conditionally compliant.
2. Internet Open Trading Protocol
2.1. Introduction
The Internet Open Trading Protocol (IOTP) provides an
interoperable framework for Internet commerce. It is payment
system independent and encapsulates payment systems such as SET,
Mondex, CyberCash, DigiCash, GeldKarte, etc. IOTP is able to
handle cases where such merchant roles as the shopping site, the
payment handler, the Delivery Handler of goods or services, and
the provider of customer support are performed by different
parties or by one party.
The developers of IOTP seek to provide a virtual capability that
safely replicates the real world, the paper based, traditional,
understood, accepted methods of trading, buying, selling, value
exchanging that has existed for many hundreds of years. The
negotiation of who will be the parties to the trade, how it will
be conducted, the presentment of an offer, the method of payment,
the provision of a payment receipt, the delivery of goods and the
receipt of goods. These are events that are taken for granted in
the course of real world trade. IOTP has been produced to provide
the same for the virtual world, and to prepare and provide for
the introduction of new models of trading made possible by the
expanding presence of the virtual world.
The other fundamental ideal of the IOTP effort is to produce a
definition of these trading events in such a way that no matter
where produced, two unfamiliar parties using electronic commerce
capabilities to buy and sell that conform to the IOTP
specifications will be able to complete the business safely and
successfully.
The Internet Open Trading Protocols (IOTP) define a number of
different types of IOTP Transactions:
- Purchase. This supports a purchase involving an offer, a
payment and optionally a delivery
- Refund. This supports the refund of a payment as a result
of, typically, an earlier purchase
- Value Exchange. This involves two payments which result in
the exchange of value from one combination of currency and
payment method to another
- Authentication. This supports the remote authentication of a
Consumer by another Trading Role using a variety of
authentication methods, and the provision of an Organisation
Component about a Consumer to another Trading Role for use
in, for example the creation of an offer
- Withdrawal. This supports the withdrawal of electronic cash
from a financial institution
- Deposit. This supports the deposit of electronic cash at a
financial institution
- Payment Instrument Customer Care. This supports the
provision of Payment Brand or Payment Method specific
customer care of a Payment Instrument
- Inquiry This supports inquiries on the status of an IOTP
transaction which is either in progress or is complete
- Ping This supports a simple query which enables one IOTP
aware application to determine whether another IOTP
application running elsewhere is working or not.
These IOTP Transactions are "Baseline" transactions since they
have been identified as a minimum useful set of transactions.
Later versions of IOTP may include additional types of
transactions.
Each of the IOTP Transactions above involve:
- a number organisations playing a Trading Role, and
- a set of Trading Exchanges. Each Trading Exchange involves
the exchange of data, between Trading Roles, in the form of
a set of Trading Components.
Trading Roles, Trading Exchanges and Trading Components are
described below.
2.2. Trading Roles
The Trading Roles identify the different parts which
organisations can take in a trade. The five Trading Roles used
within IOTP are:
- Consumer
- Merchant
- Payment Handler
- Delivery Handler
- Merchant Customer Care Provider
- Payment Instrument Customer Care Provider
Roles may be carried out by the same organisation or different
organisations. For example:
- in the simplest case one physical organisation (e.g. a
merchant) could handle the purchase, accept the payment,
deliver the goods and provide merchant customer care
- at the other extreme, a merchant could handle the purchase
but instruct the consumer to pay a bank or financial
institution, request that delivery be made by an overnight
courier firm and to contact an organisation which provides
24x7 service if problems arise.
Note that in this specification, unless stated to the contrary,
when the words Consumer, Merchant, Payment Handler, Delivery
Handler or Customer Care Provider are used, they refer to the
Trading Role rather than an actual organisation.
An individual organisation may take multiple roles. For example a
company which is selling goods and services on the Internet could
take the role of Merchant when selling goods or services and the
role of Consumer when the company is buying goods or services
itself.
As roles occur in different places there is a need for the
organisations involved in the trade to exchange data, i.e. to
carry out Trading Exchanges, so that the trade can be completed.
2.3. Trading Exchanges
The Internet Open Trading Protocols identify four Trading Exchanges
which involve the exchange of data between the Trading Roles. The
Trading Exchanges are:
- Offer. The Offer Exchange results in the Merchant providing
the Consumer with the reason why the trade is taking place.
It is called an Offer since the Consumer must accept the
Offer if a trade is to continue
- Payment. The Payment Exchange results in a payment of some
kind between the Consumer and the Payment Handler. This may
occur in either direction
- Delivery. The Delivery Exchange transmits either the on-line
goods, or delivery information about physical goods from the
Delivery Handler to the Consumer, and
- Authentication. The Authentication Exchange can be used by
any Trading Role to authenticate another Trading Role to
check that they are who they appear to be.
- IOTP Transactions are composed of various combinations of
these Trading Exchanges. For example, an IOTP Purchase
transaction includes Offer, Payment, and Delivery Trading
Exchanges. As another example, an IOTP Value Exchange
transaction is composed of an Offer Trading Exchange and two
Payment Trading Exchanges.
Trading Exchanges consist of Trading Components that are
transmitted between the various Trading Roles. Where possible,
the number of round-trip delays in an IOTP Transaction is
minimised by packing the Components from several Trading
Exchanges into combination IOTP Messages. For example, the IOTP
Purchase transaction combines a Delivery Organisation Component
with an Offer Response Component in order to avoid an extra
Consumer request and response.
Each of the IOTP Trading Exchanges is described in more detail
below. For clarity of description, these describe the Trading
Exchanges as though they were standalone operations. For
performance reasons, the Trading Exchanges are intermingled in
the actual IOTP Transaction definitions.
2.4. Offer Exchange
The goal of the Offer Exchange is for the Merchant to provide the
Consumer with information about the trade so that the Consumer
can decide whether to continue with the trade. This is explained
through following steps:
- Consumer decides to pay (request an offer) and sends
information on what to purchase to the merchant
- Merchant checks the information provided by the Consumer,
creates an Offer and sends it to the Consumer
- Consumer checks the information from the merchant and
decides whether to continue
An Offer Exchange uses the following Trading Components that are
passed between the Consumer and the Merchant:
- the Organisation Component contains information which
describes the organisations which are taking a role in the
trade:
- the consumer provides information, about who the consumer is
and, if goods or services are being delivered, where the
goods or services are to be delivered to
- the merchant augments this information by providing
information about the merchant, the Payment Handler, the
customer care provider and, if goods or services are being
delivered, the Delivery Handler
- the Order Component contains descriptions of the goods or
services which will result from the trade if the consumer
agrees to the offer. This information is sent by the
Merchant to the consumer who should verify it
- the Payment Component generated by the Merchant, contains
details of how much to pay, the currency and the payment
direction, for example the consumer could be asking for a
refund. Note that there may be more than one payment in a
trade
- the Delivery Component, also generated by the Merchant, is
used if goods or services are being delivered. This contains
information about how delivery will occur, for example by
post or using e-mail
- the "Offer Response" Signature Component, if present,
digitally signs all of the above components to ensure their
integrity.
The exact content of the information provided by the Merchant to
the Consumer will vary depending on the type of IOTP Transaction.
For example:
- low value purchases may not need a signature
- the amount to be paid may vary depending on the payment
brand and payment protocol used
- some offers may not involve the delivery of any goods
- a value exchange will involve two payments
- a merchant may not offer customer care.
Information provided by the consumer to the merchant could be
provided using a variety of methods, for example, it could be
provided:
- using [HTML] pages as part of the "shopping experience" of
the consumer.
- using the Open Profiling Standard [OPS] which has recently
been proposed, in the form of Organisation and Order
Components in a later version of IOTP.
2.5. Payment Exchange
The goal of the Payment Exchange is for a payment to be made from
the Consumer to a Payment Handler or vice versa using a payment
brand and payment protocol selected by the Consumer. A secondary
goal is to optionally provide the Consumer with a digitally
signed Payment Receipt which can be used to link the payment to
the reason for the payment as described in the Offer Exchange.
Payment Exchanges can work in a variety of ways. The most general
case where the trade is dependent on the payment brand and
protocol used is illustrated in the diagram below. Simpler
payment exchanges are possible.
- Consumer decides to trade and sends information on what to
purchase to the merchant
- Merchant decides which payment brand and payment protocols
to offer, places them in a Brand List Component and sends
them to the Consumer
- Consumer selects the payment brand and protocol to use,
creates a Brand Selection Component and sends it to the
Merchant
- Merchant checks Brand Selection, creates Payment Amount
information, optionally signs it to authorize payment and
sends it to the Consumer
- Consumer checks the Payment Amount information and if OK
requests that the payment starts by sending information to
the Payment Handler
- Payment Handler checks information including optional
signature and if OK starts exchanging Pay Scheme Component
using messages for selected payment brand and payment
protocol
- When payment protocol messages are finished Payment Hander
sends Pay Receipt and optional signature to Consumer as
proof of payment
- Consumer checks if Pay Receipt is OK
A Payment Exchange uses the following Trading Components that are
passed between the Consumer, the Merchant and the Payment
Handler:
- The Brand List Component contains a list of payment brands
(for example, MasterCard, Visa, Mondex, GeldKarte) and
payment protocols (for example SET Version 1.0, Secure
Channel Credit Debit (SCCD - the name used for a credit or
debit card payment where unauthorised access to account
information is prevented through use of secure channel
transport mechanisms such as SSL). The Merchant sends the
Brand List to the Consumer. The consumer compares the
payment brands and protocols on offer with those that the
Consumer supports and makes a selection.
- The Brand Selection Component contains the Consumer's
selection. Payment brand, protocol and possibly protocol-
specific information is sent back to the Merchant. This
information may be used to change information in the Offer
Exchange. For example, a merchant could choose to offer a
discount to encourage the use of a store card.
- The Organisation Components are generated by the Merchant.
They contain details of the Merchant and Payment Handler
Roles:
o the Merchant role is required so that the Payment Handler
can identify which Merchant initiated the payment.
Typically, the result of the Payment Handler accepting
(or making) a payment on behalf of the Merchant will be a
credit or debit transaction to the Merchant's account
held by the Payment Handler. These transactions are
outside the scope of IOTP
o the Payment Handler role is required so that the Payment
Handler can check that it is the correct Payment Handler
to be used for the payment
- The optional Authentication Data Component contains
challenge data which is used by the payment protocol to
authenticate the consumer. Authentication may not always
occur
- The Payment Component contains details of how much to pay,
the currency and the payment direction, and identifies the
Authentication Data Component to use.
- The "Offer Response" Signature Component, if present,
digitally signs all of the above components to ensure their
integrity. Note that the Brand List and Brand Selection
Components are not signed until the payment information is
created.
- The Payment Scheme Component contains messages from the
payment protocol used in the Trade. For example they could
be SET messages, Mondex messages, GeldKarte Messages or one
of the other payment methods supported by IOTP. The content
of the Payment Scheme Component is defined in the
supplements that describe how IOTP works with various payment
protocols.
- The Payment Receipt Component contains a record of the
payment. The content depends upon the payment protocol used.
- The "Payment Receipt" Signature Component provides proof of
payment by digitally signing both the Payment Receipt
Component and the Offer Signature. The signature on the
offer digitally signs the Order, Organisation and Delivery
Components contained in the Offer. This signature
effectively binds the payment to the offer.
The example of a Payment Exchange above is the most general case.
Simpler cases are also possible. For example, if the amount paid
is not dependent on the payment brand and protocol selected then
the payment information generated can be sent to the Consumer at
the same time as the Brand List Component generated. These and
other variations are described in the Baseline Purchase IOTP
Transaction (see section 5.20).
2.6. Delivery Exchange
The goal of the Delivery Exchange is to cause purchased goods to
be delivered to the consumer either online or via physical
delivery. A second goal is to provide a "delivery note" to the
consumer, providing details about the delivery, such as shipping
tracking number. A future goal is to have a signed delivery that
can be used for customer care in the case of problems with
physical delivery. This is illustrated in the diagram below.
- Consumer decides to trade and sends information about what
to deliver and who is to take delivery, to the merchant
- Merchant checks the information provided by the Consumer,
adds information about how the delivery will occur,
information about the organizations involved in the delivery
and optionally signs it
- Consumer checks the delivery information is OK, obtains
authorization for delivery(for example, by making a
payment), and sends the delivery information to the Delivery
Handler
- Delivery Handler checks information and authorization,
starts or schedule delivery and creates and then sends
Delievery Note to the Consumer
- Consumer checks delivery note is OK and accepts or waits for
delivery as described in the Delivery Note
A Delivery Exchange uses the following Trading Components that
are passed between the Consumer, the Merchant and the Delivery
Handler:
The Organisation Component(s) contain details of the Deliver
To, Delivery Handler and Merchant Roles:
- the Deliver To role indicates where the goods or services
are to be delivered to
- the Delivery Handler role is required so that the Delivery
Handler can check that she is the correct Delivery Handler
to do the delivery
- the Merchant role is required so that the Delivery Handler
can identify which Merchant initiated the delivery
- The Order Component, contains information about the goods or
services to be delivered
- The Delivery Component contains information about how
delivery will occur, for example by post or using e-mail.
- The "Offer Response" Signature Component, if present,
digitally signs all of the above components to ensure their
integrity.
- The " Payment Receipt" Signature Component provides proof of
payment by digitally signing the Payment Receipt Component
and the Offer Signature. This is used by the Delivery
Handler to check that delivery is authorised
- The Delivery Note Component contains customer care
information related to a physical delivery, or alternatively
the actual "electronic goods". The Consumer's software does
not interpret information about a physical delivery but
should have the ability to display the information, both at
the time of the delivery and later if the Consumer selects
the Trade to which this delivery relates from a transaction
list.
2.7. Authentication Exchange
The goal of the Authentication Exchange is to allow one
organisation, for example a financial institution, to be able to
check that another organisation, for example a consumer, is who
they appear to be. It uses a "challenge-response" mechanism. This
is illustrated in the diagram below.
- First organization send a request for authentication to the
second organization
- The Second organization generates Authentication Data
containing challenge data and the method of authentication
to be used and then sends it to the first organization
- The first organization uses the challenge data with the
specified authentication method to generate an
Authentication Response which is sent back to the second
organization
- The Authentication Response is checked against the challenge
data to check that the first organization is who they appear
to be.
An Authentication Exchange uses the following Trading Components
that are passed between the two organisations:
- the Authentication Data Component which contains the
challenge data to be used in the "challenge-response"
mechanism and indicates the authentication method to be
used. It is sent by one organisation to the other.
- the Authentication Response Component which contains the
challenge response generated by the recipient of the
Authentication Data Component. It is sent back to the first
organisation for verification.
2.8. Brands and Brand Selection
One of the key features of IOTP is the ability for a merchant to
offer a list of Brands from which a consumer may make a
selection. This section provides an overview of what is involved
and provides guidance on how selection of a brand and associated
payment instrument can be carried out by a Consumer. It covers:
definitions of Payment Instruments and Brands - what are
Payment Instruments and Brands in an IOTP context. Further
categorises Brands as optionally a "Dual Brand" or a
"Promotional Brand",
identification and selection of Promotional Brands -
Promotional Brands offer a Consumer some additional benefit,
for example loyalty points or a discount. This means that
both Consumers and Merchant must be able to correctly
identify that a valid Promotional Brand is being used.
Also see the following sections:
Brand List Component (section 6.12) which contains
definitions of the XML elements which contain the list of
Brands offered by a Merchant to a Consumer, and
Brand Selection Component (section 6.17) for details of how
a Consumer records the Brand that was selected.
2.8.1. Identifying Promotional Brands
There are two problems which need to handled in identifying
Promotional Brands:
- how does the Merchant or their Payment Handler positively
identify the promotional brand being used at the time of
purchase
- how does the Consumer reliably identify the correct
promotional brand from the Brand List presented by the
Merchant
The following is a description of how this could be achieved.
2.8.2. Merchant/Payment Handler Identification of Promotional
Brands
Correct identification that the Consumer is paying using a
Promotional Brand is important since a Consumer might
fraudulently claim to have a Promotional Brand that offers a
reduced payment amount when in reality they do not.
Two approaches seem possible:
- use some feature of the Payment Instrument or the payment
method to positively identify the Brand being used. For
example, the SET certificate for the Brand could be used, if
one is available, or
- use the Payment Instrument (card) number to look up
information about the Payment Instrument on a Payment
Instrument issuer database to determine if the Payment
Instrument is a promotional brand
Note that:
- the first assumes that SET is available.
- the second is only possible if the Merchant, or
alternatively the Payment Handler, has access to card issuer
information.
IOTP does not provide the Merchant with Payment Instrument
information (e.g. a card or account number). This is only sent as
part of the encapsulated payment protocol to a Payment Handler.
This means that:
- the Merchant would have to assume that the Payment
Instrument selected was a valid Promotional Brand, or
- the Payment Handler would have to check that the Payment
Instrument was for the valid Promotional Brand and fail the
payment if it was not.
A Payment Handler checking that a brand is a valid Promotional
Brand is most likely if the Payment Handler is also the Card
Issuer.
2.8.3. Consumer Selection of Promotional Brands
Two ways by which a Consumer can correctly select a Promotional
Brand are:
- the Consumer visually matching a logo for the Promotional
Brand which has been provided to the Consumer by the
Merchant,
- the Consumer's IOTP aware application matching a code for the
Promotional Brand which the application has registered
against a similar code contained in the list of Brands
offered by the Merchant.
In the latter case, the code contained in the Consumer wallet
must match exactly the code in the list offered by the Merchant
otherwise no match will be found. Ways in which the Consumer's
IOTP Aware Application could obtain such a code include:
- the Consumer types the code in directly. This is error prone
and not user friendly, also the consumer needs to be
provided with the code. This approach is not recommended,
- using some information contained in the software or other
data associated with the Payment Instrument. This could be:
o a SET certificate for Brands which use this payment
method
o a code provided by the payment software which handles the
particular payment method, this could apply to, for
example, GeldKarte, Mondex, CyberCash and DigiCash
- the consumer making a initial "manual" link between a
Promotional Brand in the list of Brands offered by the
Merchant and an individual Payment Instrument, the first
time the promotional brand is used. The IOTP Aware
application would then "remember" the code for the
Promotional Brand for use in future purchases
Note: It is not the intention of the developers of this
specification to develop a prescriptive list of payment brands.
It is anticipated that owners of brands will develop distinctive
names for Brands which should mean that name clashes are
unlikely.
3. IOTP Elements
This section describes:
- how Trading Components are constructed into Trading Blocks
and the IOTP Messages which are physically sent in the form
of [XML] documents between the different Trading Roles,
- how IOTP Messages are exchanged between Trading Roles to
create an IOTP Transaction
- the XML definitions of an IOTP Message including a
Transaction Reference Block - an XML element which
identifies an IOTP Transaction and the IOTP Message within it
- the definitions of the XML ID Attributes which are used to
identify IOTP Messages, Trading Blocks and Trading Components
and how these are referred to using Element References from
other XML elements such as
- IOTP Signature Components which use digital signature
techniques to preserve the integrity of IOTP Messages and
provide the trust relationships required by IOTP
- how extra XML Elements and new user defined values for
existing IOTP codes can be used when Extending IOTP, and
finally
3.1. IOTP Message Structure
The structure of an IOTP Message and its relationship with Trading
Blocks and Trading Components is illustrated in the diagram
below.
IOTP Message
|
|
+--------- Trans Ref Block
| |
| +- Tran Id Comp
| +- Msg Id Comp
| .
+--------- Signature Block
| +- Signature
| +- Certificate
| .
| .
+--------- Trading Block
| +- Component
| +- Component
| .
| .
+--------- Trading Block
| +- Component
| +- Component
. .
. .
. .
IOTP Message Structure
IOTP Message is an XML document which is transported between the
trading roles.
Transaction Reference Block describes the IOTP transaction and IOTP
message.
Transaction Id Component uniquely identifies the IOTP transaction
Message Id Component identifies and describes an IOTP message
within an IOTP transaction
Signature Block is optional and if present it contains one or
more Signature Components and their associated certificates
Trading Block is an XML element within an IOTP message that
contains a predefined set of Trading Components
Trading Components are XML elements within an IOTP message and
contains a predefined set of XML elements and attributes
containing information required to support trading exchange.
The diagram also introduces the concept of a Transaction
Reference Block. This block contains, amongst other things, a
globally unique identifier for the IOTP Transaction. Also each
block and component is given an ID Attribute (see section 3.6)
which is unique within an IOTP Transaction. Therefore the
combination of the ID attribute and the globally unique
identifier in the Transaction Reference Block is sufficient to
uniquely identify any Trading Block or Trading Component.
3.2. IOTP Transactions
A predefined set of IOTP Messages exchanged between the Trading
Roles constitute an IOTP Transaction. IOTP Messages can be
transported using a variety of transport mechanisms.
The IOTP Transactions in this version of IOTP are specifically:
Purchase. This supports a purchase involving an offer, a
payment and optionally a delivery
Refund. This supports the refund of a payment as a result of,
typically, an earlier purchase
Value Exchange. This involves two payments which result in the
exchange of value from one combination of currency and
payment method to another
Authentication. This supports the remote authentication of a
Consumer by another Trading Role using a variety of
authentication methods, and the provision of an Organisation
Component about a Consumer to another Trading Role for use
in, for example the creation of an offer
Withdrawal. This supports the withdrawal of electronic cash
from a financial institution
Deposit. This supports the deposit of electronic cash at a
financial institution
Payment Instrument Customer Care. This supports the provision
of Payment Brand or Payment Method specific customer care of
a Payment Instrument
Inquiry This supports inquiries on the status of an IOTP
transaction which is either in progress or is complete
Ping This supports a simple query which enables one IOTP aware
application to determine whether another IOTP application
running elsewhere is working or not.
3.3. IOTP Message
As described earlier, IOTP Messages are [XML] documents which are
physically sent between the different organisations that are
taking part in a trade.
The XML definition of an IOTP Message is as follows.
<!ELEMENT OtpMessage (TransRefBlk, SigBlk?, ErrorBlk?,
( AuthReqBlk |
AuthRespBlk |
DeliveryReqBlk |
DeliveryRespBlk |
InquiryReqBlk |
InquiryRespBlk |
OfferRespBlk |
PayExchBlk |
PayReqBlk |
PayInstCCExchBlk |
PayInstCCReqBlk |
PayInstCCRespBlk
PayRespBlk |
PingReqBlk |
PingRespBlk |
TpoBlk |
TpoSelectionBlk |
)*
) >
Content:
TransRefBlk This contains information which describes an
IOTP Message within an IOTP Transaction (see
section 3.5 immediately below)
AuthReqBlk, AuthRespBlk, DeliveryReqBlk, DeliveryRespBlk, ErrorBlk
InquiryReqBlk, InquiryRespBlk, OfferRespBlk, PayExchBlk, PayReqBlk,
PayInstCCExchBlk, PayInstCCReqBlk, PayInstCCRespBlk PayRespBlk,
PingReqBlk, PingRespBlk, SigBlk, TpoBlk, TpoSelectionBlk
3.4. XML Document Prolog
The IOTP Message is the root element of the XML document. It
therefore needs to be preceded by an appropriate XML Document
Prolog. For example:
<?XML Version='1.0'?>
<!DOCTYPE OtpMessage >
<OtpMessage>
...
</OtpMessage>
3.5. Transaction Reference Block
A Transaction Reference Block contains information which
identifies the IOTP Transaction and IOTP Message. The Transaction
Reference Block contains:
- a Transaction Id Component which globally uniquely
identifies the IOTP Transaction. The Transaction Id
Components are the same across all IOTP messages that
comprise a single IOTP transaction,
- a Message Id Component which provides control information
about the IOTP Message as well as uniquely identifying the
IOTP Message within an IOTP Transaction, and
- zero or more Related To Components which link this IOTP
Transaction to either other IOTP Transactions or other events
using the identifiers of those events.
The definition of a Transaction Reference Block is as follows:
<!ELEMENT TransRefBlk (TransId, MsgId, RelatedTo*) >
<!ATTLIST TransRefBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Transaction Reference Block within the IOTP
Transaction (see section 3.6 ID Attributes).
Content:
TransId See 3.5.1 Transaction Id Component
immediately below.
MsgId See 3.5.2 Message Id Component immediately
below.
RelatedTo See 3.5.3 Related To Component immediately
below.
3.5.1. Transaction Id Component
This contains information which globally uniquely identifies the
IOTP Transaction. Its definition is as follows:
<!ELEMENT TransId EMPTY>
<!ATTLIST TransId
ID ID #REQUIRED
Version NMTOKEN #FIXED '1.0'
OtpTransId NMTOKEN #REQUIRED
OtpTransType CDATA #REQUIRED >
TransTimeStamp CDATA #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Transaction Id Component within the IOTP
Transaction.
Version This identifies the version of IOTP, and
therefore the structure of the IOTP Messages,
which the IOTP Transaction is using.
OtpTransId Contains data which uniquely identifies the
IOTP Transaction. It must conform to the
rules for Message Ids in [RFC 822].
OtpTransType This is the type of IOTP Transaction being
carried out. For Baseline IOTP it identifies
a "standard" IOTP Transaction and implies the
sequence and content of the IOTP Messages
exchanged between the Trading Roles. The
valid values for Baseline IOTP are:
BaselineAuthentication
BaselineDeposit
BaselinePurchase
BaselineRefund
BaselineWithdrawal
BaselineValueExchange
BaselineInquiry
BaselinePing
BaselinePayInstrumentCustomerCare
x-ddd:nnn
A value for OtpTransType of x-ddd:nnn
indicates a user defined transaction type.
See section 3.9.3 User Defined Codes.
In later versions of IOTP, this list will be
extended to support different types of
standard IOTP Transaction based on market
demand. It is also likely to support the
type Dynamic which indicates that the
sequence of steps within the transaction are
non-standard.
TransTimeStamp Where the system initiating the IOTP
Transaction has an internal clock, it is set
to the time at which the IOTP Transaction
started in [UTC] format.
The main purpose of this attribute is to
provide an alternative way of identifying a
transaction by specifying the time at which
it started.
Some systems, for example, hand held devices
may not be able to generate a time stamp.
In this case this attribute should contain
the value "NA" for Not Available.
3.5.2. Message Id Component
The Message Id Component provides control information about the
IOTP Message as well as uniquely identifying the IOTP Message
within an IOTP Transaction. Its definition is as follows.
<!ELEMENT MsgId EMPTY >
<!ATTLIST MsgId
ID ID #REQUIRED
RespOtpMsg NMTOKEN #IMPLIED
xml:lang NMTOKEN #REQUIRED
SoftwareId CDATA #REQUIRED
TimeStamp CDATA #IMPLIED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
IOTP Message within the IOTP Transaction (see
section 3.6 ID Attributes). Note that if an
IOTP Message is resent then the value of this
attribute remains the same.
RespOtpMsg This contains the ID attribute of the
Message Id Component of the IOTP Message to
which this IOTP Message is a response. In
this way all the IOTP Messages in an IOTP
Transaction are unambiguously linked
together. This field is required on every
IOTP Message except the first IOTP Message in
an IOTP Transaction.
xml:lang Defines the language used by attributes or
child elements within this component, unless
overridden by an xml:lang attribute on a
child element. See section 3.10 Identifying
Languages.
SoftwareId This contains information which identifies
the software which generated the IOTP
Message. Its purpose is to help resolve
interoperability problems that might occur
as a result of incompatibilities between
messages produced by different software. It
is a single text string in the language
defined by xml:lang. It MUST contain, as a
minimum:
the name of the software manufacturer
the name of the software
the version of the software, and
the build of the software
TimeStamp Where the device sending the message has an
internal clock, it is set to the time at
which the IOTP Message was created in [UTC]
format.
3.5.3. Related To Component
The Related To Component links IOTP Transactions to either other
IOTP Transactions or other events using the identifiers of those
events. Its definition is as follows.
<!ELEMENT RelatedTo (PackagedContent) >
<!ATTLIST RelatedTo
ID ID #REQUIRED
xml:lang NMTOKEN #REQUIRED
RelationshipType NMTOKEN #REQUIRED
Relation CDATA #REQUIRED
RelnKeyWords NMTOKENS #IMPLIED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Related To Component within the IOTP
Transaction.
xml:lang Defines the language used by attributes or
child elements within this component, unless
overridden by an xml:lang attribute on a
child element. See section 3.10 Identifying
Languages.
RelationshipType Defines the type of the relationship. Valid
values are:
OtpTransaction. in which case the Packaged
Content Element contains an OtpTransId of
another IOTP Transaction
Reference in which case the Packaged Content
Element contains the reference of some
other, non-IOTP document.
x-ddd:nnn a user defined code (see section
3.9.3)
Relation The Relation attribute contains a phrase in
the language defined by xml:lang which
describes the nature of the relationship
between the IOTP transaction that contains
this component and another IOTP Transaction
or other event. The exact words to be used
are left to the implementer of the IOTP
software.
The purpose of the attribute is to provide
the Trading Roles involved in an IOTP
Transaction with an explanation of the
nature of the relationship between the
transactions.
Care should be taken that the words used to
in the Relation attribute indicate the
"direction" of the relationship correctly.
For example: one transaction might be a
refund for another earlier transaction. In
this case the transaction which is a refund
should contain in the Relation attribute
words such as "refund for" rather than
"refund to" or just "refund".
RelnKeyWords This attribute contains keywords which could
be used to help identify similar
relationships, for example all refunds. It
is anticipated that recommended keywords
will be developed through examination of
actual usage. In this version of the
specification there are no specific
recommendations and the keywords used are at
the discretion of the implementer.
Content:
PackagedContent The Packaged Content (see section 3.8)
contains data which identifies the related
transaction. Its format varies depending on
the value of the RelationshipType.
3.6. ID Attributes
IOTP Messages, Blocks (i.e. Transaction Reference Blocks and
Trading Blocks) and Trading Components (including the Transaction
Id Component and the Signature Component) are each given an XML
"ID" attribute which is used to identify an instance of these XML
elements. These identifiers are used so that one element can be
referenced by another. All these attributes are given the
attribute name ID.
The values of each ID attribute are unique within an IOTP
transaction i.e. the set of IOTP Messages which have the same
globally unique Transaction ID Component. This means that it is
possible to use these IDs to refer to and locate the content of
any IOTP Message, Block or Component from any other IOTP Message,
Block or Component in the same IOTP Transaction using Element
References (see section 3.7).
This section defines the rules for setting the values for the ID
attributes of IOTP Messages Blocks and Components.
3.6.1. IOTP Message ID Attribute Definition
The ID attribute of the Message Id Component of an IOTP Message
must be unique within an IOTP Transaction. It's definition is as
follows:
OtpMsgId_value ::= OtpMsgIdPrefix OtpMsgIdSuffix
OtpMsgIdPrefix ::= NameChar (NameChar)*
OtpMsgIdSuffix ::= Digit (Digit)*
OtpMsgIdPrefix Apart from messages which contain an Inquiry
Request Trading Block (see section 4.14), the
same prefix is used for all messages sent by
the Merchant or Consumer role as follows:
"M" Merchant
"C" Consumer
For messages which contain an Inquiry Request
Trading Block, the prefix is set to "I" for
Inquiry.
The prefix for the other roles in a trade is
contained within the Organisation Component
for the role and are typically set by the
Merchant. The following is recommended as a
guideline and must not be relied upon:
"P" - First (only) Payment Handler
"R" - Second Payment Handler
"D" - Delivery Handler
As a guideline, prefixes should be limited to
one character.
NameChar has the same definition as the [XML]
definition of NameChar.
OtpMsgIdSuffix The suffix consists of one or more digits. The
suffix must be unique within a Trading Role
within an IOTP Transaction. The following is
recommended as a guideline and must not be
relied upon:
the first IOTP Message sent by a trading role
is given the suffix "1"
the second and subsequent IOTP Messages sent by
the same trading role are incremented by one
for each message
no leading zeroes are included in the suffix
Put more simply the Message Id Component of
the first IOTP Message sent by a Consumer would
have an ID attribute of, "C1", the second
"C2", the third "C3" etc.
Digit has the same definition as the [XML]
definition of Digit.
3.6.2. Block and Component ID Attribute Definitions
The ID Attribute of Blocks and Components must also be unique
within an IOTP Transaction. Their definition is as follows:
BlkOrCompId_value ::= OtpMsgId "." IdSuffix
IdSuffix ::= Digit (Digit)*
OtpMsgId The ID attribute of the Message ID Component
of the IOTP Message where the Block or
Component is first used.
In IOTP, Trading Components and Trading
Blocks are copied from one IOTP Message to
another. The ID attribute does not change
when an existing Trading Block or Component
is copied to another IOTP Message.
IdSuffix The suffix consists of one or more digits.
The suffix must be unique within the ID
attribute of the Message ID Component used
to generate the ID attribute. The following
is recommended as a guideline and must not
be relied upon:
the first Block or Component sent by a
trading role is given the suffix "1"
the ID attributes of the second and
subsequent Blocks or Components are
incremented by one for each new Block or
Component added to an IOTP Message
no leading zeroes are included in the suffix
Put more simply, the first new Block or
Component added to the second IOTP Message
sent, for example, by a consumer would have
a an ID attribute of "C2.1", the second
"C2.2", the third "C2.3" etc.
Digit has the same definition as the [XML]
definition of Digit.
3.7. Element References
A Trading Component or one of its child XML elements, may contain
an XML attribute that refers to another Block (i.e. a Transaction
Reference Block or a Trading Block) or Trading Component
(including a Transaction Id and Signature Component). These
Element References are used for many purposes, a few examples
include:
- identifying an XML element whose hash value is included in a
Signature Component,
- referring to the Payment Handler Organisation Component
which is used when making a Payment
An Element Reference always contains the value of an ID attribute
of a Block or Component.
- Identifying the IOTP Message, Trading Block or Trading
Component which is referred to by an Element Reference,
involves finding the XML element which:
- belongs to the same IOTP Transaction (i.e. the Transaction Id
Components of the IOTP Messages match), and
- where the value of the ID attribute of the element matches
the value of the Element Reference.
3.8. Packaged Content Element
The Packaged Content element supports the concept of an embedded
data stream, transformed to both protect it against
misinterpretation by transporting systems and to ensure XML
compatibility. Examples of its use in IOTP include:
- to encapsulate payment scheme messages, such as SET
messages,
- to encapsulate a description of an order.
In general it is used to encapsulate any data stream.
This data stream has two standardised attributes that allow for
decoding and interpretation of the contents. Its definition is as
follows.
<!ELEMENT PackagedContent (#PCDATA)>
<!ATTLIST PackagedContent
Content NMTOKEN"PCDATA"
Transform (NONE|BASE64) "NONE" >
Attributes:
Content This identifies what type of data is
contained within the Content of the Packaged
Content Element. The valid values for the
Content attribute are as follows:
PCDATA.The content of the Packaged Content
Element can be treated as PCDATA with no
further processing.
MIME. The content of the Packaged Content
Element is a complete MIME item. Processing
should include looking for MIME headers
inside the Packaged Content Element.
MIME:mimetype. The content of the Packaged
Content Element is MIME content, with the
following header "Content-Type: mimetype".
Although it is possible to have
MIME:mimetype with the Transform attribute
set to NONE, it is far more likely to have
Transform attribute set to BASE64. Note that
if Transform is NONE is used, then the
entire content must still conform to PCDATA.
Some characters will need to be encoded
either as the XML default entities, or as
numeric character entities.
XML. The content of the Packaged Content
Element can be treated as an XML document.
Entities and CDATA sections, or Transform
set to BASE64, must be used to ensure that
the Packaged Content Element contents are
legitimate PCDATA.
x-ddd:usercode. The content is private,
where ddd represents a domain name of a
user, and usercode represents a particular
content format defined by that user. The
guidelines around a x-ddd are very loose.
Given company FFGGHH Inc., all of
x-www.ffgghh.com, x-ffgghh.comand and
x-ffgghh are legitimate examples. However,
only one should be the correct format, as
defined by FFGGHH Inc.
Transform This identifies the transformation that has
been done to the data before it was placed
in the content. Valid values are:
NONE. The PCDATA content of the Packaged
Content Element is the correct
representation of the data. Note that entity
expansion must occur first (i.e. replacement
of &amp; and &#9;) before the data is
examined. CDATA sections may legitimately
occur in a Packaged Content Element where
the Transform attribute is set to NONE.
BASE64. The PCDATA content of the Packaged
Content Element represents a BASE64 encoding
of the actual content.
Content:
PCDATA This is the actual data which has been
embedded. The format of the data and rules
on how to decode it are contained in the
Content and the Transform attributes
Note that any special details, especially custom attributes, must
be represented at a higher level.
3.9. Extending IOTP
Baseline IOTP defines a minimum protocol which systems supporting
IOTP must be able to accept. As new versions of IOTP are developed,
additional types of IOTP Transactions will be defined. In addition
to this, Baseline and future versions of IOTP will support user
extensions to IOTP through two mechanisms:
o extra XML elements, and
o new user-defined values for existing IOTP codes.
3.9.1. Extra XML Elements
The XML element and attribute names used within IOTP constitute an
[XML Namespace]. This allows IOTP to support the inclusion of
additional XML elements within IOTP messages through the use of
[XML Namespaces].
Extra XML elements may be included at any level within an IOTP
message including:
- new Trading Blocks
- new Trading Components
- new XML elements within a Trading Component.
The following rules apply:
- any new XML element must be declared according to the rules
for [XML Namespaces]. This means that:
o the namespace must be declared to the XML parser
o each element must have a start and end tags which conform
to the rules for XML Namespaces
- new XML elements which are either Trading Blocks or Trading
Components MUST contain an ID attributes with an attribute
name of ID.
In order to make sure that extra XML elements can be processed
properly, IOTP reserves the use of a special attribute,
Otp:Critical, which takes the values True or False and may appear
in extra elements added to an IOTP message.
The purpose of this attribute is to allow an IOTP aware
application to determine if the IOTP transaction can safely
continue. Specifically:
- if an extra XML element has an "Otp:Critical" attribute with
a value of "True" and an IOTP aware application does not know
how to process the element and its child elements, then the
IOTP transaction must fail. See section 6.34 Error Component.
- if an extra XML element has an "Otp:Critical" attribute with
a value of "False" then the IOTP transaction may continue if
the IOTP aware application does not know how to process it.
In this case:
o any extra XML elements contained within an XML element
defined within the IOTP namespace, must be included with
that element whenever the IOTP XML element is used or
copied by IOTP
o the content of the extra element must be ignored except
that it must be included when it is hashed as part of the
generation of a signature
- if an extra XML element has no "Otp:Critical" attribute then
it must be treated as if it had an "Otp:Critical" attribute
with a value of "True"
- if an XML element contains an "Otp:Critical" attribute, then
the value of that attribute is assumed to apply to all the
child elements within that element
In order to ensure that documents containing "Otp:Critical" are
valid, it is declared as part of the DTD for the extra element
as:
Otp:Critical(True | False ) #IMPLIED
3.9.2. Opaque Embedded Data
If IOTP is to be extended using Opaque Embedded Data then a
Packaged Content Element (see section 3.8) should be used to
encapsulate the data.
3.9.3. User Defined Codes
User defined codes provide a simple way to identify additional
values for the codes contained within this specification.
The definition of a user defined code is as follows:
user_defined_code ::= ( "x-" | "X-" ) domain_name ":"
name
domain_name A name which identifies the organisation which is
creating the user defined code (see [DNS]). The
purpose of this field is to reduce the
probability of two organisations creating the
same user-defined name
name A name specified by the organisation which owns
the domain_name which identifies the user defined
code within the domain_name.
User defined codes are identified in this specification as "x-
ddd:nnn". The values of User Defined Codes must conform to the
rules for the specific code (see explanations of the individual
codes).
3.10. Identifying Languages
IOTP uses [XML] Language Identification to specify which languages
are used within the content and attributes of IOTP Messages.
The following principles have been used in order to determine
which XML elements contain an xml:lang Attributes:
- a mandatory xml:lang attribute is contained on every Trading
Component which contains attributes or content which may
need to be displayed or printed in a particular language
- an optional xml:lang attribute is included on child elements
of these Trading Components. In this case the value of
xml:lang, if present, overrides the value for the Trading
Component.
xml:lang attributes which follow these principles are included in
the Trading Components and their child XML elements defined in
section 6.
3.11. Secure and Insecure Net Locations
IOTP contains several "Net Locations" which identify places where,
typically, IOTP Messages may be sent. Net Locations come in two
types:
- "Secure" Net Locations which are net locations where privacy
of data is secured using, for example, encryption methods
such as [SSL], and
- "Insecure" Net Locations where privacy of data is not
assured.
Where both types of net location are present, the following rules
apply:
- either a Secure Net Location or an Insecure Net Location or
both must be present
- if only one of the two Net Locations is present, then the
one present must be used
- if both are present, then the either may be used depending
on preference the preference of the sender of the message.
4. Internet Open Trading Protocol Transactions
The Baseline Internet Open Trading Protocol supports the following
types of Baseline IOTP Transactions:
- Authentication
- Deposit
- Purchase
- Refund
- Withdrawal
- Baseline Value Exchange
- Payment Instrument Customer Care
- Transaction Status Inquiry, and
- Ping
Each of these transactions are described in more detail in the
following sections providing descriptions of:
- the Trading Blocks in each IOTP Transaction
- the Trading Components in each Trading Block, and
- how the Trading Components are signed
Note: There are many similarities between the transactions within
IOTP. This is because there is a lot of reuse of the Trading
Blocks between the different transactions.
This means that there should be significant opportunity for
software re-use. For example, from an IOTP perspective, the
Deposit, Refund and Withdrawal transactions are essentially the
same, although the processing which will occur, especially at the
server end, will differ.
4.1. Baseline Authentication IOTP Transaction
The Baseline Authentication IOTP Transaction supports:
- the remote authentication of a Consumer by another Trading
Role using a variety of authentication methods, and
- the provision of Organization Component about a Consumer to
another Trading Role.
Typical use includes:
- when the Baseline Authentication IOTP Transaction takes place
as an early part of a session where strong continuity
exists. For example, a Financial Institution could:
o set up a secure channel (e.g. using SSL) with a customer
o authenticate the customer using the Baseline
Authentication IOTP Transaction, and then
o provide the customer with access to account information
and other services with the confidence that they are
communicating with a bona fide customer.
- as a means of providing a Merchant role with Organization
Components that contain information about Consumer and
DelivTo Trading Roles.
1. The Baseline Authentication IOTP Transaction consists of just
the Authentication Trading Exchange.The Authentication
Exchange consists of a set of predefined IOTP Messages which
are exchanged between the Trading Roles.
2. OUA initiates the IOTP transaction using out-of-band process.
3. OTR SHALL send an Authentication Request Block containing
challenge data and authentication method along with the TPO
Block.
4. Trading Protocol Options Block MUST contain one Protocol
Options Component which defines the options which apply to
the whole IOTP Transaction. Authentication Request Block MUST
contain one Authentication Data Component (see section 6.2)
5. OUA uses the challenge data, authentication method to
generate Authentication Response Block. OUA MAY store all or
partial information on IOTP transaction for record keeping
purposes.
6. OUA SHALL send Authentication Response to the OTR.
Authentication Response Block MUST contain one
Authentication Response Component (see section 6.3).
7. OTR SHALL checks the Authentication Response against the
challenge data and authentication method to verify the
validity of the OUA identity.
8. There are no variations of the Baseline Authentication IOTP
Transaction.
4.2. Baseline Deposit IOTP Transaction
The Baseline Deposit IOTP Transaction supports the deposit of
electronic cash with a Financial Institution.
The Baseline Deposit IOTP Transaction occurs in two basic forms:
- Baseline Deposit with Authentication. Where the Consumer
making the deposit is authenticated before the deposit is
made, and
- Baseline Deposit without Authentication. Where the Consumer
is not authenticated before the deposit is made.
4.2.1. Baseline Desposit with Authentication
1. OUA sends information about how much to deposit, the brand
to be used etc. to the OTR using out-of-band process.
2. OTR sets the payment brand, protocol to offer and generates
the Authentication Request and sends to OUA. Trading
Protocol Options Block MUST contain one Protocol Options
Component which defines the options which apply to the whole
IOTP Transaction and one Brand List Component(see section
6.12) which contains the payment brand and protocols which
may be selected for use in the Payment Exchange.
Authentication Request Block MUST contain one Authentication
Data Component (see section 6.2).
3. OUA selects the payment protocol to use, records selection
in Brand Selection Component, generates an Authentication
Response Block and sends back to the OTR. TPO Selection
Block MUST contain one Brand Selection Component (see
section 6.17) for use in the Payment Exchange. It contains
the results of the consumer selecting a Payment Brand and
Payment Protocol from the list provided in the Brand List
Component. Authentication Response Block MUST contain one
Authentication Response Component (see section 6.3).
4. OTR checks the Authentication Response against the challenge
data and authentication method to validate the OUA identity.
5. On successful authentication, OTR SHALL generate Offer
Response Block containing information about the deposit. OTR
MAY optionally include the Signature Block and sends it to
the OUA. Offer Response Block MUST contain:
o zero or one Authentication Data Component (see section
6.2) An Authentication Data Component is required for
each Payment Exchange, where its Payment Component
contains an AuthDataRef attribute
o one Order Component (see section 6.4) which contains
details about the deposit, for example the amount of
value being deposited and any fees which might apply
o one Payment Component (see section 6.21) which contains
information about the payment which is to be made
o Organization Components (see section 6.7) with the
following roles:
* the Merchant who is accepting the deposit
* the Consumer who is making the deposit
* the PaymentHandler for the payment. The "ID" of the
Payment Handler Organization Component is contained
within the VaOrgRef attribute of the Payment Component
(see section 6.21)
o one Delivery Component (see section 6.24) with the
DelivExch attribute set to False.
6. If the Offer Response is being digitally signed then a
Signature Block MUST be included in the same IOTP message
that contains an "Offer Response" Signature Component (see
section 6.30). The Signature Component contains hashes of
the following XML elements:
o the Transaction Reference Block (see section 3.5) for the
IOTP Message which contains the first usage of the Offer
Response Block within the IOTP Transaction. It contains
information that identifies the IOTP Message and IOTP
Transaction
o the Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1) which
globally uniquely identifies the IOTP Transaction
o the Authentication Data Component if present, the Order
Component, the Payment Component, all the Organization
Components present, andthe Delivery Component of the
Offer Response Block
o the Protocol Options Component, and the Brand List
Component of the TPO Block.
o the Brand Selection Component contained in the TPO
Selection Block.
7. OUA checks if Offer is OK, combines components from the TPO
Block, the TPO Selection Block and the Offer Response Block
to create the Payment Request Block and sends it to the
Payment Handler with the Signature Block if it present. The
Payment Request Block (see section 5.6) MUSTcontains:
o the following components copied from the Offer Response
Block:
* the Authentication Data Component if present
* the Payment Component
* the Organization Components with the roles of: Merchant
and PaymentHandler
o the following component from the TPO Block:
* the Brand List Component
o one Brand Selection Component either:
* copied from the Offer Response Block if the deposit is
a Baseline Deposit with Authentication, or
* created by the Consumer, containing the payment brand
and payment protocol selected, if the deposit is a
Baseline Deposit without Authentication
o one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if
required by the payment method used (see the Payment
Method supplement to determine if this is needed).
8. If the Baseline Deposit Offer Response Block was signed then
the IOTP Message that contains the Payment Request Block must
also contain a Signature Block with a copy of the "Offer
Response" Signature Component.
9. Payment Handlers SHOULD check that they are authorised to
carry out the Payment (see section 9 Security
Considerations). Payment Handler starts exchanging the
payment protocol messages, encapsulated in the Payment
Exchange Block. On successful completion of payment protocol
messages, Payment Handler creates Payment Response Block
with an optional Signature Block and sends it to the OUA.The
Payment Exchange Block (see section 5.7) MUST contain one
Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) which contains
payment method specific data. See the Payment Method
supplement for the payment method being used to determine
what this should contain. The Payment Response Block (see
section 5.8) MUST contain
o one Payment Receipt Component(see section 6.23) which
contains scheme specific data which can be used to verify
the payment occurred
o one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if
required which contains payment method specific data. See
the Payment Method supplement for the payment method
being used to determine what this should contain
o the "Offer Response" Signature Component (see section
6.30) from the Payment Request Block if present.
10. If a signed Payment Receipt is being provided, indicated by
the SignedPayReceipt attribute of the Payment Component of
the Offer Response Block being set to True, then the IOTP
Message that contains the Payment Response Block must also
contain a Signature Block with a "Payment Receipt" Signature
Component which contains hashes of the following:
o the Transaction Reference Block (see section 3.5) for the
IOTP Message which contains the first usage of the Payment
Response Block,
o the Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1) within
the Transaction Reference Block that globally uniquely
identifies the IOTP Transaction,
o the Payment Receipt Component from the Payment Response
Block and
o the "Offer Response" Signature Component from the Payment
Request Block if present.
11. OUA checks Payment Response is OK. OUA MAY store information
on IOTP transaction for record keeping purposes.
4.2.2. Baseline Deposit Without Authentication
In Baseline Deposit without Authentication, there is no
Authentication Exchange and the OTR provides details about the
deposit immediately at the start of the IOTP Transaction.
The Baseline Deposit without authentication might be used:
- if a previous IOTP transaction, for example a Baseline
Withdrawal or a Baseline Authentication, authenticated the
consumer, and a secure channel has been maintained,
therefore the authenticity of the consumer is known
- if authentication is achieved as part of a proprietary
payment protocol and is therefore included in the Payment
Exchange
- if authentication of the consumer has been achieved by some
other means outside of the scope of IOTP, for example, by
using a pass phrase.
IOTP aware applications supporting the Consumer Trading Role must
check for the existence of an Authentication Request Block in the
first IOTP Message to determine whether the Baseline Deposit
includes an Authentication Exchange or not.
4.3. Baseline Purchase IOTP Transaction
The Baseline Purchase IOTP Transaction supports the purchase of
goods or services using any payment method. The Baseline Purchase
IOTP Transaction occurs in two basic forms:
- Brand Dependent Purchase. Where the content of the offer,
e.g. the order details, amount, delivery details, etc., are
dependent on the payment brand and protocol selected by the
consumer, and
- Brand Independent Purchase. Where the content of the offer
is not dependent on the payment brand and protocol selected.
Further variation is supported in that:
- the Delivery Exchange is optional, and
- the Delivery Response Block may be sent to the consumer
either:
o at the same time as the Payment Response Block, or
o after the Payment Response Block as the result of the
Consumer sending the Delivery Handler a Delivery Request
Block.
4.3.1. Brand Dependent Purchases
1. In a Brand Dependent Purchase the TPO Block and the Offer
Response Block MUST BE sent separately by the Merchant to
the Consumer, i.e.:
o the Brand List Component is sent to the Consumer in a TPO
Block,
o the Consumer selects a Payment Brand, Payment Protocol
and optionally a Currency and amount from the Brand List
Component
o the Consumer sends the selected brand, protocol and
currency/amount back to the Merchant in a TPO Selection
Block, and
o the Merchant uses the information received to define the
content of and then send the Offer Response Block to the
Consumer.
2. In a Brand Independent Purchase the TPO Block and the Offer
Response Block are sent together by the Merchant to the
Consumer in the same IOTP Message at the start of the IOTP
Transaction.
3. A Brand Independent Purchase always occurs when only one
payment brand and protocol is being offered to the Consumer
by the Merchant. It is also likely to, but will not
necessarily, occur when multiple brands are being offered,
the Payment Handler is the same, and all brands use the same
set of protocols.
4. Note that the TPO Block and the Offer Response Block may be
sent in separate IOTP messages even if the Offer Response
Block does not change. However this increases the number of
messages in the transaction and is therefore likely to
increase transaction response times.
5. IOTP aware applications supporting the Consumer Trading Role
must check for the existence of an Offer Response Block in
the first IOTP Message to determine whether the Baseline
Purchase is brand dependent or not.
4.3.2. Combining Delivery Response Block and Payment Response Block
1. The Delivery Response Block and the Payment Response Block
may be sent:
o separately by the Payment Handler to the Consumer, i.e.:
* the Payment Response Block containing a Payment Receipt
and optional signature for the payment is sent by the
Payment Handler to the Consumer,
* the Consumer combines these components from the Payment
Response Block with components from the Offer Response
Block, to create a Delivery Request Block
* the Consumer sends the Delivery Request Block to the
Delivery Handler
* the Delivery Handler processes the Delivery Request
Block and sends a Delivery Response Block back to the
Consumer, or
o together, from the Payment Handler to the Consumer, when
the Payment Exchange is complete.
2. The Delivery Response Block and the Payment Response Block
are sent to the Consumer in separate IOTP Messages.
3. The Delivery Response Block and the Payment Response Block
may be combined into the same IOTP Message only if the
Payment Handler has the information available so that she
can send the Delivery Response Block. This is likely to, but
will not necessarily, occur when the Merchant, the Payment
Handler and the Delivery Handler Roles are combined. The
DelivAndPayResp attribute of the Delivery Component (see
section 6.24) contained within the Offer Response Block (see
section 5.3) is set to True if the Delivery Response Block
and the Payment Response Block are combined into the same
IOTP Message and is set to False if the Delivery Response
Block and the Payment Response Block are sent in separate
IOTP Messages.
4.3.3. Optional Delivery Exchange
The final variation of the Baseline Purchase IOTP Transactions is
a purchase without a delivery. The DelivExch attribute of the
Delivery Component (see section 6.24) contained in the Offer
Response Block (see section 5.3) is set to False if the Delivery
Exchange is omitted and is set to True if the Delivery Exchange
is included.
4.3.4. Baseline Purchase Transaction
1. OUA starts the IOTP Purchase Transaction by sending
information about what to purchase using the out-of-band
process.
2. OTR(Merchant) decides which payment brand and protocols to
offer, places them in the TPO Block and sends to
OUA(Consumer).The Error! Reference source not found. (see
section Error! Reference source not found.) MUST contain:
o one Protocol Options Component which defines the options
which apply to the whole IOTP Transaction. See Section
6.1.
o one Brand List Component (see section 6.12) which
contains one or more payment brands and protocols which
may be selected for use in the Payment Exchange.
3. OUA selects the payment brand and payment protocol and
records the selection in a TPO Selection Block and sends
back to the OTR(Merchant).The TPO Selection Block (see
section 5.2) is only used by Brand Dependent Purchase. It
MUST contain one Brand Selection Component (see section
6.17) for use in the Payment Exchange. It contains the
results of the consumer selecting a Payment Brand and
Payment Protocol from the list provided in the Brand List
Component.
4. The OTR(Merchant) uses payment brand and protocol selected
and information on what being purchased to create an Offer
Response Block containing details about goods ordered, price
etc and MAY optionally include Signature Block and sends it
to OUA(Consumer).The Offer Response Block (see section 5.3)
MUST contain:
o zero or one Authentication Data Component (see section
6.2) An Authentication Data Component is required for
each Payment Exchange, where its Payment Component (see
section 6.21) contains an AuthDataRef attribute.
o one Order Component (see section 6.4) which contains
details about the goods, services which are being
purchased
o one Payment Component (see section 6.21) which contains
information about the payment which is to be made
o Organization Components (see section 6.7) with the
following roles:
* Merchant who is providing the goods or services
* Consumer who is making the purchase
* PaymentHandler for the payment. The "ID" of the Payment
Handler Organization Component is contained within the
VaOrgRef attribute of the Payment Component
o one Delivery Component (see section 6.24) which contains
details of the delivery to be made.
5. If the Baseline Purchase includes a Delivery Exchange then
the Offer Response Block MUST also contain Organization
Components with the following roles:
o DeliveryHandler who will be delivering the goods or
services
o DelivTo i.e. the person or Organization which is to take
delivery
6. If the Baseline Purchase Offer Response is being digitally
signed then a Signature Block MUST BE included in the same
IOTP message that contains an "Offer Response" Signature
Component (see section 6.30). The Signature Component MUST
contain hashes of the following XML elements:
o the Transaction Reference Block (see section 3.5) for the
IOTP Message which contains the first usage of the Offer
Response Block within the IOTP Transaction. It contains
information that identifies the IOTP Message and IOTP
Transaction
o the Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1) which
globally uniquely identifies the IOTP Transaction
o the following components of the Offer Response Block:
* the Authentication Data Component if present
* the Order Component
* the Payment Component
* all the Organization Components present, and
* the Delivery Component,
o the following components of the TPO Block :
* the Protocol Options Component, and
* the Brand List Component
o If the Baseline Purchase is a Brand Dependent Purchase
then the Signature Component additionally contains a hash
of the following:
* the Brand Selection Component contained in the TPO
Selection Block.
7. OUA(Consumer) checks Offer is OK, combines components from
the TPO Block, TPO Selection Block and ther Offer Response
Block to create a Payment Request Block and sends it back to
the Payment Handler together with the Signature Block if
present. The Payment Request Block (see section 5.6) MUST
contain:
o the following components copied from the Offer Response
Block:
* the Authentication Data Component if present
* the Payment Component
* the Organization Components with the roles of: Merchant
and PaymentHandler
o the following component from the TPO Block:
* the Brand List Component
o one Brand Selection Component either:
* copied from the Offer Response Block if the purchase is
a Brand Dependent Purchase, or
* created by the Consumer, containing the payment brand
and payment protocol selected, if the purchase is a
Brand Independent Purchase
o one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if
required by the payment method used (see the Payment
Method supplement to determine if this is needed).
8. If the Baseline Purchase Offer Response Block was signed
then the IOTP Message that contains the Payment Request Block
must also contain a Signature Block with a copy of the
"Offer Response" Signature Component.
9. The Payment Exchange Block (see section 5.7) MUST contain
one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) which
contains payment method specific data. See the Payment
Method supplement for the payment method being used to
determine what this should contain.
10. Payment Handlers SHOULD check that they are authorised to
carry out the Payment (see section 9 Security
Considerations). Payment Handler checks optional signature,
processes Payment Request Block and starts exchanging
payment protocol messages, encapsulated in a Payment
Exchange Block with the OUA(Consumer). On successful
completion of the payment protocol messages, Payment Handler
creates Payment Response Block and send to the
OUA(Consumer).The Payment Response Block (see section 5.8)
MUST contain:
o one Payment Receipt Component (see section) which
contains scheme specific data which can be used to verify
the payment occurred
o one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if
required which contains payment method specific data. See
the Payment Method supplement for the payment method
being used to determine what this should contain
o the "Offer Response" Signature Component (see section
6.30) from the Payment Request Block if present.
11. If a signed Payment Receipt is being provided, indicated by
the SignedPayReceipt attribute of the Payment Component of
the Offer Response Block being set to True, then the IOTP
Message that contains the Payment Response Block must also
contain a Signature Block with a "Payment Receipt" Signature
Component which contains hashes of the following:
o the Transaction Reference Block (see section 3.5) for the
IOTP Message which contains the first usage of the Payment
Response Block,
o the Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1) within
the Transaction Reference Block that globally uniquely
identifies the IOTP Transaction,
o the Payment Receipt Component from the Payment Response
Block and
o the "Offer Response" Signature Component from the Payment
Request Block if present.
12. OUA(Consumer checks Payment Response is OK and creates a
Delivery Request from Payment Response Block, Offer Response
Block and Signature Block, if present, and sends to the
Delivert Handler. The Delivery Request Block (see section
5.9) MUSTcontain:
o the following components copied from the Offer Response
Block:
* the Order Component (see section 6.4)
* the Organization Component (see section 6.7) with the
roles of: Merchant, DeliveryHandler and DeliverTo
* the Delivery Component (see section 6.24)
13. Delivery Handler checks Payment Receipt, Order in Offer
Response and the optional signatures, creates a Delivery
Response Block, sends it to OUA(Consumer). The Delivery
Response Block MUST contain one Delivery Note Component (see
section 6.26) which contains delivery instructions about the
delivery of goods or services
Payment Handlers should check that they are authorised to carry
out the Payment (see section 9 Security Considerations).
If the Baseline Purchase Offer Response or Payment Response
Blocks were signed then the IOTP Message that contains the
Delivery Request Block MUST also contain a Signature Block with a
copy of:
- the "Offer Response" Signature Component if present, and/or
- the "Payment Receipt" Signature Component, if present
4.4. Baseline Refund IOTP Transaction
In business terms the refund process typically consists of:
- a request for a refund being made by the Consumer to the
Merchant, typically supported by evidence to demonstrate:
o the original trade took place, for example by providing a
receipt for the original transaction
o using some type of authentication, that the consumer
requesting the refund is the consumer, or a
representative of the consumer, who carried out the
original trade
o the reason why the merchant should make the refund
- the merchant agreeing (or not) to the refund. This may
involve some negotiation between the Consumer and the
Merchant, and, if the merchant agrees,
- a refund payment by the Merchant to the Consumer.
The Baseline Refund IOTP Transaction supports a subset of the
above, specifically it supports:
- the optional authentication of the Consumer using an
Authentication Exchange (see section 2.7), and
- the refund payment by the Merchant to the Consumer using the
following two Trading Exchanges:
o an Offer Exchange (see section 2.4), and
o a Payment Exchange (see section 2.5).
The Baseline Refund IOTP Transaction occurs in two basic forms:
- Baseline Refund with Authentication. Where the Consumer
requesting the refund is authenticated before the refund is
made, and
- Baseline Refund without Authentication. Where the Consumer
is not authenticated before the refund is made.
4.4.1. Baseline Refund with Authentication
In Baseline Refund with Authentication an Authentication Exchange
occurs before the Offer Exchange containing the details of the
refund is provided by the Merchant.
Following sequences of messages are exchanged between the trading
roles for refund transaction:
1. OUA(Consumer) requests payment of previously agreed refund,
sends information about refund, such as a reference number to
the OTR(Merchant) using out-of-band process.
2. The OTR(Merchant) sets the payment brand and decided which
protocol to offer in TPO Block, generates an Authentication
Request Block containing challenge data and the authentication
method and sends it to the Consumer. The TPO Block must
contain:
- one Protocol Options Component which defines the options
which apply to the whole IOTP Transaction. See Section 6.1.
- one Brand List Component (see section 6.12) which contains
the payment brand and protocols which may be selected for
use in the Payment Exchange.
The Authentication Request Block (see section 5.4) MUST contain
one Authentication Data Component (see section 6.2)
3. IOTP aware applications supporting the Consumer Trading Role must
check for the existence of an Authentication Request Block in the
first IOTP Message to determine whether the Baseline Refund
includes an Authentication Exchange or not. The Consumer selects
payment protocol to use, records selection in a Brand Selection
Component, generates an Authentication Response Block and sends
them back to the Merchant. The TPO Selection Block (see section 5.2)
MUST contain:
- one Brand Selection Component (see section 6.17) for use in
the Payment Exchange. It contains the results of the
consumer selecting a Payment Brand and Payment Protocol from
the list provided in the Brand List Component.
The Authentication Response Block (see section 5.5) MUST contain
one Authentication Response Component (see section 6.3).
4. The OTR(Merchant) checks the Authentication Response against the
challenge data and authentication method, based on the Consumer
identity and refund information generates the Offer Response Block
containing the information about the refund and optional Signature
Block and sends them to the Consumer. The Offer Response Block
(see section 5.3) MUST contain:
- zero or one Authentication Data Component (see section 6.2)
An Authentication Data Component is required for each
Payment Exchange, where its Payment Component contains an
AuthDataRef attribute
- one Order Component (see section 6.4) which contains details
about the refund, for example the amount being refunded and
any conditions which might apply
- one Payment Component (see section 5.2) which contains
information about the payment which is to be made
- Organization Components (see section 6.7) with the following
roles:
o the Merchant who is making the refund
o the Consumer who is requesting the refund
o the PaymentHandler for the payment. The "ID" of the
Payment Handler Organization Component is contained
within the VaOrgRef attribute of the Payment Component
- one Delivery Component (see section 6.24) with the DelivExch
attribute set to False.
5. If the Baseline Refund Offer Response is being digitally signed
then a Signature Block must be included in the same IOTP message
that contains an "Offer Response" Signature Component (see
section 6.30). The Signature Component contains hashes of the
following XML elements:
- the Transaction Reference Block (see section 3.5) for the
IOTP Message which contains the first usage of the Offer
Response Block within the IOTP Transaction. It contains
information that identifies the IOTP Message and IOTP
Transaction
- the Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1) which
globally uniquely identifies the IOTP Transaction
- the following components of the Offer Response Block:
o the Authentication Data Component if present
o the Order Component
o the Payment Component
o all the Organization Components present, and
o the Delivery Component,
- the following components of the TPO Block :
o the Protocol Options Component, and
o the Brand List Component
- If the Baseline Refund is a Baseline Refund with
Authentication then the Signature Component additionally
contains a hash of the following:
- the Brand Selection Component contained in the TPO Selection
Block.
6. OUA(Consumer) checks Offer is OK, combines components from
the TPO Block, the TPO Selection Block and the Offer Response
Block to create a Payment Request Block and sends to the
Payment Handler together with the optional Signature Block.
The Payment Request Block (see section 5.6) MUST contain:
- the following components copied from the Offer Response
Block:
o the Authentication Data Component if present
o the Payment Component
o the Organization Components with the roles of: Merchant
and PaymentHandler
- the following component from the TPO Block:
o the Brand List Component
- one Brand Selection Component either:
o copied from the Offer Response Block if the refund is a
Baseline Refund with Authentication, or
o created by the Consumer, containing the payment brand and
payment protocol selected, if the refund is a Baseline
Refund with Authentication
- one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if required
by the payment method used (see the Payment Method
supplement to determine if this is needed).
7. If the Baseline Refund Offer Response Block was signed then the
IOTP Message that contains the Payment Request Block must also
contain a Signature Block with a copy of the "Offer Response"
Signature Component.
8. Payment Handlers should check that they are authorised to carry
out the Payment (see section 9 Security Considerations). Payment
Handler checks signature(if present), process Pay Request Block,
starts payment protocol message exchanges with the Consumer.
The Payment Exchange Block (see section 5.7) MUST contain one
Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) which contains
payment method specific data. See the Payment Method supplement
for the payment method being used to determine what this should
contain.
9. On successful completion of the payment protocol messages creates a
Pay Receipt component inside Pay Response Block, sends to the
Consumer with the optional Signature Block. The Payment Response
Block (see section 5.8) contains:
- one Payment Receipt Component (see section 6.23) which
contains scheme specific data which can be used to verify
the payment occurred
- one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if required
which contains payment method specific data. See the Payment
Method supplement for the payment method being used to
determine what this should contain
- the "Offer Response" Signature Component (see section 6.30)
from the Payment Request Block if present.
10. If a signed Payment Receipt is being provided, indicated by the
SignedPayReceipt attribute of the Payment Component of the Offer
Response Block being set to True, then the IOTP Message that
contains the Payment Response Block must also contain a Signature
Block with a "Payment Receipt" Signature Component which contains
hashes of the following:
- the Transaction Reference Block (see section 3.5) for the
IOTP Message which contains the first usage of the Payment
Response Block,
- the Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1) within the
Transaction Reference Block that globally uniquely
identifies the IOTP Transaction,
- the Payment Receipt Component from the Payment Response
Block and
- the "Offer Response" Signature Component from the Payment
Request Block if present.
11. Consumer checks Pay Response is OK. OUA MAY optionally keep
all information related to the transaction for record keeping
purposes.
4.4.2. Baseline Refund without Authentication
In Baseline Refund without Authentication, there is no
Authentication Exchange and the Merchant provides details about
the refund immediately at the start of the IOTP Transaction.
The Baseline Refund without authentication might be used:
- when authentication of the consumer has been achieved by
some other means, for example, the consumer has entered some
previously supplied code in order to identify herself and
the refund to which the code applies. The code could be
supplied, for example on a web page or by e-mail.
- when a previous IOTP transaction, for example a Baseline
Authentication, authenticated the consumer, and a secure
channel has been maintained, therefore the authenticity of
the consumer is known and therefore the previously agreed
refund can be identified.
4.5. Baseline Withdrawal IOTP Transaction
The Baseline Withdrawal IOTP Transaction supports the withdrawal
of electronic cash from a Financial Institution.
Note: The Financial Institution has, in IOTP terminology, a role
of merchant in that a service (i.e. a withdrawal of electronic
cash) is being offered in return for a fee, for example bank
charges of some kind. The term "Financial Institution" is used in
the diagrams and in the text for clarity.
The Baseline Withdrawal IOTP Transaction occurs in two basic
forms:
- Baseline Withdrawal with Authentication. Where the Consumer
making the withdrawal is authenticated before the withdrawal
is made, and
- Baseline Withdrawal without Authentication. Where the
Consumer is not authenticated before the withdrawal is made.
4.5.1. Baseline Withdrawal with Authentication
In Baseline Withdrawal with Authentication an Authentication
Exchange occurs before the Offer Exchange containing the details
of the withdrawal is provided by the Financial Institution.
Following sequences of messages are exchanged between the Consumer
and the financial institution(OTR) for withdrawl transaction:
1. OUA(Consumer) decides to withdraw electronic cash and sends
information about hoe much to withdraw to the OTR(Financial
Institution playing a merchant role) using out-of-band process.
2. The OTR(Financial Institution) sets the payment brand and decided
which protocol to offer in TPO Block, generates an Authentication
Request Block containing challenge data and the authentication
method and sends it to the Consumer. The TPO Block must
contain:
- one Protocol Options Component which defines the options
which apply to the whole IOTP Transaction. See Section 6.1.
- one Brand List Component (see section 6.12) which contains
the payment brand and protocols which may be selected for
use in the Payment Exchange.
The Authentication Request Block (see section 5.4) MUST contain
one Authentication Data Component (see section 6.2)
3. IOTP aware applications supporting the Consumer Trading Role must
check for the existence of an Authentication Request Block in the
first IOTP Message to determine whether the Baseline Withdrawal
includes an Authentication Exchange or not. The Consumer selects
payment protocol to use, records selection in a Brand Selection
Component, generates an Authentication Response Block and sends
them back to the Financial Institution. The TPO Selection Block
(see section 5.2) MUST contain:
- one Brand Selection Component (see section 6.17) for use in
the Payment Exchange. It contains the results of the
consumer selecting a Payment Brand and Payment Protocol from
the list provided in the Brand List Component.
The Authentication Response Block (see section 5.5) MUST contain
one Authentication Response Component (see section 6.3).
4. The OTR(Financial Institution) checks the Authentication Response
against the challenge data and authentication method, based on the
Consumer identity and refund information generates the Offer
Response Block containing the information about the withdrawal and
optional Signature Block and sends them to the Consumer.
The Offer Response Block (see section 5.3) MUST contain:
- zero or one Authentication Data Component (see section 6.2)
An Authentication Data Component is required for each
Payment Exchange, where its Payment Component contains an
AuthDataRef attribute
- one Order Component (see section 6.4) which contains details
about the refund, for example the amount being withdrawn and
any conditions which might apply
- one Payment Component (see section 5.2) which contains
information about the payment which is to be made
- Organization Components (see section 6.7) with the following
roles:
o the Merchant who is making the refund
o the Consumer who is requesting the refund
o the PaymentHandler for the payment. The "ID" of the
Payment Handler Organization Component is contained
within the VaOrgRef attribute of the Payment Component
- one Delivery Component (see section 6.24) with the DelivExch
attribute set to False.
5. If the Baseline Withdrawal Offer Response is being digitally signed
then a Signature Block must be included in the same IOTP message
that contains an "Offer Response" Signature Component (see
section 6.30). The Signature Component contains hashes of the
following XML elements:
- the Transaction Reference Block (see section 3.5) for the
IOTP Message which contains the first usage of the Offer
Response Block within the IOTP Transaction. It contains
information that identifies the IOTP Message and IOTP
Transaction
- the Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1) which
globally uniquely identifies the IOTP Transaction
- the following components of the Offer Response Block:
o the Authentication Data Component if present
o the Order Component
o the Payment Component
o all the Organization Components present, and
o the Delivery Component,
- the following components of the TPO Block :
o the Protocol Options Component, and
o the Brand List Component
- If the Baseline Withdrawal is a Baseline withdrawal with
Authentication then the Signature Component additionally
contains a hash of the following:
- the Brand Selection Component contained in the TPO Selection
Block.
6. OUA(Consumer) checks Offer is OK, combines components from
the TPO Block, the TPO Selection Block and the Offer Response
Block to create a Payment Request Block and sends to the
Payment Handler together with the optional Signature Block.
The Payment Request Block (see section 5.6) MUST contain:
- the following components copied from the Offer Response
Block:
o the Authentication Data Component if present
o the Payment Component
o the Organization Components with the roles of: Merchant
and PaymentHandler
- the following component from the TPO Block:
o the Brand List Component
- one Brand Selection Component either:
o copied from the Offer Response Block if the refund is a
Baseline Refund with Authentication, or
o created by the Consumer, containing the payment brand and
payment protocol selected, if the refund is a Baseline
Refund with Authentication
- one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if required
by the payment method used (see the Payment Method
supplement to determine if this is needed).
7. If the Baseline Withdrawal Offer Response Block was signed then the
IOTP Message that contains the Payment Request Block must also
contain a Signature Block with a copy of the "Offer Response"
Signature Component.
8. Payment Handlers should check that they are authorised to carry
out the Payment (see section 9 Security Considerations). Payment
Handler checks signature(if present), process Pay Request Block,
starts payment protocol message exchanges with the Consumer.
The Payment Exchange Block (see section 5.7) MUST contain one
Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) which contains
payment method specific data. See the Payment Method supplement
for the payment method being used to determine what this should
contain.
9. On successful completion of the payment protocol messages creates a
Pay Receipt component inside Pay Response Block, sends to the
Consumer with the optional Signature Block. The Payment Response
Block (see section 5.8) MUST contains
- one Payment Receipt Component (see section 6.23) which
contains scheme specific data which can be used to verify
the payment occurred
- one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if required
which contains payment method specific data. See the Payment
Method supplement for the payment method being used to
determine what this should contain
- the "Offer Response" Signature Component (see section 6.30)
from the Payment Request Block if present.
10. If a signed Payment Receipt is being provided, indicated by the
SignedPayReceipt attribute of the Payment Component of the Offer
Response Block being set to True, then the IOTP Message that
contains the Payment Response Block must also contain a Signature
Block with a "Payment Receipt" Signature Component which contains
hashes of the following:
- the Transaction Reference Block (see section 3.5) for the
IOTP Message which contains the first usage of the Payment
Response Block,
- the Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1) within the
Transaction Reference Block that globally uniquely
identifies the IOTP Transaction,
- the Payment Receipt Component from the Payment Response
Block and
- the "Offer Response" Signature Component from the Payment
Request Block if present.
11. Consumer checks Pay Response is OK. OUA MAY optionally keep
all information related to the transaction for record keeping
purposes.
Note:
1. The Financial Institution can offer withdrawal of several different
types of electronic cash. In practice usually only one form of
electronic cash may be offered. However, there may be several
different protocols which may be used for the same "brand"
of electronic cash
2. The financial institution may use the results of the
authentication to identify not only the consumer but also
the account from which the withdrawal is to be made. If no
single account can be identified, then it must be obtained
by other means. For example:
- the consumer could specify the account number in the initial
dialogue , or
- the consumer could have been identified earlier, for example
using a Baseline Authentication IOTP Transaction, and an
account selected from a list provided by the Financial
Institution.
4.5.2. Baseline Withdrawal without Authentication
In Baseline Withdrawal without Authentication, there is no
Authentication Exchange and the Financial Institution provides
details about the withdrawal immediately at the start of the IOTP
Transaction.
The Baseline Withdrawal without Authentication might be used:
- when a previous IOTP transaction, for example a Baseline
Deposit or a Baseline Authentication, authenticated the
consumer, and a secure channel has been maintained,
therefore the authenticity of the consumer is known
- when authentication is achieved as part of a proprietary
payment protocol and is therefore included in the Payment
Exchange
- when authentication of the consumer has been achieved by
some other means, for example, by using a pass phrase, or a
proprietary banking software solution.
4.6. Baseline Value Exchange IOTP Transaction
The Baseline Value Exchange Transaction uses Payment Exchanges
(see section 2.5) to support the exchange of value in one
currency obtained using one payment method with value in the same
or another currency using the same or another payment method.
Examples of its use include:
- electronic cash advance on a credit card. For example the
first payment could be a dollar SET Payment Exchange on a
credit card with the second Payment Exchange being a
download of DigiCash e-cash in dollars.
- foreign exchange using the same payment method. For example
the payment could be an upload of Mondex value in French
Francs and the second a download of Mondex value in British
Pounds
- foreign exchange using different payment methods. For
example the first payment could be a SET payment in Euros
followed a download of GeldKarte in Deutchmarks.
The Baseline Value Exchange IOTP Transaction occurs in two basic
forms:
- Brand Dependent Value Exchange. Where the content of the
offer, for example the rate at which one form of value is
exchanged for another, is dependent on the payment brands
and protocols selected by the consumer, and
- Brand Independent Value Exchange. Where the content of the
offer is not dependent on the payment brands and protocols
selected.
4.6.1. Brand Dependent Value Exchange
In Brand Dependent Value Exchange the TPO Block and the Offer
Response Block are sent separately by the Merchant to the
Consumer, i.e.:
- the Brand List Components for the two payments are sent to
the Consumer in a TPO Block,
- the Consumer selects a Payment Brand and Payment Protocol
from the Brand List Component for each of the payments in
the Value Exchange
- the Consumer sends the selected brands and protocols back to
the Merchant in a TPO Selection Block, and
- the Merchant Uses the information received to define the
content of the Offer Response Block and then sends it to the
Consumer.
Whether or not the Value Exchange is brand dependent, the
exchange of Trading Blocks between the Consumer and the Payment
Handlers are the same. The following sequences of messages are
exchanged between the Trading Roles for the Value Exchange
Transaction:
1. OUA(Consumer) sends information about the value exchange to
the OTR(Merchant) using out-of-band process.
2. OTR(Merchant) decides which payment brand and protocols to
offer for each payment, places them in Brand List Components
in a TPO Block and sends them to OUA(Consumer). The TPO
Block MUST contain the following Trading Components:
o one Protocol Options Component which defines the options
which apply to the whole IOTP Transaction. See Section
6.1.
o two Brand List Components (see section 6.12) one for each
Payment Exchange where each Brand List Component contains
one or more payment brands and protocols which may be
selected for use in the Payment Exchange.
3. OUA(Consumer) selects the payment brand and payment protocol
to use each payment, records selections in two Brand
Selection Components in TPO Selection Block, and sends back
to OTR(Merchant). The TPO Selection Block (see section 5.2)
is only used by Brand Dependent Value Exchange. It contains:
o two Brand Selection Components (see section 6.17). One
for each of the Payment Exchanges. Each Brand Selection
Component contains the results of the consumer selecting
a Payment Brand and Payment Protocol from the list
provided in the Brand List Component.
4. OTR(Merchant) uses payments brands and protocols selected to
create an Offer Response Block containing details about the
value exchange and sends it to OUA(Consumer) together with
the optional digital signature. The Offer Response Block
(see section 5.3) contains the following components:
o zero, one or two Authentication Data Component (see
section 6.2). An Authentication Data Component is
required for each Payment Exchange, where its Payment
Component contains an AuthDataRef attribute.
o one Order Component (see section 6.4) which contains
details about the Value Exchange, for example, exchange
rates, commission, etc.
o two Payment Components (see section 6.21) which contain
information about each of the two payments which are to
be made
o Organization Components (see section 6.7) with the
following roles:
* Merchant who is providing the goods or services
* Consumer who is making the purchase
* the PaymentHandlers for the payments. The "ID" of a
Payment Handler Organization Component is contained
within the VaOrgRef attribute of each of the Payment
Components
4. If the Baseline Value Exchange Offer Response is being
digitally signed then a Signature Block must be included in
the same IOTP message that contains an "Offer Response"
Signature Component (see section 6.30). The Signature
Component contains hashes of the following XML elements:
o the Transaction Reference Block (see section 3.5) for the
IOTP Message which contains the first usage of the Offer
Response Block within the IOTP Transaction. It contains
information that identifies the IOTP Message and IOTP
Transaction
o the Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1) which
globally uniquely identifies the IOTP Transaction
o the following components of the Offer Response Block:
* the Authentication Data Component if present
* the Order Component
* the two Payment Components
* all the Organization Components present, and
o the following components of the TPO Block :
* the Protocol Options Component, and
* the Brand List Component
o If the Baseline Value Exchange is a Brand Dependent Value
Exchange then the Signature Component additionally
contains a hash of the following:
o the two Brand Selection Components contained in the TPO
Selection Block.
5. OUA(Consumer) checks Offer is OK, combines components from
TPO Block, TPO Selection Block and Offer Response Block to
create a Payment Request Block for the first payment and
sends it to the Payment Handler 1 together with the optional
Signature Block.The Payment Request Block (see section 5.6)
for the first payment contains:
o the following components copied from the Offer Response
Block:
* the Authentication Data Component for the first payment
if required
* the Payment Component for the first payment
* the Organization Components with the roles of: Merchant
and PaymentHandler for the first payment
o the following component copied from the TPO Block:
* the Brand List Component for the first payment
o one Brand Selection Component for the first payment which
is either:
* copied from the Offer Response Block if the purchase is
a Brand Dependent Value Exchange, or
* created by the Consumer, containing the payment brand
and payment protocol selected, if the purchase is a
Brand Independent Value Exchange
o one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if
required by the payment method used (see the Payment
Method supplement to determine if this is needed).
6. If the Baseline Value Exchange Offer Response Block was
signed then the IOTP Message that contains the Payment
Request Block for the first payment must also contain a
Signature Block with a copy of the "Offer Response"
Signature Component. The Payment Exchange Block (see section
5.7) for the first payment contains:
o one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) which
contains payment method specific data for the payment
method being used by the first payment. See the Payment
Method supplement for the payment method being used to
determine what this should contain.
7. Payment Handler 1 processes Payment Request Block for the
first payment and starts payment protocol messages. On
successful completion of the payment protocol messages,
Payment Handler creates Payment Response Block and sends it
to the OUA(Consumer) along with the optional Signature
Block.The Payment Response Block for the first payment (see
section 5.8) contains:
o one Payment Receipt Component (see section 6.23) which
contains scheme specific data which can be used to verify
the first payment occurred
o one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if
required by the payment method used by the first payment
which contains payment method specific data. See the
Payment Method supplement for the payment method being
used to determine what this should contain
o the Signature Component (see section 6.30) from the
Payment Request Block for the first payment if present.
8. If a signed Payment Receipt is being provided for the first
payment, indicated by the SignedPayReceipt attribute of the
Payment Component for the first payment in the Offer
Response Block being set to True, then the IOTP Message that
contains the Payment Response Block for the first payment
must also contain a Signature Block with a "Payment Receipt"
Signature Component which contains hashes of the following:
o the Transaction Reference Block (see section 3.5) for the
IOTP Message which contains the first usage of the Payment
Response Block for the first payment,
o the Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1) within
the Transaction Reference Block that globally uniquely
identifies the IOTP Transaction,
o the Payment Receipt Component from the Payment Response
Block for the first payment and
o the "Offer Response" Signature Component from the Payment
Request Block for the first payment, if present.
9. OUA(Consumer) checks Payment Response for first payment is
OK and create a Payment Request for Second payment using the
Offer Response Block along with the optional Signature Block
and sends it to Payment Handler 2.The Payment Request Block
(see section 5.6) for the second payment contains:
o the following components copied from the Offer Response
Block:
* the Authentication Data Component for the second
payment if required
* the Payment Component for the second payment
* the Organization Components with the roles of: Merchant
and PaymentHandler for the second payment
o the following component copied from the TPO Block:
* the Brand List Component for the second payment
o one Brand Selection Component for the second payment
which is either:
* copied from the Offer Response Block if the purchase is
a Brand Dependent Value Exchange, or
* created by the Consumer, containing the payment brand
and payment protocol selected, if the purchase is a
Brand Independent Value Exchange
o one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if
required by the payment method used (see the Payment
Method supplement to determine if this is needed)
10. Payment Handler 2 processes Payment Request Block for the
second payment and starts payment protocol messages.
11. The Payment Exchange Block (see section 5.7) for the second
payment contains:
o one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) which
contains payment method specific data for the payment
method being used by the second payment. See the Payment
Method supplement for the payment method being used to
determine what this should contain.
12. On successful completion of the payment protocol messages,
Payment Handler creates Payment Response Block and sends it
to the OUA(Consumer) along with the optional Signature
Block.The Payment Response Block for the second payment (see
section 5.8) contains:
o one Payment Receipt Component (see section 6.23) which
contains scheme specific data which can be used to verify
the second payment occurred
o one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22) if
required by the payment method used by the second payment
which contains payment method specific data. See the
Payment Method supplement for the payment method being
used to determine what this should contain
o all the Signature Components (see section 6.30) from the
Payment Request Block for the second payment if present.
13. If a signed Payment Receipt is being provided for the second
payment, indicated by the SignedPayReceipt attribute of the
Payment Component for the second payment in the Offer
Response Block being set to True, then the IOTP Message that
contains the Payment Response Block for the second payment
must also contain a Signature Block with a "Payment Receipt"
Signature Component which contains hashes of the following:
o the Transaction Reference Block (see section 3.5) for the
IOTP Message which contains the first usage of the Payment
Response Block for the second payment,
o the Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1) within
the Transaction Reference Block that globally uniquely
identifies the IOTP Transaction,
o the Payment Receipt Component from the Payment Response
Block for the second payment
o the "Offer Response" Signature Component from the Payment
Request Block for the second payment, if present, and
o the "Payment Receipt" Signature Component from the
Payment Request Block for the first payment, if present.
14. OUA(Consumer) checks Payment Response for first payment is
OK and create a Payment Request for Second payment using the
Offer Response Block along with the optional Signature Block
and sends it to Payment Handler 2.
15. If the Baseline Value Exchange Offer Response Block or the
Payment Response Block for the first payment was signed then
the IOTP Message that contains the Payment Request Block for
the second payment must also contain a Signature Block with
a copy of:
o the "Offer Response" Signature Component, if present,
and/or
o the "Payment Receipt" Signature Component copied from the
Payment Response Block for the first payment, if present.
16. If signatures are used then the Payment Handlers should
check that all Signature Components they receive are valid
(see section 9 Security Considerations).
Note that:
- the Payment Component for the first payment is the one
within the Offer Response Block that contains no StartAfter
attribute (see section 6.21)
- the Authentication Data Component to include is identified
by the AuthDataRef attribute of the Payment Component for
the first payment. If no AuthDataRef attribute is present
then no Authentication Data Component is required
- the Payment Handler to include is identified by the Brand
Selection Component (see section 6.17) for the first
payment. Also see section 9.7 Check the Action Request was
sent to the Correct Organization for an explanation on how
Payment Handlers are identified
- the Brand List Component to include is the one identified by
the BrandListRef attribute of the Payment Component for the
first payment
- the Brand Selection Component to include from the Offer
Response Block is the one that contains an Element Reference
(see section 3.7) which identifies the Brand List Component
for the first payment
- the Payment Component for the second payment is the one
within the Offer Response Block that contains a StartAfter
attribute (see section 6.21) that identifies the Payment
Component for the first payment
- the Authentication Data Component to include is identified
by the AuthDataRef attribute of the Payment Component for
the second payment. If no AuthDataRef attribute is present
then no Authentication Data Component is required
- the Payment Handler to include is identified by the Brand
Selection Component (see section 6.17) for the second
payment. Also see section 9.7 Check the Action Request was
sent to the Correct Organization for an explanation on how
Payment Handlers are identified
- the Brand List Component to include is the one identified by
the BrandListRef attribute of the Payment Component for the
second payment
- the Brand Selection Component to include from the Offer
Response Block is the one that contains an Element Reference
(see section 3.7) which identifies the Brand List Component
for the second payment
4.6.2. Brand Independent Value Exchange
In Brand Independent Value Exchange the TPO Block and the Offer
Response Block are sent together by the Merchant to the Consumer
in the same IOTP Message at the start of the IOTP Transaction.
The TPO Block and Offer Response Block may only be combined into
the same IOTP Message if the content of the Offer Response Block
does not change as a result of selecting the payment brands and
payment protocols to be used in the Value Exchange.
Note that the TPO Block and the Offer Response Block may be sent
in separate IOTP messages even if the Offer Response Block does
not change. However this increases the number of messages in the
transaction and is therefore likely to increase transaction
response times.
IOTP aware applications supporting the Consumer Trading Role must
check for the existence of an Offer Response Block in the first
IOTP Message to determine whether the Baseline Value Exchange is
brand dependent.
4.7. Payment Instrument Customer Care IOTP Transaction
An IOTP Payment Instrument Customer Care Transaction is used to
provide Payment Brand or Payment Method specific customer care.
It allows Consumer Payment Brand software to exchange information
with a Payment Instrument Customer Care Provider.
The circumstances under which this transaction is used, if any,
is defined in the IOTP Supplement for the Payment Brand.
Note that the IOTP Payment Instrument Customer Care Transaction:
- is initiated by the Consumer Payment Brand software which
must identify the need for the transaction to occur. Note
that in other IOTP Transactions, the transaction is initiated
by the Merchant
- has no TPO Block, as it is initiated by the Consumer
- relies on the Consumer Payment Brand software to identify
the net location of the Payment Instrument Customer Care
Provider to which the first message in the transaction must
be sent
- ends when the Payment Scheme Customer Care Service
determines that the exchange of messages with the Consumer
is to stop.
Note that a Payment Instrument Customer Care Transaction can be
initiated at any time by a Consumer including in the middle of
another IOTP Transaction. In this case, the transaction shall
establish a different transport session from the ongoing
transaction. See the Mapping to Transport for the Transport
Mechanism being used.
Following OTP messages are exchanged between the Payment Instrument
User and Payment Instrument Care Provider roles:
1. OUA(Consumer) identifies the need to contact Payment instrument
Care Provider and generates Payment Instrument Customer Care
Request Block and sends it to the Customer Care Provider. OUA
determines the Customer Care Provider by Net Location. The Payment
Instrument Customer Care Request Block MUST contain:
- a Payment Method Information Component (see section 6.27)
which describes the Payment Method for which Customer Care
is requested, and
- zero or more optional Payment Scheme Components (see section
6.22) which contain optional Payment scheme data
2. OTR(Payment Instrument Customer Care Provider) process the Payment
Instrument Customer Care Request Block and starts exchaging
Payment Instrument Customer Care Exchange Block with the
OUA(Consumer). The Payment Instrument Customer Care Exchange
Block MUST contain:
- a Payment Method Information Component (see section 6.27)
which describes the Payment Method for which Customer Care
is being provided, and
- zero or more optional Payment Scheme Components (see section
6.22) which contain optional Payment scheme data
3. On successful completion of the Customer Care Exchange messages,
OTR(Payment Instrument Customer Care Provider) generates the payment
instrument customer care response block and sends it to the OUA(
consumer). The Payment Instrument Customer Care Response Block
MUST contain:
- a Payment Method Information Component (see section 6.27)
which describes the Payment Method for which Customer Care
is complete, and
- zero or more optional Payment Scheme Component (see section
6.22) which contains optional Payment scheme data
Any of the IOTP Messages which contain Payment Instrument Customer
care blocks may also include a Signature Block (see section 5.18)
containing a Signature Component (see section 6.30). How these
are used and what it signs is dependent on the Payment Brand and
Payment method being used.
4.8. Baseline Transaction Status Inquiry IOTP Transaction
The Baseline IOTP Transaction Status Inquiry provides a Consumer
with information on the status of an existing or complete IOTP
transaction.
The Trading Blocks used by the Baseline Transaction Status
Inquiry Transaction are:
- an Inquiry Request Trading Block (see section 5.14), and
- an Inquiry Response Trading Block (see section 5.15).
Note that:
- Consumer Inquiries on Authentication transaction are not
supported.
- Authentication of Consumers as part of an inquiry is not
supported in the Baseline version of IOTP.
4.8.1. Which Trading Roles can receive Inquiry Requests
The Consumer can send a Transaction Status Inquiry Block to the
appropriate Trading Role after the following events have
occurred:
- to the Merchant, after sending TPO Selection Block,
- to the Payment Handler, after sending Payment Request Block,
- to the Delivery Handler, after sending Delivery Request
Block.
Note: IOTP does not support sending Inquiry Requests to the
Consumer since the consumer may not be on-line to receive and
process them.
If the Consumer is inquiring on transaction that is not yet
complete, it should send the Inquiry Request Block to the Trading
Role to which it sent the last IOTP message. If the Consumer is
inquiring on a transaction which is complete, there are two
alternatives in deciding the Trading Roles that the Inquiry
Request Block should be sent to:
- the Consumer IOTP software can ask the end user to determine
the type of inquiry they want to make, or
- the Consumer IOTP software can send the inquiry request
message to all the Trading Roles that were involved in the
IOTP transaction.
For the second case above, how the Consumer IOTP Aware Application
displays the inquiry response data received from each Trading
Role is up to each implementation.
4.8.2. Transaction Status Inquiry Transport Session
For a Transaction Status Inquiry on an ongoing transaction, the
Consumer SHALL establish with a Trading Role, a different
transport session from the ongoing transaction. For a Transaction
Status Inquiry on a past transaction, how the IOTP module on the
software at the Trading Role is started upon the receipt of
Inquiry Request message is defined in each Mapping to Transport
supplement for IOTP.
4.8.3. Transaction Status Inquiry Error Handling
Errors in a Transaction Status Inquiry can be categorised into
one the following three cases:
- Business errors (see section 7.2) in the original (inquired)
messages
- Technical errors (see section 7.1) - both IOTP and payment
scheme specific ones - in the original IOTP (inquired)
messages
- Technical errors in the message containing the Inquiry
Request Block itself
The following outlines what the software should do in each case
Business errors in the original messages: Return an Inquiry Response
Block containing the Status Component which was last sent to the Consumer.
Technical errors in the original messages: Return an Inquiry Response
Block containing a Status Component. The Status Component should contain
a ProcessState attribute set to ProcessError. In this case send back an
Error Block indicating where the error was found in the original message.
Technical errors in the Inquiry Request Block: Return an Error message. That
is, send back an Error Block containing the Error Code (see section 6.36)
which describes the nature of the error in the Inquiry Request message.
4.8.4. Inquiry Transaction Messages
Following messages are exchanged between trading roles for
Inquiry Transaction:
1. OUA(Consumer) generates an Inquiry Request Block and sends it
to the appropriate trading role. The Inquiry Request Block
(see section 5.14) MUST contain:
- one Inquiry Type Component (see section 6.29). This
identifies whether the inquiry is on an offer, payment, or
delivery.
- zero or one Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22).
This is for encapsulating payment scheme specific inquiry
messages for inquiries on payment.
2. The Consumer must use the same Transaction Id Component (see
section 3.5.1) as in the inquired transaction. The OtpTransId
attribute in this component serves as the key in querying the
transaction logs maintained at the Trading Role's site. The value
of the ID attribute of the Message Id Component should be
different from those of the inquired transaction (see section
3.6.1).
3. The OTR checks the transaction status of the transaction being
inquired upon by using the Transaction Id component of the
Transaction Reference Block. OTR generates the appropriate
response block based on the status of the transaction and sends
it back to the OUA(Consumer). The Inquiry Response Block (see
section 5.15) MUST contain:
- one Status Component (see section 6.28). This component hold
the status information on the inquired transaction,
- zero or one Payment Scheme Components. These contain for
encapsulated payment scheme specific inquiry messages for
inquiries on payment.
4.9. Baseline Ping IOTP Transaction
The purpose of the Baseline IOTP Ping Transaction is to enable IOTP
aware application software to determine if the IOTP aware
application at another Trading Role is operating and verifying
whether or not signatures can be handled.
The Trading Blocks used by the Baseline Ping IOTP Transaction are:
- a Ping Request Block (see section 5.16)
- a Ping Response Block (see section 5.17), and
- a Signature Block (see section 5.18).
The verification that signatures can be handled is indicated by
the sender of the Ping Request Block including:
- Organization Components that identify itself and the
intended recipient of the Ping Request Block, and
- a Signature Block that signs data in the Ping Request.
In this way the receiver of the Ping Request:
- knows who is sending the Ping Request and can therefore
verify the Signature on the Request, and
- knows who to generate a signature for on the Ping Response.
Note that a Ping Request:
- does not affect any on-going transaction
- does NOT start an IOTP aware application, unlike other IOTP
transaction messages such as TPO or Transaction Status
Inquiry.
Following sequences of messages are exchanged bewteen the tranding
roles for the Ping transaction:
1. The OUA in an IOTP Trading Role decides to check whether the
counterparty IOTP application is running or not. It generates
a Ping Request Block with an optional Signature Block and sends
it to the other IOTP Trading Role. If the Ping Transaction
is anonymous then no Organization Components are included
in the Ping Request Block (see section 5.6).
2. If the Ping Transaction is not anonymous then the Ping Request
Block MUST contain Organization Components for:
- the sender of the Ping Request Block, and
- the verifier of the Signature Component
- If Organization Components are present, then it indicates
that the sender of the Ping Request message has generated a
Signature Block. The signature block must be verified by
the Trading Role that receives the Ping Request Block.
3. A Baseline IOTP Ping request can also contain an optional
Signature Block. IOTP aware applications can, for example, use the
Signature Block to check the recipient of a Ping Request can
successfully process and check signatures it has received. The
Ping Request Signature Block MUST contain:
- one Signature Component(see section 6.30)
- one or more Certificate Components, if required.
4. The OTR which receives the Ping Request generates a Ping Response
and sends it back to the sender of the original Ping Request. The
Ping Response Block (see section 5.17) MUST contain:
- the Organization Component of the sender of the Ping
Response message
- If the Ping Transaction is not anonymous then the Ping
Response additionally contains:
o copies of the Organization Components contained in the
Ping Request Block.
5. The Ping Response Signature Block (see section 5.18) MUST contain:
- one Signature Component (see section 6.30)
- one or more Certificate Components, if required.
Note:
1. For each Baseline Ping IOTP Transaction, each IOTP role shall
establish a different transport session from other IOTP
transactions.
2. Any IOTP Trading Role can send a Ping request to any other IOTP
Trading Role at any time it wants. A Ping message has its own
OtpTransID, which is different from other IOTP transactions.
3. The OtpTransId of a Ping transaction SHOULD BE different from any
other IOTP transaction.
5. Trading Blocks
Trading Blocks consist of one or more Trading Components and
optionally one or more Signature Components. One or more Trading
Blocks may be contained within the IOTP Messages which are
physically sent in the form of [XML] documents between the
different Organizations that are taking part in a trade.
Trading Blocks are defined as part of the definition of an IOTP
Message (see section 3.1).
This section describes the Trading Blocks used in this version of
IOTP. They are:
- Authentication Request Block
- Authentication Response Block
- Delivery Request Block
- Delivery Response Block
- Error Block
- Inquiry Request Block
- Inquiry Response Block
- Offer Response Block
- Payment Exchange Block
- Payment Request Block
- Payment Response Block
- Payment Instrument Customer Care Exchange Block
- Payment Instrument Customer Care Request Block
- Payment Instrument Customer Care Response Block
- Signature Block
- Trading Protocol Options Block
- TPO Selection Block
The Transaction Reference Block is described in section 3.5.
5.1. Trading Protocol Options Block
The TPO Trading Block contains options which apply to the IOTP
Transaction. The definition of a TPO Trading Block is as follows.
<!ELEMENT TpoBlk ( ProtocolOptions, BrandList*, Org* ) >
<!ATTLIST TpoBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Trading Protocol Options Block within the
IOTP Transaction (see section 3.6 ID
Attributes).
Content:
ProtocolOptions The Protocol Options Component (see section
6.1)defines the options which apply to the
whole IOTP Transaction (see section 4).
BrandList This Brand List Component contains one or
more payment brands and protocols which may
be selected (see section 6.12).
Org The Organization Components (see section
6.7) identify the Organizations and their
roles in the IOTP Transaction. The roles and
Organizations which must be present will
depend on the particular type of IOTP
Transaction. See the definition of each
transaction in section 4. Open Trading
Protocol Transactions.
The TPO Block should contain:
- the Protocol Options Component
- the Organization Component with the Trading Role of Merchant
- the Organization Component with the Trading Role of Consumer
- optionally, the Organization Component with the Trading Role
of DeliverTo, if there is a Delivery included in the IOTP
Transaction
- Brand List Components for each payment in the IOTP
Transaction
- Organization Components for all the Payment Handlers
involved
- optionally, Organization Components for the Delivery Handler
(if any) for the transaction
- additional Organization Components that the Merchant may
want to include. For example
o a Customer Care Provider
o an Certificate Authority that offers Merchant
"Credentials" or some other warranty on the goods or
services being offered.
5.2. TPO Selection Block
The TPO Selection Block contains the results of selections made
from the options contained in the Trading Protocol Options Block
(see section 5.1).The definition of a TPO Selection Block is as
follows.
TpoSelectionBlk (BrandSelection+) >
<!ATTLIST T<!ELEMENT poSelectionBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
TPO Selection Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content:
BrandSelection This identifies the choice of payment brand
and payment protocol to be used in a payment
within the IOTP Transaction. There is one
Brand Selection Component (see section 6.17)
for each payment to be made in the IOTP
Transaction.
The TPO Selection Block should contain one Brand Selection
Component for each Brand List in the TPO Block.
5.3. Offer Response Block
The Offer Response Block contains details of the goods, services,
amount, delivery instructions or financial transaction which is
to take place. Its definition is as follows.
<!ELEMENT OfferRespBlk (AuthData*, Order?, Payment*, Delivery?,
Status ) >
<!ATTLIST OfferRespBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Offer Response Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content:
AuthData The Authentication Data Component contains
information about how Authentication
associated with the Offer will occur. See
section 6.2.
Order The Order Component contains details about
the goods, services or financial transaction
which is taking place see section 6.4.
The Order Component must be present unless
the ProcessState attribute of the Status
Component is set to Failed.
Payment The Payment Components contain information
about the payments which are to be made see
section 6.21.
Delivery The Delivery Component contains details of
the delivery to be made (see section 6.24).
Status Contains status information about the
business success (see section 7.2) or
failure of the generation of the Offer. Note
that in an Offer Response Block, a
ProcessState of NotYetStarted or InProgress
are illegal values.
The Offer Response Block should contain:
- the Order Component for the IOTP Transaction
- Payment Components for each Payment in the IOTP Transaction
- the Delivery Component for IOTP Transaction requires (if any)
- the Authentication Data Component (if required) for each
Payment
5.4. Authentication Request Block
This Authentication Request Block contains the challenge data
which is used to obtain information about and optionally
authenticate a Consumer by another Trading Role. Its definition
is as follows.
<!ELEMENT AuthReqBlk (AuthData?) >
<!ATTLIST AuthReqBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Authentication Request Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content
AuthData If the Authentication Data Component is not
present it means that the Authentication
Request Block is just requesting the return
of Organization Components which describe
the Consumer.
If the optional Authentication Data
Component (see section 6.2) is present it
contains data which describes what
additional Authentication the consumer must
provide.
5.5. Authentication Response Block
The Authentication Response Block contains the response which
results from processing the Authentication Request Block. Its
definition is as follows.
<!ELEMENT AuthRespBlk (AuthResp, Org+) >
<!ATTLIST AuthRespBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Authentication Response Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content:
AuthResp The Authentication Response Component which
contains the results of processing the
challenge data in the Authentication Data
Component - see section 6.3.
Org Organization Components which contain
information corresponding to the Consumer
and DelivTo Trading Roles.
5.6. Payment Request Block
The Payment Request Block contains information which requests
that a payment is started. Its definition is as follows.
<!ELEMENT PayReqBlk (AuthData?, BrandList, BrandSelection,
Payment, PaySchemeData?, Org*) >
<!ATTLIST PayReqBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Payment Request Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content:
AuthData The optional Authentication Data Component
contains data about how Authentication
associated with the payment, if any, will
occur. See section 6.2.
BrandList The Brand List Component contains a list of
one or more payment brands and protocols
which may be selected (see section 6.12).
BrandSelection This identifies the choice of payment brand,
the payment protocol and the payment handler
to be used in a payment within the IOTP
Transaction. There is one Brand Selection
Component (see section 6.17) for each
payment to be made in the IOTP Transaction.
Payment The Payment Components contain information
about the payment which is being made see
section 6.21.
PaySchemeData The Payment Scheme Component contains
payment scheme specific data see section
6.22.
Org The Organization Component contains details
of Organizations involved in the payment
(see section 6.7). The Organizations present
are dependent on the IOTP Transaction and the
data which is to be signed. See section 9
Security Considerations for more details.
The Payment Request Block should contain:
- the Organization Component with a Trading Role of Merchant
- the Organization Component with the Trading Role of Consumer
- the Payment Component for the Payment
- the Brand List Component for the Payment
- the Brand Selection Component for the Brand List
- the Organization Component for the Payment Handler of the
Payment
- the Organization Component (if any) for the Organization
which carried out the previous step, for example another
Payment Handler
- the Organization Component for the Organization which is to
carry out the next step, if any. This may be, for example,
either a Delivery Handler or a Payment Handler.
- the Organization Components for any additional Organizations
that the Merchant has included in the Offer Response Block
- an Optional Payment Scheme Data Component, if required by
the Payment Method as defined in the IOTP supplement for the
payment method.
5.7. Payment Exchange Block
The Payment Exchange Block contains payment scheme specific data
which is exchanged between two of the roles in a trade. Its
definition is as follows.
<!ELEMENT PayExchBlk (PaySchemeData) >
<!ATTLIST PayExchBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Payment Exchange Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content:
PaySchemeData This Trading Component contains payment
scheme specific data see section 6.22
Payment Scheme Component.
5.8. Payment Response Block
This Payment Response Block contains a information about the
Payment Status, a Payment Receipt, and an optional payment
protocol message. Its definition is as follows.
<!ELEMENT PayRespBlk (Status, PayReceipt, PaySchemeData?) >
<!ATTLIST PayRespBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Payment Response Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content:
Status Contains status information about the
business success (see section 7.2) or
failure of the payment. Note that in a Pay
Response Block, a ProcessState of
NotYetStarted or InProgress are illegal
values.
PayReceipt Contains payment scheme specific data which
can be used to verify the payment occurred.
See section 6.23 Payment Receipt Component.
PaySchemeData Contains payment scheme specific data see
section, for example a payment protocol
message. See 6.22 Payment Scheme Component.
5.9. Delivery Request Block
The Delivery Request Block contains details of the goods or
services which are to be delivered together with a signature
which can be used to check that delivery is authorised. Its
definition is as follows.
<!ELEMENT DeliveryReqBlk (Order, Org*, Delivery) >
<!ATTLIST DeliveryReqBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Delivery Request Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content:
Order The Order Component contains details about
the goods, services or financial transaction
which is taking place see section 6.4.
Org The Organization Components (see section
6.7) identify the Organizations and their
roles in the IOTP Transaction. The roles and
Organizations which must be present will
depend on the particular type of IOTP
Transaction. See the definition of each
transaction in section 4. Open Trading
Protocol Transactions.
Delivery The Delivery Component contains details of
the delivery to be made (see section 6.24).
The Delivery Request Block contains:
- the Organization Component with a Trading Role of Merchant
- the Organization Component for the Consumer and DeliverTo
Trading Roles
- the Delivery Component for the Delivery
- the Organization Component for the Delivery Handler.
Specifically the Organization Component identified by the
ActionOrgRef attribute on the Delivery Component
- the Organization Component (if any) for the Organization
which carried out the previous step, for example a Payment
Handler
- the Organization Components for any additional Organizations
that the Merchant has included in the Offer Response Block
5.10. Delivery Response Block
The Delivery Response Block contains a Delivery Note containing
details on how the goods will be delivered. Its definition is as
follows. Note that in a Delivery Response Block a Delivery Status
Element with a DeliveryStatusCode of NotYetStarted or InProgress
is invalid.
<!ELEMENT DeliveryRespBlk (Status, DeliveryNote) >
<!ATTLIST DeliveryRespBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Delivery Response Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content:
Status Contains status information about the
business success (see section 7.2) or
failure of the delivery. Note that in a
Delivery Response Block, a ProcessState of
NotYetStarted or InProgress are illegal
values.
DeliveryNote The Delivery Note Component contains details
about how the goods or services will be
delivered (see section 6.26).
5.11. Payment Instrument Customer Care Request Block
The Payment Instrument Customer Care Request Block contains
information which requests that an IOTP Payment Instrument
Customer Care Transaction is started in order to provide Customer
Care for the Consumer's Payment Instrument. Its definition is as
follows.
<!ELEMENT PayInstCCReqBlk (PaymethodInfo, PaySchemeData*) >
<!ATTLIST PayInstCCReqBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Payment Instrument Customer Care Request
Block within the IOTP Transaction.
Content:
PayMethodInfo The Payment Method Information Component
(see section 6.27) contains data which
describes the Payment Method which initiated
the Payment Instrument Customer Care
Transaction
PaySchemeData Optional Payment Scheme Components (see
section 6.22) that contain payment scheme
specific data. The sequence of the Payment
Scheme Components in the Block is the
sequence in which they should be processed
by the Payment Scheme software which
receives this message.
5.12. Payment Instrument Customer Care Exchange Block
The Payment Instrument Customer Care Exchange Block contains
payment scheme specific data which is exchanged between the
Payment Instrument User and the Payment Scheme Customer Care
Provider. Its definition is as follows.
<!ELEMENT PayInstCCExchBlk (PaySchemeData) >
<!ATTLIST PayInstCCExchBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Payment Instrument Customer Care Exchange
Block within the IOTP Transaction.
Content:
PaySchemeData Optional Payment Scheme Components (see
section 6.22) that contain payment scheme
specific data. The sequence of the Payment
Scheme Components in the Block is the
sequence in which they should be processed
by the Payment Scheme software which
receives this message.
5.13. Payment Instrument Customer Care Response Block
The Payment Instrument Customer Care Response Block contains the
final Payment Scheme Component of the IOTP Payment Instrument
Customer Care Transaction. Its definition is as follows.
<!ELEMENT PayInstCCRespBlk (PaySchemeData) >
<!ATTLIST PayInstCCRespBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Payment Instrument Customer Care Response
Block within the IOTP Transaction.
Content:
PaySchemeData Optional Payment Scheme Components (see
section 6.22) that contain payment scheme
specific data. The sequence of the Payment
Scheme Components in the Block is the
sequence in which they should be processed
by the Payment Scheme software which
receives this message.
5.14. Inquiry Request Trading Block
The Inquiry Request Trading Block contains an Inquiry Type
Component and an optional Payment Scheme Component to contain
payment scheme specific inquiry messages.
<!ELEMENT InquiryReqBlk ( InquiryType, PaySchemeData? ) >
<!ATTLIST InquiryReqBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Inquiry Request Trading Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content:
InquiryType Inquiry Type Component (see section 6.29)
that contains the type of inquiry.
PaySchemeData Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22)
that contains payment scheme specific
inquiry messages for inquiries on payments.
This is present when the Type attribute of
Inquiry Type Component is Payment.
5.15. Inquiry Response Trading Block
The Inquiry Response Trading Block contains a Status Component
and an optional Payment Scheme Component to contain payment
scheme specific inquiry messages. Its purpose is to enquire on
the current status of an IOTP transaction at a server.
<!ELEMENT InquiryRespBlk (Status, PaySchemeData?) >
<!ATTLIST InquiryRespBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED
LastReceivedOtpMsgRef NMTOKEN #IMPLIED
LastSentOtpMsgRef NMTOKEN #IMPLIED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Inquiry Response Trading Block within the
IOTP Transaction.
LastReceivedOtpMs Contains an Element Reference (see section
gRef 3.7) to the Message Id Component (see
section 3.5.2) of the last message this
server has received from the Consumer. If
there is no previously received message from
the Consumer in the pertinent transaction,
this attribute should be contain the value
Null. This attribute exists for debugging
purposes.
LastSentOtpMsgRef Contains an Element Reference (see section
3.7) to the Message Id Component (see
section 3.5.2) of the last message this
server has sent to the Consumer. If there is
no previously sent message to the Consumer
in the pertinent transaction, this attribute
should contain the value Null. This
attribute exists for debugging purposes.
Content:
Status Contains status information about the
business success (see section 7.2) or
failure of a certain trading exchange (i.e.,
Offer, Payment, or Delivery).
PaySchemeData Payment Scheme Component (see section 6.22)
that contains payment scheme specific
inquiry messages for inquiries on payments.
This is present when the Type attribute of
StatusType attribute of the Status Component
is set to Payment.
5.16. Ping Request Block
The Ping Request Block is used to determine if a Server is
operating and whether or not cryptography is compatible.
The definition of a Ping Request Block is as follows.
<!ELEMENT PingReqBlk (Org*)>
<!ATTLIST PingReqBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED>
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Ping Request Trading Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content:
Org Optional Organization Components (see
section 6.7).
If no Organization Component is present then
the Ping Request is anonymous and simply
determines if the server is operating.
However if Organization Components are
present, then it indicates that the sender
of the Ping Request wants to verify that
digital signatures can be handled.
In this case the sender includes:
an Organization Component that identifies
itself specifying the Trading Role(s) it is
taking in IOTP transactions (Merchant,
Payment Handler, etc)
an Organization Component that identifies
the intended recipient of the message.
These are then used to generate a signature
over the Ping Response Block.
5.17. Ping Response Block
The Ping Response Trading Block provides the result of a Ping
Request.
It contains an Organization Component that identifies the sender
of the Ping Response.
If the Ping Request to which this block is a response contained
Organization Components, then it also contains those Organization
Components.
<!ELEMENT PingRespBlk (Org+)>
<!ATTLIST PingRespBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED
PingStatusCode (Ok|Busy|Down) #REQUIRED
SigVerifyStatusCode (Ok|NotSupported|Fail) #IMPLIED
xml:lang NMTOKEN #IMPLIED
PingStatusDesc CDATA #IMPLIED>
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Ping Request Trading Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
PingStatusCode Contains a code which shows the status of
the sender software which processes IOTP
messages. Valid values are:
Ok. Everything with the service is working
normally, including the signature
verification.
Busy. Things are working normally but there
may be some delays.
Down. The server is not functioning fully
but can still provide a Ping response.
SigVerifyStatusCo Contains a code which shows the status of
de signature verification. This is present only
when the message containing the Ping Request
Block also contains a Signature Block. Valid
values are:
Ok. The signature has successfully been
verified and proved compatible.
NotSupported The receiver of this Ping
Request Block does not support validation of
signatures.
Fail. Signature verification failed.
Xml:lang Defines the language used in PingStatusDesc.
This is present when PingStatusDesc is
present.
PingStatusDesc Contains a short description of the status
of the server which sends this Ping Response
Block. Servers, if their designers want, can
use this attribute to send more refined
status information than PingStatusCode which
can be used for debugging purposes, for
example.
Content:
Org These are Organization Components (see
section 6.7).
The Organization Components of the sender of
the Ping Response is always included in
addition to the Organization Components sent
in the Ping Request.
Note: Ping Status Code values do not include a value such as
Fail, since, when the software receiving the Ping Request message
is not working at all, no Ping Response message will be sent
back.
5.18. Signature Block
The Signature Block contains one or more Signature Components and
associated Certificates which sign data associated with the IOTP
Transaction. For a general discussion and introduction to how IOTP
uses signatures, see section 9 Security Considerations. The
definition of the Signature Component and certificates is
contained in the paper "Digital Signature for XML - Proposal",
see [XMLSIG].
The definition of a Signature Block is as follows:
<!ELEMENT SigBlk (OtpSig+, OtpCert*) >
<!ATTLIST SigBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Signature Block within the IOTP Transaction.
Content:
OtpSig Contains a Digital Signature. See the paper
"Digital Signature for XML - Proposal"
[XMLSIG], for its definition
OtpCert Contains a Digital Certificate. See the
paper "Digital Signature for XML - Proposal"
[XMLSIG], for its definition
The contents of a Signature Block depends on the Trading Block
that is contained in the same IOTP Message as the Signature Block.
5.18.1. Offer Response
A Signature Block which is in the same message as an Offer
Response Block contains just an Offer Response Signature
Component (see section 6.31).
5.18.2. Payment Request
A Signature Block which is in the same message as a Payment
Request Block contains:
- an Offer Response Signature Component (see section 6.31),
and
- if the Payment is dependent on an earlier step (as indicated
by the StartAfter attribute on the Payment Component), then
the Payment Receipt Signature Component (see section 6.32)
generated by the previous step
5.18.3. Payment Response
A Signature Block which is in the same message as a Payment
Response Block contains just a Payment Receipt Signature
Component (see section 6.32) generated by the step.
5.18.4. Delivery Request
A Signature Block which is in the same message as a Delivery
Request Block contains:
- an Offer Response Signature Component (see section 6.31),
and
- the Payment Receipt Signature Component (see section 6.32)
generated by the previous step.
5.19. Error Block
The Error Trading Block contains one or more Error Components
(see section 6.34) which contain information about Technical
Errors (see section 7.1) in an IOTP Message which has been
received by one of the Trading Roles involved in the trade.
For clarity two phrases are defined which are used in the
description of an Error Trading Block:
- message in error. An IOTP message which contains or causes an
error of some kind
- message reporting the error. An IOTP message that contains an
Error Trading Block that describes the error found in a
message in error.
An Error Trading Block may be contained in any message reporting
the error. The action which then follows depends on the severity
of the error. See the definition of an Error Component, for an
explanation of the different types of severity and the actions
which can then occur.
Note: Although, an Error Trading Block can report multiple
different errors using multiple Error Components, there is no
obligation on a developer of an IOTP Aware Application to do so.
The structure of an Error Trading Block is as follows.
<!ELEMENT ErrorBlk (ErrorComp+, PaySchemeData*) >
<!ATTLIST ErrorBlk
ID ID #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies
the Error Trading Block within the IOTP
Transaction.
Content:
ErrorComp An Error Component (see section 6.34) that
contains information about an individual
Technical Error.
PaySchemeDat An optional Payment Scheme Component (see
a section 6.22) which contains a Payment
Scheme Message. See the appropriate
payment scheme supplement to determine
whether or not this component needs to be
present and for the definition of what it
MUST contain.
6. Trading Components
This section describes the Trading Components used within IOTP.
Trading Components are the child XML elements which occur
immediately below a Trading Block.
The Trading Components described in this section are listed below
in approximately the sequence they are likely to be used:
- Protocol Options Component
- Authentication Data Component
- Authentication Response Component
- Order Component
- Organization Component
- Brand List Component
- Brand Selection Component
- Payment Component
- Payment Scheme Component
- Payment Receipt Component
- Delivery Component
- Delivery Note Component
- Signature Component
- Certificate Component
- Error Component
Note that the following components are listed in other sections
of this specification:
- Transaction Id Component (see section 3.5.1)
- Message Id Component (see section 3.5.2)
6.1. Protocol Options Component
Protocol options are options which apply to the IOTP Transaction
as a whole. Essentially it is used to identify what type of IOTP
Transaction is being carried out. For Baseline IOTP it will
identify one of the "Baseline" IOTP Transactions (see section 4.
Internet Open Trading Protocol Transactions) by name.
The definition of a Protocol Options Component is as follows.
<!ELEMENT ProtocolOptions EMPTY>
<!ATTLIST ProtocolOptions
ID ID #REQUIRED
xml:lang NMTOKEN #REQUIRED
ShortDesc CDATA #REQUIRED
SenderNetLocn CDATA #REQUIRED
SecureSenderNetLocn CDATA #REQUIRED
SuccessNetLocn CDATA #REQUIRED
CancelNetLocn CDATA #REQUIRED
ErrorNetLocn CDATA #REQUIRED >
Attributes:
ID An identifier which uniquely identifies the
Protocol Options Component within the IOTP
Transaction.
xml:lang Defines the language used by attributes or
child elements within this component, unless
overridden by an xml:lang attribute on a
child element. See section 3.10 Identifying
Languages.
ShortDesc This contains a short description of the IOTP
Transaction in the language defined by