draft-ietf-v6ops-transition-ipv4aas-10.txt   draft-ietf-v6ops-transition-ipv4aas-11.txt 
IPv6 Operations (v6ops) J. Palet Martinez IPv6 Operations (v6ops) J. Palet Martinez
Internet-Draft The IPv6 Company Internet-Draft The IPv6 Company
Intended status: Informational H. M.-H. Liu Intended status: Informational H. M.-H. Liu
Expires: April 19, 2019 D-Link Systems, Inc. Expires: June 3, 2019 D-Link Systems, Inc.
M. Kawashima M. Kawashima
NEC Platforms, Ltd. NEC Platforms, Ltd.
October 16, 2018 November 30, 2018
Requirements for IPv6 Customer Edge Routers to Support IPv4 Connectivity Requirements for IPv6 Customer Edge Routers to Support IPv4 Connectivity
as-a-Service as-a-Service
draft-ietf-v6ops-transition-ipv4aas-10 draft-ietf-v6ops-transition-ipv4aas-11
Abstract Abstract
This document specifies the IPv4 service continuity requirements for This document specifies the IPv4 service continuity requirements for
an IPv6 Customer Edge (CE) router, either provided by the service an IPv6 Customer Edge (CE) router, either provided by the service
provider or through the retail market. provider or through the retail market.
Specifically, this document extends the "Basic Requirements for IPv6 Specifically, this document extends the "Basic Requirements for IPv6
Customer Edge Routers" in order to allow the provisioning of IPv6 Customer Edge Routers" in order to allow the provisioning of IPv6
transition services for the support of "IPv4 as-a-Service" (IPv4aaS) transition services for the support of "IPv4 as-a-Service" (IPv4aaS)
by means of new transition mechanisms. The document only covers by means of new transition mechanisms. The document only covers
transition technologies for delivering IPv4 in IPv6-only access transition technologies for delivering IPv4 in IPv6-only access
networks, commonly called "IPv4 as-a-Service" (IPv4aaS). This is networks, commonly called "IPv4 as-a-Service" (IPv4aaS). This is
required in a world where sufficient IPv4 addresses are no longer necessary because there aren't sufficient IPv4 addresses available
available for every possible customer/device. However, devices or for every possible customer/device. However, devices or applications
applications in the customer LANs may be IPv4-only or IPv6-only and in the customer LANs may be IPv4-only or IPv6-only and still need to
still need to communicate with IPv4-only services at the Internet. communicate with IPv4-only services at the Internet.
Status of This Memo Status of This Memo
This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79. provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.
Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on April 19, 2019. This Internet-Draft will expire on June 3, 2019.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
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11. Annex A: Usage Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 11. Annex A: Usage Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
12. Annex B: End-User Network Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . 14 12. Annex B: End-User Network Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . 14
13. ANNEX C: Changes from -00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 13. ANNEX C: Changes from -00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
14. ANNEX D: Changes from -01 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 14. ANNEX D: Changes from -01 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
15. ANNEX E: Changes from -02 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 15. ANNEX E: Changes from -02 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
16. ANNEX F: Changes from -03 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 16. ANNEX F: Changes from -03 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
17. ANNEX G: Changes from -04 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 17. ANNEX G: Changes from -04 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
18. ANNEX H: Changes from -05 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 18. ANNEX H: Changes from -05 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
19. ANNEX I: Changes from -06 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 19. ANNEX I: Changes from -06 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
20. ANNEX J: Changes from -07 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 20. ANNEX J: Changes from -07 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
21. ANNEX K: Changes from -08 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 21. ANNEX K: Changes from -08, -09 and -10 . . . . . . . . . . . 18
22. ANNEX K: Changes from -09 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 22. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
23. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 22.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
23.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 22.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
23.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
This document defines IPv4 service continuity features over an This document defines IPv4 service continuity features over an
IPv6-only network, for a residential or small-office router, referred IPv6-only network, for a residential or small-office router, referred
to as an "IPv6 Transition CE Router", in order to establish an to as an "IPv6 Transition CE Router", in order to establish an
industry baseline for transition features to be implemented on such a industry baseline for transition features to be implemented on such a
router. router.
These routers rely upon "Basic Requirements for IPv6 Customer Edge These routers rely upon "Basic Requirements for IPv6 Customer Edge
Routers" ([RFC7084]), so the scope of this document is to ensure the Routers" ([RFC7084]), so the scope of this document is to ensure the
IPv4 "service continuity" support, in the LAN side and the access to IPv4 "service continuity" support, in the LAN side and the access to
IPv4-only Internet services from an IPv6-only access WAN even from IPv4-only Internet services from an IPv6-only access WAN even from
IPv6-only applications or devices in the LAN side. IPv6-only applications or devices in the LAN side.
This document covers a set of IP transition techniques required when This document covers a set of IP transition techniques required when
ISPs have, or want to have, an IPv6-only access network. This is a ISPs have, or want to have, an IPv6-only access network. This is a
common situation in a world where sufficient public IPv4 addresses common situation in when sufficient IPv4 addresses are no longer
are no longer available for every possible customer and device, and available for every possible customer and device, causing IPv4
become prohibitive expense, so the service providers need to addresses to become prohibitive expense. This, in turn, may result
provision IPv6-only WAN access. At the same time, they need to in service providers provisioning IPv6-only WAN access. At the same
ensure that both IPv4-only and IPv6-only devices or applications in time, they need to ensure that both IPv4-only and IPv6-only devices
the customer networks can still reach IPv4-only devices and or applications in the customer networks can still reach IPv4-only
applications in the Internet. devices and applications in the Internet.
This document specifies the IPv4 service continuity mechanisms to be This document specifies the IPv4 service continuity mechanisms to be
supported by an IPv6 Transition CE Router, and relevant provisioning supported by an IPv6 Transition CE Router, and relevant provisioning
or configuration information differences from [RFC7084]. or configuration information differences from [RFC7084].
This document is not a recommendation for service providers to use This document is not a recommendation for service providers to use
any specific transition mechanism. any specific transition mechanism.
Automatic provisioning of more complex topology than a single router Automatic provisioning of more complex topology than a single router
with multiple LAN interfaces may be handled by means of HNCP with multiple LAN interfaces may be handled by means of HNCP
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communications. communications.
The "WAN Interface" term used across this document, defines an IPv6 The "WAN Interface" term used across this document, defines an IPv6
Transition CE Router attachment to an IPv6-only link used to provide Transition CE Router attachment to an IPv6-only link used to provide
connectivity to a service provider network, including link Internet- connectivity to a service provider network, including link Internet-
layer (or higher layers) "tunnels", such as IPv4-in-IPv6 tunnels. layer (or higher layers) "tunnels", such as IPv4-in-IPv6 tunnels.
3. Requirements 3. Requirements
The IPv6 Transition CE Router MUST comply with [RFC7084] (Basic The IPv6 Transition CE Router MUST comply with [RFC7084] (Basic
Requirements for IPv6 Customer Edge Routers) and this document add Requirements for IPv6 Customer Edge Routers) and this document adds
new requirements, as described in the following sub-sections. new requirements, as described in the following sub-sections.
3.1. LAN-Side Configuration 3.1. LAN-Side Configuration
A new LAN requirement is added, which in fact is common in regular A new LAN requirement is added, which in fact is common in regular
IPv6 Transition CE Router, and it is required by most of the IPv6 Transition CE Router, and it is required by most of the
transition mechanisms: transition mechanisms:
L-1: The IPv6 Transition CE Router MUST implement a DNS proxy as L-1: The IPv6 Transition CE Router MUST implement a DNS proxy as
described in [RFC5625] (DNS Proxy Implementation Guidelines). described in [RFC5625] (DNS Proxy Implementation Guidelines).
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In general, the new requirements don't have extra cost in terms of In general, the new requirements don't have extra cost in terms of
RAM memory, neither other hardware requirements such as more powerful RAM memory, neither other hardware requirements such as more powerful
CPUs, if compared to the cost of NAT44 code so, existing hardware CPUs, if compared to the cost of NAT44 code so, existing hardware
supports them with minimal impact. supports them with minimal impact.
The other issue seems to be the cost of developing the code for those The other issue seems to be the cost of developing the code for those
new functionalities. However, at the time of writing this document, new functionalities. However, at the time of writing this document,
it has been confirmed that there are several open source versions of it has been confirmed that there are several open source versions of
the required code for supporting all the new transition mechanisms, the required code for supporting all the new transition mechanisms,
and even several vendors already have implementations and provide it and several vendors already have implementations and provide it to
to ISPs, so the development cost is negligible, and only integration ISPs, so the development cost is negligible, and only integration and
and testing cost may become a minor issue. testing cost may become a minor issue.
8. Security Considerations 8. Security Considerations
The IPv6 Transition CE Router must comply with the Security The IPv6 Transition CE Router must comply with the Security
Considerations as stated in [RFC7084], as well as those stated by Considerations as stated in [RFC7084], as well as those stated by
each transition mechanism implemented by the IPv6 Transition CE each transition mechanism implemented by the IPv6 Transition CE
Router. Router.
9. IANA Considerations 9. IANA Considerations
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Ole Troan, James Woodyatt, Lorenzo Colitti and Alejandro D'Egidio, Ole Troan, James Woodyatt, Lorenzo Colitti and Alejandro D'Egidio,
for their review and comments in this and/or previous versions of for their review and comments in this and/or previous versions of
this document. this document.
11. Annex A: Usage Scenarios 11. Annex A: Usage Scenarios
The situation previously described, where there is ongoing IPv6 The situation previously described, where there is ongoing IPv6
deployment and lack of IPv4 addresses, is not happening at the same deployment and lack of IPv4 addresses, is not happening at the same
pace in every country, and even within every country, every ISP. For pace in every country, and even within every country, every ISP. For
different technical, financial, commercial/marketing and socio- different technical, financial, commercial/marketing and socio-
economic reasons, each network is transitioning at their own pace, economic reasons, each network is transitioning at their own pace;
and nobody has a magic crystal ball to make a guess of the global the global transition timings cannot be estimated.
transition timings.
Different studies (for example [IPv6Survey]) also show that the IPv6 Different studies (for example [IPv6Survey]) also show that the IPv6
deployment is a changing situation. In a single country, it may deployment is a changing situation. In a single country, not all
happen that not all operators provide IPv6 support, and consumers may operators will necessarily provide IPv6 support. Consumers may also
switch ISPs and use the same IPv6 Transition CE Router with an ISP switch ISPs, and use the same IPv6 Transition CE Router with either
that provides IPv4-only and an ISP that provides IPv6 with IPv4aaS. an ISP that provides IPv4-only or an ISP that provides IPv6 with
IPv4aaS.
So, it is clear that, to cover all those evolving situations, an IPv6 So, to cover all those evolving situations, an IPv6 Transition CE
Transition CE Router is required, at least from the perspective of Router is required, at least from the perspective of the transition
the transition support, which can accommodate those changes. support.
Moreover, because some services will remain IPv4-only for an Moreover, because some services will remain IPv4-only for an
undetermined time, and some service providers will remain IPv4-only undetermined time, and some service providers will remain IPv4-only
for an undetermined period of time, IPv4 will be needed for an for an undetermined period of time, IPv4 will be needed for an
undetermined period of time. There will be a need for CEs with undetermined period of time. There will be a need for CEs with
support "IPv4 as-a-Service" for an undetermined period of time. support "IPv4 as-a-Service" for an undetermined period of time.
This document, based on those premises, ensures that the IPv6 This document, based on those premises, ensures that the IPv6
Transition CE Router allows the continued transition from networks Transition CE Router allows the continued transition from networks
that today may provide access with dual-stack or IPv6-in-IPv4, as that today may provide access with dual-stack or IPv6-in-IPv4, as
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servers, or port/protocol forwarding. In general, IPv4 CE Routers servers, or port/protocol forwarding. In general, IPv4 CE Routers
already provide a GUI and/or a CLI to manually configure them, or the already provide a GUI and/or a CLI to manually configure them, or the
possibility to setup the CE in bridge mode, so another CE behind it, possibility to setup the CE in bridge mode, so another CE behind it,
takes care of that. The requirements for that support are out of the takes care of that. The requirements for that support are out of the
scope of this document. scope of this document.
It is not relevant who provides the IPv6 Transition CE Router. In It is not relevant who provides the IPv6 Transition CE Router. In
most of the cases is the service provider, and in fact is most of the cases is the service provider, and in fact is
responsible, typically, of provisioning/managing at least the WAN responsible, typically, of provisioning/managing at least the WAN
side. However, commonly the user has access to configure the LAN side. However, commonly the user has access to configure the LAN
interfaces, firewall, DMZ, and many other features. However, in interfaces, firewall, DMZ, and many other features. However, in many
fact, in many cases, the user must supply or may replace the IPv6 cases, the user must supply or may replace the IPv6 Transition CE
Transition CE Router. This makes even more relevant that all the Router. This underscores the importance of the IPv6 Transition CE
IPv6 Transition CE Routers support the same requirements defined in Routers supporting the same requirements defined in this document.
this document.
The IPv6 Transition CE Router described in this document is not The IPv6 Transition CE Router described in this document is not
intended for usage in other scenarios such as large Enterprises, Data intended for usage in other scenarios such as large Enterprises, Data
Centers, Content Providers, etc. So even if the documented Centers, Content Providers, etc. So even if the documented
requirements meet their needs, they may have additional requirements, requirements meet their needs, they may have additional requirements,
which are out of the scope of this document. which are out of the scope of this document.
12. Annex B: End-User Network Architecture 12. Annex B: End-User Network Architecture
According to the descriptions in the preceding sections, an end-user According to the descriptions in the preceding sections, an end-user
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1. Removed reference and text related to pref64folks-6man-ra-pref64. 1. Removed reference and text related to pref64folks-6man-ra-pref64.
2. General text clarifications. 2. General text clarifications.
20. ANNEX J: Changes from -07 20. ANNEX J: Changes from -07
Section to be removed for WGLC. Significant updates are: Section to be removed for WGLC. Significant updates are:
1. Added text to UPnP section. 1. Added text to UPnP section.
21. ANNEX K: Changes from -08 21. ANNEX K: Changes from -08, -09 and -10
Section to be removed for WGLC. Significant updates are: Section to be removed for WGLC. Significant updates are:
1. Editorial edits. 1. Editorial edits.
22. ANNEX K: Changes from -09 22. References
Section to be removed for WGLC. Significant updates are:
1. Minor editorial edit.
23. References
23.1. Normative References 22.1. Normative References
[RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119,
DOI 10.17487/RFC2119, March 1997, DOI 10.17487/RFC2119, March 1997,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2119>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc2119>.
[RFC3633] Troan, O. and R. Droms, "IPv6 Prefix Options for Dynamic [RFC3633] Troan, O. and R. Droms, "IPv6 Prefix Options for Dynamic
Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) version 6", RFC 3633, Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) version 6", RFC 3633,
DOI 10.17487/RFC3633, December 2003, DOI 10.17487/RFC3633, December 2003,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3633>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc3633>.
skipping to change at page 21, line 5 skipping to change at page 20, line 48
Wang, "Delivery of IPv4 Multicast Services to IPv4 Clients Wang, "Delivery of IPv4 Multicast Services to IPv4 Clients
over an IPv6 Multicast Network", RFC 8114, over an IPv6 Multicast Network", RFC 8114,
DOI 10.17487/RFC8114, March 2017, DOI 10.17487/RFC8114, March 2017,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8114>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8114>.
[RFC8115] Boucadair, M., Qin, J., Tsou, T., and X. Deng, "DHCPv6 [RFC8115] Boucadair, M., Qin, J., Tsou, T., and X. Deng, "DHCPv6
Option for IPv4-Embedded Multicast and Unicast IPv6 Option for IPv4-Embedded Multicast and Unicast IPv6
Prefixes", RFC 8115, DOI 10.17487/RFC8115, March 2017, Prefixes", RFC 8115, DOI 10.17487/RFC8115, March 2017,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8115>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc8115>.
23.2. Informative References 22.2. Informative References
[IPv6Survey] [IPv6Survey]
Palet Martinez, J., "IPv6 Deployment Survey", January Palet Martinez, J., "IPv6 Deployment Survey", January
2018, 2018,
<https://indico.uknof.org.uk/event/41/contribution/5/ <https://indico.uknof.org.uk/event/41/contribution/5/
material/slides/0.pdf>. material/slides/0.pdf>.
[OpenWRT] OpenWRT, "OpenWRT Packages", January 2018, [OpenWRT] OpenWRT, "OpenWRT Packages", January 2018,
<https://openwrt.org/packages/start>. <https://openwrt.org/packages/start>.
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